By on January 12, 2015

2016-Chevrolet-Volt-4

Fuzzy photos from the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show are one thing, official photos of the 2016 Chevrolet Volt are definitely another [Live photos now available – CA].

The second-gen five-passenger PHEV gets its motivation from a 1.5-liter DOHC I4 paired up with two electric motors that are 12 percent more efficient and 100 pounds lighter than the first-gen’s single motor unit. Electrical power comes from a new 18.4 kWh battery pack composed of 192 cells — 96 less than the previous pack — with weight reduced by 21 pounds. Zero to 30 is achieved in 2.6 seconds, while nought to 60 arrives in 8.4 seconds.

Charging can now be set to exclusively occur at home via GPS, where owners can arrange 120V charging levels (either eight amps or 12), have charging occur immediately or at another time, and set a departure time for every day of the week. The settings only need to be entered once, and the Volt will default to those settings upon arrival at the home garage, which should take 13 hours at 12 amps; 240V charging reduces the time to 4.5 hours.

Range is 50 miles on electric-only driving, 420 miles when the 1.5-liter is in play. Fuel economy is 41 mpg, jumping to 102 mpg-e with the electric motors.

Other features include: Chevrolet MyLink; rearview camera; increased use of high-strength steel throughout the body; on-demand energy rengeneration; illuminated charging port; and a redesigned portable 120V cord.

The 2016 Volt is set to arrive in showrooms during H2 2015.

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109 Comments on “NAIAS 2015: A Clearer View For The 2016 Chevrolet Volt...”


  • avatar
    kovakp

    A melting Civic with beaks.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      You took the words out out of my mouth, I thought the new Volt was supposed to be more “Corvette-like”.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnnyFirebird

      It’s called a CSX!

    • 0 avatar
      Brett Woods

      So true. I see a subtle blend of civic, corolla, and elantra. I don’t know if the designers are proud of this coachwork. What is that giant fin splitting passengers like a daggerboard in a sofa? Did they not look at any of the battery design patents offered openly by Tesla?

      GM are one paradigm shift away from extinction with their current vehicle fleet I worry. Thankfully they are improving this one and owners seem to love it. It’s one of those cars that’s better than it looks I’ve heard. Econobox look. Luxury stealth fighter ride. I want to try one.

  • avatar
    Instant_Karma

    Who put that Acura beak on a 200?

  • avatar
    Maxb49

    Very nice.

  • avatar

    I thought it was a Corvette at first. Just kidding.
    http://www.autoblog.com/2014/12/20/next-gen-chevy-volt-corvette-looks-adjustable-regen-levels/

  • avatar
    wmba

    It’s an ILX four door coop in Electric Blue.

  • avatar
    Varezhka

    Hyundai Elantra meets Honda Civic, with Acura beak for a good measure… a lot more coherent than the current Volt though.

    The dash actually looks usable this time, too.

    Overall, it seems like a nice evolutionary update that the car really needed.

  • avatar
    Toy Maker

    I googled ” Acura CSX blue ” (it’s a Canadian specialty)…. and bam there it is.

  • avatar
    clivesl

    Nice, but I’m waiting for the ELR refresh.

  • avatar
    bts

    It really says something when every comment so far only mentions the styling and fails to see the major efficiency and performance gain, and the addition of a 5th seat, which was the one factor holding back the first gen Volt. The Best and Brightest? More like the Superficial and Simple.

    • 0 avatar
      kovakp

      “the Superficial and Simple.”

      Well, we’re all pretty much accomplished adults long accustomed to time management and prioritizing so when we see a blobby little car that couldn’t begin to serve any useful purpose for our families we toss it a one-liner and move on.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        @kovakp – Time management? Sure because making some snarky, pointless comment like yours is such a good use of time. And look at that eye blinder in your avatar. You ripping on the looks/styling of the new Volt is like a leper giving me a hard time because I got sunburned!…..LOL

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      “and the addition of a 5th seat, which was the one factor holding back the first gen Volt.”

      “The one factor?” Let’s see, tiny cargo area, premium fuel requirement, $41K MSRP (cut to $35K – still too much), crappy RE fuel economy…

      Now, it looks like this car has fixed most of that but until we see the price (no mention of price, did you notice that?), there’s no knowing how it will do in the dealerships.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        The cargo space in the first Volt wasn’t at all bad, and given it’s a compact anyway, I don’t think the lack of a middle seat was really “holding it back” since you can’t really fit anything in the middle seat and very few people do.

