By on November 6, 2014

tesla-model-x-09

Were you hoping to have a Tesla Model X next to your Model S sometime in the next few months? How does Q3 2015 sound?

CEO Elon Musk informed investors during his company’s quarterly earnings call Wednesday that the electric SUV would be delayed until the aforementioned quarter to insure quality would be Job No. 1 as tooling and production step-up to handle both the S and the X:

In anticipation of this effort, we now expect Model X deliveries to start in Q3 of 2015, a few months later than previously expected. This also is a legitimate criticism of Tesla — we prefer to forgo revenue, rather than bring a product to market that does not delight customers. Doing so negatively affects the short term, but positively affects the long term.

In other news, Tesla is discontinuing two colors going forward — green and brown — and if you wanted a P85S, you’re out of luck there, as well: the highest-performing model will now be solely the P85D.

Speaking of the S, Q3 2014 sales have gone well for the automaker, with 7,785 units delivered overall and 907 delivered in a single day, the highest figures ever recorded in a quarter for Tesla. Most of the deliveries were in North America.

Demand for the 85D and P85D is also strong, meriting a boost in production capacity to over 2,000 units per week by the end of 2015.

Finally, the D is beating a path toward the Model 3. Per Jalopnik, Musk proclaimed that the dual-motor powertrain is a precursor to what could happen when the low-cost EV arrives, which may entail a FWD model followed by a D version.

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42 Comments on “Tesla: Model X Delayed Until Q3 2015, D Models In High Demand...”


  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Don’t they pay that poor man enough to afford spine surgery?

    Those rear doors… jeez, what a dorkmobile.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Tesla actually sells something you can’t get elsewhere, and cars that Toyota hasn’t already done better.

      I’m not much for expensive cars or nameplates, but I get it for Tesla.

      (I don’t get it for similarly priced cars with the same kind of engines and doors that I have on my Toyotas.)

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        If you mean different=value then I guess you’re right, but is that a proper measurement?

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @Lie2me
          When I compare a 3-Series and a Camry with leather seats, the Camry wins. It provides the same transportation with roughly the same ammentites for less money. Yeah, there are differences – but they aren’t worth several thousand dollars to me, and the running costs of the of the Camry are likely to be lower too.

          But no such comparison is available for the Tesla car(s). If you want a 200+ mile electric sedan, you have one choice. If you want a 200+ mile electric crossover with gullwing doors next year, you have one choice – and it costs what Tesla sells it for. So, if you want a long range EV, paying $80k gets you something you can’t get cheaper from some other vendor.

          I’m not arguing that this is value in and of itself – but, if you value these things, you can get them for a luxury car price. I value these things, but not enough to drop $80k car. But I get why someone would want to spend that kind of money on that kind of car.

          On the other hand, df someone pays $80k for a 5 or 7 series, I don’t get it – because I would MUCH rather have a Camry and $45k in my pocket. The marginal cost of that BMW is MUCH higher than the marginal benefit. At least for me. Someone with different values, or different life experiences, might have a different answer.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Mr. Burns was middle-aged once too.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “Musk proclaimed that the dual-motor powertrain is a precursor to what could happen when the low-cost EV arrives, which may entail a FWD model followed by a D version.”

    With the packaging advantages of electric drivetrains, I wonder what if any advantage there would be in making a FWD version.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “With the packaging advantages of electric drivetrains, I wonder what if any advantage there would be in making a FWD version.”
      A flat load floor without a big motor hump over the rear axle.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        There’s not a significant amount of space to be saved there because the of the rear suspension and battery space requirements. They’d just be consuming more cargo space in the frontal compartment with a FWD drivetrain anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I’ll accept the argument on the suspension, but not on the battery; Tesla’s battery packs are virtually flat and would need to remain so for the battery-swap stations to be effective across multiple models.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Yes, the batteries are somewhat flat, but they aren’t so thin as to not consume a good amount of floor space/interior room. The rear seating area is notably shallow in the Model S.

  • avatar
    jrmason

    Dolorean meets Pontiac Aztec.

    • 0 avatar

      Nope. The Model X will sell like CRAZY. I am not a Tesla fan, but that thing is going to be a huge winner… if they can get it launched successfully and get their many production bottlenecks sorted out.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Not sure how something can be a winner when it is going to lose money.

        Tesla’s main source of cash comes from debt. It posts losses, quarter after quarter, on a car with even higher ARPU than this. How is this model supposed to deliver profit when the current model on the market cannot?

        The continuous delays are largely a cost savings measure — R&D costs money, and the company is trying to hold down its costs by deferring them. But a car company can’t defer R&D into perpetuity.

        If this was a winner, then Tesla would be trying to stay on schedule instead of continually delaying it, as a winner would produce much-needed profits. But since it isn’t, they keep talking about it because of the PR value of having more product in the pipeline.

        • 0 avatar
          bimmermax

          “Not sure how something can be a winner when it is going to lose money.”

          Absolutely true. People forget how much money Tesla is losing right now. If it weren’t for the sale of EV credits their losses would be stupendous.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            So tell me: Exactly how much money is Tesla losing? Show links.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Here we go again. The guy who can’t read a financial statement can’t figure out that his beloved Tesla posts losses.

            Tesla just posted a third quarter loss of $74.7 million. Losses for the year total $186.4 million.

