By on January 5, 2015

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Here it is folks. The 2016 Chevy Volt revealed at CES.

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41 Comments on “2016 Chevrolet Volt Revealed...”


  • avatar
    nickoo

    This and other pics floating around leave me extremely disappointed. From what I can see, they appear to have went for max aero, damn the rear headroom and hatch space, which would make the car all but useless. I also do not like the front end redesign over the old model. I guess here’s waiting for the 2017 leaf.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Personally, the photos we’ve seen don’t really tell us enough about the car as yet; camera angles can exaggerate the lines making them look more extreme than they are.

      As for rear headroom and hatch space? If I purchased one, the back seats would remain folded down 99% of the time so obviously rear headroom (and the back doors) are unimportant to me. As long as I can carry what I need to carry (like 100 pounds of bowling gear) then I’m good.

      • 0 avatar
        Russycle

        100 pounds of bowling gear? How can a ball, pair of shoes, and a shirt with “Lou” embroidered on it weigh 100 pounds?

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          How about 6 balls, two pair of shoes and the bags to carry them? What, you think I’m the only person in my house who bowls? I personally own 7 balls that I use regularly (at two different bowling alleys) and another 9 that I’ve ‘outgrown’ in the last 2.5 years. My wife has three balls she uses regularly, another two she hasn’t had drilled yet and another four that are now too light for her. That makes 25 balls that we own of which the old ones are being saved to turn into garden mirror balls.

          By the way, two 3-ball bags fit nicely in the back of a Fiat 500 with the rear seats folded down and LOTS of room to spare. If I stacked the two bags, they could ride back there with the seats up.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Melody Lee promises that the Cadillac rebadge of this, to be named the CT-E, & priced at an MSRP of $79,999.99, will deliver many socio-ecological synergistic benefits derived from Cadillac’s dynamic responsiveness & cultural positivism directed towards aware Millennials who will drive corporate consciousness towards collective, global betterment.

    Or something.

    The CT-E Lululemon Edition will also be featured in the 2015 Nieman Marcus catalogue assuming Cadillac has the sufficient requisite advertising budget for this coming fiscal year.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      You know those shtick skits on SNL? The ones that depend not on original writing but, instead, depend upon the actor mugging to get laughs? Yeah, I hate those too.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Cadillac will also feature a CT-E Jimmy Choo Edition with fashion forward leather tires. Keep up the good work Melody Lee.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Also, Jack, I and many others are ALREADY VINDICATED regarding the failure that is the ATS.

      Admit it:

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/05/how-gm-could-save-the-cadillac-ats-from-its-otherwise-inevitable-fate-of-complete-marketplace-failure/

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    The article contains less information than the headline….

  • avatar
    mcs

    I still can’t believe those idiots are only going to offer a slow 3.6 kW on-board charger on the thing. Supposedly they interviewed current owners that said a slower charger was just fine. Who in their right mind is going to turn down a faster charger? I think it was their accountants that didn’t want the faster charger. For comparison, the current Volt has a 3.3 kW and the Leaf has a twice as fast 6.6 kW charger available. With a good aftermarket charger, a Leaf on a 120 volt 20 amp circuit will charge at a 2.2 kW rate – almost as fast as the current Volt on 240 volts.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      GM has been incompetent in every way & at every level, with exceedingly few exceptions, since the late 1960s.

      Even with a full taxpayer bailout, a prepackaged bankruptcy to discharge a massive debt load, and the ability to massively cut past financial obligations to pensioners & renegotiate then existing and new/future contracts with the UAW & their major suppliers, they are now re-entering a new, profound era of incompetence and incompetent management/managerial direction that is nearly certain to drag them back towards financial ruin given enough time.

      They are one of the most incompetent corporations, post-1960s, to have ever existed in the history of corporations.

      • 0 avatar
        koreancowboy

        Add in Chrysler to that as well

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I would dispute the first 30 years of that argument, DW; I would say since the late 1990s you’re mostly correct my ’96 Camaro, ’86 LeSabre and ’85 Toronado were all pretty good (though I admit cheaping out with a bloomin’ NYLON timing gear in the Toronado was a real PITA.) Even my ’02 Saturn Vue was remarkably good–but GM was already in the process of screwing over three of their most notable and advanced brands by then.

        • 0 avatar

          From the time the accountants had the final say over the 1960 Corvair…and Cadillac began chasing market share over being the Standard of the World, GM’s had its troubles.

          That said, 1971 was the turning point and it just went downhill from there to the 2009 bankruptcy.

          I maintain they’re currently making the finest vehicles they’ve ever made with few exceptions.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “I still can’t believe those idiots are only going to offer a slow 3.6 kW on-board charger on the thing”

      I’m willing to bet they’re just saving the quicker chargers for another year.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      @mcs – You do realize that Volt owners have actually put MORE electric miles on the their cars than Leaf owners. If you didn’t know, now you do. Obviously the 3.6kW charger is just fine.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        >> Obviously the 3.6kW charger is just fine.

        No, it’s not. It’s a very slow charger – with the current 3.3kw about half the speed capability of most level 2 stations and not much faster than some level 1. How many of those miles were in EV mode? Volt owners I know have greater range anxiety than some EV owners and try hard to avoid ICE mode. Do you own a PHEV or EV? I own an EV and know Volt drivers as well. A faster 6.6 kw would be twice as fast. Why wouldn’t someone want their car to charge twice as fast? Even with a much larger battery, my EV charges faster than a Volt.

        Get a Volt and spend some time actually driving it and charging – then let’s see what you think.

        • 0 avatar
          Palouser

          mcs, you say, “Volt owners I know have greater range anxiety than some EV owners and try hard to avoid ICE mode.”

          Your bias is revealed by your hyperbole. Why would ‘range anxiety’ of Volt owners be greater than owners of EV’s when the car just keeps going in hybrid mode after the all electric mode is no longer available? An EV is just plain dead in the water when it reaches it’s limit. A Volt owner suffers no disadvantage driving cross country. An EV owner really can’t even follow.

          I use 120v to recharge overnight when I’m not going to drive anyway. Almost anyone can do this the first night they have the car. The 240v charging capacity is faster but most would have to upgrade or install the circuit at some cost to use 240v charging. Only a small % of the Volt market would require this. It’s a bigger drawback for EV’s as they aren’t as flexible as the Volt.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            If you didn’t notice what MCS said, he pointed out very clearly that the Volt owners he knows go out of their way to AVOID letting the ICE start at all. Sure, I’ll agree that the ICE is great for covering those last few miles, but the point of an EV is to use the electric drive exclusively and never buy another drop of gas. The slightly-extended range of the new model Volt helps, but the Bolt comes across as the far superior choice simply because the range anxiety suffered by current EV owners (with the exception of Tesla) is effectively eliminated. With 200 miles range, I could easily drive to any one of three state capitols from my home and a very major city round trip without buying a drop of gasoline. I could drive round trip to one NASCAR track and one-way to two others. I could make any of those trips for less cost than one day’s electricity use in my home or about $6. How much gas would you use on that trip in a Volt? I’ll bet more than $6 worth.

          • 0 avatar
            Palouser

            Vulpine, the parameters of your argument are so restricted to one set of conditions in an attempt to justify a single conclusion you distort the idea of rational argument. Of course owners of EVs, as WELL as owners of Volts, want to use as little fuel as possible. But let’s not over dramatize the situation. So, where is my consumer 200 mile range EV for an affordable price??

            I have the Volt now and my lifetime mileage of 100 mpg for a well built and quality car (right, NOT a Prius). And I’m not going to have to break out my older car when I have to drive 210 miles for a meeting in the morning. I can go as far as I want in the Volt! WHAT anxiety? I’m a real person with real, and not un-average requirements. Though most of my miles are within its EV range I do occasionally have to go further – like most drivers (and especially in much of the US).

            True, the ‘not really available to the average consumer Tesla’ would be nice, but remember, when they have to go further they burn the gasoline in a backup car. Just because it doesn’t accumulate on the Tesla or other as yet vaporware car does not mean the driver doesn’t burn fossil fuels.

            I have the Volt now, I don’t have to have a backup car for any reason, and yet I’m sad I don’t get the thousands/mpg some Volt owners can get. But I’m NOT living in a theoretical dream world as some do. They are a microscopic market segment.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Palouser: And the parameters of the naysayers are no better, insisting on extremes when such extremes are the exception rather than the rule. I’ve never said an EV is best for all people, but an EV can be the best for most people even given the occasional extreme circumstance.

            As for, “where is my consumer 200 mile range EV for an affordable price?” Well, according to both Chevrolet and Tesla, they are less than three years down the road. Maybe just in time for your lease (if you have one) to run out or you get tired of your current model.

            Meanwhile, my needs are obviously different from yours because I can see the definite advantages to a true BEV as compared to any other type of drive system currently in existence or projected for the near future. When all is said and done, the BEV is the least energy intensive ‘well to wheel’ of any of them, especially considering how much energy is required to drill, pump and refine the liquid fuels required by non-BEVs.

          • 0 avatar
            Palouser

            Vulpine, you demonstrate what the Volt is up against that GM has yet to figure out how to counter. “The Volt is not the perfect EV that meets all my theoretical needs and the Tesla is SO much cooler and goes further than the stupid Volt (but I’m not going to buy a Tesla cause it’s too expensive [and pssssst, I have a backup car for going further if I do get an inheritance and can convince my wife I should buy a flashy Tesla ….. which isn’t going to happen]}.”

            I have a Volt now, I’m saving oil now and when something else comes along that’s better that meets my requirements I will buy/lease it THEN and save even more oil. But a customer average of 1,000 miles between fill ups of a 10 gal tank predicted for the Gen 2 Volt I’ve already reached with the Gen 1, so a Gen 2 driver like me would do better than that. The longer range may have more of a geometric or logarithmic effect on mpg as more trips can be accomplished in the EV mode.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “an EV can be the best for most people even given the occasional extreme circumstance.”

            You can’t fit a fridge in a Model S. Doesn’t pass the fridge test, no go.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Palouser, you should have stopped when you were ahead. Attacking me personally killed your credibility.

            First off, it’s my wife that wants the Tesla NOW, but she’s also aware of its limitations–specifically its high price. We are willing to wait the two-to-five years to see where the technology is leading and to give the infrastructure time to grow enough to meet all our needs, not just 99% of them. We’re also aware that our HOA where we live may not appreciate a recharging station mounted in our yard and have intentions of moving to someplace a little more open to new technologies around that same time.
            Yes, there is a “cool factor” and I won’t deny it. But that doesn’t mean I buy something just because it’s “cool”; I buy because it is the best available for the money and quite honestly that’s the main reason I’m not buying any EV at this time despite what it could do for me. Even so, the Chevy Bolt will be by far the better choice than the Volt when I do buy. I expect the Tesla Model III to be the even better choice for multiple reasons, but since it isn’t on the roads yet, I’ll hold off on recommending it as such.

            Fine. You have a Volt now. By some viewpoints, you’re using it as a status symbol–saying “Hey! Look how Green I am!” Personally, I don’t care why you have it–for real economy or as a status symbol–your reasons are not mine and the Volt simply cannot meet my needs for the foreseeable future. It is not the panacea for all things EV.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Cute one, danio. While the Model S can’t pass the “fridge test”, the Tesla Model Y might. Yet another reason to wait rather than jumping on board the EV bandwagon right now.

          • 0 avatar
            Palouser

            I was replying to your arguments, not your masculinity. Volt as a status symbol ??? That’s a new one. 99% of the people who walk by one have no idea it’s even electric – it’s just another unremarkable Chevy.

            Your argument was that it was all about not burning oil and apparently the Volt doesn’t ‘not burn oil’ to your satisfaction. But I’m in fact ‘not burning’ a lot of oil because of the Volt.

            NOW, you tell me that you DON’T have an electric OR a Volt and aren’t ‘not burning oil’ because none of the products that will ‘not burn oil’ are good enough for you! And 99% isn’t satisfaction enough.

            I cannot help you sir.

            Maybe GM’s Volt PR problem runs WAY deeper than I thought. Especially when you can lease a car so cheaply, save $$$ from ‘not burning oil’ and jump to a better alternative when it’s available.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Ha, ha, they forgot to take the plastic shipping tape off the grille before taking the picture

  • avatar
    thanh_n

    Yawn. From a styling perspective it’s as boring as a 1st gen Prius.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Looks like a Toyota, nothing more, nothing less.

    Hopefully not all of GMs “family style” wwill go this route.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The Verge has some decent photos of it.

    It’s interesting that this car drops almost all of the Lutz-era styling cues of the first one. I’m personally glad to see that the black faux-windows in the door sills are gone; they existed only to hearken the Lutz concept Voltamaro that was more aerodynamic when driven backward.

    I think we can assume that the Volt is mainstream, and that the drivetrain will migrate out to other GM models.

    But it’s a pity that it looks rather a lot like a Honda Civic.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      The current Volt was engineered and designed using an exisiting platform(Cruze). The firewall height was something that could not be changed and hence the black faux-windows. The 2nd Gen, also uses the same platform as the Cruze. But different is that this time the platform was designed with the Volt in mind.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Not as handsome from the front as the current model but I like the fact that they kept the “fake grill” styling cue form the Gen 1. No mistaking that it’s a Volt.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Color me disappointed.

    I was really hoping for something that was more of a Prius V type roofline or a full on CUV.

    The Volt would be a PERFECT car for how I drive – I fall into the narrow group of folks who drive within the electric range but regularly need the range extended to make trips using the series hybrid system. However we found the backseat way to cramped and with a third person in the backseat the cargo area lacking.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    They really went out on a limb with styling this time. Good job, GM. Glad to see you’re making the most of the bailout dollars.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    It’s really hard to say exactly how this car will look when we see the actual model, but I rather like the restyle. It looks more like a mainstream car than the last one did. At least what little I can make out from the universally crappy photos of the car…

    I was hoping to see something Voltec-related based off of the Orlando CUV, but maybe that’s down the road.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Something about my comments on this article is triggering the spam filter even though I checked very carefully for “s!d.”

    I like this car… a surprising amount. I’m *very* curious how much it will lease for, given that owning a PHEV at this early stage in the technology is a bit foolish. I’m usually looking at cars that have at least some performance orientation, but I also really like the s!lence and smoothness of electric motoring, and would consider doing something different this time for the right lease deal.


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