By on April 10, 2015

2015 Lincoln MKCWith November’s sales results in hand, we asked four months ago whether Ford Motor Company’s Lincoln division had reached “Peak MKC.” Initial evidence suggested the Escape-related small crossover wasn’t able to cross the threshold from middling success in the Acura RDX and Audi Q5-dominated small luxury CUV arena into the upper tier.

With the MKC’s U.S. sales results from the first-quarter of 2015 now in, there’s yet more evidence leading us to believe that demand for the MKC – at its current price point, with its current level of incentives, without a new MKX stealing limelight – won’t climb noticeably higher.

Its share of the small luxury SUV category is lower than it was during the launch period in the third-quarter of last year. After claiming 9.3% market share last summer, the MKC accelerated to 10.9% in the final three months of 2014. But with five established rivals selling (RDX, Q5, X3, XC60, GLK) more often and Lexus’s NX also generating greater interest, the MKC’s share in the segment was down to 8.6% in Q1 2015.

The MKC was Lincoln’s best-selling model in November, and it seemed likely that it could continue to be the brand’s most popular model given the decreasing interest in the brand’s main car, the MKZ, and the fact that the MKC was believed to be just getting going. (MKZ volume declined in each of the last ten months.) Some showroom traffic is perhaps being diverted toward the MKC, as well, because the first-generation MKX is more than eight-years old and the new MKX is forthcoming.

Lincoln
March 2015
March 2014
% Change
3 mos. 2015
3 mos. 2014
% Change
MKZ
2,842 4,052 -29.9% 6,506 9,218 -29.4%
MKC
2,070 5,230
MKX
1,475 2,581 -42.9% 3,968 7,101 -44.1%
Navigator
1,097 746 47.1% 2,875 1,561 84.2%
MKS
838 1,034 -19.0% 2,042 2,440 -16.3%
MKT
373 556 -32.9% 857 1,283 -33.2%
Total
8,695 8,969 -3.1% 21,478 21,603 -0.6%

Lincoln dealers have the MKCs to sell, as well. Automotive News shows more than 10,000 MKCs were in stock at the beginning of March, a month in which 2070 MKCs were sold, the MKC’s fourth-best of 11 months. That’s a 163-day supply, not an extraordinary number for Lincoln (which has the highest inventory levels of any auto brand in America), but far greater than the industry average of 69 days.

We are, however, approaching the prime automobile buying season. Top-selling small luxury crossovers like the Acura RDX and Audi Q5, for example, sold 19% and 27% more, respectively, in the second-quarter of 2014 than in the first. Over the next three months, the auto industry should produce at least 10% more activity than it did over the previous three months. But after averaging fewer than 2000 monthly sales over the last nine months and never topping the 2400-unit mark, there’s little reason to believe that, even with plenty of MKCs available, there will be a sudden spike in demand without real pricing aggression from Ford MoCo.

As for the hope that the MKC would be a Lincoln saviour, well, that’s not turning out to be the case. Non-MKC Lincoln sales plunged 25% in the first-quarter and 26% in March. Even including the MKC, brand-wide Lincoln sales slid 3% last month and 0.6% in Q1.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

73 Comments on “Lincoln MKC Inventory Rising, But U.S. Sales Have Levelled Off...”


  • avatar
    Whatnext

    What a sad state the automobile is in when this category is nothing more than a collection of alphanumeric soup (MKC, RDX, Q5, X3, XC60, GLK). No wonder millenials aren’t emotionally inspired by vehicles, these “names” have evoke all the passion of a toaster.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      What a silly statement. How many people out there are really buying cars based on the model name? It’s just such a dumb, tired, trite whine from internet nobodies.

      • 0 avatar

        I look at this list of cars and, except for the Navigator, I don’t know what any of them are. I’d need to google them. And I’m at least a little more car-savvy than the average car buyer. If buyers don’t know your car exists, or what the name of the car that is in the category they are shopping in is, they aren’t going to buy it.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          “If buyers don’t know your car exists, or what the name of the car that is in the category they are shopping in is, they aren’t going to buy it.”