        And let’s be honest, the R/E fuel economy was a non-issue that only mattered to people who wanted another reason not to buy a car they weren’t going to buy anyway.

        The Volt was held back only by it’s price. And the Prius’ price, which is about half as much for 80% of the benefit.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      “major efficiency and performance gain”. Maybe I’m missing something, but these gains seem modest at best. From all appearances, Chevy spent more energy on appearances of the car rather than the internals. I take it you are a fan of this car?

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Seriously have you read anything about the 2nd Gen Volt at all? The internals are pretty much all new and anything but a carryover from the current car.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          People gonna hate. Everything about 2nd gen Volt is better. The extra EV range and fifth seat are essential to me. I will look at it whenever I decide to replace my C-Max.

          • 0 avatar
            iMatt

            But people may think you’re driving an Acura! or a Hyundai or a Kia or a Mazda or a Dodge or a Ford (all of which came from the comments section as of now).

            Have you no self respect, man?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I drive a blue-green hybrid MPV that is shaped like a suppository. I also got rid of a GTI to buy that vehicle. If I don’t feel shame now, I don’t think the Volt would push me over the edge.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        “major efficiency and performance gain”: the more precise phrasing is “incremental efficiency and performance gain”. Most of the gains are in the single digits, except of course the number of seats which is up by 25%. The number of seats that adults will willingly use stays at 4.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      When people want to hate a car, these guys are the best at finding a way.

      In before somebody comments on the inert “deal-breaker, ruoh my god!” of it having to still require many more dimes of premium fuel.

      But really I love the car, and the only thing that sucks about this new one is the medley of C-segment design language, sprinkled with Acura. Perhaps if we had the Ampera face on the last model, it wouldn’t be as bad. It’s styling is blatantly unoriginal. I also HATE that upswept glasswork and C-pillar Malibuish treatment. But…that brown interior looks so good.

      Crab prediction:ELR refresh will get wireless inductive charging.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      Kicking Tires has pictures of the nominally 3 person back seat. Mind the thigh gap.

      https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7548/16237775036_72a97bf83c_b.jpg

      https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7510/15641277564_777a5e8266.jpg

      Full gallery: http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2015/01/2016-chevrolet-volt-up-close-1.html

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “fails to see the major efficiency and performance gain, and the addition of a 5th seat”

      What good is a fifth seat when your new EV looks like a cheap Civic clone?

    • 0 avatar

      We are mocking the car because CHEVY made a big deal about the styling, referencing the Corvette, in press releases. At least it’s not as bad as when they had the prototype for the 1st gen Volt looking like a 4 door Camaro. I understand that to get a low drag coefficient, you need to have the car shaped a certain way. That’s fine. But Chevy shouldn’t try to mislead folks to generate buzz.

      If the interior dimensions are anything like those of the Cruze, you wouldn’t want to put a third person back there. I understand that it may be useful “in a pinch”.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        “At least it’s not as bad as when they had the prototype for the 1st gen Volt looking like a 4 door Camaro. I understand that to get a low drag coefficient, you need to have the car shaped a certain way. That’s fine. But Chevy shouldn’t try to mislead folks to generate buzz.”

        The concept first-generation Volt would have been more aerodynamic if driven backwards.

        That said, it was a concept, and GM concepts of that era were a far cry from the reality of production–if they made production at all. By that metric, this is a nice change.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      While those are improvements, they’re hardly major. I didn’t buy a Volt before because to me it’s still an over-engineered piece of junk lacking almost everything to make it a truly efficient car. The Volt would be a far better car as a full EV with 150 miles of range and a faster charging rate (Really? 4.5 hours for a mere 50 miles? Even Nissan does better than that!)

      I’ll admit the looks of the Volt have improved–but looks alone won’t sell me an EV or EREV. The Bolt is a far more effective vehicle for the same (approximate) money.

  • avatar
    JD321

    Superficial and Simple is the Best and Brightest…Have you been to other car sites? This one is more “adult” than most.

    Looks like a Kia Forte went on an unchaperoned date with an Acura slut.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    My initial reaction is it is too round /bulbous on the outside. But I am an angles kinda guy. This looks a bit too soft. I actually really like the look of the current volt.

    Interior and rest of the package sounds very good IMHO. Cost is of course also important.

