By on April 24, 2015
Renault Logan

Renault Logan

Among the first to come to Brazil when the market was opened up again in the 1990s – after a hiatus of almost 50 years when this country closed itself off to the world – Renault has seemingly reached a limit in Brazil. Its market participation has hovered around 6 percent for years. Now, hungry for more, the French company is showing its new plans that will deeply affect their operations in Latin America at large and shake up their manufacturing base in South America, most especially Mercosur (namely Brazil and Argentina).

When their Ayrton Senna factory was opened in São José dos Pinhais in Paraná state, their line was in tune to what they produced in Europe. They offered the Clio, Kangoo, Mégane and Scénic. With an emphasis on safety, even the lowly Clio offered dual frontal airbags. At that time, the relative parity between the Brazilian real and American dollar allowed them to import systems such as the aforementioned airbags on the cheap. The minivan Scénic offered space for five, a large trunk, modular seating and became a favorite for families. The Mégane and Kangoo meanwhile suffered at the hands of more established competition and never made a dent in Volkswagen Golf, Fiat Stilo or Ford Focus sales. The Fiat Doblò passenger and commercial versions plus the Uno-based Fiat Fiorino conspired to keep the Kangoo down.

In the Brazilian market, reception was mixed. At the entry level, the Clio had lukewarm success. The majority of compact level car buyers are not exactly flush with money, so buying a new entry into that market was seen as a risky proposition. The Scénic and other minivans slowly, but surely, decimated the station wagons then available on the market. Together with Citroën minivans, Renault owned that market. As it became a favorite, the prices of this type of car rose above the rest of the competition and became expensive to buy.

Undeniably, Renault and other French makes suffered a perception problem. While most think their engines are robust and can take the pressure, suspension systems were and remain under suspicion in the eyes of Brazilian consumers. So, despite placing rather high in consumer satisfaction surveys, Renaults take a hit at re-sale time.

Brazilian Clio

Brazilian Clio

Over the years the American dollar and euro appreciated against the Brazilian real and growing sales plateaued. Renault’s reaction was to cheapen their offerings. Soon, the Clio lost its airbags, losing its appeal to the better off buyers that seemed to favor it over the VW Gol or Fiat Uno. When it was re-designed, it kept the previous car’s internal design. A new Scénic was launched in Europe, but citing cost complications, Renault chose to keep building the old one. Renault also tried to gain market penetration by locally building and selling a Mégane sedan and station wagon. Inevitably, Renault’s line became outmoded and nothing on offer in Europe was sold here.

Of course, errors in reading the market collaborated to their downfall. In the early 2000s, Renault was challenging Ford for fourth place in the Brazilian market. Ford reacted by launching the EcoSport and new Fiesta, new engines, and soon saw the distance between it and Renault grow. Besides the cheapening and non-updating of the line, beginner errors abounded. In Brazil, the Scénic was a solid middle class car, even higher middle class, and not the cheap and cheerful family transportation pod it was in Europe. As such, Brazilian dealers clamored for black and silver Scénics while the French continued offering it in purple, red and other colors the middle class rejected. The Clio, besides keeping the same interiors forever, never changed wheel cover designs or had new versions launched (tricks in which the traditional Brazilian Big Four – Fiat, GM, Volkswagen and Ford – are experts).

In the late 2000s, Renault re-made itself in Brazil. The Scénic was gone. The Kangoo was now only a commercial vehicle. The Clio soldiered on unmolested and seemingly only existed so Renault could keep a foot in the entry-level market. A solution was found though and it was the result of the deepening of the synergies and integration within the scope of the global Renault-Nissan Alliance.

