By on December 14, 2014

2015 Dodge DartThe Chrysler Group reported the Dodge Dart’s best-ever sales month in November 2014 as year-over-year volume jumped 39% to 9012 units.

This was the first time Dart volume climbed beyond 9000 units in a single month. The previous top month for this modern incarnation of the Dart was May of this year, when 8644 were sold.

Yet at best, a best-ever month from the Dart still represents nothing more than a mid-pack performance.

Toyota sold 2.8 Corollas for every Dart sold by Dodge in November. (Year-to-date, Corolla volume is four times stronger.) The Honda Civic and Chevrolet Cruze both sold more than twice as many copies as the Dart did last month. By large margins, the Dart was also outsold by the Volkswagen Jetta, Ford Focus, Hyundai Elantra, and Nissan Sentra.

Through the first eleven months of 2014, Dart volume is down 1% compared with the same period one year ago. However, the trend has been much more favourable since the beginning of May. Over the last seven months, year-over-year Dart volume is up 17%, an 8K-unit gain.

The Dart’s November performance was especially strong in a particularly healthy month for the compact car segment as a whole. Sales of Corolla-class cars are up just 3% this year but jumped 8% in November thanks in large part to big gains from the Corolla (up 14%, equal to 3175 units), Chevrolet Cruze (up 26%, 4657 units), Volkswagen Jetta sedan (up 32%, 3440 units), and the Dart. Nissan Sentra sales jumped 16% and the Kia Forte was up 14% for a combined 2490-unit improvement.

As for its impact on the overall Chrysler Group, the Dart generated 5.3% of Alfa/Chrysler/Dodge/Fiat/Jeep/Ram sales in November of this year, up from 4.6% in November 2013. Chrysler says their four car-selling brands generated a combined 26% year-over-year car improvement last month, although pickup trucks, SUVs, crossovers, and minivans still accounted for 76% of the company’s total volume.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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108 Comments on “November 2014 Was The Dodge Dart’s Best Month Ever...”


  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Who wants to trust Dodge when you can have Japanese or Korean for similar $$? It’s not like people shopping this segment are cavalier spendthrifts, they need value and reliability and we ALL know about ChryCo small cars of recent decades.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      For whatever reason, there are those who simply don’t want a Japanese brand. In my own case I’ve only owned one single Japanese-branded vehicle in my entire driving career of over 40 years and that was a compact pickup truck. It’s not that I have anything against the Japanese cars, I just prefer to buy an American brand when I can. And since Dodge is an American brand name (even if it is owned by Fiat now) I would prefer the Dart over any comparable Japanese model.

      Of course it has to help that they re-tuned that little engine to give better performance. I recently purchased a Fiat 500 Pop and have to say I’m amazed at how quick and peppy that little car is. If the Dart had that kind of life out the gate, I’m sure sales would have been much better all along.

      • 0 avatar
        HerrKaLeun

        So you don’t like Japanese, prefer US cars but buy a Fiat?

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Yup. Couldn’t wait any longer and really wanted the new Renegade. Time constraints cost them an immediate sale.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Just one issue, Vulpine. You must’ve posted 20+ comments praising the mulch-carrying capabilities of small pickups, particularly in regard to their being superior to minivans for mulch-centric work.

            And I believe you said you’ve gotten rid of your pickup. So now your only vehicle is a 500? What of the need to mulch? Is there a trailer hitch on your Pop?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            ” Is there a trailer hitch on your Pop?”

            You’re kidding, right? I’m not sure I’d put a bike rack on one of those

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            I’m just concerned for a man in his 50s undergoing such a radical personality transformation that he’d give up mulching.

            I’ve been there.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The automakers must have entire teams dedicated to studying the mulch transportation needs of America.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “I’ve been there.”

            Been where, dissociative identity disorder or compulsive mulching?

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            You must’ve addressed that to Pete. He’s gone to sleep and I have dominance now.

            Hi, I’m Ludwig.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I had a choice; Trade the truck, or trade the Jeep. Either way, the wife needed something smaller than the truck, with an automatic transmission–which only the truck had. Since I absolutely hated the truck for its size and (lack of) reliability and we absolutely need the Jeep if snow comes during the course of the winter, the truck lost out. I’ll just have to pay someone to deliver my mulch for a few years.

            Surprisingly, the Pop is rated to tow as much as 2,000 pounds because it’s a non-turbo engine and an automatic transmission, while the turbo and stick models are marked, “Not recommended for towing”.

            On the other hand, had the Renegade been available just one month sooner, it’s very probable the Jeep would have lost out to the smaller Jeep.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Lie2: I suggest you go test drive a Pop. It might surprise you.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Vulpine, “I’ll just have to pay someone to deliver my mulch for a few years”

            Just get yourself a little trailer. Buy one or rent one when you need it.

            I have seen lots of subcompact cars with little utility trailers behind them, carrying anything from mulch to washing machines to refrigerators.

            One time, I saw a guy haul a fridge home from Home Depot on his hitch-mounted carrier of his CUV.

            Necessity is the mother of invention. Versatility and adaptation are the cousins of invention.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Just get yourself a little trailer. Buy one or rent one when you need it.”

            I’ve stated many times before here on TTAC that I cannot store a trailer in my yard. And renting a trailer is kind of a silly option for a one-shot trip of that sort when a pickup can do the same thing more easily and safely. You see, I do understand why pickup trucks are useful WHEN used for work; just not when used only as a family vehicle and/or status symbol. Buy a Caddy, Lincoln or Mercedes for that. More status, more comfort and lower cost.

            Personally, I want something like the Central American GM Montana, Ram 700 or Fiat Strada as my pickup truck.

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        Vulpine, you must be from metro Detroit … On the east coast, or west coast, a decent starter home costs 1M. With payments like that, bullet proof reliability is a must. So, Detroit vehicles are not an option. On the coasts, when you have a 7K house payment, your vehicle must last 200K miles without repair expense.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          “7K house payment”

          I’d kill myself

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          You must live in New York City, or Beverely hills. Or you have an interesting idea of what a starter home is.

          • 0 avatar
            nickoo

            That’s what cracker jack wwII era 1200 sf houses go for in LA and Bay Area. It’s total insanity, house horny “investors” about to be shaken out in the next crash, old timers living in their golden sarcophaguses eating dog food, and Chinese money launderers make up the majority of home owners in these areas.

            I will never buy a home here, I can accept renting for the next 30 years and then retiring somewhere sane. Look up Arcadia or Culver city real estate prices. It won’t be too long before Compton, Longbeach, and Lawndale follow the same trend.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Jimmyy- how high are you right now?

          $1M “starter home”? $7K house payment? And you assume that just because a car is Japanese that it will last 200k with 0 repairs?

          The only way I can rationalize your stupidity is if I thinl of you as an 11 year old boy who was eves dropping on his dad as he BSed with his buddys over a 12 pack of Budwiser. Obviously youve never been in the real world, because every Japanese car Ive owned has required some repair before 200k. Some more than others, like my Camry that the tramsmission was going out in at 155k when I dumped it. Others, like my Accord, simply started using oil after 150k or so, and also needed things like CV axles, alternator, starter, etc.

          Either that, or you need to quit drinking the bong water, bro.

        • 0 avatar

          jimmyy you are uninformed or you are troll! I owned only one Japanese vehicle in my life (’89 Toyota Carina II) and not living in Detroit I was still able to purchase nice house in the most wealthy medium size town in US in the SF Bay area and made 100K renovation paying in cash. So 7K monthly payment is not requirement to live even in crazy expensive SF area. And I drive Ford too. I am not as poor as you to drive 200K mile Japanese car either.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Jimmyy, you could say I’m on the east coast–but you’re absolutely joking if you think a starter home is that much. A decent 1500-2000sq-ft home brand new runs about $250K, a quarter of what you’re claiming and the mortgage would run around $1500/mo. or so. Older homes vary from as little as $50K (for a real fixer-upper) to maybe half a mil if it’s bigger and well cared for. A full mil is a 3,000sq-ft+ house on a full acre of property. (I might note however that the quality of the construction crews seems questionable. They may meet code, but within 10 years the owner has to rebuild any wooden exterior components like stairs and decks.)

