By on August 7, 2014

2016-Chevrolet-Volt-Teaser   The first teaser shot of the Chevrolet Volt has emerged, with the car debuting at the 2015 North American International Auto Show. GM is investing nearly $450 million into production facilities for the next-gen Volt, which will remain at GM’s Hamtramck plant. The investment will be split between the plant and GM’s battery facility in Brownston Township, which will assemble a next-generation battery that should pack greater range than the current Volt’s 38 mile electric-only range.

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89 Comments on “2016 Chevrolet Volt Will Debut At Next Edition of NAIAS...”


  • avatar
    Quentin

    Hopefully it makes a Gen 1 to Gen 2 Prius type jump as far as practicality. I think 4 seats only limited the appeal and I think being closer to a midsize in interior space (like the 2nd gen Prius was versus the 1st gen) will open it to a larger audience. I don’t see much need for more battery only range; the 1.4T is quite thirsty compared to the atkinson cycle engines running in the Toyota and Ford plug-ins. Of course, cost reduction has to be the largest priority. Anyway, their best bet is evolution over revolution. The Volt isn’t a terrible car or concept… it just needs some decent sized tweaks to make it make more sense to the average buyer.

  • avatar

    What the Volt needs is a 5th seat and price cut not an increase in EV range. EV range is really not that important for a car with an ICE range extender. A 40 mile EV will work for 80% of the population on 80% of the trips. Why carry heavy batteries if you really dont need to.

    The current Volt has held up really well to my sursprise. No major issues with 60,000 sold so far. Tesla OTH had to replace 100s of drive units and main batteries with 35,000 sold. GM and Nissan seem to have done their homework wrt ev drive units.

    • 0 avatar

      “EV range is really not that important for a car with an ICE range extender.”

      Agreed

      Which is why the Tesla Model S would be so much better if they made it a hybrid. They are however locked into the idea of being fully Electric.

      I always liked the Fisker Karma more than the Model S because of the ICE range extension. There mistake – once again – was that it was TOO SMALL and TOO GODDAMNED EXPENSIVE.

      What is it with these people? Must every thing be a stupid compact?

      Don’t they get it yet?

      Big motors, Big Cars, MURICA…

      • 0 avatar
        cmoibenlepro

        I do not agree.

        An ICE range extender is not that important for an EV with enough EV range and a network of superchargers.

        Which is why the Voit would be so much better if they made it an electric car. They are however locked into the idea of being a plug-in prius-like.

        I never liked the Fisker Karma as much as the Model S because of the useless ICE. Their mistake – once again – was that it was a small car BECAUSE it contained both a ICE and an hybrid system.
        Which is why it was goddamned expensive.

        What it it with these people? Must everything be a stupid compact with an ICE?

        Don’t they get it yet?

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          I have to disagree. At the current state of battery technology, a PHEV makes sense for an electrified car that is highway driven. The pile of batteries needed for highway range is too large, weighs too much, and costs too much for a mainstream car.

        • 0 avatar

          @cmo : Batteries are insanely expensive. The current volt has a 17.1 kwh battery that costs more than 50% of the car. An 80 mile Ev Volt would need a 30+ kwh battery even if you remove the ICE powertrain. That would push the cost to $50K or more. Cost is a major factor for any mainstream brand. The ICE powertrain costs 14th and can travel 340 miles between fillups. The idea is to use the electric motor as much as possible for as many trips as possible but have a cheap ICE backup when the battery runs out or for longer trips.

          My driving habits represent about 60% of the drivers. A daily round trip work commute plus daycare/grocery trips no more than 20 miles, road trips or trips greater than 40 miles once a month. A cheap 40 Mile EV with an ICE backup would mean I use electricity for 90% of my driving needs. The ICE will ensure that I am never stranded and there will be no need for a second car. I would just have to plug in every night. An 80 mile EV would cost me 75% more (batteries are the biggest cost). The only benefit is that I can plugin every other night and this added range would probably cover 95% of all trips. I would have to drive around with with heavier batteries. When all batteries degrade and battery technology is improving at 8% every year why pay double to use a 40kwh battery when you can pay half for a 20kwh battery now and 6 years later replace it with a new 20kwh that is much cheaper than what you paid 6 years ago.

          The future is electric but only when battery tech has matured. Until then a hybrid like setup that lets you use electricity for 80% or more of your trips is the most viable.

      • 0 avatar
        bigtruckseriousdouche @ Youtube

        Agree to disagree

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          With a name like that, it has to be good!

          Right?

          ———–

          I agree with BigTruck (The actual BigTruck). A car with a range limit would stop me from buying it. I can put gas in my cars as long as my wallet isn’t empty.

          I will not wait hours for charging. I can put fuel in my car in less than 10 minutes. And I get 400 miles of range.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            This is why for now the car (Tesla) isn’t for everyone.

            I do like their idea of the battery swap. Faster than using a gas pump, and you don’t have to get out of your car.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        In what way do you mean the Karma was small? In person they are SUPER HUGE. I was stunned how large it was when I was next to one.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      LLN is reporting that it is an all new platform. I take that with a big grain of salt because I don’t know if that means Volt is getting its very own platform, or is they going to be based on the new Delta platform coming that is replacing Delta II and Theta (and the new Buick midsize CUV is based on). I haven’t seen anything to clear that up.

      LLN is reporting that the dedicated platform (again, whatever that means) will make it much lighter (but no specifics) and speculation is battery only range will grow to 50 to 60 miles.

      LG is also claiming (stress claiming) that they have increased battery density in Lithium Ion batteries so that a much smaller pack could yield 200 miles. GM is saying that will be in a Sonic electric in another 18 to 24 months (oh I know, the B&B said impossible and BS, I read that too).

      All sorts of IFs here and we are talking about GM.

      IF this has its own platform.

      IF this gets a 1.0 liter for the range extender as the original design specification called for (the 1.4L was a cost compromise)

      IF this gets lighter.

      IF this gets a bit bigger with more cargo room so it can seat five in a pinch.

      IF it benefits from new battery technology (and maybe part of the weight reduction is this alleged higher capacity battery means a much smaller pack is needed)

      IF GM doesn’t mess with the driving dynamics, which overall I’ve read are good.

      IF they price it at say $30K base before government handouts.

      Maybe this dog will actually hunt.

      A lot of IFs.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        My understanding is it uses the same platform as the new Cruze but it that the platform was designed with the Volt in mind.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “A lot of IFs.”

        You forgot IF GM says solvent long enough to introduce it.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          You do realize that GM has *$20 billion* in cash, right?

          Even if they weren’t profitable (which they currently are) they would last for a very, very long time.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            @dal204002….”they would last for a very long time”.

            Music to my ears!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Just prior to the 2008 economic calamity, GM had $38 billion in losses. The company is smaller than it was and shed most of its debt, but a few bad years could put them in a very precarious position yet again. GM and the auto industry at large is feasting on extremely low interest loans and incredibly long loan terms from lenders. The music will eventually stop and there won’t be enough chairs for everyone.

            Additional: I personally don’t want to see GM in trouble again, but it is in the realm of possibility.

            “For fiscal year 2007, GM’s losses for the year were US$38.7 billion,”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Motors_Chapter_11_reorganization

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            @ 28 cars… Darn.. I already cracked a beer to celebrate.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @mikey

            Enjoy it, you’ve inspired me to do the same.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I would disagree. Most of these are commuter-mobiles ferrying one person back and forth to work, and the selling point is the EV capabilities of the vehicle. That’s why buyers would consider paying more for it than a Prius. So, I’d say the EV range is more critical than the back seat, assuming that the back seat space is staying the same.

      Given that, though, I agree – the rear seat room in this vehicle does limit its appeal somewhat.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        For a PHEV, enough EV range to complete your typical day’s drive is enough, since you have the engine to cover the longer trips. Battery that doesn’t get used on a daily basis isn’t cost effective.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      I want 50mi range on battery, 50 amp L2 charging, and 50mpg on range extender. A fifth seat would be good. A midsize CUV formfactor would be even better.

  • avatar

    If only GM would simply build a plug-in hybrid Malibu and a plug-in hybrid Impala…

    The Volt (and Spark EV) sucks because it’s too damned small.
    The Tesla Model S sells because it’s so much larger. space for the family on a road trip and their bags and skis and stuff.

    PRICE, RANGE and INTERIOR SPACE.

    Give us a Malibu or Imapala plug-in hybrid which gets 100 miles on a charge and costs less than $50,000/ $60,000 respectively.

    • 0 avatar
      healthy skeptic

      You forgot performance. I think that’s actually a bigger draw for Tesla than the other factors you mention, or at least it’s as important.

      None of the other EVs or hybrids even bother trying when it comes to performance. I think it’s more of a factor than most manufacturers realize. They tend to view all EV and hybrid enthusiasts as joyless environmentalists who simply want an appliance car. That might be true for some, but certainly not all, and that outlook certainly isn’t going to help push these vehicles into the mainstream.

      • 0 avatar

        No – I left out performance because these Electric motors have instant torque and quickly propel these cars to 60mph despite the mass.

        With traffic enforcement keeping speed limits well below 80MPH in most places, their acceleration and high-speed abilities are unnecessary.

        None of these buyers need to be going faster than me anyway.

        Furthermore, most of them will either be doing highway miles or sitting in traffic. In traffic these vehicles are dead silent and don’t waste fuel while running accessories such as the cabin heater or radio.

        You AREN’T buying a Model S “Performance” for anything less than $85,000 – which is 3 times what the average person is spending on a car and the model S suffers from range anxiety.

        I WANT TO SEE a car the same interior size as the current Malibu, 4 doors, with a plug-in hybrid system like what you have in the Volt/ELR. Those cars SUCK because they are to small and too expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          seth1065

          big truck,With traffic enforcement keeping speed limits well below 80MPH in most places, their acceleration and high-speed abilities are unnecessary.( Yet you almost make the Hell cat a religion in terms of the worship you give it)

          None of these buyers need to be going faster than me anyway. ( thank you for deciding that for all of us)

          And really 50 K for a Malibu plug in Hybrid- Yeah that would sell no problem.

          • 0 avatar

            My logic is simple.

            Move Over People Are Racing…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Seth1065 has it right.

            Pulled over last month for 89 in a 80 (Idaho) on my annual road trip. I was cruising along in perfect weather on a nearly empty highway. The G8 was loafing — barely felt like we were moving. The cop acted surprised that I was surprised he pulled me over for 9 over.

            Electric performance is perfect for a world where there’s really no reason ever to exceed 80 mph.

        • 0 avatar
          Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

          “With traffic enforcement keeping speed limits well below 80MPH in most places, their acceleration and high-speed abilities are unnecessary.”

          You have that backwards: with speed limits, acceleration is all you got.. What’s the point of a 199mph supercar limited to 80? Acceleration is very nice to have in traffic, and just generally for the lulz. And silent acceleration, which doesn’t prick up a cop’s ears? Even better. So folks like to read HP numbers but like to drive torque. Sounds like an ideal situation for max-torque-at-zero electrics, if they’re geared properly and not gimped by the computer…

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “They tend to view all EV and hybrid enthusiasts as joyless environmentalists who simply want an appliance car.”

        The stuff that makes Tesla interesting is what makes it unprofitable.

        Big batteries cost money. The other automakers avoid going that route because it’s a sure money loser. Instead, they try to make do with a smaller battery and less weight.

    • 0 avatar
      cmoibenlepro

      Why would someone buy a Malibu with an hybrid system when they could buy a NORMAL Malibu for much less?

      There was Malibu hybrid, it was a total failure. They removed it from the line-up.

      Making an EV with an ICE sucks.

      • 0 avatar

        “Why would someone buy a Malibu with an hybrid system when they could buy a NORMAL Malibu for much less?”

        Because if the range is long enough for them to drive GASOLINE FREE back and forth to work each week – they’d simply plug it in on the weekend and not have to worry for fuel unless they want to go on an extended range trip.

        The reason I don’t mind the RIDICULOUS thirst of my 6.4’s is because I drive fewer than 10 miles per day. If My cars had a plug-in hybrid that game me just 20 miles of EV range – I’d be really happy!

        Charge in my garage.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      And by the same token, why not try a plug in hybrid Caddy?

      Oops, forgot…

      Ford is having very limited success with its midsize plug in hybrid…and the Fusion is a far more appealing car than the Malibu to begin with. And the weight and size of the basic Impala package would work against it as a plug in hybrid. I think GM should wait and see if Ford has any success in this market before doing a midsize plug in of its own. I’m not sold on the market, personally.

      http://cleantechnica.com/2014/08/05/nissan-leaf-still-king-ford-fusion-energi-sales-jump-201/

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      BMSR: “Give us a Malibu or Imapala plug-in hybrid which gets 100 miles on a charge and costs less than $50,000/ $60,000 respectively.”

      I’m not surprised that you don’t realize how impractical your request is.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @KixStart, that’s why electric cars are still impractical to my mind and my reality. 350 miles to a charge, $30,000, and recharging in 10 min you would have a business model for mainstream America.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Batteries are expensive and take up considerable room. Adjust either or both of those problems by a factor of 5 and you’d have some kind of EV that would sell well. Until then, it’s the tax credits that keep these things afloat.

    GM is also burdened by limited seating and cargo space, so-so aerodynamics, excess weight and an engine that’s greatly outclassed by the engine in the Prius, which hampers range-extended fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You’re right, once the technology launched they should have been adapting it for use in something bigger such as Equinox.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Gas fuel economy in the Volt really isn’t that important. The whole point of the Volt is you run it like an EV. Which means it will go 4 times farther than a Prius on a dollar of fuel.

      If you drive 12K miles a year and 80% of those miles are on electricity, that means you went 2400 miles running on gas.

      @ 40 MPG you used 60 gallons of gas for the year.
      @50 MPG you used 48 gallons of gas for the year.

      The difference between 40 MPG and 50 MPG is 12 gallons for the year or $42 @ $3.50 a gallon. The Prius needs good gas economy because it is ALWAYS running its ICE.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        Carlson Fan: “Gas fuel economy in the Volt really isn’t that important. The whole point of the Volt is you run it like an EV. Which means it will go 4 times farther than a Prius on a dollar of fuel.”

        Except when you leave town. We do that on a regular basis; a Volt would cost us more to operate.

        The big problems with the mediocre CS mode fuel economy are that it:

        A) Needn’t be so bad… GM cheaped out on the engine and chickened out on the aerodynamics.

        B) Leaves a lot of room for a Prius win. 37? 50? Which of these numbers is better?

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          The existing engine and chassis/platform were not optimal for the design of the Volt but remember this is what they had to work with during the bankruptcy. Money wasn’t exactly falling off the trees at GM during those years. Like I said in a post further down, lots of low hanging fruit on the Gen 1 to signifigantly improve an already great car.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Carlson Fan,

            GM bragged on about this car for nearly 4 solid years before underwhelming us in December of 2010. This was their “moonshot,” remember? But it seems GM was satisfied to coast into a low Earth orbit.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Well that’s your opinion. Most would agree that the engineering in current the Volt is pretty impressive and it does what GM promised. Either you can appreciate that or you can’t. Me, i may just buy a used Volt outright versus my initial plan of leasing a new one. With any other EV I might have concerns about the battery pack. With a Volt I figure the pack is probably good for 12-15 years easy.

            When i was looking at one this week and said I had a possible trade the sales person guessed I owned a Prius…….LOL

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Carlson Fan: “Well that’s your opinion. Most would agree that the engineering in current the Volt is pretty impressive…”

            It’s a Prius wannabe, except not as good. Heck, they had to farm out the drive unit to Aisin. If they had delivered this in 2004, I might agree. As it didn’t hit the streets until just shy of 2011… no.

            “… and it does what GM promised.”

            GM promised 50/50/600, nicely under $30K and never mentioned giving up a seat. Then they got down to the difficult business of building the thing. Uh-oh.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Nope, it is nothing like the Prius. Prius is an ICE vehicle with electric assist, Volt is an EV with gas assist. Maximum Bob didn’t want a Prius copy, he wanted to leapfrog the Prius. I know you don’t agree, but I think they did that. Let’s wait and see if GM worked as hard on the 2nd Gen as the 1st. Good news is at least they seem to be thinking long term with this tech. despite the fact that gas prices have been pretty stable the last 3-4 years. Trying to think of the last time I payed $3.29 for a gallon of gas during August in MN

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    My Volt works for me: one year of work commute + taking kid to school: zero problems, 21,445km’s @ 0.74l/100km (13,325 miles @ 317.85mpg).
    Next will hopefully cost less and have a more energy-efficient gas engine and heater.
    Ah, yes: my home electric bill went from $84Cdn to 135Cdn / mo.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      As noted in CR – the Volt does very well. I haven’t read complaints on reliability, safety, or driveability.

      What I have read is price versus value, some questionable interior material and design, inadequate storage, the lack of a middle seat, and the rear seat being barely adequate for humans.

      As a second car commuter appliance, price point they missed the mark – if GM learned their lessons in Gen I as Toyota learned with the Echo based Prius – then Gen II should show massive improvement.

      They certainly are committed if they are plopping down $450 million.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        The ’11 was pretty good, the later years of Volt production do not exhibit the same levels of reliability (source: truedelta). Not bad, just mediocre. There are also not-infrequent postings on GM-Volt dot com about problems. Time to repair seems to be a big issue (which could be more a problem with dealer service personnel and training) and, every now and then, a Volt gets lemon-law’ed back to GM.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Your electric bill cost ate up a surprisingly large chunk of your fuel savings (over something like a Prius, for example). Using $3.75/gal for fuel, you saved nearly $850 in gas over a Prius… but your electric bill was up over $600 for the year.

      *Lots of assumptions in the number, of course. I don’t know his specific situation as far as electric or gas cost… just spitballing some numbers.

  • avatar
    cmoibenlepro

    Why would someone buy an EV car with an ICE? Drop the ICE, increase the range, and the interior space, reduce the price, and maybe someone will buy it.

    Why did Tesla was able to sell 25,000 model S per year, while GM was only able to sell 188 units of the ELR?

    Because there is an ICE, which nobody is interested to pay for in an EV.
    People who want an ICE will buy a normal car.

    • 0 avatar
      Nicholas Weaver

      As the target buyer (80 mile round trip commute, a couple of plugs available to leech at work and solar panels at home), I disagree.

      The optimal is 80 mile electric with a range extender. A pure electric, unless you have a mega 200+ mile battery, always leaves you uncertain. But having access to that worldwide-network of 3 MW fastchargers, err, gas-pumps changes behavior. There is a reason why in early reports, people drive more electric miles on the i3 Range-extended version than the electric-only version.

      Not to mention cost: Batteries are frightfully expensive: its cheaper to add a generator like the i3 has than to add another 100 miles of range.

      • 0 avatar
        cmoibenlepro

        Exactly! You need a 200+ mile battery, or it will always leave you uncertain.

        But a 80 miles electric with a range extender is absolutely not optimal.
        Better to buy a Cruze than a Volt. Then you keep 20k in your pockets, which is more that enough to buy some gas. Anyway the Volt has a worse mileage than other cars (because of the weight of both system) so it is not interesting.

        A Tesla on the other hand is better that its gasoline-powered competitors and have a comparable range. Once the battery prices decrease (and they will), that would be a game changer.

        • 0 avatar
          Nicholas Weaver

          A 200 mile battery costs way way more in practice than 80 mile + Range Extender. And even at 200 miles, “fast” chargers ain’t.

          • 0 avatar
            cmoibenlepro

            And a 80 mile + Range Extender costs way more than a regular car.
            What is the point?

            And the battery swap that Tesla will implement will allow a “charge” faster that you can fill up a gas tank.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      “Why would someone buy an EV car with an ICE?”

      Range anxiety and versatility. The Volt makes sense as a commuter car where most of the trips will run entirely off of battery, but the ICE provides ease of mind since those trips can sometimes require extra miles for other needs, and sometimes the car will need to be used for non-commute trips. However, you’re right on the Cruze if more than about 30% of the miles driven exceed the electric range. I will seriously consider the Volt or its ilk once I’m forced to retire my current ride.

      • 0 avatar
        cmoibenlepro

        Maybe ICE-powered cars should include a horse, so in case you run off gas, the horse would pull the car.

        A good network of superchargers and improved 250+ miles battery is the best solution.

        • 0 avatar
          ClutchCarGo

          “A good network of superchargers and improved 250+ miles battery is the best solution.”

          Yes, and until it they’re available, a range extended EV is a decent compromise.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          The ICE in the Volt is a good solution to deal with the current battery technology limitations. If you compare the MPGe against the Volt and Leaf you’ll soon realize that even though it is carrying around that ICE it doesn’t give up a lot of efficiency to the Leaf. Plus with the Volt you can always use 100% of the available battery range while with a EV there is always that 10-15% buffer that you never use to make sure you make it home.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Batteries are too expensive to only use occasionally. Put in enough battery to get your daily driving done, use the ICE for long trips.

          There may come a day when you can buy an EV with a 300 mile range for $35,000, but this isn’t it.

        • 0 avatar
          DrSandman

          @cmoibenlepro

          Because there are Sooooo many superchargers in the hinterlands of Appalachia….

          Listen. I understand that you are a True Believer. But you are acting like the dou***bag vegan who won’t let other people eat milk or eggs either. Personally, I find eggs, milk, berries, and steak very tasty.

          My next car will probably be a hybrid and will have an ICE because my normal commute is 50+ miles through DC traffic in all weather. Sometimes the DoD wants me at another base, so it’s 100 extra unplanned miles RIGHT EFFIN’ NOW, SIR with no time to charge. Sometimes it’s cold and rainy and snows. Sometimes, I have to take my kids 400 miles one way for sports competitions. Sometimes I have to visit my dying parents in the deep woods of West Virginia where my grandparents don’t even have indoor plumbing, let alone access to a SuperCharger. Yes — these places still exist in 2014 Amera.

          I need gas like I need fish, steak & bacon. Some people can live without, but I cannot.

          So, with all DUE respect, stuff it, Sir.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I am not sure if it is fair to compare a telsa at their MRSP to a Volt or any other car at that price level. That is like comparing a E class to a a Mazda 3, both have ICE engines and four wheels.

  • avatar
    THE_F0nz

    Quite the flurry of comments as per usual. Few cars are as polarizing as a Volt.

    I love mine for what it is, not what I think it should be. I’ve submitted messages to the site to see if they would publish my 12-month review.

    170+mpg over 12 months. A hatchback that fold the seats down and stores a big screen television. $300 per month payments on 15k/yr lease. Carpool lane access. ~5 nine-gallon tanks of gas per year. Leather, bluetooth, and more gadgets than I really need.

    It is not perfect, but damn it makes my life better. No a single problem or hiccup yet. Knock on wood.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      Matt Farah and Chris Harris, who strike me neither as eco-nuts nor as GM apologists, like the Volt. (Farah leases one, in fact.) It sounds like a far better vehicle, both in terms of objective metrics and subjective enjoyment factors, than its critics are willing to concede.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      Really glad it works for you, well I am not a person who will buy one, I drive to much, it seems like it fits your needs, hope we see a review. Are you in a cold weather state? if so how does a cold winter effect your range.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @seth

        I actually drive too little, so the savings from fuel wouldn’t offset the upfront expenditure, and the tax break wouldn’t benefit me much – I pay a ridiculous amount of alimony, which cuts my federal tax burden down dramatically (that’s the only benefit).

        I’m just fine in my good old ’03 Buick, with zero payments. But the Volt is a very cool car – even if it doesn’t appeal to my inner Cole Trickle, it’s a great piece of technology and engineering.

      • 0 avatar
        THE_F0nz

        Hi Seth,

        I live in hotter climate out here in Southern California. The Santa Ana winds get it upwards of 100 degrees several times a year and this summer has been a hot one for the most part.

        The volt is different than the Nissan Leaf in that it has a dedicated coolant system for its batteries. When it is cold, the range extender kicks on automatically to get the car and the battery up to optimal temperature range in a hurry. It really isn’t as sensitive as other EVs. My sister has one in Michigan and she still got well over 30 miles on hers in the winter. I would do you research on the volt boards. Hers was an early one with less advertised range than the 2013/2014. A beast in the snow. Skinny tires, FWD and heavy.

        My right foot really determines my energy consumption. I get ~34 miles if I drive like a jerk, and close to 40 when I don’t. I usually lose a mile or two when the AC is on, but there is no drop off in power like with a 4 cylinder car.

        Hills are as easy as can be when driving to Vegas so long as you are in Mountain mode.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The Volt wouldn’t work for me…but I definitely appreciate the technology and engineering that went into this car.

      And frankly, the only “polarizing” thing about this car what the GM haters think about it. You don’t see them hating on other hybrids nearly as much. Silly political blather.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Big Truck,
    My logic is simple.

    Move Over People Are Racing…

    Hope your on a track big boy, on 280 or the GSP not so much, last time I looked there were no Big Truck lanes in metro NY.

  • avatar
    timlange

    Well my 2013 Volt gets me my daily driving 100% on electric and works just fine on my out of town trips about every 6-8 weeks of 160-300 miles. No electric only would work for me as I have no place to recharge on the trip. The Volt has almost been perfect for my needs, I use 50% of the battery daily in the summer, and in the winter with heat I use close to 100%. No gas used unless the temps are below 15F. Only one trip a year do I need a fifth seat. This year I will only need four and from now on.

    But as you all said, everyone’s needs are different, I lucked into 99% perfect setup.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I suspect a smaller, lighter, more fuel efficient turbo engine for the generator, purpose built electric motors, versus the of the shelf units in the 1st gen. A platform designed with the Volt in mind versus a reworked compact platform for an ICE car. I have also heard 2 different battery options. The 1st Gen is a great car but lots of low hanging fruit to improve the 2nd Gen substantially.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      It seems the people who own them like them, so all GM has to do is get more people who “fit” the model to use them, yeah there are pricey but hell the car pool lane usage is the only plus I see in them for me but I am not their target customer, know my wife is she drives 16 miles a day, she is the person GM has to get to try the volt.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    What is GM thinking?? The new Volt better have something spectacular to offer in order to get out of the big disappointment GM caused with the current one. I understand GM will be cutting options and holding pricing at 35K. Toyota is saying they’re introducing a Prius we’ve never seen before. Perhaps GM has something up its sleeve that’ll entice buyers.

  • avatar
    VCplayer

    Forget EV range and ICE efficiency, what Chevy desperately needs is some new design language.

  • avatar
    colin42

    As a 2013 volt driver I’d like these changes for gen 2 (in this order)

    1. An extra 2 kW of battery range over 2013 – now I didn’t say a bigger battery. Mine has a 16.5 kWh battery but only uses 10.5 kwh or 63%. Toyota and Ford, Nissan & Tesla use much more of their battery capacity. 2 kWh would give between 6 and 10 miles extra range

    2. Faster charging on 240 L2 charger. The volt is limits it charging rate to 3.8kW. Other EV can charge at double this rate

    3. More rear leg room – 4 more inches should do it

    4. Improved ICE efficiency – I can get upto 45 mpg at highway speeds but my average on gas is only 30 mpg.

    5. Nicer interior – including rear AC vents

    6. The included charger to be dual voltage – Chevy don’t sell L2 chargers and the cost difference between an L1 or a dual L1/ L2 charger is minimal. S

    7. Rear windscreen wiper

    8. 5th seat

    9. Lower lip to the trunk

    10. No increase in price

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      colin,
      well that should not be a problem to meet your needs with no increase in price , what are you willing to give up?

      • 0 avatar
        colin42

        Well most of what is on my list design or calibration and therefore has minimal cost increase i.e. increase rear leg room. The engine could be improved by focusing on efficiency like Ford & Toyota with their atkinson cycle engine as the electric motor could handle the acceleration needs.

        I’m not sure what increasing the charging rate would cost but GM does it in the spark ev which sells for less. The combo L1/L2 charger has minimal cost increase – it more of a switch unit than a charger

        So the only piece that is likely to cost more would be the interior. Almost every other vehicle in the market manages to improve their interior with breaking the bank. So yes I want it all.

  • avatar

    So long as GM doesn’t present the new Volt with “The Chevy Volt Dance II: Electric Boogaloo,” I’ll be interested in this PHEV.

    Also: I can’t seem to find anything on who was tasked to sing the Volt Song. Would the B&B happen to have any ideas?

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Oh how I love the armchair engineering in these Volt/ELR posts.

    “Car is too small. Need more big.”
    -Okay. So we’ll make it bigger. It is now heavier, with worse aerodynamics. We’re gonna need some more of those expensive batteries. Oh dear, now it’s “too expensive”. Maybe better to just slash the range and hope the public “gets it”. That’s worked in the past right?

    “Car is not geared for performance.”
    -GM engineers look at each other, and then think about how they can improve performance on a car that sits in traffic all day. The solution is to offer a used C5 with every purchase.

    “The ICE is some cheap off the shelf thing that’s not the latest tech/not diesel/not 3 cyl.”
    -GM designs new dedicated engine. Price increases $4000. Marginal improvement of 3 miles of battery only range results. Fuel economy while running on the ICE improves to 40mpg, but nobody notices SINCE IT NEVER TURNS ON for most people/situations. Recalls result because new stuff.
    -GM engineer puts in diesel range extender. Same as above, but price is now $6000 more. No improvement in battery only range because heavier. Engine bay now cramped with emissions equipment and urea tank. Large portion of customer base (both knowledgeable and stupid for different reasons) instantly alienated by diesel engine. Car is ripped by the press for high NVH. Even more recalls. Engineer is sacked.

    “It’s too much money.”
    -GM decides to offer a free home economics course after test drives. Real world cost analysis is explored. Access to the internet, especially automotive forums, is strictly prohibited.

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