          Except the gripe is directed at the 5 biggest sellers in one of the hottest segments in the market. Sooooo…you’re wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            People that buy American brand luxury cars like model names and the people that buy Japanese and European luxury cars aren’t defecting.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            One fair criticism is that the nomenclature doesn’t always make sense or is the easiest to comprehend – which is why Mercedes redid their alphanumeric scheme (so that their crossovers better correlate to the nomenclature for the similar sized sedans).

            One big reason for alphanumerics is the China merket, where translations of names sometimes don’t come out well.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        Probably not too many buy based on alpha name but the alphabet soup comment is legitimate. I don’t know what most of these apha named models are, I can’t remember their size segment or what they look like and doubt anymore that I would know them on sight. Clearly, to me anyway, this wasn’t always the case.

      • 0 avatar
        Whatnext

        Rrright, well from one internet nobody to another, you’re wrong. Have you named your kids S2kv.1 and S2kv.2, or did you give them gender specific letters and numbers?

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Again. Most popular five models. One of the most popular automotive segments. ALl have alphanumeric names. How can the premise “customers don’t understand them and won’t buy them” POSSIBLY be right given that customers buy them in droves. YOU may not get it, and YOU may not like alphanumeric names, but the salesproof part of “Lincoln MKC” is “Lincoln” not “MKC”.

          • 0 avatar
            wmba

            “Again. Most popular five models.”

            You’re being too dogmatic. I got to the chart and realized I didn’t have a clue which model was which. And furthermore, didn’t care. My mind had vague recollections of chrome baleen grilles and general bulk, and that’s it.

            Alphanumerics is one thing, Having just letters is another. Throwing away two letters by using MK in front of the only distinguishing mark leaves Lincoln with the following models:

            Z, C, X, S and T, plus an SUV.

            Totally hopeless. And I seem to have a much better memory than all the people who go into conniptions each time they read Nissan is making Mercedes engines.

            Utter marketing fail is what it is. Same with Cadillac – but at least Johan is changing it to alphanumeric with numbers corresponding to size. Much easier.

            Z,C,X,S and T. Haven’t a clue, don’t need a lecture from someone about it either. It’s just 100% idiotic. If you drag your sorry a*s into a Lincoln dealer, you presumably are awake enough to know you’re in a Lincoln dealership, which very few people do visit. Then you are then confronted by the salesman “Which model are you interested in? Z, C, X, S or T?”

            It’s just an utter waste of time, and reeks of intellectual laziness on the part of marketing. Furthermore the sales prove it by going down continually when the vehicles themselves are at least competent. Because no one cares, it’s simply not worth the effort to understand Lincoln’s code.

          • 0 avatar

            Everybody knows that RDX is Acura,, Q5 is Infiniti, X3 is Audi and GL is Taurus (I had one). And no one knows what MKC is. But actually works like this – I want Audi and I go to Audi dealership and ask – do you have any kind of AUDI compact CUV. The say – yes that is one – it is called X* – how can we help you to part with your money. If you do not want Lincoln or not aware that it even exists (most think it is a town somewhere in Nebraska since they graduated from American public school system) it does not matter how it called.

      • 0 avatar
        jfbramfeld

        Wrong side of the bed, today?

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Me? I just don’t take stupidity well. “No one will ever buy this alphahumeric nonesense like X3, RDX, and Q5!” It’s demonstrably wrong. It’s a stupid thing to say.

          • 0 avatar
            Toad

            Don’t agree with me = Stupid. Gotta love the internet.

            The only Lincoln vehicle I can identify on sight is the Navigator, the rest are just a blur of letters. I don’t think that I am close to being alone.

            Since Lincoln’s current marketing effort to be a “me too” import brand does not seem to be working maybe it is time to try something new: OWN the fact that you are a domestic brand, sell comfort and luxury, and rake in sales from the age 50+ middle and upper middle class buyers who actually have some money to spend.

            Let BMW/Lexus/MB/Audi chase the segment of the market that wants a performance import. That leaves a decent number of prospective buyers who would be happy to own a semi luxury domestic vehicle if they could figure out what the models are and why they should test drive one.

            Lincoln actually has some appealing vehicles but I’ll be damned if I have talked to anybody who understands what they are.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “Don’t agree with me = Stupid. Gotta love the internet. ”

            Let’s frame the argument here.

            The ORIGINAL criticism was of the X3, Q5, RDX, XC60, and GLK. The assertion was made that those can’t sell because consumers don’t recognize the names, which is garbage, because they sell just fine.

            So the problem is not with Alphanumeric names.

            Now, if you want to say LINCOLN’S alphanumeric names are arbitrary and crap, fine, whatever, I don’t bother keeping track of them either, so you’re not wrong, but I still say it doesn’t sell because no one wants to pay a premium for a Lincoln, not because it has a funny letter-name.

            My “you’re stupid” thing is aimed at those who declare the ineffectiveness of alphanumeric names overall, because plenty of brands are doing just fine, thanks, with all goofy numer-letter combos. That other brands are not is not necessarily an indictment of alphanumerica names, it’s more an indictment of those brands.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I think it is a valid point within a brand when the model designations are completely and utterly meaningless, too similar, and confusing. MKC, MKT, MKZ, MKX, WTF? Acura and Infiniti are just as bad. I don’t know which is which, which is bigger or smaller or more expensive or what. Or even which are cars and which are CUVs. At least the Germans each have a system that makes some sense. I know that an X1 is a CUV, because it starts with an X. I know an X3 is bigger and more expensive, and an X5 is bigger and more expensive yet.

        The Germans have almost always used numbers, but the rest should go back to names instead of being bad copycats. Continental means something. So does Legend and Integra. It all just adds to my general level of not giving a crap about any of these makes.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I’ve got to disagree with you. While I guess I could bother to learn the cold-sounding labels of alphabet soup, names like Continental, Silver Spur, Legend and many more sound majestic.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree 100%

      NON ENTHUSIASTS don’t remember the names of these cars unless it’s one they specifically desire. Lincoln would have done so much better if they’d simply made better cars and kept solid NAME BADGES.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      The idea is that you’re not buying a MKC, you’re buying a Lincoln. Just as people say “I drive a BMW” or “I drive a Cadillac”. The model name doesn’t matter anymore to most non-enthusiasts because very few model names carry a brand equity. Miata does, and Taurus kinda does, but even the best model names in history don’t carry much brand equity: Countach, Continental GT, LS4xx, etc etc. Therefore most luxury brands attempt to trade on the brand name, not the model name.

      Plus it costs money to maintain brand equity, brand recall, brand messaging. It’s easier and cheaper to build the Lincoln brand and let the models fall out as packages.

      Buick is the only near-luxury maker still attempting to use model names. It may work, but mainly because now that is a unique approach and thus much easier to market.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Marketing by brand doesn’t help when its toxic or otherwise damaged marque. In such a case, an attractive model name might actually help.

        • 0 avatar
          MrGreenMan

          We are all still in awe of how downright clever it was for General Motors to step in and crap all over Cutlass to keep it from becoming a sub-brand and outshining Oldsmobile.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofoo

      While I also dislike the automotive alphabet soup, millenials seem fine with alphabet soup in the tech world.

      HTC M8/M9, Samsung S5 /S6, LG G3, Moto X…etc. are all popular smartphones, and millenials seem to scoop them up in droves.

      The problem millenials have with most cars is that they are simply too much money, and not very interesting.

      Vehicles like a Tesla or a Jeep wrangler are different, interesting, and are selling decently well. Boring me-too appliances like the MKC will never capture a millenial’s heart – or anyone else’s.

      • 0 avatar

        Wrong – they scoop iPhones, number does not matter – it is still Apple. Does anyone remember Lincoln LS? It was not MK something – it had a real name.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Be careful with the preferences of millennials. They supposedly didn’t like cars, but it turned out they love ’em, they just can’t afford them. I suspect that millennials are dreaming, not of a BMW “3-series”, but of having and driving a Belchfire Brougham Limited.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      911
      M3
      GTO
      GTI
      2002
      Model S

      Yup, no passion whatsoever.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Having driven both the Escape and the MKC, I’m not surprised. I really wanted to like the MKC, but it really doesn’t justify its higher price. There’s not a lot of difference between it and a Platinum Escape.

