By on June 10, 2015

Renault Kangoo Z.E. Recharges At A Construction Site

Renault is testing the waters for a full return to the Canadian market via the limited introduction of its Kangoo Z.E. EV.

The announcement of Kangoo Z.E.’s arrival follows an announcement made last week regarding the Twizy city EV’s own introduction through partner Azra Network, La Press reports.

Once approved by Transport Canada, Renault will bring over up to 1,000 Kangoo Z.E. EVs for a two-year period per the terms of the compliance waiver. This move would give Renault an opportunity to see if it would be worth bringing its EV products in line with the Canadian and U.S. standards.

According to EV sales manager Vincent Square, it would four to five years for volume to be sufficient enough to merit building products specifically for the Canadian market, and hopes the waiver will be enough to put the automaker on the path back to a market vacated by the French automakers in 1991.

Should Renault’s two-pronged attack not pan out as hoped, however, the automaker plans to have an after-sales network for the EVs and their owners.

[Photo credit: Renault]

[H/T: Jonathan Roy/Twitter]

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46 Comments on “Renault Testing Canadian Waters With Limited Kangoo EV Sales...”


  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I’m sure that the granola cruncher’s in the GVRD and Island portion of British California would gobble them up assuming it has the range to get them to that seal pup protest or Spirit Bear Rain Forest Protest ;)

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      I think it will be more of a commercial/light urban delivery platform, but your version is way more interesting.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @heavy handle – something has to haul all of those protest signs and placards from place to place. Give’s those “Occupy” types something to cough hack “work” out of.

        • 0 avatar
          Mackie

          @Lou_BC.

          Why are you using EVs as a platform to express your obvious disdain for people who give a damn about the environment and social justice? Is your “one-percenter” lifestyle at risk somehow?

          By the way… you forgot to use the term “tree-huggers”, what kind of left-o-phobe are you?

    • 0 avatar
      brianyates

      Lou-BC, did you mean the Great Bear RainForest? I think that you’d have a hard time getting there in ANY vehicle as I understand that the area is almost roadless, but then you knew that……..Didn’t you? Wasn’t the seal pup protest on the East coast of Canada?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @brianyates – Seal harvest protests occur all over and you can get into the “Great Bear Rain Forest”. Spirit Bears also known as Kermode bears live in those regions. The anti-logging movement called it that because of the emotional impact. Just like showing pictures or footage of “the rainforest” then that of a freshly logged cut block. It all tugs on the heartstrings and wallets of those who don’t understand which forest ecosystems are fragile. There is logging going on in the south central parts of BC in very arid areas. Scraggly pine abound. There are also rattlesnakes in some of those areas that are considered endangered .

        No protests………..

        WHY?

        No visual or emotional appeal.

        But I bet if that rattlesnake had the face of a seal pup………

        Eco-corporations need to make money too.

        I have no problems with conservation. The issue is that most protesters do not offer up viable alternatives to logging, mining, fossil fuels et al.

        @Mackie – first time I’ve been called a left-o-phobe on this site. LOL

        Tree-hugger? My brother, a forest resource manager got in trouble once with his company’s PR hacks. He was asked about logging by some so called tree-huggers. His reply, ” Does a bear sh!t in the woods? NO. They sh!t in the cut block like all of the other animals.”

        I thought it was funny. I’m sure you won’t.

        BTW – you missed the smirk emoticon to show that I was joking?

        Look up Patrick Moore, one of the founders of Greenpeace and why he left.

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          If, as it appears, you live in BC and think there’s a seal pup cull or protest in BC, then that’s proof of your sadly shallow grasp of environmental issues.

          You did say “Spirit Bear Rainforest”, and there is no such thing. So stop the weaseling. As to where bears crap, I’ve been to clearcuts and the woods. Bears crap in both.

          Regarding Patrick Moore and his defection from Greenpeace, his circumstances cannot be mentioned without also pointing out that a number of Greenpeace founders continue to support, work with, and contribute to Greenpeace events. 40+ years after they started Greenpeace. You can see this for yourself at Jericho Beach in Vancouver this Saturday. Moore is also balanced by Paul Watson, who parted ways with Greenpeace to found the very effective Sea Shepherd Conservation Society.