            Here’s a link: http://www.google.com Learn how to use it for a change.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            How about just showing us all the REAL link instead of being so obstinate? Maybe I just don’t FEEL like searching for it.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “How about just showing us all the REAL link instead of being so obstinate? Maybe I just don’t FEEL like searching for it.”

            Are you this difficult in real life?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Vulpine,
            In the time it took you to whine that you didn’t feel like searching for Tesla’s financial results, you could have looked them up yourself on your favorite financial website.

            Tesla is losing money. It also is worth $30B because investors have faith it will eventually turn profits, but today it does not.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Your laziness and lack of smarts are not my problem.

            Your federal government has a website that includes financials from public companies. Go find it.

            As an alternative, Tesla’s website has an investor relations section where the financial statements are posted. Go find it.

            In any case, there is no point in providing you with a link since you can’t understand the financial reporting even when you do see it. You aren’t very bright, and you go out of your way to prove it day after day after day.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Yes. I take almost nothing at face value because I’ve been ‘stung’ too many times in the past by doing so.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            A guy who doesn’t take things at face value would learn how to use Google.

            And you need to break the habit of arguing passionately about things that you clearly don’t understand. The losses are obvious to anyone who can read financial statements, but you obviously can’t read them.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Here’s a “real link” http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/tsla/financials

            Tesla losses are 74million

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @VoGo: I’m not whining, I’m just sick and tired of PCH101’s smartaleky ways. He never presents direct evidence–ESPECIALLY when he’s wrong. I’ve argued with him for years about many different subjects and refuse to rise to his bait any more.

            @PCH101: My laziness and YOUR lack of smarts are YOUR problem; you’re the one who has been so obstinate that you can’t see the forest for the trees.

            Is Tesla “losing” money? Yes; because all their profits AND investments are going right back into the company to expand it so that it can be as big and as profitable as any other large automaker. You don’t think manufacturing facilities are built for free, do you?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Providing you with links is a waste of time because you don’t understand them. You’re not very smart.

            Meanwhile, the only thing that you do is spew opinions that are based on nothing. For a guy who is always demanding evidence from everyone else, it’s quite funny that you never provide any proof to support your own positions. And I’m sorry, but your hypocrisy doesn’t compensate for your lack of brain power.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Thank you, lie2me, for the link. As expected, the IMPLIED results are not borne out by the real figures, which shows their losses at the lowest level since 2009 AND that their gross income is at their highest level ever–almost 9X higher than last year and 8X higher than their previous highest. Most of that income growth is from sales.

            What it shows is that Tesla IS proving itself a viable company and that its continued growth will make it comparable to other large automakers once their many expansion projects are completed.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Vulpine,
            Take the high road; lead by example. We’ll improve the TTAC community with our insights, not insults.

            Admittedly, I am imperfect, but do the best I can and try to always admit when I’m wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            So, when you said this…

            “So tell me: Exactly how much money is Tesla losing? Show links.”

            You actually knew this…

            “Is Tesla “losing” money? Yes”

            Vulpine, are you trolling us?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “As expected, the IMPLIED results are not borne out by the real figures”

            That is complete gibberish.

            The net losses are calculated with the use of GAAP accounting, which is used by every public company in America. I suppose that you never learned that from your eighth grade education.

            And you wonder why I can’t take you seriously.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “You actually knew this”

            No, he didn’t. He’s just trying to save face.

            He can’t read a financial statement. He really has no idea whether there are losses or how the company is doing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “No, he didn’t. He’s just trying to save face.”

            Oh… trolling would have put him in a much more favorable light

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            No, Lie2me, I’m not trolling. I’m correcting a negative impression that PCH101 is well noted for exaggerating in nearly every discussion he gets involved with. In every case so far, his stated comment implies a far worse outcome than reality demonstrates. The link you so kindly provided proves this latest example.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      No. Not even close.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “Demand for the 85D and P85D is also strong, meriting a boost in production capacity to over 2,000 units per week by the end of 2015.”

    Wait for it….

    Everyone wants the D

  • avatar
    Marko

    I know this isn’t a popular opinion, but I’d rather buy this with four conventional doors.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      As would I. I’m not convinced that these doors would work in my garage.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        I thought the same thing… Gull-wing doors make no sense they take up too much room. However it turns out Gull-wing doors actual require LESS space to open then normal doors to open! Take a look at this picture:
        http://s.hswstatic.com/gif/delorean-2.jpg
        Wikipedia lists the opening as only 11″:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gull-wing_door
        I’ve always thought the biggest advantage was in the rain… the door provides cover and water should drain around the opening.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I not convienced it will have anything but conventional doors. A prime example, show cars always seem to have sexy mirrors and crazy doors like this. Yet, once the car moves to production, cost and safety standards bring it more in line with standard industry offerings. I think these doors are pretty awesome myself, but I can see a number of engineering and practicality issues why that would not make sense.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It is kind of a “we can do this better than anyone else since our COG is already so low adding 1000lbs to the rood makes little difference..” UPS. Gas car makers will have a hard time following this even if it does catch on.

      “Forcing your competitors to follow you over difficult terrain” is one of those Paul Graham pearls everyone either engineering product or dispensing cash is Silicon Valley, has heard a million times over and thoroughly internalized.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I now believe it won’t be possible for the Model 3 to be my next car.

    10 months to go on my Leaf lease, Elon…

  • avatar
    sandeepj

    Thank you for sharing nice information, For more details about car reviews, news please log http://autoportal.com/


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