    I’d consider this car I think.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    My initial reaction is it is too round /bulbous on the outside. But I am an angles kinda guy. This looks a bit too soft and low cost. I actually really like the look of the current volt.

    Interior and rest of the package sounds very good to great IMHO. Cost is of course also important.

    I’d consider this car I think.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    My initial reaction is it is too round /bulbous on the outside. But I am an angles kinda guy. This looks a bit too soft. I actually really like the look of the current volt.

    Interior and rest of the package sounds very good to excellent IMHO. Cost is of course also important.

    I’d consider this car I think.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    My initial reaction is it is too round /bulbous on the outside. But I am an angles kinda guy. This looks a bit too soft… Kinda cheap looking. I actually really like the look of the current volt.

    Interior and rest of the package sounds very good IMHO. Cost is of course also important.

    I’d consider this car I think.

  • avatar
    shaker

    First thing I asked myself is “Did they keep the HATCH?”

    By the looks of the rear photo, they *did*!

    And, better in several meaningful ways.

    This is back on my “aspirational” vehicle list – now…

    How many shekels?

  • avatar
    mcs

    Okay, still no mention of a decent on-board charger. Most 240 volt chargers are capable of charging the new Volt in about 2.8 hours instead of 4.5 hours if they weren’t limited by that crappy 3.6kw on-board unit. This is GM being cheap. Imagine if they discovered that could produce ICE cars cheaper by using a narrower fuel filler neck even though owners could only fuel the car at half the rate the pump was capable of. It’s the same thing. The current Leaf has an optional 6.6kw on-board charger. GM needs to do the same thing. Increasing the charge time by over an hour and a half so they can save a couple of hundred dollars is absurd and typical GM.

    My home 240 volt charger is 14.4kw. It’s capable if charging a battery the size of the new Volts in about an hour and a half.

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      I think most of the people buying the Volt will easily work around the limitations of the charger – though, you’re correct that they could have offered it as an option.

      Still, you have to admit that there might not even be physical space for a bigger charger (which would require extra cooling); there’s a heck of a lot of stuff packed in that car, and now, a 5th seat! To many potential buyers, that’s more important than a faster charger.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        >> Still, you have to admit that there might not even be physical space for a bigger charger (which would require extra cooling

        My 6.6 kw isn’t that much larger than a 3.3 kw and that includes any increase cooling and I’ve got fast DC charging as well.

        I really suspect they will offer the larger 6.6 kw or larger as an option and I’m probably jumping the gun complaining about the lack of one.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Fair point, but then you can say typical cost cutting Nissan for not providing battery cooling. Unlike GM, which did spend the extra money so battery performance in say AZ is not compromised. All companies make compromises.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        >> Fair point, but then you can say typical cost cutting Nissan for not providing battery cooling.

        No, Nissan did provide battery cooling – and there are potential engineering benefits to air cooling. The 3.6 kw charger is a nickel-and-dime kind of cost cut and provides no engineering benefit over a 6.6 kw charger.

        However, I’m probably being a bit premature in complaining because there is still a possibility that it could be an option – which is okay.

        • 0 avatar
          iMatt

          How many people do you figure will deplete the 50 mile range and then want to wait around even for a two hour charge? Would it not make more sense just to use the available on board range extender at this point?? You know, the car’s biggest feature?

          I’m not an engineer and have never been too fond of GM but even I have some faith that the engineers who designed this car made the best possible compromises between usability, durabilty and cost.

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            +1. I can’t think there are all that many people who are going to drive 50 miles, stop and charge for a relatively short period of time, and then drive another 30 or 40 miles.

            When I had my charging station installed, I was trying to figure out which one to get. I finally settled on a 4.8 kW one. It adds 16 miles of range per hour of charge, so in the 8 hour overnight charge period I could add 120 miles of range. There’s no time where I would drive more than 120 local miles in a day, so 4.8 kW is more than enough.

          • 0 avatar
            colin42

            For the past 9 months, every 2-4 weeks I’ve driven 60 miles for my son’s medical appointment, plugged in at a free charger and 1.5 hours later driven 60 miles home. getting 30 miles of recharge vs 15 can make a large difference the my total gas use / cost per mile

            Or all the times I haven’t plugged into the paid charging station because gas would have to be above $8/ gal due to the EV charger hourly rate and the Volt’s 3.3 kWh charger.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      If I had a Volt, the amount of extra gas I’d end up burning as a result of having a 4.5 hour charge time rather than a 2.8 hour charge time almost certainly wouldn’t pay for the difference in charger cost over the life of the car. Maybe not so much “cheap” as “engineered with actual user needs in mind.”

    • 0 avatar
      clivesl

      I agree with the consensus, why put a faster more expensive charger on a car that will almost always be plugged in overnight? When would the Volt ever need a faster charge?

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        You want an extreme example, or a fairly common one?

        How about… Car is used for commuting. Let’s be nice and say the commute is about 15 miles one way (where I live the average commute is longer). Assuming there is no readily available charging post at the workplace, the driver has to drive back home in the evening on what’s left of the charge. If he’s lucky, he’s got about 5 to 8 miles remaining on the battery. However, it’s a bowling night and the bowling alley is 10 miles away and he’s only got about an hour to get ready before heading out to bowl. With the normal charger, one hour MIGHT give him 10 miles–but there’s a good chance it wouldn’t give him enough to get back without starting the ICE and he’s really trying to avoid that (I’ve heard from some that they only keep one or two gallons of gas in the tank anyway). On the other hand, if he’d had a faster charger, he might have had 20 or more miles added to the battery while he was home and been able to make the round trip on battery alone. (You could substitute softball/soccer/football, etc in place of bowling there.)

        The point is that an EV is an EV. The Volt has been given the benefit of a gasoline engine to extend its range in an emergency, but the very simple fact is that most commenters on these boards focus on the fact that it has that ‘available’ engine rather than the savings possible by simply avoiding gas stations. They claim that today’s EVs are too limiting yet with the exception of the Volt and the new Audi A7 hybrid EV, the other EVs can ALL handle that example without requiring a recharge OR starting the backup engine.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        GM has been collecting data over the last 4 years on how its customers are using/charging their Volts. What that data said is the reason they didn’t bother putting in a more expensive/faster charger. It’s that simple.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          It’s not their current customers they should be polling if they want to entice more buyers, it’s the customers who AREN’T buying they should be asking. I’ll wager the vast majority of them are saying electric-only range is far too short.

          I’ll grant the ’16 model has improved range and a bigger engine, but it’s still an ICEV pretending to be an EV.

  • avatar

    The window arrangement in the C-pillar area is very reminiscent of the 2009-2013 Mazda6. But I like the new design a lot better than I thought I would, and it seems to now be much more useful as a family/traditional car.

    • 0 avatar
      This Is Dawg

      I like that they cleaned up all that black-but-not-a-window slop along the sides, and the front end of that trim looks a little better, although I still don’t get the point of it. The back looks better too, though a bit ricey, but what is with the Acura grille? Is the 3rd gen going to ape the lexus predator face?

  • avatar
    Acd

    Looks like a Dodge Dart with an Acura grill. Overall a much cleaner look than the 1st generation Volt.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I like the appearance better than the current model which I think is “awkward” and cluttered at best. I don’t like the “going down hill” attitude of this model however. Still, I think this 2016 has an overall improved appearance.

    Disappointed to hear that the all “e” driving range is only 50 miles; not much improved over the current model.

  • avatar
    kovakp

    That front clip looks like it was inspired by multi-blade razors.

    They’re just testing the waters now but wait till the blade wars take off.. a whole new Audi Quattro.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I’ve long ridiculed the Volt for being over engineered, over hyped, and over priced, but this does seem to be a nice improvement. Do I read that correct though, 41mpg combined? Seems very average. I get that there is an electric mode, although I expected greater range.

    Not sure about the Acura-esque front end and not a fan at all of all the piano black plastic on the back.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      The 41mpg is running on the range extending engine alone. This is a pretty nice improvement from IIRC 34mpg, with a new bigger engine no less.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I love it when people call the Volt over engineered. It could never be that it’s well built or well engineered. That’s what we’d say if it was a foreign car. This is a GM car, so it’s over engineered.

        With a Volt the MPG isn’t as important as it is with a Prius which uses its gas engine constantly. The difference in yearly gas usage between 41 and 50 MPG isn’t worth talking about. On the road during long trips(which is where you’ll use the gas engine most) current Volt owners get low to mid 40’s so I would expect the Gen 2 Volt to get mid to high 40’s.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    First thing I thought when I saw it (front) was Dart/200. But the rear is most certainly Civic (bit of Focus too).

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    Seems to me that a 25% increase in electric-only range isn’t insignificant (do I remember correctly that the range used to be 40 miles and is now up to 50?).

    I realize that 50 miles in EV mode doesn’t go after a Tesla. But the Tesla can’t keep driving without a lengthy recharge and this one can. It also seems to me that for a large majority of drivers who commute a regular route, this is more than adequate to run in only electric propulsion almost every day.

    I suspect that GM has a lot of information from current drivers that bears this out. For me this would would great, but so would a Leaf… just not as my only car as I do have to drive further every couple of weeks. The Volt, on the other hand, could satisfy all of my needs and rarely use gas.

    The exterior styling looks ok but the interior looks like a really big improvement to me. I never liked the idea of the touch-sensitive controls though it is a shame they lost the cool spaceship-style shift lever for something that looks to have come from a Cruze.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      With a PHEV, you need enough battery for your typical daily driving and no more, because you have an engine. I think the 50 miles is probably more than enough for 90 percent of all drivers.

      As long as you have an engine, you might as well use it for highway travel. The engine is fairly efficient at highway speeds, and it takes a ton of batteries to get decent highway range. I can’t think there are that many private owners who drive more than 50 non-highway miles per day.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Very nice and that interior rocks. I think GM really hit it out of the park w/2nd Gen Volt.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Sure it looks like a Honda Civic/what a good looking Acura should be. It also retains a lot of Volt styling cues AND that rear end hatch is the best I have seen on a Chevy in quite some time. Haters going to hate.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Heaven help me, I really like it.

    This could – could – become my first GM car ever.

    I was an ardent critic of the Volt 1.0 during its development, partly because of GM’s financial predicament at the time. After getting a Leaf, I’ve changed my tune quite a bit. But I still poke fun at Volt owners whose goal is to minimize gasoline usage, even though I understand that too. And the Volt 1.0 interior is way too small for me, nor do I like the dashboard.

    But this car is a vast improvement in every way.

    Dear Nissan: My Leaf 1.0 is nice. If you don’t soon offer some details on Leaf 2.0, you’ll lose me as a customer for a while, because I’ll move on to something else after my lease is up this year. Even a Jeep Renegade is an option.

    Edit: I may have to rethink my praise. AB has the specs and dimensions – it’s way too small inside. The back seat is only suitable for small children in terms of legroom and headroom. Calling it a ‘5-passenger’ car is really a stretch.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      This car actually has less rear headroom than the current Volt.

      Basically, the interior volume is the same as today’s tiny car, but now they call it a 5-passenger. Guess the joke’s on us.

      It’s even smaller than a Nissan Versa.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Manufacturers are quite inconsistent in their use of interior dimensions. Let’s wait and see some photos of the rear seat (I haven’t seen one yet).

  • avatar
    Zackman

    A beautiful car. I want one. The only design issue I see is the black plastic triangle of death – lifted from a Mazda 6. Otherwise, I really like the refresh.

    50 miles on a charge? That may realistically almost get me to work and use gas on the way home, where it will charge until morning when I leave.

    However, in 2 years my awful commute will be moot, for I will be retiring then.

    Still, I want one!

  • avatar
    Steinweg

    I’ve admired the Gen 1 Volt–but bought a 2013 Prius because an extra $12,000 (Canadian) didn’t justify the Volt to me. Also, was not a fan of the four-seat layout or the touch-capacitive controls. But styling wise, Gen 1 Volt was fine by me.

    Gen 2 Volt has the glasshouse of a Kia Forte with a ridiculous rake angle. This makes cars hard to back-up in my opinion. I like the more conventional controls and seating but… I dunno, there’s nothing too special about the cabin. You could be in any rental car. WTF is with all those buttons on the steering wheel also. Cripes.

    But if the price drops $10,000, and it’s still a quieter and more comfortable car than the Prius, it will likely replace the 2008 Accord in my garage. It’s got enough electric range for the urban driving I do.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I LOVE the new interior.

    I hate what it is wrapped in. Put me in the disappointed column – I was really hoping for something different – closer to a CUV or a Prius-V style roofline to make it more functional.

    I get 2.0 is bigger and can now seat five, but I guess I’m at the point of my life that my sedan of preference is RWD, V8 and a blast to drive and my runabout needs to be more of a CUV.

  • avatar
    meefer

    As a Gen1 Volt owner, I’m glad they made the Gen2 with more normal car touches like the shifter. Given my current commute, the increase in electric range is irrelevant, so I won’t be upgrading immediately, especially with the Model III/Bolt/Elio.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Straight up honda styling rip offs up in in here. Way to ruin the car…should have simply evolved the gen 1 themes and kept the gen 1 roof line.

  • avatar

    I like it!

  • avatar
    carguy

    It definitely has an Acura/Civic thing going on but I like the overall design and the incremental improvements keep it competitive.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The interior is a HUGE upgrade. Overall, I like the design. Not very “Corvette” – like (spin is spin), but the car looks good.

  • avatar
    omer333

    At the end of the day, it does look like an actual car an actual person would want to drive.

    Y’know, the actual person with an actual job, actual bills, actual kids, actual life. Someone that just wants a car that works and won’t fall apart on the way to the actual school that the actual kids go to, or the actual job that will actually fire the actual person if they are actually late. Again.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    It looks and sounds (on paper, at least) better than its predecessor in every way. Never a bad thing.

    • 0 avatar
      rpol35

      Exactly – on paper anyway.

      Lot’s of pro’s & con’s bantered about here; I find it hard to state that the interior “rocks” based on a few pictures or that the economics are hugely improved (or not that much better) without knowing what it will cost.

      It will be interesting to see it in the flesh and check it out for real. It “looks” like a nice improvement over the current model however.

  • avatar
    Phil Ressler

    I have an ELR and a 2013 Volt. With the existing platform, I am running 137 mpg for miles driven against gasoline consumed, and during occasional gasoline-fueled travel lengthy enough to measure the generator-based mpg, I am usually getting 42-46 in the Volt and 38 – 42 in the ELR. The Volt usually yields 40-46 miles from the battery per charge. The ELR pretty much gets me the same. Neither car shows up meaningfully on my electric bill. You can cite a Prius getting 51 mpg all you want, but Volt drivers are using much less gasoline than Prius drivers, in actual use. Plus the Volt is a premium experience compared to a Prius, with also much more competent dynamics and handling.

    Living in LA and having to traverse the Santa Monica mountains most days, I expected somewhat poorer figures but on a typical 40 miles +/- day, I use 0.12 gal of gasoline for climbing over the Santa Monicas in one direction. I have an occasional longer trip or some high-speed driving where I’ll use gasoline. I buy about 5 gallons of gas every 6-8 weeks, and at those quantities neither I nor anyone else will care about the extra dime or two for premium — even at $5/gal or more.

    50 miles of stated EV range will probably yield 56 or so for me, which means I don’t even have to use that 0.12 gal of gasoline for one of the hill climbs. A tank of gas for the range extender might last six months.

    I like the Bolt configuration and appearance more than the next Volt, but platform-wise, GM made judicious and economic choices. Most owners won’t need gasoline most days — just for weekend or other extended trips. The brillance of this architecture is it being a “bridge” car that allows battery-stored electric driving 85 – 98% of the time, with efficient gasoline range extension (still electromotive) to drive the whole continent unencumbered. Works great for me and others who took the plunge.

    Since buying the ELR, my Volt is my Home Depot and foul weather car. The hatch is handy. I’m 6’3″ and fit in it fine. Cargo room is fairly vast for a small car. Unfortunately, only Volt owners understand how groundbreaking the car and its architecture actually are in this market, and GM has been deficient in mustering the communications skills to explain Voltec, Volt and the ELR. But these cars are far better than the general market and automotive press understand them, and the evolution of Volt plus the intentions for Bolt are smart increments for the push toward more progressive personal transports.

    Phil

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    Its not perfect, but it works very well for me.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Curious about the leasing deals that will be offered on these. I agree it’s pretty risky to own a PHEV at this point, with the technology moving so fast, but I might consider leasing one rather than buying another of the enthusiast sleds I usually dream about — if the price were right. I like electric motoring – so quiet and tranquil, and when you do floor it you don’t get any dirty looks.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Curious about the leasing deals that will be offered on these. I agree it’s pretty risky to own a PHEV at this point, with the technology moving so fast. But I might consider leasing one rather than buying another of the enthusiast sleds I usually dream about — if the price were right. I like electric motoring. So quiet, smooth, and tranquil, and when you do floor it you don’t get any dirty looks.

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