          Since the anti-environmental chattersphere likes to perpetuate the myth that environmentalists are motivated by greed, I’d venture Patrick Moore found he could make far more money shilling for polluting corporations than working for Greenpeace.

          If you think environmentalists are demanding an immediate end to all logging, mining and oil industries, or if you think they don’t have viable proposals to wean ourselves off destructive and excessive levels of resource extraction, then you have isolated yourself from a wealth of facts. Kindly do a bit of research outside the walls of the beer parlor before futher spreading such idiocy.

          You’d be sympathetic to the anti-environmental reaction of some to a big anti-pipeline rally in Vancouver. The protesters of the protest claimed two things. One was that the protesters were jobless bums. And the other was that the protesters were hypocrites for driving big suv’s to the rally. Outside the fact both claims were basically false, the inherent contradiction reveals the pure stupidity of the anti-environmental dingbats. What’s worse, is that such people continue to spout their garbage despite how many times they are refuted. Which suggests they’re either abysmally stupid or unethical.

          And note that your failure to get away with posting a bunch of anti-environmental drivel on a car website is a clear sign that things are changing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            brandloyalty – activism whether it be “anti” or “pro” always heads towards the extreme ends of the spectrum when criticizing the opposite. Both sides will point out the extremes for effect. Middle ground tends to be a “no-mans land” that either camp is afraid of venturing in to.

            Your pipeline protest comment is interesting and what is the alternative to shipping oil over long distances safely and economically?
            I’ve seen and heard of more rail or truck accidents then that of oil lines.

            What are the viable alternatives to logging?
            How long would it take to implement and how much would it cost?
            I’ve been in Haida Gwaii multiple times and have traveled down logging roads blasted out of the rock. Logging trucks carrying 50 tons of logs rolled down those same roads. In 5 years of inactivity those same roads are covered in regeneration so thick that is almost impossible to traverse. I’ve hiked or 4-wheeled into some rather interesting places while there.
            Spirit Bear is more of a First Nation’s term for the Kermode. Great Bear Rain Forest WAS a phrase coined by the environmental lobby. That area is also known as the Central and North Coast forest, or simply the Central and North Coast.
            Anyone actually involved in Forest Resource Management knows that the rate of logging is greater than that of reforestation and/or regeneration. Politicians turn a deaf ear to those in the Forest Service and even in Industry that are worried about that fact. No politician wants to commit political suicide by addressing the issue and subsequent drop in revenue. Areas such as the coastal forests tend to regrow rapidly so in many respects harvesting with intense silviculture practices make much more sense in those high yield regions.

            The Pine Beetle Epidemic could of been suppressed to some degree by allowing selective harvesting of Tweedmuir Park for example. That plan was blocked by environmentalists and politicians. I’ve seen multiple aerial photographs of that region at the early onset of outbreak. I’ve flown over and traveled through those regions.
            Sure, I was playing up the stereotypes of the “green” side of the equation. Hyperbole on my part.
            This is a conversation much more interesting than that of an EV. I’m open to any comments or factoids you post. I do find it amusing that I’m being painted by the same broad brush that I’m accused of using on the environmentalist lobby.

            How many “environmentalists” actually live deep in the “wild” environment they say they want to protect?

            It is rather humbling to be within feet of a predator that puts you lower than them in the food chain.
            It is also rather humbling to see first hand how cruel and unforgiving that “wild” environment can be.

          • 0 avatar
            brandloyalty

            I too have paid my dues working and recreating in the woods across BC in all seasons and at all elevations. I too have had face-to-face encounters with black bears, wolves, grizzlies and cougars. That has little or nothing to do with my understanding of the issues.

            You have completely missed my point about environmentalists being (wrongly) depicted as absolutists. They are not. Anyone who thinks so, as you clearly do, has not done basic homework and speaks in knee-jerk reactionary phrases. I challenge you to show me a link to where any reasonably prominent environmentalist has called for a complete end to logging, mining, petroleum extraction, pipelines, or any of the numerous other things they are accused of saying, but never did.