Renault underwent the so-called “Dacia-lization” (Dacia being a Romanian company that Renault uses as its low-cost brand in Europe). The Logan, Sandero and eventually the Duster were launched. In spite of the insipid design, the cars used a Renault-Dacia version of a modern Nissan platform. The Logan family’s claim to fame and a space in the market was that it offered a lot of space for modest prices. Size-wise similar to Focus and Toyota Corolla type cars (sometimes even bigger, trunks tended to be larger), but priced similarly to smaller cars like Gol or Fiat Siena, they appealed to a more rational buyer. After a few years, with the launch of the Duster CUV, Renault was again encroaching on Ford and distancing itself from the Asian brands that were finally “acclimatizing” (by offering compact cars similar to market favorites) to Brazil and had been threatening Renault’s (by then traditional) fifth place in Brazilian sales rankings.

Nov-Ford-Ka-SEL-2015 (3)

As the 2000s became the 2010s, Renault was again under assault. Competition grew. Everybody copied their idea of a larger cars for more modest prices. Fiat launched a bigger Palio and a Grand Siena. Volkswagen do Brasil got into the compact sedan market again with its Voyage. Ford brought the new Fiesta and conjured up the highly competitive new Ka. GM came strong based off of its GM Korea know-how and re-invented themselves in Brazil, becoming the leader of in-car mobile electronics. Toyota got serious in Brazil and the Etios family has been gaining ground, horrible design notwithstanding, based on modern mechanics and a good ride. Hyundai’s HB20 has done the opposite: it has conquered image conscious consumers due to the success of it fluidic design language, in spite of the bad ride. All these companies and cars offered up new technologies and engines, bringing more fuel economy to buyers, extra gadgets and crept up on the Logan family’s cost benefit advantage.

Reacting, Renault has launched a re-designed Logan and Sandero. Though the new designs have been well-accepted and increased sales, this growth has been deemed insufficient. Both Hyundai and Toyota routinely sell more than Renault on a monthly basis and could soon take fifth place in overall sales. As such, Renault studied its South American operations and has cooked up a plan.

Renault Oroch Concept

Renault Oroch Concept

An “un-Dacia-lization” of sorts seems to be in place. Logan and Sandero production is being moved to Argentina. The company is investing heavily in their ancient Santa Isabela factory in that country. Duster production will be kept in Brazil and soon the Oroch pickup (based on the Duster and rumored to be a 1 ton pickup) will be launched. From what the press has been able to piece together, both Duster and Moroch will be produced off of the current platform and updates will be infrequent, following the age-old strategy of competing on price and, also, space. The Duster is larger than EcoSport and the recently launched Jeep Renegade, Honda HR-V and Peugeot 2008. The Moroch will dwarf the current Fiat Strada (new, larger version of which has been seen tooling around the factory), VW Saveiro and the old-as-the-hills, barely competitive Chevrolet Montana.

The Moroch however is an indication of the deepening of the CUV event horizon presciently seen by our recently departed Derek Kreindler. Renault is going all-CUV-in. The Renault Captur, a current Clio-based mini CUV is a foregone conclusion. Renault is not even hiding it anymore and it has been seen around the factory in Paraná and on highway tests. This lends credence to the thesis Renault is re-inventing itself. The new Brazilian Clio, the same again as the Euro Clio, should also appear soon, albeit placed in a category above the current Brazilian Clio’s status. Suppliers also say Renault is quoting prices for a sedan version of the Clio (non-existent in Europe) and indicative of the soon to come demise of its midsize sedan offering, the Fluence. Informed journalists in Brazil have stated that the Espace, Renault’s large (and former) minivan, which has turned into a sort of a CUV, is slated to be introduced in Brazil in 2016 as a locally-produced offering.

The current Brazilian Clio is also on its last days. Though reports are conflicting, either a version of Nissan’s own low-cost brand Datsun Go will be built here in Brazil, or a version of the concept recently shown in world Auto Shows by Nissan called the Sway (supposedly an early version of a substitute for the March/Micra line), could gain a Renault badge and come strong in the lower echelons of the Brazilian market.

Meanwhile, in Argentina, besides the heavy modernizing investments at the local plant and the responsibility of building the Logan family, current cars will remain in production. And very interestingly, the new Frontier/Navara pickup that will used by Mercedes Benz to offer its own global midsize pickup (compact PU for Americans) will also gain a Renault badge for sale, initially, all over Latin America. Internally called the Raptur, this will be Renault’s first incursion into the traditional midsize pickup market. It is an important step and will allow Renault to compete in an important market spanning the entirety of Latin America. Coming soon (reports say early 2016) you could soon take your pick and buy your midsize pickup in your preferred flavor – Nissan, Mercedes or Renault – as they will all be built side-by-side at the Argentinian factory.

The next few years will be very important for Renault in Latin America. It will keep and modernize entry-level cars. It will continue offering competitively priced compact cars that offer a bit more and are the bulk of the Brazilian market. It will make new tries, with new product, to gain a presence in upper middle-class garages by “Euro-pizing” its Brazilian production. It will sell CUVs for all pockets. Pickups, small and large will further broaden Renault’s Latin American presence.

If this will be enough to keep Toyota and Hyundai at bay remains to be seen. However, it seems if they will be offering cars, CUVs and trucks, the market wants. Sounds like a plan.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

44 Comments on “Dispatches do Brasil: Renault Re-Invents Itself in Latin America...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    What is the annual sales volume of the Brazilian market?

    I love these pieces, by the way.

    • 0 avatar

      First quarter this year was a total of around 650,000 cars, which is a 14% decline year-on-year. Last year’s total was 3,328,716 cars down from the 2012 all time high of 3.65 million. All numbers taken from TTAC’s own Matt Gasnier’s excellent bestsellingcarsblog com.

      Thanks for the kind words sportyaccordy!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Soon, the Clio lost its airbags”

    Here’s where a responsible government steps in and says “No, you will not intentionally cause more people potential harm by cutting safety from product.”

    Hopefully all buyers spoke with their wallets and chose something else. It sounds like Renault Brazil has had a history of being entirely reactive instead of proactive about changes.

    The back half of that new Ka up there just says so much Peugeot 308 to me.

    • 0 avatar

      Buyers did. They left it in the dust and it has not recovered. Eventually the government did react and Renault’s action may (or not) have been one of the spurs that led to legislation forcing makers to equip their cars with dual airbags and ABS. It was done gradually, over a few years, and led to the situation where in 2014 all cars (finally!) were equipped with those systems.

      Renault has indeed been reactive here, though of course Nissan increases the scope of the company here. Some years Renault-Nissan did outsell Ford. Now, according to what I have read, they are bothered that Toyota and Hyundai have crept up on them and are reacting. Nothing like a little competition to force you forward!

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Desperation is the driver of innovation!

      • 0 avatar
        mmmbacon

        Renault removed airbags from Clio’s standard equipment because dealerships were receiving negative feedback from customers. Brazilians were (and still are) very uneducated about automotive safety. It’s extremely rare to find a pre-2012 VW Gol, Fiat Palio or Ford Fiesta with the equipment.

        When I was living in Brazil, some of my relatives were sales personnel at some local dealerships. Dealerships would avoid cars with airbags or ABS like the plague – they just did not have any appeal with the average car buyer in Brazil.

        Some automakers attempted to make airbags and ABS popular in the 1990s, but there was too much rejection.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Oh and I meant to ask, they didn’t ever try and sell their famous Espace? I guess that’s either too big, too safe, or would just cost 39B Reals.

    • 0 avatar

      No, they never did Corey. I have seen a few over the years tooling around, but they must have been independently imported. An Espace here will surely cost over 100k reais. And yes, there is a market for that. See Honda CR-V and Fiat Freemont (Dodge Journey) prices.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Haha, you and your Luxurious Honda Pricing (TM) anger! I would gladly pay much more for a CRV than I ever would a Journey, if I had to choose.