    • 0 avatar
      Mandalorian

      Exactly. For the same amount of money, you get a better equipped Escape than an MKC. If the bottom tier MKC was to be priced slightly higher than the loaded Escape and have all the features, it would be one thing. But it isn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Don’t know why this would be.
      OK…I have not driven one. I also think it is rather small for the price, but then again I think the same about its competitors, other than the RDX.
      The MKC has a whole lot more than the even highest level Escape.
      I know…I have the Escape.
      The cargo size is slightly larger.
      The engines is special to it alone.
      The leather and other materials and interior specs and options are not available on the Escape.
      Even some of the suspension is different than that of the Escape.
      These are pretty important separation points.

    • 0 avatar

      What does the Lexus RX offer (besides the Lexus nameplate) that makes it a better choice than the Toyota Highlander? You can get just about the same equipment in both cars, except for the fact that the RX doesn’t have a third row of seating.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @Ronnie, exactly. Highlander Limited > Lexus RX

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Says the Highlander owner.

          Off the top of my head I’d better materials and the potential of RX Japanese assembly vs the Princeton Indiana assembled Highlander (wikipedia is sketchy on the assembly location of the MY15s as the previous generation was assembled in Japan and Ontario).

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Dang I didn’t expect you to swallow the Japanese assembly kool aid.

            I would also argue that most loaded Buicks and Chevrolets are better values than Cadillac.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think its a question of suppliers more than the physical assembly process. Toyota most likely has the same equipment/robots and lean mfg processes in place on both continents. If Toyota say shipped all of the RX’s components from Japan and simply assembled it in North America, the Japanese assembled and NA assembled examples would probably be nearly the same.

            I agree with you on the second point, but shouldn’t be surprising since Cadillac is such a disaster.

          • 0 avatar
            Richard Chen

            http://corporatenews.pressroom.toyota.com/releases/2014+toyota+highlander+launch+event+tmmi.htm

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          First of all, if you’re comparing a Highlander Limited to an RX with Nav, you aren’t saving a ton of money, about $5k, ~$43k vs. $48k.

          Second, my MIL drives a ’13 Highlander Limited, my SIL drives a ’12 RX350. The RX seems like it was assembled out of materials befitting a $50k car by professionals who knew what thy were doing. The Highlander seems like it was assembled out of materials rejected by fisher price by a bleary-eyed drunken father on Christmas Eve who hit the eggnog way too hard and is trying to finish the Highlander before he passes out under the tree and ruins the magic of St. Nick for his kids.

          In my MIL’s Highlander, the airbag cover on the steering wheel, right front and center on the $43k SUV, has a 1/8″ gap on one side and a 1/2″ gap on the other. It’s just garbage. Maybe the 3G ones are better, I dunno, but the 2G (this is her second, the first, a 2010 SE, was even worse) is terrible.

      • 0 avatar
        LectroByte

        I don’t get the “it’s just a more expensive version of something else argument”. That it is. But the MKC vs Escape or Highlander vs RX or Escalade vs Tahoe decision comes down to a lot of things, including at least styling, dealer experience and better materials, more sound deadening.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          If I wanted some popular features like a lot of buyers will such as Navigation, real leather seats, a trailer hitch and AWD, I can get an Escape Titanium for roughly $33k.

          If I wanted those on an MKC, it would be $42k. Does the Lincoln name honestly carry that much value? $9k MORE and not even an engine upgrade. Even GM, the king of rebadging isn’t that stupid.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s BS that Nav is not standard on ALL Lincoln vehicles. I’ve let Ford/Lincoln people know this numerous times. All Lincolns comes with MLT now. The cost to add Nav to a MFT equipped Ford is $795. They should just include it. It makes me so very angry.

            I also agree that AWD should not be package specific. AWD should be available on all Lincolns, no matter tha pacakage. It should be a $2000 or whatever option.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s NOT BS because many of us don’t want Nav, I’m perfectly capable of getting around on my own. Now if In forced to get it with a touch screen instead of an actual Radio headunit, then yes it is BS, but only because I have to get some POS touchscreen and can’t even have all the options.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Many of us don’t want NAV. Exactly. I prefer my NAV in my pocket, to carry with me, as in Garmin 42 or 52.

            I own two vehicles with OEM NAV, a 2015 Sequoia and a 2012 Grand Cherokee, and I have never used either of those NAV systems, except to play with it in my driveway, while parked.

            Too involved. Too costly. Not portable enough. Can’t take it with you.