            The game, of course, is to make them look stupid. But putting words in their mouths and then criticizing them for those words is unethical. We humans have problems with the planet’s climate. Solutions will not be built upon lies. So cut it out.

            I agree with you about the general mismanagement of BC’s forests. And you are in agreement with the environmentalists on that topic, though no doubt to a different degree. By starting to log third-growth “pecker poles” already, the logging industry definitely is fishing down the food chain.

            Had the pine beetle not exploded in Tweedsmuir Park, it would have happened sooner or later somewhere, and could not be controlled. The conditions were and are too primed and extensive to prevent it. And the conditions are a result of matters environmentalists have been criticizing for decades, not because they didn’t want a Class A provincial park logged.

            Whether environmentalists live naked in caves has utterly nothing to do with the validity of their concerns.

          • 0 avatar
            brandloyalty

            Let’s try again.

            If I tell you that you should eat less, do you think I’m telling you to eat nothing?

            If I tell you that you should save more of your income, do you think I’m telling you to save 100% of your income and stop all spending?

            Silly? But that’s exactly what you claim environmentalists propose.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            brandloyalty – good points.
            I’ve run into too many “urban environmentalists” that have never actually been in the parts of the country they say they want to save. That is why I made comment of the humbling aspect of being out there. It is relevant in as much as there are many that don’t really understand the issues. That is a valid statement on both sides of the fence. Most have never set foot or looked into the eyes of those affected by protests or will ever see what they are trying to save.

            I’ve been out there and am all for sustainable use.

            Both sides tend to paint the other side with extremes. Virtually everyone I know is on the harvesting side of the equation. I do admit that does affect my viewpoints.

            My comments for the most part were tongue in cheek and were playing the stereotypes.

            Thanks for presenting your opinions and I’ll keep them in mind in the future.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    please tighten the border with Canada so these things don’t come here!

    • 0 avatar
      Domestic Hearse

      Limit them to the Great Concavity, I say. Use them as Empire Waste Disposal (EWD) vehicles. Give them to the sovereignists as a gesture of good will from the Gentle O.N.A.N. administration.

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    You’re right, having more purchasing options is very un-American!

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Love the wagon version! That’s got to be the most unabashed and heroic greenhouse going today.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    I was around when Renault used to be sold here, they were horrible cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Mackie

      I loved the Fuego and Le Car (Renault 5) when I was a kid. I know they were crap-tastic, but they were cool-looking. I’m guessing Renault has improved since then—if they hadn’t, they wouldn’t be around still (one would assume). I’d consider owning one if the reviews were favourable. Vive la difference…

    • 0 avatar
      spreadsheet monkey

      Do you think it’s possible that the cars might have changed in the 30 years since then?

      Renault is owned by Nissan. Perhaps you ‘Mericans might buy this if it wears a Nissan badge.

      • 0 avatar
        Victor

        No it isn’t. Nissan and Renault are associated and have exchanged shares of each other, but one does not own the other.

        As for Renault improvement, we’ve had a couple of Mégane Scénic in our driveway and albeit comfortable and practical, the thing just would not handle six months without any major mechanical issue. Engines were rebuilt, autoboxes were replaced, and the tow trucks kept on coming. We blamed the Natural Gas conversion on the first one, but the second ran on gas alone and was just as screwed up.

        Dad went the Honda way and never came back; I myself am a bit more adventurous, still driving French cars, only now they’re mostly from PSA.

  • avatar
    STS_Endeavour

    Kangoo? I don’t want any goo on my can, thank you.

  • avatar
    readallover

    They used to sell well in Quebec. I bet Peugeot will be watching this closely.

  • avatar

    The Kangoo is beloved in Europe. It’s a small vehicle with a seemingly impossible amount of space inside, so the used values are apparently through the roof (own of my colleagues owns one back in France).

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Betcha my Honda’s engine is less polluting than the generator they’re using to charge that EV. Hope they don’t have to be at another job site in a hurry.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      This depends on where customers are located. Three of the four most populous Canadian provinces use low-carbon sources for baseload (overnight) demand.
      Ontario uses hydro and nuclear, Quebec uses hydro, BC uses hydro, and Alberta uses coal/NG.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        Well, those cutie-pie male models are at a supposed construction site which probably hasn’t had city power connected yet. So stinky, primitive-engined generator.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          RideHeight – not necessarily. Often temporary power will be run in to cover construction use. I’ve seen residential contractors build and wire a house and use it as a power source for adjacent homes. Gen sets aren’t always used.

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            Well, I *could* be right. In which case I’d be right.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            RideHeight – I have to add that your comment does beg the question as to where the energy that charges these vehicles comes from.
            Many major centres in Canada have the good fortune of using electricity generated by “clean” hydroelectric facilities. Unfortunately dams have also fallen under the jaundiced eye of environmental lobbyists. It all has to be viewed as a cost/benefit/harm ratio. Dams do flood a lot of terrain but I’d rather have a dam in my backyard as opposed to a coal plant or nuclear plant. Viable cost effective solutions are what are needed.

  • avatar
    brianyates

    Lou-Bc I never said you couldn’tget intothe Great Bear rainforest. Drive to Port Hardy and then fly in via Pacific Coast airlines. If you read my earlier comments you can’t drive there, even in a Tesla.
    By the way, it wasn’t the”anti logging” protesters that gave the name Great Bear Rain Forest, it was the first nations.
    But don’t let a good rant get in the way of the facts.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      brianyates – um……… the Spirit Bear is First Nations. Great Bear Rain Forest is a Green construct. There are several First Nations Territories that are encompassed in that area. There are those that want the “Great Bear Rain Forest to cover most of the mainland Pacific coast. There is road access for portions of that region i.e. Prince Rupert, Terrace, Kitimat and even Bella Coola. I’ve been in and around parts of that region, have you?

      If you want to engage in a discussion, well then let’s…..

      You could read my reply to “brandloyalty”.

      • 0 avatar
        brandloyalty

        The Great Bear Rain Forest was a much wider “construct” than environmentalists and First Nations. It was a landmark achievement in collaboration by opposing groups. A brief history can be read at:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Bear_Rainforest

        “The 2006 agreement between the BC government and a wide coalition of conservationists, loggers, hunters, and First Nations established a series of conservancies stretching 400 kilometres (250 mi) along the coast.”

        On top of the other corrections your comments have needed, this should be enough to convince you that your grasp of these issues is insufficient for the pronouncements you make on the subject.

        With all due respect, of course.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          brandloyalty – I’m well aware of the issues since I live in the North and am affected indirectly or directly by them.

          I didn’t make any pronouncements other than a mischievous cooking session aka “stirring the pot”. My subsequent comments were based more on memory as opposed to use the ultra-reliable Wikipedia.

          I didn’t expect such a heated series of retorts.

          My apologies for ruffling any feathers… With all due respect, of course.

          (Sorry…. doing it again)

          People do get extremely emotional over these issues.

          Ever encounter protesters trying to save rattlesnakes in the southern Interior?
          That was serious.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Lou_BC originally referred to driving an ev to a protest event. Most of these are in urban areas where an ev would do just fine. Arguing about whether one can drive an ev to coastal BC is a mugs game.

  • avatar
    Irvingklaws

    I’d name mine “Hoppy.” That would be kewl.

  • avatar
    shaker

    “Should Renault’s two-pronged attack not pan out as hoped”

    I see what you did there.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    The Canadians are a little testy about anyone testing their waters lately. With both the Americans and the Russians poking around in it, sniffing the ocean floor for gas and oil, one can see Canada’s point.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Skoda would be a slam-dunk in Canada, Renault, not a chance.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Thanks for that picture, best laugh I’ve had all week. Oh yeah, lets go out to the job site and find a place to plug in our EV! The only clichés they missed were a thermos of coffee, and plaid flannel shirts.

  • avatar
    shaker

    I wish that they would bring the original Bollore Bluecar (the “B0” Pininfarina-bodied beauty) to fruition. I believe it combined batteries and supercapacitors to make better use of regenerative braking; but the concept seems to have “vaporized” (unfortunately).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bollor%C3%A9_Bluecar

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