          But then, I live between Philadelphia and Baltimore–far enough away to serve as a bedroom community for either city whether you drive or take the train.
          I recommend a Tesla Model S if you drive. You don’t have to buy gas, then.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          People who pay $1m for a home either have money to spare or are making up for shortages elsewhere ;)

          • 0 avatar
            George B

            Most of those $1m homes are really <$200k structures built on a really desirable and expensive piece of land. What's strange is the small houses don't get torn down and replaced by larger houses.

        • 0 avatar
          Onus

          East coast here. Bos-NY-Wash megalopolis. I live in CT specifically. You can spend that much money in some areas for sure. But, nearly everything else is much much cheaper.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        Are you sure the 1.4L turbo was retuned, or is it just because it’s in a much smaller, lighter car? That same engine in the Dart was really lambasted in reviews and taken out of the Dart lineup with the exception of the high mpg ‘Aero’ Dart special.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I’ll admit I haven’t looked yet. Do you know how much the new Dart weighs? Because if a non-turbo 1.6L engine can be so lively in a 3,000# car, then the turbo should be almost insanely so–as seen with the Abarth version of the Fiat 500. If it isn’t, it pretty much has to be de-tuned or the car has to be insanely heavy for its size.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      I’ve noticed Chrysler group products are very popular with the military. I don’t know exactly why that is, but I assume it has to do with easy financing. I see a ridiculous number of challengers, chargers, 300s, avengers, jeep products, darts, old 200s and even new 200s whenever I drive by a base parking lot.

      • 0 avatar

        They have a deal with Santander and Chrysler Capital is very generous with their terms/qaulifications.

        • 0 avatar
          el scotto

          Allotments from your paycheck take care of your car note. Lots of military personnel have some cash socked away after being deployed 12 months. The Hemi badge never hurts in a testosterone filled environment.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Think it has more to do with Exchange car sales. While deployedbone can pick up a vehicle tax free and at a significant discount. Ford and Chrysler I believe are the last 2 doing this and Chrysler was more aggressively marketed my last trip. On the plus side the way the world is I’ll be able to deploy again and maybe pick up that Harley I’ve been admiring the past 3 trips.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Not after January 1st. The alotment rules are changing.

        • 0 avatar
          mkirk

          The we finance e1 and up joints have a lot of 3-5 year old Chrysler products generally. As for what’s popular, depends on your post. As a Fort Drum Soldier it was likely a Hyundai purchased at one of Billy Fucillo’s establishments. Here at Fort Knox Sam Swipe will sell you pretty much any make. Fort Leonard Wood was Chrysler Country though.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        nickoo, it’s the same in my area on the military bases as well, especially around the barracks areas where there are huge numbers of Wranglers, RAMs, Challengers, and Chargers in the parking lots.

        But lotsa girls drive Wranglers too. I saw a gorgeous all-white two-door Sahara Hardtop Wrangler pull up at the BX one day, and out popped four lady AF sergeants. It was a Kodak moment, but my Tracfone doesn’t have a camera.

        I believe Flybrian is right in that easy financing is certainly one factor for the popularity of Chrysler products, but I think another equally important factor is the raw gut-wrenching appeal of these visceral machines when properly and suitably equipped.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Those are probably all G.O.V’s. They are popular in the motor pool for sure.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Something has to take the place of the 200 now that the 200 is cool

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      As in, this litter needs a runt?