            I’m sure others can add to the reasons why they don’t want a fixed NAV unit in their vehicles.

            And to complicate things further, both our Apple cellphone and our Samsung cellphone do a better job of maps and NAV. Not to mention our iPads.

            Fixed NAV systems built in to a vehicle are sooooooo, 20th century.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            Maybe not navigation…but Back Up Cameras SHOULD be standard today.
            Especially in any car over 25K

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You are getting the head unit regardless with Lincoln. Might as well get the Nav included. They package it with other stuff because people want it and they can get a premium for it.

            I don’t drive as much for work anymore, but I enjoyed having the Nav when I did. I know my way around Metro Detroit, but it’s good to have an 8″ map in your dash when making detours. It was also helpful in giving time frames on when I’d arrive someplace.

            My wife has done home health care in the past. She could plug in 5 addresses before she left the driveway and the Nav she wouldn’t have to worry about directions. Not everyone went to Army Pathfinder School.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The biggest problem for the MKC is its size/packaging of interior room.

      Not coincidentally, the Escape has the same issue.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Perhaps a new ad with Matthew McConaughey driving one while wearing this will help?

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/c6/89/f4/c689f433bc66d50e12f2c02806ed16dd.jpg

  • avatar

    All I can say is if I was in the market for a new luxury CUV, an MKC would be at the top of my list. I reviewed one last fall and fell in love with it. My dream one would be a Black Label Indulgence in Chrome Couture (Google the image and the pics I took at NAIAS come up).

    Sure, I could buy a loaded Escape, but then I’d have to look at the ugly thing…

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Really?

      It has a really small/cramped interior, is essentially the same vehicle as the Escape (to all those who claim it’s not, let me preempt your misinformation; it has the same chassis as the Escape – including exterior wheelbase & width externally – built on the same assembly line, in St. Louis, with only a higher level of standard equipment, an alleged differently tuned suspension, and available 2.3 liter engine as distinguishing “features”), yet is priced, at least in window sticker terms, at a ridiculous level.

      The two positive things I’ll say about it is that it’s not only the best styled Lincoln, by far, but it’s one of the better styled compact CUVs overall, and more sophisticated looking than the Escape, and those Matthew McConaughey commercials make me want to eat some magic shrooms & go for a completely random dive to nowhere & trip balls.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Different dash design. Different materials. Different leathers.
        Different options.
        Different suspension.
        Different capacities and volume data…

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The one thing you left out is that the 2.3, like the base turbo 2.0 is a four. The Acura RDX and Audi Q5 both have V6 options. You can bandy the horsepower numbers or cry “Turbo!” all you want, but a luxury car buyer still equates more cylinders = more power. On the MKC, the extra cylinders aren’t available.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Many of us don’t equate cylinders = luxury if the proffered engine gets the job done.

          To me, the MKC is well worth the premium over an Escape Titanium, based on the exterior and interior designs alone. I test drove the Escape 2 years ago and the deep dashtop bugged the hell out of me. The MKC resolved that issue…

          I would also gander now that prices have subsided, the premium for an equivalent MKC over an Escape is no more than $5k.

  • avatar
    YellowDuck

    I pay attention to cars more than the average Joe, yet I was somehow unaware that Lincoln even *had* an Escape-sized CUV. Not sure how I missed it because this is a segment I am quite interested in. Is it possible that they have dropped the ball a little on marketing this model?

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      You know doubt remember when Mercury existed and they specifically resisted making a Lincoln version of the Escape/Mariner, and suggested the Mercury Mariner Premier edition filled that hole.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      It just came out last year, so you’re forgiven for not knowing it exists. Perhaps if Lincoln’s commercials advertised their vehicles instead of advertising Matthew McConaughey more people would know the MKC exists. Next time you see the commercial if you can look past the actor, you can see glimpses of the vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        I think the commercials flashed the letters MKC, but all McConaughey mentioned was “Lincoln”, not the model he was driving, and everyone who saw the ads was distracted by his rubbing his fingertips together. Ask any woman who saw the ads what the model was, and she’s likely to say, “What car?”

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Apparently, the MKC Escaped your attention.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Again this reminds me of the lady at the GM dealership parts counter asking one of the techs what an ATS was, mind she’s worked there for at least 10 years that I can remember. No one knows what it(This Lincoln) is and saying its a Lincoln doesn’t evoke anymore excitement than saying its a Hyundai. Jeep actually has power with its brand name and uses actual model names, Jeep isn’t suppose to be full-on luxury like the Lincoln is, yet it stills offers a larger Engine option?

    Luxury has to be sold with Quality, brand recognition power, options, and clear cut reasons why it’s superior to lesser products. The Car above could be mistaken for a Hyundai.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Looking at those sales numbers, I’d say the MKC IS Lincolns savior. The MKC has at least brought Lincoln’s sales to basically flat, imagine what the decrease would look like without the MKC! When you look at that lineup, there is a lot of old outdated product there – MKX – 8 years with 1 update, MKS 6? years with a minor update, MKT is 5 years now. The MKZ came out 3 years ago now, and was barely adequate then. The next 2 years is going to see a total revamp of the lineup, so sales should improve dramatically.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    RDX sells because it’s roomy and relatively cheap; MKC is expensive and TINY inside. I have no idea how Lincoln took the perfectly decent Escape and made it feel like a subcompact.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    My neighbor picked up one of these a few months ago, in black. More attractive than the other 3 SUVs they have in the driveway.

    I sat in one at the DC auto show. Hate the capacitive-touch everything. Stuck my finger into a panel gap, and part of the “wood” trim snapped off.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Love the RDX

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I’d love it if it had the right AWD system. Unfortunately, buyers don’t know the difference, because they pay more attention to the “AWD” badge than what actually happens when it’s slick out.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        That can be asid for most vehicles that carry an AWD badge. Most are electronic 4WD that will disengage once it has overcome the immediate problem and the driver has no control over the engagement. Of course in this day and age actual AWD is not going to happen on many vehicles because of the MPG penalty and many of people who are buying based on that badge can’t be trusted with driver selectable 4WD. Too many people would put it in 4WD to get out of the neighborhood and leave it there after they make it to the cleared roads.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        RDX buyers weren’t interested in ponying up more $$ for the SH-AWD system, so Acura switched to a cheaper, more basic system.

  • avatar

    Lincoln is still not capturing the essence of a luxury vehicle, they still have work to do.

    The MKC is attractive looks better than some other CUV’s, great highway cruiser, its only offered with a 4 cylinder, the Ecoboost has great torque, and is a rough 4 cylinder.

    In most instances where a new utility is offered on top if the existing utility model, sales are cannibalized. M-B GLA/GLK Audi Q3/Q5 BMW X3/X4 as a few examples.

    All these CUV/SUV are lifestyle vehicles, with a limited shelf life, and whoever has a new offering will steal sales.

    MKC: March 2070 YTD March 5230

    Lexus NX: March 3633 YTD March 9111

    Here is the MKC http://www.thestrada.net/reviews/2015/3/30/2015-lincoln-mkc.html

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    Was shopping in this segment for father in law. Lincoln want $53k for a well specced MKC in toronto. That is absolutely INSANE. I can do a fully loaded Q5 for that money. I was absolutely floored by the sticker price. Floored.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Well, that’s $42,400 in US dollars. When the looney drops to 80 cents American from its former parity, you have to expect higher Canadian prices. Still, that’s a bit steep for a compact vehicle with no V6 option.

  • avatar

    It is hard to believe Lincoln exists at all since their annual sales are half that of Cadillac!!

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      It’s even more shocking because Cadillac is in a sales freefall (death spiral?), with CTS, ATS & even SRX sales absolutely cliff diving – being down anywhere from 23% to 54% YoY (ATS & CTS have many, many months – over YEARS now – of consecutive monthly sales declines).


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Mike-NB2: My first car was a 1978 Honda Accord that I bought in 1984. I live in an area that uses lots of salt on the...
  • Art Vandelay: The subdued flag on the fender is a nice touch for those that wore that in combat. Not my bag really,...
  • Art Vandelay: I’d have paid extra for that color too
  • Rick T.: You must be having some spectacular spring weather there in Chicago. The trees are much farther along than...
  • Lie2me: $30K is loaded Renegade Trailhawk 4X4 177hp turbo money, I’m not feeling this Kona

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States