        • 0 avatar

          Ha! Fair enough. But notice I placed a Fiat in the same Price Anger diatribe. Anyway, to me they are similar, but I’d take the Fiat/Dodge. The Freemont has a 2.4, the CR-V a 2.0. Many more gadgets, and a huge support network. My brother owns one. I like it better than the CR-V. More agile. Maybe the most recent Brazilian CR-Vs use the 2.4, I don’t really know. And I’m not really interested enough to check, ;)!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I would advise against that, because we’ve had the Journey here for several years and…

            You don’t see ones that are more than a couple years old before they start looking VERY tired. By contrast, it’s easy to go online and find a ten year old CRV which is still in perfect condition and has 175,000 miles on the original engine, etc.

            I can understand the massive dealer presence for Fiat vs. the Honda though. I don’t know about your availability of independent shops which will work on anything though?

            Doesn’t the Honda have a more upscale image than Fiat (known mostly for little cars?)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Journey looks tired on the lot new.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I was trying to be kind because Marcelo really likes Fiat!

          • 0 avatar

            Too late. He’s had it for 2 years now. He likes it a lot. I’m waiting for an opportunity to drive it again and I’ll do a piece on it. In this time only some suspension work, which is very common in Brazil because of the “pavement”.

            As to Honda vs. Fiat, Fiat has had some luck here selling bigger cars. Honda does have a reputation for being more reliable, but that is not that much of an issue for Fiat here. Here we have seen, and felt (in our own pockets), Fiat’s improving reliability over time. I think most would consider it good enough.

            I have a hard time seeing Honda as more upscale. Maybe some, but it seems Hyundai has won over those folks who value that sort of thing. Seems to me most Honda buyers here are well-mannered folk not really interested in showing off (though a Civic or CR-V are used for that here, but so is the Freemont, for God’s sake!).

            Cars like the CR-V and Freemont are not for every shop. They surely require some special tools not all small shops will invest in. I have seen independent shops claiming to specialize in this “import” brand or another and more “sophisticated” systems like auto trans (!), however, as evidenced by my own brother’s travails with his other car (a Ford Fusion), this is still an iffy proposition. That car has not been adequately fixed for years and lives in the shop. And this is in a metropolitan area of 5 million people. I can’t imagine having cars like these out in the country.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I understand why people buy the Journey though. So cheap!

            I would bet that cars like the Explorer, Acadia, Pilot, and Highlander are not popular in Brazil. Do they even sell them?

          • 0 avatar

            bball, Corey, the relative rarity of the thing here keeps it looking fresh.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m not sure those fancy auto transmissions will catch on! Those independent shops have the right idea.

            Hyundai for show-offs and display, now I’ve heard it all!

          • 0 avatar

            Explorer yes, for a while back in the 90s. I drove one as a friend had it. The others not. No Honda trucks for us. GM only has the S10 (Colorado-related here) and leads that segment. Toyota only the Hilux which might (or not) be distantly related to the Highlander. The RAV4 is sold here though. Ill looking thing. Ford now has the Edge in that category. And weirdly enough I have seen 3 Lincoln Navigators over time and 1 LS back in the day, but no Escalade or other Cadillacs. Except for the 50s Eldorados and others at car shows, but never on the street.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Unfortunately for everyone involved, the Highlander is not related at all to the Hilux. The Highlander is on the FWD Camry platform, and is thoroughly mushy and car based.

            The Hilux is their global RWD truck (except USA). Instead of the Hilux we have the Tacoma, which is I’m sure related tangentially.

            They don’t currently have anything else small-truckish here except for the 4Runner, which is either Tacoma or Hilux based (I think).

            Big trucks include the Tundra, Land Cruiser, and the Sequoia which is Tundra based.

            Edit: I think we USED to get the Hilux in the form of the T100 for a short while. Someone will have to get more specific though, Al from OZ or PCH perhaps.

          • 0 avatar

            So the Highlander is a CUV. Hummm. It looks so SUV-ish. Oh well. Espace competitor then, lol.