    • 0 avatar

      This very blog had an article a while back pointing out that due to the deep discounts on the old Avenger, it was probably cannibalizing some Dart sales – if you are just looking for a transportation appliance and the Avenger is discounted cheaply enough to make it the same price as a Dart, with more features and room, might as well buy the Avenger.

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/07/why-buy-a-dart-when-you-can-buy-an-avenger/

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Exactly, now that the Avengers are gone sales of the Dart have improved. There will always be a market of some sort for the bottom

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        Yep, just like Taurus did to the Contour in the 90s. The Contour was more sophisticated and such, but it was still a lot smaller and expensive for what it was. Taurus was simply a better value for the money.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    The engineer in me just cant get behind Chrysler’s cars. They are so heavy and poorly proportioned.

    • 0 avatar
      frozenman

      +1 A small car that needs a 2.4L to provide good performance is not competitive. Weight is the same as a 4cyl Honda Accord and 400lbs+ more than Civic.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Am I missing something? It gets 8.2 0-60 with the 1.4. Seems entirely adequate for a cheap family sedan.
        Does it really take mid-low 7’s or even 6’s to be considered “good” these days?

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        (2nd try) It gets an 8.2 0-60 with the 1.4. That’s not class-leading, but it should be adequate for a cheap family sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          It wasn’t all that long ago that an 8-second 0-60 was considered an exceptional time in anything short of a muscle car. That’s still quick, even if it isn’t capable of 150mph. Most people won’t drive it even that hard.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      That’s my biggest issue as well. As much weight as the Accord, a lot less space, slower but with worse fuel economy (in everything but the 1.4T, and even then it’s a wash). And care to take a bet as to which car will still be problem free and worth something in 5,10,15 years?

      The Dart can only sell on a few merits:
      a) financing anyone with a heartbeat
      b) loading it up with incentives to lower the price significantly
      c) it has a comfortable/quiet interior for a compact car.

    • 0 avatar

      Sporty, How do you mean poorly proportioned? I know the Dart was a rush job to satisfy requirements of the buyout, but I thought the exterior design was the one thing the Dart had going for it.
      I like the proportions, but then again I liked the proportions of the Sirius-Stratus twins, and the LH clan.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        The pear-shaped back end has middle-aged, four kids, housewife written all over it, though I doubt she would be caught dead in one

        • 0 avatar
          This Is Dawg

          Especially visible in this post’s picture, the dart has a butt like a balloon that’s been way over-inflated. The word “dumpy” comes to mind every time I see one. Maybe “wal mart” as well.

  • avatar
    blackEldo

    Any idea what percentage of sales went to fleets?

  • avatar

    I’d be curious to know what the fleet breakdown of Dart sales versus the others is – I would bet that a few of those big sellers (Hyundai and the Cruze) are going to rental car companies and the government.

    Although on the flip side, now that the Avenger is dead and the 200 is probably being held for consumers, maybe the Dart is selling more because it’s now selling to fleets.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I know both Hertz and Thrifty have/had them, though none were available at either when I was renting (Hertz had a ton of Altimas). Hertz has lots of Darts for sale, 2013 models, with under 50k, some under 40k.

    • 0 avatar
      Brantta

      % Fleet vs. Total…2012-CY…2013-CY
      Chevy Cruze………..26%……21.5%
      Ford Focus…………26%……26.4%
      Dodge Dart…………16%…….5.7%
      Hyundai Elenatra….12.5%……18.1%
      Kia Forte………….11%……12.5%
      Mazda 3……………19%………9%
      Nissan Sentra………18%………7%
      Toyota Corolla……22.4%……14.8%
      VW Jetta…………..16%……12.5%
      http://www.automotive-fleet.com/

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Unsurprisingly this car started to hit it’s sales stride when the discounted 2014 200 and Avenger began to get scarce.

  • avatar
    zach

    I was just behind one and never realized how big the rear window is, it actually meets at the roof!

  • avatar
    nickoo

    The dart was a rush job to meet US government’s MPG car requirement so Fiat could get more shares of Chrysler. The second generation car has no excuses for not being a lot better when it comes out next year, especially, IMO, the exterior styling department.

    Dodge will have a new hurricane 4 coming online which will be a huge product for them, their current 4s are quite lacking. The 9 speed will continue to improve and make it’s way across the line-up which will help a lot.

    The dart as-is is not sized very well. It’s technically a small midsize if I recall, based on it’s interior volume.

    Dodge needs to better plan it’s lineup:

    Fullsize: Charger, keep doing what its doing, don’t mess with success.

    Midsize: *Rumored RWD car shared with alpha, can’t get here soon enough.

    Compact: Dart, needs to shrink slightly or lose weight.

    Subcompact: Need a “hornet” hatch desperately here, a cheap entry level car allows the compact to be nicer.

    Minivan: Rumor is the Caravan might go away, that would be a huge
    mistake. Keep the minivan.

    Crossover: Journey, need to keep improving this beast with each refresh, still not up to speed with competition.

    SUV: Durango, good for what it is, just priced too high to sell reasonable volume, especially as the trim levels climb.

    Chrysler needs a lot of work on product planning too. Needs the 100 ASAP, and as Dodge fills out its line-up, it needs to get rid of lower priced, rental spec, trim levels. Chrysler doesn’t need cross-overs or SUVs, that’s what Jeep is for, however, they need to keep the town and country and move it upscale.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Great example of halo effect. It’s undeniable that people are walking into showrooms motivated by other products, the sales data says it all.

    Chrysler brands are on a tear and a rising tide lifts all ships.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Yep, the same thing happened in the mid 90s with their product blitz back then. The neon was a pretty sweet driving car, but it had some issues such as the 3 speed auto and the head gaskets that liked to blow out.

      I hope cry-co learned its lesson and fired whoever decided on those cost cutting measures this time around.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The 3-speed auto was Chrysler’s modified Torqueflite, very durable, but not economical. Keeping that transmission so long was Lee Iacocca’s idea. The failing paper head gaskets were the responsibility of Tom Eaton, the chairman who replaced Iacocca and sold out Chrysler in the infamous “merger of equals”, walking away with a bundle of cash. Eaton came over from GM, so he was experienced at overruling engineers to save a couple bucks per unit on critical parts.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I asked a friend why they switched from Buick to Chrysler and the reply was “Chrysler is doing good things. GM is good at pulling the wool over people’s eyes.”

      He and his wife bought a left over 2014 Chrysler 300 V6 for $26000 at a dealer end-of-year sale in El Paso, minus the trade in value for their old 2007 Buick. This car is mostly for his wife because he drives an F150.

      And this guy is no conservative. He is a life-long New Mexico Democrat, long time mover and shaker for the Democrat Party in New Mexico, a Democrat delegate to the national convention, and business owner.

      He didn’t like the GM bailout either.

      But he likes what Sergio has done with Chrysler and the $1.3B bribe. The winners are clearly the Grand Cherokee, the Cherokee, the Wrangler, the 300-series, the RAM, and , now, maybe, the Dart?

  • avatar
    markf

    Dodge Dart, the 2014 Neon……….

  • avatar

    Launch was botched, reeks of a compliance car, budget shoppers got so very much more with the now-defunct Avenger/200. What else is there to say?

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      No doubt it was a compliance car. It was also the first joint-project car from Fiat and Chrysler. There was bound to be some teeth cutting issues, the second generation, which will debut next year, will determine if they are doing it right.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Maybe that you need to check it out for yourself before you pan it?

      • 0 avatar

        I have. Its an acceptable car whose strong suit IMO is the styling. Certain trims have a nice look to them. But Chrysler as a whole has a major product credibility problem when it comes to the compact segment. For as much as they wanted it to be, the Dart was NOT a hit-it-out-of-the-park car and its clear that’s what one needs to be in order to play.

        Remember 20-odd years ago, Chrysler was a distant 3rd/4th-runner-up in the fullsize truck segment until the brash Semi-inspired Ram came along.

        10 years ago, they were an also-ran in the mid/large/premium segment until the LX cars bowed.

        The current Durango is also one of those turn-around cars.

        The Dart isn’t.

  • avatar
    willbodine

    It has often been said that the best cheap car is a used Corolla or Civic. Chrysler has an horrendous track record with small cars: Neon, PT Cruiser, Calibre. Crap cars each and every one. How could anyone think that a new Chrysler small car based on a Fiat product could in any way be thought of as class-leading? Fiat has the worst quality record of any automaker in the western world.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      They are doable if you don’t keep them beyond the factory warranty period, or buy an extended warranty if you want to keep it longer than that. All cars breakdown. Chryslers just break down sooner than the others.

      Best thing to do with an out-of-warranty Chrysler product is sell it, trade it, give it away, and let future breakdowns be someone else’s worry and expense.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Which is also why they’re such a bad idea if you’re not going to keep them. Nobody will pay for them used.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          True, but there always will be takers. That’s why we have a robust used car market.

          Example: buyer A buys new Chrysler product as main transportation, then trades it before the warranty expires.

          Buyer B buys this out-of-warranty jalopy off the used car lot, expecting to either work on it when it breaks down or put some cash with it to keep it running.

          Buyer B may not have the cash to buy new or may not need it for their main transportation. It could be a cheap throw-away commuter.

          In MY area Chevy trucks are huge with a demographic that is here illegally but needs transportation and can only afford ONE vehicle for the whole family.

          Chevy truck parts are plentiful, readily available and can often be replaced by a shade-tree mechanic.

          The new trucks with their OBDII ports and other electronics are getting to be too complicated for the shade-tree mechanics, so the old, road-worn trucks are kept running and on the road by those who can’t afford to buy new.

          I could see used Chrysler products being used for HS and College students. Cheap, and if they break down just call the junk yard to haul it away, and get $100 for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “Fiat has the worst quality record of any automaker in the western world.”

      I assume you mean that 40-year-old reputation in the US, because the REST of the Western World seems to love it and its European reputation is remarkably good.

      Honestly, you wouldn’t recognize the new Fiat compared to 40 years ago.

    • 0 avatar

      The Neon and PT were decently designed cars for their times.. with unfortunate build quality.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        What, exactly, do other companies do differently that Chrysler needs to emulate?

        Personally, I’ve covered 300,000 miles in a neon and PT. I sincerely don’t feel my quality of life has been made worse by it. The (2008) PT is right at 100,000 miles– I’ve yet to even change the brakes.

        • 0 avatar
          formula m

          I can’t take you seriously if you tell me you can go over 100,000 mi without changing pads and rotors. Even if you haven’t, just means your car isn’t safe.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            It depends on how the car is used and how often the brakes are applied during your commute.

            People with long commutes, like 200 miles a day roundtrip on the highways, rack up ~1000 miles per week, ~52K per year, and after 150K still have their original pads.

            I still have the original pads on our 2008 Highlander with almost 90K miles on it. Ditto with our two other vehicles.

            It really depends on the traffic you drive in.

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            I’m at 92k on original pads and rotors, with about 1/3rd left. With a manual trans, and where I drive, there’s virtually no need to use the brakes to control speed, they’re really only necessary to come to a full stop. Hence, they last.

          • 0 avatar
            iNeon

            I don’t appreciate your cavalier attitude, Formula M– What makes it unsafe? When I push the middle pedal; it stops. It stops with no noise, shaking or untoward actions. That (you know… and the inspections whenever I change the oil or rotate the tires…) tells me the brakes are fine.

            Has any car that stopped fine become instantly unstoppable under your stewardship? Has any well-kept, moderately-driven 6 or 7 year-old car you’ve owned ever suffered complete, and instant, brake failure? Have I missed a safety memo that requires complete braking system rebuilds every 5 years?

            In the approximately 500,000 miles I’ve driven since getting my license in 1996– that situation has never presented itself to me. I do understand happenstance, and am as prepared as anyone else for those situations.

            I urge you to take a step back, Formula M; you’ve questioned something I will not allow questioned. I will read any number of ‘hehehe Chrysler owners are poor morons that just don’t know, and can’t afford, any better’ commentaries– but I will not have you tell me I’m putting others in danger because my car has performed above the low standards you’ve assumed it was built to meet.

  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    I do like the new advertisements for Dodge (Dodge Brothers)

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Agree on the Bros.
      But the “don’t touch my Dart” ones seem incredibly lame.
      Like they have zero to advertise about the product itself.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I hate that ad because the Dodge Brothers both died in 1920, eight years before Chrysler bought the remains of their company. The suggestion that they had anything to do with the Chrysler Corporation vehicles that came later is an insult to the audience’s intelligence.

      • 0 avatar

        Its the same company that’s all rah-rah America while being owned by a foreign entity, too. So…no surprise.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        More accurately, it’s an insult to anyone in the audience with any intelligence. It’s unfortunate, but a high IQ isn’t exactly the market demographic Dodge is targeting. A low credit score is more accurate as to whom they’re going for.

        In that regard, the Dart really isn’t that bad. If it’s the only new car someone can afford, it’s okay. The problem is it just doesn’t do anything particularly well, and longevity is suspect in comparison with competitors, so it’s probably not going to have a whole lot of conquest sales. As others have pointed out, the increase in sales is most likely due to the outgoing Avenger having been completely phased out.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          It’s no worse than the Buick commercials with the ghost of Harley Earl.

          The real ghost of Harley Earl would have been chasing any female crew member around the set.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I wonder if sales got an addition boost because the GT was introduced with a revised and apparently better 2.4 Tigershark. According to Allpar an SRT version is due next year with option AWD.

    • 0 avatar
      EAF

      I *believe* the 2.0/2.4 Tigershark (dumb name) is a GEMA engine with “multi-air” adapted to it. Same engine in many Hyundai’s (Sonata) as well as the Mitsubishi Evolution X. I’ve heard only positives about the aforementioned.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Correct about GEMA http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Gasoline_Engine. I’ve heard good things about these engines. The 2.4 adds Fiat Multi-Air technology.

        If I was in the market for a compact I would consider the Dart over a Hyundai or Kia. The Alfa lineage has to give it some brio.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    It’s amazing how short sighted people are when it comes to cars like this. A few thousand more and your resale value would nearly double with something like a Corolla.

    Dodge continues to scrape near the bottom when it comes to reliability. You can’t give these cars away once they get outside the warranty.

  • avatar
    TW5

    Don’t Touch My Dart is making people buy Darts?

  • avatar
    omer333

    If you follow TTAC’s advice of “Hit’em where they ain’t”, the Dart does that quite well. For less than $20k (before rebates), you can get a car with way more kit, engine, and drivetrain, and interior than the Corolla, Jetta, Focus, Cruze, and Civic. The only car in the segment that offers as much is the Mazda3, but you still only get the 2 litre engine.

    The Dart’s a good car, it just needed to be 200lbs lighter.

    Oh, and it really is $1m to buy a home in the SF Bay Area. Oakland and San Jose might be less, but not much. Prices are starting around $250-$350k in Salinas, but that’s the price to pay.

  • avatar
    ErRoc

    The compact market tough market to break into, especially with a revived nameplate on an aggressive (read: not like the rest of the class) design.

    I personally own one with the most critisized powertrain (1.4T DDCT) and am thrilled with it, however I understand that the bold styling in this class doesn’t sell volume like civics, corollas, etc. I quite enjoy the platform, and think that although it is not a huge seller (although 9k/month is not bad), it would make a great srt4 platform to continue to elevate dodge as a performance brand along with the Viper, Hellcat twins, And other SRTs.

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