NAIAS 2015: Jaguar Land Rover Bringing Diesel Power To US Market

naias 2015 jaguar land rover bringing diesel power to us market

Want a diesel in your Land Rover or Jaguar XE, yet live in the United States? Jaguar Land Rover has heard you loud and clear.

Land Rover is bringing over its Td6 3-liter turbodiesel V6 from Europe into the U.S. market this year, delivering 254 horsepower, 440 lb-ft of torque, and a combined 25 mpg to those who desire to burn oil in their Land Rover or Land Rover Sport. Diesel-powered versions of the SUVs will be on display at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show during press days.

Meanwhile, AutoGuide says JLR will install diesels in all future Land Rover and Jaguar models save one: The F-Type. The first Jaguar diesel will be the XE, whose mill a 2-liter four-pot the automaker is confident will deliver 40 mpg on the highway.

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  • Chocolatedeath Chocolatedeath on Jan 12, 2015

    Would love that engine in my CX9 mated to a 10 speed. Combined with Mazdas Skyy Acive I bet I could get 30 plus combined easy.

  • Pch101 Pch101 on Jan 12, 2015

    JLR has at least 24,258,426 reasons for doing this. That would happen to be the number of dollars that JLR paid in CAFE fines since December 2013. And they haven't yet paid their fines for MY 2013 and 2014, which one would presume will be even higher than before. I wonder if some of the diesel fans who whine incessantly about CAFE will see the irony of this. (Yes, I doubt that they will, too.)

  • Kyree Kyree on Jan 12, 2015

    From what I've read, the Td6 engine has every bit of the refinement that one would expect from a luxury car. Hopefully, the pricing for the diesel resides somewhere between the base gas-powered 3.0-liter supercharged V6 and the 5.0-liter naturally-aspirated V8, but it might end up being between the 5.0-liter and the supercharged 5.0-liter...

  • Corey Lewis Corey Lewis on Jan 12, 2015

    My first thought was, "Bout damn time." But then I realized in this class, diesel and mpg is not important to Americans. So meh.

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