          • 0 avatar
            mmmbacon

            Corey, 4Runner was based on the Hilux SW4 (they shared the same basic design in the 1990s) but the current model is based on the FJ Cruiser/Land Cruiser Prado.

            Marcelo, Renault Espace is a large MPV… It’s more related to a Toyota Sienna or Dodge Grand Caravan than CR-V or Journey.

            The Espace was sold in Argentina for some time. For some reason, los hermanos always had some very interesting imports that were not available in Brazil. Reverse economies of scale?

    • 0 avatar
      mmmbacon

      Too big. Citroen and Peugeot sold the C8/807, but these cars had a very restricted niche. They were the equivalent of VW Phaeton for the Brazilian dealerships: imported so dealerships in major cities could have some unique/upscale models in the showroom. Sometimes it would take up to three years to sell them.

      Renault did import the Laguna: sales were low in the 1990s, and it became too expensive to import after the dollar went up in early 2000s.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    KAAAAAAAAA!

    • 0 avatar

      LOL! I knew you’d like that!

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It looks like it needs bigger tires or something. I’d like to drive a Ka ST though. Too bad they won’t build one.

        • 0 avatar

          Yes, like I said in the other thread, the Ka is the only modern car I’d say needs bigger wheels. That was done to keep tyre replacing costs down I’m sure as the Ka is destined for developing countries, though some rumors insist they could try it in Europe, maybe as early as spring (in the Northern hemisphere) next year in countries with a strong Ka tradition like the UK.

          The Ka has a long tradition of “sports” version and used the XR moniker a couple of times. With VW putting a turbo on the up! and beating the Ka in the hp wars (not yet available, but coming soon according to the press), I wouldn’t bet against it. They have had cars with 1.0 engines fitted with compressors in the past here. And, the Fiesta already has the 1.0 turbo. Let’s see, could get interesting!

          • 0 avatar
            Felis Concolor

            Judging from my own experience test driving Ford’s 1.0 3-pot turbomotor, you’re going to love it – and putting the full power version in a sports version of the Ka would instandly vault it ahead of VW’s up! subcompact in the horsepower wars. I have read about 3 factory power tunes for the 1.0 litre; it’s the 125 hp version you want to play with.

            As I’ve said in earlier threads, I can’t help but engage the fuel cut-off whenever I test drive one; its power delivery is so much fun, I don’t realize I’m close to the shift point until the computer tells me to grab a higher gear.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The 1.0T motor is sweet. I agree.

          • 0 avatar

            Sounds like too much fun! Seems like the up! will get around 100 hp, so Ford’s 3 easily beats it. Can’t wait to try it (up!) or them (if Ford does it for the Ka).

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Hey Marcelo!
    Another interesting piece of Brasilian auto history. Your market is relatively large and a little inconsistent.

    I’m not surprised by the past behaviour of the auto makers in Brasil. The article I read a year or so ago by the WHO indicates that many developing markets require more rigid regulatory controls, as should of been the case with Renault.

    What’s you view on the Clio? I’m going to NA and the EU in June and have booked a Clio in France. I’ll need and want a small car to dart in and out of the villages and to find parking easier. I hope it’s a diesel.

    It’s a pity we don’t anyone in our Australian market writing article like you do.

    • 0 avatar

      Hey Big Al! Thanks for reading.

      Yes the inconsistencies have to do with fluctuations in currency values. When the real appreciates some more modern systems find their way into the cars and when it depreciates, most makes cut them, but the smart ones keep them, “nationalize” suppliers and gain a competitive advantage in the market. Eventually, all others start using those systems again. With the current down trend in the market noted in a comment above, it’ll be interesting to see if and who will resist the urge to cut equipment as Brazilian cars have become more equipped over time.

      The same can be said of safety as per the WHO article you mention. All recent Brazilian launches have gotten 4 and 5 star ratings from Latin NCap, while cars with time on the market usually got 3 or even 2. From what I read and hear, everyone has invested to get a better classification over the last 2 or 3 years and airbags and ABS are now mandatory, so it stands to reason there won’t be a massive backslide in this area. Also to be seen.

      The Brazilian Clio as noted in the article is massively different from the current Euro one (in spite of a simpler Clio, related but not exactly the same as the Brazilian one, still being on sale until very recently in Europe – don’t know if it’s still the case). The Brazilian Clio is a very small car, although internal space is surprising. It has been cheapened out over the years, but it still is a pleasant car to drive. I have not driven the current Euro Clio, but from everything I’ve read it is too a nice drive, though bigger and more isolated. So, I can’t say really.

      As to writing from Australia, you seem to like to write. Maybe you’ll do some pieces for us? I’d read, :).

      • 0 avatar
        cafe

        Renault France stopped selling the Clio Campus (an entry level Clio II “created” when the Clio III was introduced) at the end of 2012. It looks like the brazilian Clio II got a further restyling.

        The Clio Collection (an entry level Clio III born in 2012 when the Clio IV was introduced) died last year.

        The only Clio currently sold in France is he 4th generation (5-door hatchback & wagon).

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart (or, maybe my head) for Renault. I owned a ’61 Dauphine Gordini years ago – it was my “4-4-2” with 4 spd on the floor, 4 cylinders and 2 driving wheels. It was quirky no doubt but fairly well screwed together and cost only $2.40 to fill up when empty at $0.30/gallon. And I was getting 38 mpg combined city/highway. Wouldn’t go over 65 mph; there was a limit to 1100 cc’s. But the engineering or lack thereof was frightening. A leather strap was used as the lower control limit on the swing-type drive axles; the radiator fill cap, gas cap and engine oil caps were all in close proximity to each other causing one service station attendant to get a face full of hot coolant when attempting to fill up the gas tank.

  • avatar
    Nico

    I was going to comment on how the name “Moroch” will probably get them a lawsuit from VW and their Amarok pickup, but it looks like that was just a typo. Oroch is not as bad.

    As someone who grew up in south america in the 90s, it’s sad to see the current Renault lineup there these days. I remember getting the exact same cars that Europe would get. I even did my driving test in a french Twingo! Similar story with Fiat, though they do offer the 500. And Peugeot seems to have the same nameplates but the ones on south america are older versions.

    • 0 avatar
      Felis Concolor

      I’m wondering if the name is intended to evoke parallels with the Auroch, a now extinct ancestor of modern cattle.

    • 0 avatar

      Hey Nico, yeah I messed up. Somehow I got it in my head the Oroch should’ve been called Moroch and now I can’t shake it! What is an Oroch anyway??

      As to “local” cars I don’t see a problem if done right, i.e., using the best each has to offer. My problem with the Gol was that, how could that survive so long and last so long being what it was? After G5 they finally got it right. And though exported worldwide, it is still very much a Brazilian car directed at other emerging markets. Which doesn’t make it bad, just different.

      As to Renault, the “Dacia” line is fine. What they do need is better engines. The 1.0 16v is still acceptable, but the 1.6 8v should be dead. For Fiat, much the same. Unless they really develop it, the FIRE engines are the main letdown. Short on power comparing to the competition and thirsty in comparison (if you know how to work it, it will run with the others but most don’t know/care), it is still smooth. Seems like the Multiairs are (finally) coming. Peugeot is slowly improving. Outside the 207 line (really a 206 with worse design), the 208 is fine as are the bigger cars. They do need work on the perception/reliability side.

      However, the biggest letdown for Renault is the Clio. Maybe the new Twingo is too expensive for us. But the old Clio has lived out its welcome (and will apparently be substituted by a Nissan as per the article). The engine is still good, but it is small in comparisons to most other makes and the interior is the same since the 90s. If it undercut the competition by a wider margin in price, it could develop a sort of Uno Mille career. As is, it makes no sense.

      The Ka I would point to as an example of a local car done right.

      • 0 avatar
        ccode81

        I don’t know it is any coincidence, but Orochi is an acient japanese term for big snakes. Mitsuoka using the name for small production sort of supercar with Lexus
        RX330 engine.

  • avatar

    nice article, Marcelo. but I can’t see much of a “re-Renaultization” of their lineup here. sure, CUVs and pick-up trucks sell like hot cakes in Brazil and it makes sense for Renault to build them in all flavors they can.

    but, apart from this and the current success of their Dacia offerings, I just don’t see any initiatives. some of their products (the Twingo, the Mégane SW and a spiced Clio) could gather some sales, as there is not much competition for these niches. and, aside from that, Renault-Nissan should have something here to fill in the recent demise of the Mitsubishi TR4: a tough, compact SUV with real off-road skills.

    • 0 avatar

      Hey Palandi,

      These plans have been cooking for a while. The Captur was here throughout 2014, testing, adapting, being tropicalized. It’s basically ready and now the green light has been shown (it seems).

      The consolidation of the plans was done in February this year. A map titled “A Global Line Up, Renewal and Expansion” showing new plans and expansions was leaked and even shown on-line by blogs. For our region clearly shown were:
      – A-entry vehicles for emerging countries
      – C & D offer complete renewal, (New Espace, C-MPV, D-sedan, C-hatch)
      – Full crossovers line up for all our markets (B-crossover, C-crossover,D-crossover)
      – LCV international roll out (Pick-up 0,5T, Pick-up 1T)

      Remember, Carlos Goshn was here for a almost a full week earlier this year. Argentina was making noises about Mercosur (fair game, just like we did with Mexico). So the investment in Argentina was made, part of Logan and Sandero production was moved. The news is that now all Logan production will go to Argentina making up a lot of place in Paraná. Remembering the plans calls for a doubling of sales in 6 years, that is why, and talking to people, we can say the Captur is here, the Clio too as it underpins the Captur. Where it gets tricky and we can’t say for sure and Renault does not confirm is exactly what is what.

      New A – entry? Brazlian Clio dead, new possibly Nissa, possibly Datsun, possibly even a shortened Sandero.

      C and D complete renewal. What is the D sedan? A new Mégane (doubt it)? A stretched Clio sedan is a better bet. The new Espace is the only one named and the C-MPV is possibly a Clio minivan or Scénic, though I doubt it.

      B-CUV is the Duster, C-CUV is Captur, D-CUV would be the Koleos or maybe even Kadjar

      LCVs are Oroch and Raptur.

      Remember, the plan calls for a doubling of sales. Ambitious yes, and to do that new A car and CUVs and pickups are a way to go. The Logan family will remain on sale.

  • avatar
    Magnusmaster

    I hope Renault brings the current Clio here, but I don’t see it. Maybe they will just import it in small quantities and with a ridiculous price tag. They will keep focusing on the Dacia and Datsun lines with only a handful of actual Renault models. They really need to up their game though, most of their models are either meh or utterly trash.

    BTW, I’m can’t login on this site from my computer. I’m using Firefox.

  • avatar
    jimbob457

    Fine article. We want and need more of them.

    Beware, though. In English, bad puns (is there any other kind) and certain cultural cross references are punishable by public flogging, or at least a major groan.

    “The Fiat Doblò passenger and commercial versions plus the Uno-based Fiat Fiorino conspired to keep the Kangoo down.”

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • bullnuke: I believe that I wrote “at the current time” regarding general population vehicles. Granted...
  • mcs: “A wiser use of battery electric at the current time than general population vehicles needing to operate...
  • brn: Ol Shel, Please inject your political opinion into every topic. Thank you.
  • Old_WRX: Judging by all the the todo in the “news” lately the next CV shutdown will be coming to a state...
  • Ol Shel: Companies shouldn’t be allowed to tell the public that they’re taking steps that please most...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber