By on November 13, 2014

2015-GMC-Canyon-Main_001

Would you like a “professional grade” Jeep Wrangler? Should Buick-GMC vice president Duncan Aldred get his way, that’s exactly what will happen as part of Aldred’s vow to “change the face” of GMC.

Edmunds reports Aldred is looking at where to take GMC to boost sales, including what segments will and will not be key to success. While only in the brainstorming phase with no plans at present to expand the lineup, he said there was “room throughout the range” if one were to segment it, with “plenty of room everywhere in the hierarchy” to spare.

Thus, Aldred’s team could bring aboard an “active all-road, Wrangler-esque type of vehicle” to the lineup, as well as a flagship SUV above the Yukon, and an Encore-sized subcompact crossover. Aldred added that the brand could play around in “more big segments” if so desired.

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98 Comments on “Aldred: Jeep Wrangler-Style GMC Model A Possibility...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “active all-road, Wrangler-esque type of vehicle”

    Here’s a clue, B-L-A-Z-E-R. Is GM so dense that they think they have to copy someone else even though they used to build their own?

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      And while they’re at it, they should offer it with lowered suspension, full time AWD, and a stout turbocharged V6.
      I’ll take mine in all black, thanks.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        “And while they’re at it, they should offer it with lowered suspension, full time AWD, and a stout turbocharged V6.”

        I was fully prepared to hammer you because of your “suggestion”.

        But then I remembered the “SUV” that you were referring to.

        I second this notion.

        Resurrect the Cyclone!!

        (Typhoon while their at it?? ??)

        I never did get too comfortable with Blazers and Jimmies. The steering effort always seemed to feel too light for my tastes, with too much oversteer or something.

        Combine that with feeling top heavy. Add in that gloriously cheap plasticky interior that GM had in the 90’s.

        The big 6’s felt like they had more grunt than they actually did. I could go on…

        But the Cyclone was a different animal. I imagine the Typhoon was an as$-kicker, as well.

        Hmmmm. I’ll take them both, please.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      What about H-U-M-M-E-R?

      Let’s hope this time they don’t overshoot the target weight by half a ton and the target size by a foot and a half in very dimension.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I was following an H3 yesterday and bemoaning it’s demise

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          It’s most likely the Hummer Hx concept, they’ve talked about putting that into production for years as a GMC.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            What about the Studebaker H2! Lol

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “It’s most likely the Hummer Hx concept”

            That’ll work, but the time to do it is NOW

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think it’ll need toned down!

            http://image.trucktrend.com/f/future/concepts/163_1108_gmc_sierra_all_terrain_hd_concept/32785669/2008-hummer-hx-concept-front-view.jpg

            But I can see it as the High Sierra Denali.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            “High Sierra”

            Oh man. You’ve got me thinking about K-5 Blazers.

            Memories.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You’re welcome for the warm fuzzies.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            We had an 83 K-5 Blazer in the fam. No options with the exception of an auto transmission AND 4WD.

            It was kept down on our family’s property.

            Had those sweet vinyl seats with little piping that would leave huge indentions on your legs after sitting in them.

            Had the notoriously squeaky camper shell over the backseat which, despite never being removed, squeaked and chattered constantly (think removable shell like on the Ford Bronco).

            You could rotate the steering wheel about 90 degrees + and still be going straight.

            Lol!

            Damned tank, though.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Broncos, Blazers and Cherokees, those were some 4X4s

            That will be my only dip in the nostalgia pool

            Thank you

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            The last of the Broncos are carrying surprisingly high resale values…

            …but methinks Cherokee for the win. Value and reliability.

            Keep it inline six now, kids.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            The Hx was intended as removable roof, completely, not just the part in the above picture, and two engine options a 4, and a 6 cyclinder.
            If it would have been introduced as a Hummer it would probably have gotten the V8 after 2 years like the H3, as a GMC, you’d probably have to be happy with the 3.6l.

        • 0 avatar
          Sam Hell Jr

          The H3, the Xterra, whatever that Toyota was called … the market for Wrangler-esque vehicles is as big as the market for actual Wranglers, and no bigger.

          Speaking of which, I’m surprised the discussion about moving the next-Gen Wrangler production out of Toledo hasn’t been covered in more depth here.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            The segment can be cracked wide open, it’s a matter of how much makers want to succeed in doing so.

            Removable roof, removable doors, Bimini tops, pricing, engine options, all variables that can tear away at wranglers grip

            The wrangler is a big seller, why wouldn’t someone want some of those sales?

          • 0 avatar
            Sam Hell Jr

            Because CAFE and crash worthiness, I’d think. The current Wrangler layout is reaching the end of its regulatory compliance life. FCA will make the investment in a safer, more efficient Wrangler (aluminum, whatever) because the ROI is there. I can’t see another automaker putting that much upfront money into what would likely be an expensive, unique platform. The sales of similar models in the past just don’t seem to support it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Good points, Sam Hell Jr. I just find it hard to believe that GM and Ford can’t come up with something similar to the Wrangler with existing BoF platforms

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Lie2Me-

            You’d have a better chance of seeing Ford make a full size Bronco out of an F150 than a Wrangler sized vehicle. That being said, I would like a Bronco SVT Raptor thing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            BS, there are smaller BoF frames available now. GM has the new Colorado platform up and running, Ford’s small truck platform would take a little time, but is quite doable in the near-term

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m not saying it isn’t doable, but based on what Ford has done with it’s trucks, do you see them adding another platform or continuing to get the offroad liftstyle market with the Raptor?

            I don’t know about GM, it seems they are at least taking about it. Ford execs don’t even want to think about bring the Ranger stateside.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Comment eaten.

            Lie2Me-

            What makes you think that Ford, with their production constraints, current product rollout schedule, and lack of caring for any BoF vehicle smaller than the F150 (in the US) wants anything to do with a Wrangler competitor?

            I can GM building one along side the midsized truck twins though.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’d rather see a Canyon/Colorado Raptor fighter or some sort of off-road biased truck that is well beyond sticker engineering and a shock and tire swap.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @Lie2me……I’m sorta of interested in the Wrangler. I probably will never buy one, but its always fun to look. I owned one of the last generation Jimmys. It was as different from the Wrangler as night and day.

    Carry on guys, just another day, another GM hate fest.

    ZZZZZZZZZZ

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I meant it as a compliment to GM’s former (and present) capabilities, they don’t have to copy when they are one of the originals

      We only criticize GM because we love them and want them to excell

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        Lie2me….As a life long, {with a few exceptions} GM owner ,buyer, employee, and present retiree, I’m very much aware of GM “blunders”.

        I to really want to see GM excel. I just think that beating a product up while its still in the design stage, is piling on, for no reason

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Should we wait ’til the “blunder” is on the showroom floor before “beating a product up”

          How would that help?

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            I understand what your saying. Were you here in the time before the Camaro launch? The hate, and vile, that were spewed out. “Splash in the pan” “rental queen” “cartoon etc, etc.

            How about the 14 Impala? The comments here ripped it apart. Even C.R has heaped praise on the 14 Impala. I drive one everyday its the best car I’ve ever owned. I also owned a 2011 Camaro. It wasn’t the right car for my needs. But the build quality was flawless. {I know what defines build quality} I only kept the Camaro for 18 months, and I lost money when I traded.
            Still I recovered a lot more money than I thought I would. That tells me that in the used car world, the Camaro commands a big buck.

            Lets wait and see until we can actually see one, and drive it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            No, I missed all that. The B&B didn’t like the Impala?

            I guess the B&B could be wrong, hard to believe, isn’t it?

          • 0 avatar
            Monty

            Mikey – I would concur about the Impala. A friend of mine recently traded his 2011 Impy for a new one. Wow. To use a baseball analogy, Chevy didn’t just hit it out of the park, they launched it into the atmosphere.
            The 2014 Impala is probably GM’s best ever new car, AFAIC.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Tough love, right Lie2Me?

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    // “change the face” of GMC.

    Change the sides, too.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    // “change the face” of GMC.

    Change the s*des, too.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    A Wrangler is a Wrangler and no one should try to copy it. After all, it is an icon. I briefly owned a 1992 model.

    Ford should reinvent an updated and safer edition of the original Bronco and GM should… hmmm… well, invent something unique to them.

    The original Blazer was huge, so that’s out unless they downsize it, but it has to be different than the downsized model they used to have because as I recall that, while popular, it wasn’t all that good of a vehicle. I’m sure some will disagree, so there’s something at least to consider.

    The other Jeep-type vehicles GM used to offer were all rebadged imports, and I’m not sure if anything like that would have the same appeal. I have been known to be wrong on occasion, though!

  • avatar
    mags1110

    I don’t want to cause any american job loss, but why is there even a GMC brand? Why copy what Chev can and already is making, just use the Denali as a trim level to the Chevys. This would most likely improve brand imagine for Chevy across there entire line up and stream line production.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Because, for some strange reason, people are willing to pay more for product X with a GMC badge than a Chevy badge. They’ve been the exact same vehicles for almost half a century, but those three letters pull in an extra $5 or $10g per capita.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I’m not suire you pay anymore for a GMC than a Chevy that are comparably equipped. I bought my ’04 GMC Sierra 2500HD over the Chevy for the sole reason that I couldn’t stand the looks of the Chevy with that tacked on Avalanche front end. I traded in a Tahoe.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Historically, GMC was mechanically different (V6s vs. I6s) from Chevy, and until 1967, the entire front clip was unique. GMCs were(are?) also available in even lower trim levels than Chevy’s W/T. It was only after Denali was introduced that buyers began seeing GMC as more than just a rebadged Chevy. It certainly didn’t hurt that that was also the time GMC started using unique bodies (Terrain and Acadia) vs. just a unique front end or grille.
      Now that Pontiac and Oldsmobile have gone the way of [insert extinct thing here], GMC has taken their spot. A well-equipped Acadia SLT or Denali slots up nicely against the Buick Encore. What’s that you say? GMC will never have cars? That’s okay, they’re a dying market anyway. CUVs and SUVs are where the money’s at. And now that Denali has brand recognition, it’s never going away.

    • 0 avatar
      Domestic Hearse

      mags1110 – The reason GM has a GMC brand is because Buick dealers need a truck to sell. As most Buick dealers are now stand-alones (separate from Chevy and Cadillac stores), they’d have a hard time staying profitable without GMC trucks.

      This does cause a bit of model overlap as GMC and Buick have essentially the same vehicle in the Acadia and the Enclave, but other than that, GMC and Buick coexist well. It was a bit of a mess when Pontiac was still alive, as the three brands were all sold at the same stores with quite a bit of Pontiac-Buick model overlap.

      No doubt GM could fold GMC and add upscale versions of the same vehicles in the Chevy model lineup and maybe only lose a couple market share points, but then they’d be killing off their Buick dealers as they would struggle to stay profitable without trucks. And that is something GM is simply not willing to do at this time, given the strength of the Buick brand in Asia.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Oh, Jesus.

    Come on, GM. A GMC “Wrangler”

    Pffffffft. Scuse me, I’m a little gassy.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    GM had this vehicle once. It was based on the earlier gen Canyon/Colorado platform and it was called a Hummer H2. And right before the brand was folded, GM introduced the HX concept which featured a removable top and two doors in a trimmed down size — very Wrangleresque. Would have been a hit had the Hummer brand been allowed to live.

    So the history and the experience is all there, they just need to resurrect the HX and GMCize it. However, I don’t see how the current GMC design language and “face” can be made to pull off the “feel” of a Jeep nearly as well as the Hummer did.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      H3, it was the H3 based on the Colorado. a highly underrated SUV if you ask me, I miss them

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I (surprise, surprise) agree, front and rear lockers, steel bumpers, V8, manual tranny, was a pretty good truck, though the H2 had insanely better visibility than the H3, and is probably my biggest problem with them, H3T helped a little for that problem.

      • 0 avatar
        Domestic Hearse

        Ooops. Meant H3, complete brain fart on my part. And yes, Lie2me, not a bad vehicle at all. Could’ve been better with more horsepower, but for what it was, and for what it was intended to do at its price-point, it wasn’t bad at all.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          They were inexpensive for what you got, again, GM did something right and of course, it’s no more

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          The H3 was available with a V8 at the end, and that versions could have done with a little less horsepower. Felt like riding on top of a bobble head.

          Decent truck with the usual maddening GM details. For instance the heated seat controls were near the floor, there was barely enough room to get your hand down there and you couldn’t see what you were doing.

          Overall, not a Wrangler competitor. GM overdid the style with those mail-slot windows, and that limited the appeal to mostly poseurs. Say what you want about the Wrangler, it’s got mass appeal (men, women, single, married, city, country, red, blue, rich, poor, everybody loves them).

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Actually I’d like something a little less Wrangler and a little more Xterra. That’s why I like the H3 and, yes, I like it’s “go anywhere” look even if I only choose to go to the mall

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      H3 was close to the Colorado/canyon, the H2 wasn’t based off of any single vehicle, though it shares many parts with 3/4-1 ton trucks.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Now is the time GM probably regrets killing off Hummer…but having said that, sure, they could do a Wrangler-esque GMC, and it’d sell.

    Plus, look at GMC’s JD Power numbers versus Jeep.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I haven’t looked since gas went down, but when we were at 3.25-3.50 a gallon 08-09 H2s were selling used, those with less than 50k miles, for the same prices, and in some cases more than they cost new.

      04,06 H1s are the same deal, I can’t think of any other vehicle made in the last 10 years that can show similar data.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Where?

        The Toyota dealer around the corner from me had 3 H2’s that sat there for at least a year if not longer. I remember them always moving them around and kept them highly visible but at least 2 of them disappeared suddenly. The FJ’s they’ve gotten in don’t sit for too long though.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I doubt they had 3 08-09 H2s, and if they did they were trying to get out every penny.

          For 03-07 H2s well, they’re the older interfaces, you can get a largish amount for them, but it takes a while, the 03s started at 48k, so to get 18k 11 years later is pretty good and possible if they (dealers) work hard enough.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          There’s one at my local dealer, it’s been there awhile, but it’s high mileage and overpriced

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            There’s a bit of a disconnect, people want new ones, but used ones are going to go almost exclusively to those that are actually going to “use” them, and the people that use them don’t equate SUV to expensive this new found thing where automakers charge 30k profit on a truck based SUV has thrown a lot of people off.
            Dealers think they can exploit that, but being as I can’t buy new door panels, new front diff, among other things for my truck, its becomes a strange scenario. The vehicles have good value in them, but are at an age that similar aged vehicles have little value.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam Hell Jr

      There was no way the Hummer brand was going to survive the political environment of the time. Nor would it likely survive the next time petrol gets expensive. Fuel is $3/gallon and people want guzzlers again. This too shall pass.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        The cost difference out of my wallet from the $2.73 I’ve paid the last couple times and the $3.60 at the times it got high is minimal, it’s all about the mental thought process, if everyone’s used to 3.50 than 15MPG is acceptable if the vehicle otherwise is compelling.

        But no your right being anti-political correct is a bad image when the government and thus politics are suddenly making the decisions.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Sam, “Nor would it likely survive the next time petrol gets expensive.” I don’t think that holds true in America. Elsewhere, probably yeah, but not in America.

        In America there is a huge number of people who don’t care about the price of gas. We saw time and again when the price of gas went high and the F150, Suburban, and the like still sold all the OEMs could make.

        For people who have to worry about the price of fuel, they ought not to buy a gas guzzler. But large trucks, utes, etc continue to sell extremely well even though they provide OEM’s an outrageous $8K – $10K in profit for each and everyone of them.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Hummer had an image issue, that’s for sure, and it wasn’t because of MPG. It got to the point where you half expected any Hummer to have a huge decal from a strip joint. Things got out of hand, and it had very little to do with the product. Toyota sold plenty of FJ Cruisers and Lexus LXs without being the butt of jokes like Hummer was.

        I think that bad rep will clear once the last Hummer limo’s been fumigated, but I don’t blame GM for dropping the brand. It will be interesting to see if they can bring back the interesting Hummer 4wd tech without straying back into that opportunistic (and short-sighted) Hummer marketing.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “Hummer 4wd tech ”

          I didn’t know that the H2 4wd tech was anything other than a GM 3500 4wd system, including the Newprocess 203/205 for torque distribution.

          When did they change? What model year?

          The original H1 has a unique system of gears and chains and a high-mounted drive train but that is not at all like those in the H2 and H3.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Mechanically it did use very similar parts/ the same, but it’s implementation was unlike anything on the market for fullsize drivers.

            It has a feature similar to H1s that allowed pre-government required ABS H1s to function without need of lockers. It was computer controlled so not as good, modulating the brakes in a certain fashion activated it, look up lynch hummer, I’m pretty sure there’s a write up, and I believe the H3 has a similar setup.

            Mechanically, none of GMs vehicles had a transfer case that was fulltime 4wd w/ traditional 4-high and traditional 4-low. Nor did any other GMs have a factory rear push-button locker, it also had a alternate traction control, again lynchs website can better explain it.

            Where it differed from competition was, it was the only fullsize from the start made with offroad intentions. Approach,departure, breakover angles, these were and especially now, are completely un existent. I can fit 37s without any lift or rubbing, under carriage protection was actually good, no BS plastic guards as if that’s good enough, rocker protectors being standard are a nice touch.
            They have a few flaws but when it was introduced few actual off-roaders were willing to look at a vehicle without a solid front axle, had jeep looked like it does today, in 2002, it would have helped a little.

            But no, no where near as intrinsic as the H1s, but the original goal of the project was to create a vehicle for those that couldn’t afford the price the H1 had reached.

            The H1 when introduced was ~40k, in its last year it had gone up to 130k, no small jump.
            The H2 at 48k was a easy decision once GM had acquired rights to the name. The original H2 prototype had a 4wd system similar to the H1, but for the costs, it wasn’t realistic

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Hummer, interesting. Thanks!

            I learn something every day I visit ttac.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Really interesting, thank you Hummer

  • avatar
    matador

    Why do we have GMC again?

    They don’t have any unique products that I can think of.

    I hate to say it, but I’m starting to agree with the people that wanted Pontiac to live instead of GMC.

    This truck would need to be a Hummer. GMC doesn’t have that same “credibility” that Hummer had.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Meh, they may not have unique products, but their sales more than support their existence.

      It would be nice for them to carve out a niche, jeep is exploding, and GMC could make a reasonable attempt at the segment if they tried.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      GMC gives Buick and Cadillac a truck to sell. It is also far more profitable then the former Pontiac or the others, so it lives

    • 0 avatar
      CobraJet

      GMC is doing a better job today than in the past with regards to badge engineering. Every new generation of GMC leadership claims they are making the brand more distinct and exclusive. I have owned 3 GM vans, one Chevy Astro and two GMC Safaris. Absolutely no difference in them except grilles and minor badging. My Dad bought a new GMC pickup in 81. It had GMC badging on one side and Chevy badging on the other. The dealer didn’t even catch it.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Why is there a Ford pickup in the picture wearing a GMC badge?
    (Except for the front grille.)

  • avatar
    tbhride

    I dunno about a Wrangler competitor for GMC, but perhaps something that could compete with the Grand Cherokee. Something mid-sized with robust, off-road capable AWD/4×4, a respectable towing capacity, and can be lux’ed up in Denali trim to compete with the Overland JGC’s. Could use the Canyon/Colorado as a base to amortize some of the costs of developing that platform. To me that sounds like a great fit in the GMC lineup. Just don’t call it “Jimmy.”

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Forget about the Wrangler competitor for now, make sure you get the diesel option in that new truck on the dealer lots ASAP.

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    Finally some news on this, I was starting to think the project had been abandoned. I’ll buy 2 if that’ll help make it happen, is there a petition I can sign somewhere?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Let’s not get too excited, this is GM its hit or miss, they could add all-terrain tires to a GMC Terrain and call it good.

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        Way to burst my bubble Hummer, although I suspect there is a high probability that is exactly what it will be, “all-road” has crossover written all over it. GM did buck the trend and move forward with the Colorado so there is some hope I suppose.

  • avatar
    anti121hero

    My guess is that it will have independent front suspension with button activated 4wd and some ubiquitous gm v6 and generally be disregarded by the offroad community.

  • avatar
    Luke42

    I’ve been thinking about this one.

    I secretly like Jeeps, but won’t own one because it’s a heavy obsolete truck, and I don’t need one. But the Wrangler is still awesome, and it’s probably my default midlife crisis car.

    The current Wrangler is selling as many units as Jeep can make.

    Jeep keeps floating ideas about how to make the Wrangler a better vehicle, but a worse Wrangler. For instance, a modern suspension, better fuel efficiency, a convertible top that retracts automatically.

    But all of this undermines the Wrangler-ness. As near as I can tell, many of these efforts to modernize the Wrangler have been shouted down, because that would make it a modern CUV and not a Wrangler.

    But, I’d rather own a modern vehicle that reflects the Wrangler’s simplicity, durability, and hackability — while applying the lessons of a half century of automotive progress to building an off-road convertible vehicle.

    So, what to do?

    It occurred to me the other day that FCA/Jeep should keep making the Wrangler as it is, making small incremental improvements to improve its reliability, safety, and fuel economy. It’s printing money for them, and if they keep the improvements incremental, they can keep it that way – while maintaining the integrity of the brand.

    And then they should introduce a modern Wrangler-like “CUV” for guys like me, who would like a simple durable vehicle with a timeless appearance that’s actually built for the modern world. That means independent four wheel suspension, lightweight unibody construction, good MPGs, electronically controlled AWD and so on. But it still needs to be an off-road capable convertible that 2-3 motivated guys can rebuild in their driveway (think me and my sons, in a few years).

    If GMC beats them to the punch, fantastic. Just so long as it really does reflect the values of the Wrangler, while eliminating its weaknesses. (I’m not looking for another FJ Cruiser.)

    But, in the meantime, I’ll get back to my regularly scheduled fawning over minivans and EVs. The minivan gets me through the day, and the EV would do it better. But, when I think about saying “fuck it all, let’s go have some fun”, I really do think of a Wrangler Unlimited with the top down.

    • 0 avatar
      azmtbkr81

      The problem is that creating a unibody SUV with independent suspension that can perform well off-road is a very expensive proposition. By the time all of the structural elements are added to keep it rigid and strong enough for off road driving, the weight savings becomes negligible vs BOF. Solid axles are simple, durable, perform ideally offroad, and are very easy to modify and lift if desired. Same with a transfer case 4×4 system.

      20 years from now I suspect you and your son or daughter will have a lot more fun installing a lift kit on a 20 year Wrangler and changing the transfer case fluid vs. replacing 40 different bushings on an independent suspension and testing AWD circuit boards for shorts with a multimeter!

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