By on September 12, 2014

2015-ford-falcon-xr6-ute_100480760_h

The Ford Falcon Ute will bow out for 2015, alongside its Falcon sedan sibling, and Ford is preparing a final edition to commemorate the end of an era.

The last Falcon Ute will come with a 4.0L I6 making 260 horsepower. A turbocharged version of this mill is also available, and bumps power up to 362 horsepower. Both manual and automatic transmissions will be offered. The Ute’s final redesign follows an update for the Falcon sedan.

Ford’s Australian manufacturing arm will shut down in 2016, with arch-rival Holden ending its own operations a year after that. The Ute is considered an icon of the Australian motoring industry, which has now largely collapsed in a short time frame due to a strong Australian dollar and shifting market conditions.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

30 Comments on “Ford’s Final Ute...”


  • avatar
    GoFaster58

    Me want!

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Does that poor car really have box flares over the rear wheels and flared lips over the fronts? The JC Whitney-Martin grill is their weakest effort yet. It’s like they’re just going through the motions now. I’m jealous of Australia. But that it were the US that Ford was abandoning.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Is the bed on this car around the size of a Subaru Brat’s?

    So naming it to imply utility is like there having been a Metro Speedster?

  • avatar
    geozinger

    This isn’t meant as a disparaging remark, but glancing at the pic and not immediately comprehending the headline I thought: Kia has a pickup truck?

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    “Kia has a pickup truck?”

    Vaporishly, yes.

    http://www.kia-world.net/334/

  • avatar
    RHD

    If Kia were smart, they would build a mini pickup with a 4 cylinder engine that got 30+MPG that they could sell starting at 10,995 in the US. They could re-start a market segment that used to be quite significant (70’s and early 80’s). Keep ’em small and economical, just right for college students to use when they move out and back home every year. They could sell them as utilitarian commuters and to low-credit-score customers at 199 a month for 84 months. They would be positioned to make a killing the next time crude oil spikes and gas prices jump up again. Then they could be traded in on a Borrego a few years down the line, profitably rolling the old loan in with the new loan.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Gotta be sarcasm or you managed to miss the bajillion sorties between Vulpine and the rest of known space triggered by the new Colorado.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      No one can build a car today for $11K new and pass US safety, emissions, and CAFE requirements, along with consumer technology demands and make a profit.

      Why don’t you just add brown, diesel, manual, and 0 to 60 in 4 seconds and you can buy it CPO used with a $2000 rebate as your requirements.

      Car companies are not charities and Kia has moved up from crappy econoboxes

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree 11K is tight but it could be done for 15K and the Chinese could be the folks to do it. If I had my magic wand I’d say Geely simply recycle the old Volvo P2 platform you now own with cheaper materials, crank windows and other Luddite touches, a cheap I4 motor already certified for Cali, and very different styling so as to not undercut Volvo too much. Voila.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          I simply don’t understand this fixation on building a particular body style for which there is no evidence of demand.

          Is there supposed to be a point here? Are the fanboys really expecting the automakers to spend hundreds of millions or more to build vehicles that won’t sell simply because a few guys online think that they’re neato?

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Exactly. Complete agreement.

            North American buyers have spoken up loud and clear, there is no market in the US for a compact truck.

            If there was the Tacoma and Frontier wouldn’t have bloated to their current size. The Colorado/Canyon wouldn’t be almost GMT800 sized. Ford would have invested in updating the Ranger. Mazda would still be making pickup trucks, and Honda would be building something more likely based on a modified Accord or Civic chassis for a compact truck (instead of the Odyssey for the Ridgeline).

            The argument that oh if only something smaller was offered, stupid Americans wouldn’t buy a crew cab F-150. It isn’t true. They were offered. The sales data showed that sales were tanking. Everyone bailed out except for Toyota and Nissan, and their overall fortunes in the market aren’t even close the glory days.

            Everyone may look fondly at the old compact pickup trucks of the 80s and 90s. Yes, they were as reliable as the sunrise, and they were death traps, crude, noisy, and made with what would be considered today incredibly cheap materials – a sea of vinyl and hard touch plastics in bland colors.

            American buyers don’t want “small” trucks. They’ve spoken loud and clear on it.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            It would be the F150 in Australia, different places different demands

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          28-

          The P2 platform can’t be cheap to produce. The lowliest of vehicles ever built on the P/D Platform is the Five Hundred/Taurus.

    • 0 avatar
      mr.cranky

      @RHD- But, would YOU buy it?

      Either way, not gonna happen.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      All the vulpii would storm the showroom drooling, but when it comes time buy, suddenly their hands can’t reach their wallets… It’s called T-Rex Syndrome.

      They all want the other vulpii to pull the trigger, so they can scoop up a nice used one, when they all hit the used car market.

      OEMs *love it* when this happens!

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      KIA, not interested in Pickups vans are their thing

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      There’s just not enough of a demand. If manufacturers thought there was, and that a profit could be made, we’d be able to buy this in North America.

      I, for one, would be willing to fork out money for a new one, but I’m probably one of the 3 or 4 dozen who would.

      I think the most telling statistic is that Tacoma and Frontier sales didn’t increase anywhere near enough to replace the sales of the discontinued Ranger. I don’t know what former buyers of Rangers started replacing their little trucks with, but it sure wasn’t Tacomas or Frontiers.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    FPV will make a supercharged V8 version of this ute. The Ford V8 is called the Miami. Most of the work for the supercharged engine was done in the UK and Australia.

    http://www.motoring.com.au/news/commercial/ford-performance-vehicles/gt-f/final-fpv-pursuit-ute-revealed-44080

    Well, I do know you guys in the US love your V8 pickups. But imagine this, 4.5 second 0-100kph, or under 4.5 0-60mph. I do know this sounds arrogant but, this is one fast pickup. It use’s GM’s supercharged 6.2.

    You gotta love CAFE! But it’s a pity to see these two vehicles disappear, but was sadly inevitable for years now.

    http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/holden-releases-the-worlds-most-powerful-ute-20140911-10fmmh.html

    I do actually like the HSV Maloo over the Ford, but I’d have anyone.

    It will take some time for the US to beat this pickup in speed and acceleration.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    i dont understand why they cant move the tooling someplace cheaper and keep building them, or for GM too with their version.

    theyd have a lock on the US market, and still be able to export to other countries

  • avatar
    skor

    Ford of Oz received the tooling for the original Falcon in the early 60s where it evolved into a fine car line. The Australian Ford engineers took the wheezy American I6 and developed it into a an excellent engine, as good as any German or Japanese inline 6. It’s a pity we never got it here in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      The engine the 4 litre Barra was definitely the best thing, Ford Australia produced. Extremely reliable, and the ability to be turned into a monsterously great. Engine with turbocharging

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    i can imagine how silly this vehicle looks for non Australians because its ridiculously silly to me

    who wants a rwd live axled 4,000lb ute with a Ford Fusion note glued on?

    nah me neither?

    i dont like the current Fusion looking model

    the old Aston Martin looking model is one of the best looking sedans ever made but thats just me

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Silliness is in the mind of the beholder, many have wondered why Ford dropped the FPV version of the Ute. a lot of the negatives regarding the Falcon Ute come down to the fact that it is much expensive than the cheaper Ranger

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Vulpine: @jack4x: Semi trucks aren’t driven by un-trained idiots, either. drivers of Semi trucks are required...
  • Carrera: Every Saturday I take my daughter to balet. Since it only lasts one hour, I just sit in my modest, little...
  • DC Bruce: Once your German machine is out of its 3-year warranty, you’ll probably want to sell it before it...
  • pveezy: That’s because if you want a reasonably price EV, and you don’t want a car that makes you look like a total...
  • pveezy: I know everyone loves to hate on the Camry using tired old 2003 tropes about the colour beige, but it is a...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber