By on August 25, 2014

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Within the next few months, the 2016 Chevrolet Volt will enter showrooms on a new platform, cutting ties to the Delta II platform underpinning both the first-gen Volt and the Cadillac ELR. The move won’t matter ultimately, as the premium PHEV may not be long for this world as it is.

AutoGuide reports Cadillac chief engineer Dave Leone proclaimed it too early to state whether the ELR will see a second generation or not, proclaiming the brand was in “the business of making money,” and that management would make their decision when the time came to do so.

As of this writing, inventory is at 194 days, consisting of 1,400 unsold units. Meanwhile, only 578 copies of the $75,995 PHEV actually left the showroom through the end of July 2014 through the kindness of discounts and other incentives.

If cut, the ELR would join the Opel Ampera, whose own existence drew to a close after only 332 units were sold through the first five months of this year. This is likely due to the fact that few want to pay the equivalent of $51,000 USD for a Volt with a new face, or, in the case of the ELR, $76,000 for a Volt with a new body.

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77 Comments on “Cadillac ELR May Not Be Long For This World...”


  • avatar
    shaker

    As much as I love PHEV’s like the Volt, and as much as I love the looks of the ELR, this product was a bad move. A shame, really.

    If they offered me one for $35k, maybe I’d take it off their hands.

    Hoping the next-gen Volt is more affordable than the existing one.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Does it come with a periscope for rear seat passengers?

  • avatar
    Dawnrazor

    What a tragically missed opportunity.

    The ELR might the best looking and most stylish Cadillac to have been built in my lifetime (born in ’73), but the performance (really no upgrade over the Volt in this area) completely betrays the good stuff.

    They should have made this car an alternative to the Model S; at its price point it could have been a great “halo” car had it been a complete package.

    I just don’t forsee buyers who are in the market to spend $60k+ on a car ever being willing to make such severe compromises with regard to performance (even if a given buyer has no intention of hooning). Buying into the luxury tier should not require ANY compromises relative to mainstream products, but (at least on paper) it appears that a 4-cylinder Camry or Accord could out-accelerate and out-handle the ELR.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    That’s too bad. The PC crowd, who seem to lack an understanding of prices and marketing, will take a victory lap because they hated the TV advertisements.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Ya got to admit, the commercials were a little weird. The only way they could have been stranger is if Cadillac had decided to a “villains” theme like Jaguar did.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree that would have been cool, but the trouble is Cadillac *is* the villain.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        When it comes to automakers, I’m an equal opportunity offender (even my beloved Mazda is p!ss!ng me off in some respects with their new offerings lately).

        Let me be clear about Jaguar: It’s a company being propped up, exclusively, by Land/Range Rover sales/profits.

        It’d be DEAD poste haste if it were relying on LOSSES from its non SUV/CUV lineup.

        The F-Type is a flop (for good reason) as well as the XF.

        Jaguar should bring back the classic look of the XJ6/XJ8/XJ12with a revised chassis, interior and better reliability.

        When their fortunes due to their over-reliance on SUV/CUV sales change (due to a changing pendulum), JLR will be farked.

        And let me add that Jaguar and Aston Martin are incredulous, closely inbred versions of each other, both hawking outdated, POS cars cribbing off each other.

        Clarkson is a wanker for even trying to sell the notion that Aston or Jaguar are remotely worthy car manufacturers. They make poor quality, gaudy, hopelessly redundant fashion accessories for the terminally stupid & shallow people who have a lot of money or debt.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          100% True.

          We are fortunate to have Deadweight on the B&B – one of the few people with the insight and the balls to tell it like it is.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I appreciate that.

            Many people believe that moan to moan, “get off my lawn” style.

            But my frequent complaints about the things I perceive to be wrong (and even egregious wrong) about today’s automotive world are all voiced only after careful, measured contemplation.

            I don’t expect much agreement with my own viewpoints, being a skeptical, non-conformist, but am pleased that many who read and contribute to TTAC are co-skeptics, c no-conformists, & see what I do & share my pain.

        • 0 avatar
          probert

          Absurd.
          On fact they did try a classic look xj with a modern chassis and it failed.

          The only thing I can glean from this rant is that you don’t like Jaguar or aston Martin. No need to build a flawed philosophy around it.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Probert,
            DW’s post is an insightful counterweight to all the fawning fanboy magazine articles saying how wonderful the F-type and AM are.

            Now that the ‘Vette’s interior is decent, can you honestly tell me you’d spend double or triple the money for less performance and more “British-ness”? I know I would not.

            No one else is stating the obvious: that car sales for JLR are in the toilet, and SUVs are keeping them afloat.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          Normally, I agree with Deadweight. Not here.

          Jaguars are sold around the world, and what Americans think about how they suit the market here is irrelevant or more properly, relevant only to the USA, which is about 15% of the total.

          As for Jaguar and Aston Martin being the same under the skin, was true in the mid ’90s to early 00s. Not so much now, unless you think they share the same aluminum construction techniques under the skin. Which they don’t. Merecedes is buying up Aston now, starting with 5% and some engines.

          Jaguar is making almost twice as many cars as 5 years ago, easily verifiable on the Internet – 80,000 a year. But of course LR is making twice as much as well, so it’s still a 5 to 1 ratio. The new E series will determine their future, and all models are due for renewal in the next four years.Then we’ll see.

          I like a good rant myself, but getting one’s facts reasonably straight helps, unless you’re one of these people praising a thundering diss, apparently believing DW is telling it like it is LOL!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’m sorry, I got a kick out of that ad. I just wish it’d been done for a different car!

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    “The brand is in the business of making money”

    Lol. Then why make the Alpha platform, and abandon PHEVs?

    If Caddy wanted to make money and rejuvinate their brand, they would make a serious attempt at a PHEV and abandon this “compete with the Germans” garbage. PHEV technology is way more relevant to the average luxury buyer than Nurburgring tuning and Brembo brakes. And in any case, I would bet a PHEV could be designed to handle well anyway, with all that weight so low to the ground.

    No, Cadillac is in the business of making mistakes, half assing the products they actually need to nail and going 100% into products they shouldn’t have built in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Agreed, making mistakes since MY81.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Because the vast majority of PHEVs on the market are money losers for their makers. You keep repeating that PHEVs will somehow save Cadillac, but the market for those cars is exceedingly small. Cadillac has a chance to actually make a profit off the Alpha cars when all is said and done. There isn’t any hope for them to make a profit from PHEVs.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        +1 danio

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        >> the vast majority of PHEVs on the market are money losers for their makers

        How much do you think Porsche loses on each 918? How much is BMW losing on the i8? PHEV is going to be the majority of the luxury market. Nothing to do with saving gas or money and everything to do with quiet and wonderful instant torque. Learn how to make PHEVs at a profit or perish.

        Once you’ve driven an electric with some power, gasoline engines seem like crap.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “How much do you think Porsche loses on each 918? How much is BMW losing on the i8? ”

          I don’t know, but I’d be willing to bet it’s a good amount.

        • 0 avatar
          cackalacka

          +1 MCS, quiet delivery of a wall of torque, this concept is almost painfully obvious for a high-end livery vehicle.

          Instead, GM went the GM route and put it in a coupe to answer the unasked question. And now that it is about to be inevitably irrelevant, cue up the ‘har hars’ from the roll coal crowd.

        • 0 avatar
          Chris FOM

          The i8 starts at $136k. The 918 at $845 THOUSAND dollars. These are not volume models. The Alpha platform cars may be underperforming, but at least they’re playing in a volume segment.

        • 0 avatar
          ellomdian

          Nothing to do with the Torque, and everything to do with image-conscious high-end buyers.

          Are the i8 and the 918 awesome cars? Sure.

          But is Tesla selling like hotcakes because it makes a technically superior platform? If you talk to most of the people buying the car… no. It’s a big, fancy, highly visible iPod. It should come with special earbuds so that people know you own one even when you aren’t in it.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            Now that you’ve written this out in the open, how long can it be before Elon makes it so? The idea that there aren’t Tesla S branded earbuds or, better yet, borg like bluetooth monstrosity doesn’t really make sense now that I’ve seen the idea. Obviously color matched to your car, and with about a dozen batteries.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree with what you posted, but in general the brand has made a number of big mistakes since 1981. This particular PHEV was never going to profit, but unlike say the Volt, it has no sales volume to boot.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        “the vast majority of PHEVs on the market are money losers for their makers.”

        And all the Alpha cars with 4 figure incentives on their hoods, as well as failures like the STS, XLR, Catera etc. aren’t?

        And PHEVs have a small market because they aren’t well marketed. I would bet most folks don’t know what a plug in hybrid is, and I would bet when most folks hear “plug in” they think of a car that will leave them stranded. When in reality, a plug in hybrid = a “super hybrid”. If a car like the Volt got as good of a marketing push as a Prius, people would be more into them. Plus like others said, the silent effortless character of an electric powertrain is right in tune with what luxury buyers want.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      PHEV means silent vibration free driving coupled with massive torque. Just what you want in a luxury vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      A proper >= midsize luxury EREV platform would be a huge differentiator IMO. The smoothness, silence, reliability and torquiness of a proper electric drivetrain most of the time, coupled with a properly-balanced range extender. 40kWh battery (30 usable) and 75kW balance-shafted I3, properly muffled and mounted, to accomodate longer trips. 200kW motor at the rear with 100kW EREV setup at the front, differently geared.

      Shit, put that in an Escalade and watch greenies heads explode.

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      Sportyaccordy – “PHEV technology is way more relevant to the average luxury buyer than Nurburgring tuning and Brembo brakes.”

      As someone who just bought a CTS, I fully disagree with this. The first thing people ask me, both car people and non car people, is “is it the V/fast one? How fast is it? Did you get the corvette engine in it? ” I think most people are not even aware of the ELR and would sooner associate the PHEV tech as a money saving, economy option over a luxury option.

      That said, I think Cadillac is missing out here. We’re sitting at the edge of new propulsion tech truly becoming mainstream, and you can’t be wishy washy about it. There’s not going to be a true singular replacement for IC, do if you’ve got something that can feasibly compete, you’ve got to stick with it to establish yourself. Especially if you’re a luxury brand. You’ve got to put in the time to get the market to associate the tech your name. The prius really needs to be studied by every auto maker. Get a product you can make work and keep improving it. But you’ve got to be clear on the mission of the product and be true to it.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I don’t know that I believe that everyone asks those questions but I don’t want to get bogged down in a semantical argument.

        I agree that Cadillac is missing out on a huge opportunity here. Their brand is irrelevant, and while the ATS/CTS are great executions on their concepts, the concept is not relevant to today’s market. GM has a huge opportunity to get ahead of the curve and make a serious ground up PHEV luxury car. I am not sad to see the ELR go, it never should have happened in the first place.

        • 0 avatar
          SlowMyke

          Sportyaccordy, the one person who didn’t ask about the power/speed aspects of the car was a 25yr old who drives a civic and he scoffed about the had mileage I was probably getting. He then went on to say his friend’s parents bought a bmw that he loves to drive. That’s the conundrum here. A lot of people may be “concerned” with gas mileage, but give then the option to drive something and it’s a sporty luxury car they’re after. Cadillac either needed to go full bore green machine or do the high end lexus/Mercedes hybrid that augments the power more than the mileage. I like the elr (probably the looks and size most) but it didn’t commit to either end of that spectrum.

          Also their marketing sucks hard.

          And I’m not sure how you are concluding the brand is irrelevant… As far as American luxury goes, it’s far and away the most successful and people who don’t hate “gubment motors” generally appreciate Cadillac. Sure you have the population that refuses to forget the eighties and nineties, but Cadillac has made great cars in the 2000’s and you’ve got a lot of 20-40 yr olds who realize that.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            The brand is irrelevant. First let me just say the cars are not bad. In some aspects they are class leading. And they are by far the best cars Caddy has made in the last 40 years, well, maybe aside from the last CTS.

            But Cadillac has to put thousands of dollars on the hoods of the ATS/CTS to get them out the door, while BMW has no problems moving “inferior driving machines”. People aspire to own BMWs, nobody aspires to own a Cadillac. Couple that with Cadillac’s narrow (and IMO misguided) focus and unreasonably high prices and it’s clear why the ATS/CTS are way off their sales targets.

          • 0 avatar
            SlowMyke

            Sportyaccordy – yeah that I agree with whole heartedly. Cadillac has piss-poor packaging, pricing, and marketing strategy for sure. Someone on here said it in a different thread, Cadillac ought to have gone the route of the upscale Hyundais – create a price leading quality cat before squaring off head to head on all fronts, price included. Or they could have held it together for the thirty years leading up to the cts launch and not wrecked their cachet with the market… But they’re tired to GM so that was never going to happen.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “proclaiming the brand was in “the business of making money,””

    Do the sales figures know that?

  • avatar
    turbosaab

    “It’s not that senior GM management disliked cars. It was more an atmosphere of ‘benign neglect,’ a generalized consensus that we were, after all, primarily in the business of making money, and cars were merely a transitory form of money: put a certain quantity in at the front end, transform it into vehicles, and sell them for more money at the other end. The company cared about “the other two ends”—minimizing cost and maximizing revenue—but assumed that customer desire for the product was a given.” – Bob Lutz on why Cadillac failed

    Sounds like nothing has changed.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    At least the ELR didn’t take the whole month of August off.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Within the next few months we’ll see the new 2016 Volt in the showrooms? Really?

  • avatar
    cargogh

    Is it too late to shove the turbo 4 and 6 speed in it?

  • avatar

    The Delta-II platform as a whole is on its way out, in favor of a new modular platform. The only car that I can envision remaining on this platform for a while to come is the Buick/Opel Cascada.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, I guess this was predictable.

    But one wonders why similar hate and derision isn’t heaped on Lexus, which failed miserably (though not this miserably, it must be said) with not one, but two hybrids.

    Maybe it’s time for the Two Minutes’ Lexus Hate?

    • 0 avatar
      Compaq Deskpro

      Toyota is the hybrid king, and has the economies of scale and numerous hybrid platforms it can experiment with.

      Just wondering, exactly which hybrids failed miserably?

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        I’m guessing he is talking about the HS (remember that?) in the US at least, and the CT. Although I don’t know if I would say it failed “miserably” .

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Exactly. The HS was a bomb, and now that I’ve actually looked up CT sales, I’ll back off that being a bomb too, but it’s not exactly a roaring success either.

          So, even with the parent brand’s massive success and great reputation with hybrids, Lexus hasn’t succeeded much with them at all, so it’s not surprising Cadillac would not succeed either (at least off the bat, anyway). Even if they’d priced the ELR sanely, I think it’d still have been a low-volume piece, at best.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Lexus has been selling many hybrid models, some are hybrid-only, and others are versions of an ICE vehicle, like the GS. With the exception of the RX, none has sold well.

            But in Lexus’ defense, they have carved out a leadership position in hybrids. They have a commercial out claiming 85% of the luxury hybrid market.

            So when/if hybrid sales do start to get really big, Lexus is well positioned from a brand and market coverage perspective.

          • 0 avatar
            redav

            Another difference to consider:

            CT = Lexus with Prius drive train
            ELR = Caddy with Volt drive train

            CT = cheapest, entry Lexus
            ELR = double the price of an ATS

            CT = okay sales (because cheap, entry Lexus)
            ELR = not okay sales (because stupid price)

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Low performance, too expensive, and too small interior.

    But mostly, I don’t believe Cadillac owners want to mess around with TWO fuels.

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    So why can’t the next gen ELR just be a four door, based off the Volt? With the total lack of popularity of 2 doors (in relation to four door vehicles), that should have been a no-brainer @ GM

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    What a shock – not (and no pun intended).

    The only thing this has going for it is the potential to be a future collectible given the extremely limited production run, the technical curiosity, and the good looks inside and out (subjective).

    This wasn’t a “bad” car, it was a grossly over priced, horribly marketed car.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “This wasn’t a ‘bad’ car, it was a grossly over priced, horribly marketed car.”

      Yes, I’ve seen some people compare the ELR to the Cimarron, but it is really Allante & XLR Part III.

  • avatar
    matador

    Why bother with a second generation? Just ramp up production and you’ll have enough in surplus to last for years!

    ————-

    That car looks totally useless to me. Add 2 doors, and turn back the edges a bit. We don’t need more geometric faces on these things!

    Oh, and price it reasonably. The Tesla would be my choice for a high-dollar hybrid. The Tesla at least looks like a car to me!

  • avatar

    Hasn’t this story been beaten to death already? The idea of a 2 door low volume halo car, designed to create brand awareness somehow escapes everyone. Cadillac doesn’t want to sell the ELR in great numbers. It is more cost effective to build 1000 a month for 2 months and stop production for the rest of the year than to build 150 a month for the entire year.

    Acura sold a whopping 7 ZDX crossovers last month. 63 sold YTD or 1/3rd of what the ELR sold in July alone. Acura would kill to sell tens of thousands of them a year unlike Cadillac with the ELR. There are probably 25 to 30 cars/cuvs that the ELR outsells. A lot of them are mainstream cars that cost a fraction of the ELR.

    What we have is a bunch of Monday morning QBs who believe they are better then product planners at one of the worlds largest auto companies.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      The ELR didn’t create brand awareness; if anything, it hurt it.

      “What we have is a bunch of Monday morning QBs who believe they are better then product planners at one of the worlds largest auto companies.”

      This isn’t Monday morning quarterbacking; many in the TTAC community criticized the ELR even prior to its launch:
      “https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/gm-approves-cadivolt-elr-for-production/”
      Not to mention that GM has a colorful history of botched marketing plans.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      “It is more cost effective to build 1000 a month for 2 months and stop production for the rest of the year than to build 150 a month for the entire year.”

      Based on what? How is it more cost effective to have a plant idling for 10 months a year?

      And the average person does not even know the ELR exists. They will have a higher chance of seeing a current year Ferrari or Lamborghini. It was doomed for failure from the get go.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        The plant wouldn’t be idled for 10 months. Flexible production lines used at just about every car factory in the world now would simply transfer the capacity to a different platform.

        It doesn’t matter if the factory is building ELRs today and Equinoxes tomorrow. The issue is the factory is building something and at maximum utilization (look up LEAN manufacturing – Toyota basically invented it out of necessity, not out of genius)

        They are 100% spot on, it costs a lot more to build 150 widgets a month on a production line capable of building 1000 widgets a month. Low utilization is a massive killer of the bottom line, and over capacity was one factor that killed GM and Chrysler, and brought Ford to its knees. It’s also why Toyota shed capacity when they could have kept NUMMI. They had San Antonio at maybe 50% utilization and Mississippi sitting unused, and extra capacity in Mexico. It was easier to kill NUMMI and the outdated plant and cost structure, shuffle production of SUVs to San Antonio, reallocate those flexible lines to other products, move the Corolla to Mississippi and the Tacoma fully to Mexico.

        If you run a 1000 vehicle a month factory at 1000 vehicles a month for two months, spend 2 to 4 weeks retooling on the flexible line and fire it back up – it is WAY cheaper.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Would YOU drop $75,000 on a fancy Volt? I didn’t think so.

      Predicting the ELR’s failure wasn’t Monday morning quarterbacking – it was common sense.

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      Alluster – Acura is also killing the zdx, so..

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      The halo car might have worked if the Volt didn’t exist. But putting the Volt drivetrain in a cramped, very expensive wrapper is a tough sell

  • avatar
    willbodine

    GM doesn’t seem to learn from its mistakes. Case in point, The Volt didn’t really start selling until the prices were lowered (or incentivized.) Ditto the ELR.
    I think offering a truly deluxe version of the Volt would be the way to go. Something with full leather, power front seats, rear HVAC vents and adjustable pivots for the B-pillar seat belts. A Caprice, if you will.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Clearly the ELR was the wrong nut to crack this market with, but the fact remains: the luxury “greenmobile” segment is very, very tough to crack (or even understand). Even Toyota – the undisputed king of hybrids – has largely failed trying to sell them as Lexuses.

      I think the essential issue is that luxury car buyers want performance – at a minimum they want their cars to feel effortlessly powerful, and Prius-style hybrids or Volt-style plug ins just aren’t going to do that.

  • avatar

    Old GM would give up now, I hope new GM sticks with the concept learns from their errors and makes the next ELR even better.
    But GM has broken my heart too many times for me really to believe that they will, but I still hope.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      New GM is Old GM on a debt diet, so this thing will be axed and forgotten. I suspect eventually though they will try again with a different model and approach.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    GM made a big mistake by not making the Volt a Cadillac. They could have put a few bucks into upgrading the Volt’s interior, chipped the Volt’s motors to improve the acceleration, and charged $50,000 for it in sedan or coupe form. Virtually no one was going to pay $40,000 for a Chevy economy car, but a few more might pay 50 for a Cadillac eco-car that looked and drove decently. GM might even have a made a small profit on a Caddy Volt, which they have never done on the Chevy Volt and can never dream about with the ELR.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    This is hilarious. GM is offering $14,000 USD Supplier Bonus Cash for ELR in August for GM Suppliers looking to purchase one. My company happens to be a GM supplier and wandered into the supplier site…

    SUPPLIER PURCHASE BONUS CASH OFFERS2

    $14,000 – 2014 Cadillac ELR
    $2,000 – 2014 Cadillac CTS Sedan
    $1,500 – 2014 Cadillac ATS
    $1,500 – 2014 Cadillac XTS

    XTS, btw:

    MSRP of XTS as shown4 $ 45,525.00
    Supplier Discount Price5 $ 43,272.00
    Supplier Purchase Bonus Cash2 – $ 1,500.00
    Price You Pay4 $ 41,772.00
    Your Discount $ 3,753.00

    So $42K+dest for that… or $13-16K in five years. Here’s how MY13 FWD is fairing barely two model years old:

    08/14/14 NORTHSTR Regular $34,500 9,627 Above BLACK 6G A Yes
    08/21/14 PHOENIX Regular $31,400 16,496 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    08/21/14 ARENA IL $30,500 28,478 Avg TAN 6G A Yes
    08/07/14 ARENA IL $29,500 29,016 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes

    Oddly, XTS spanks MY13 CTS “Luxury” RWD:

    08/21/14 TX HOBBY Regular $23,900 10,926 Avg GOLD 6G A Yes
    08/05/14 FT LAUD Regular $24,900 13,547 Above Red 6G A Yes
    08/20/14 NASHVILL Regular $23,500 13,816 Avg BEIGE 6G A Yes
    08/14/14 TX HOBBY Regular $22,750 20,475 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    08/21/14 TX HOBBY Lease $22,600 22,083 Avg GREEN 6G P Yes

    Then there’s MY14 ELR:

    07/11/14 PA Regular $55,000 347 Avg BLACK 4H A No
    08/08/14 PA Regular $51,000 151 Avg BLACK EL A No

    Less than 500 miles and they do low to mid 50s.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    If you like the coupe looks of it, just drop a small block V8 in it and call it the SLR.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Someone please explain how GM made money (reduced tax burden, whatever) by making this car they clearly never intended to sell more than a few of. The marketing was more of a knife than a pat on the back. They never offered a value proposition for purchasing one over a Volt. The Volt had established that their pricing was not going to be supported. They released this at 20k+ over a Volt. The discounting was so steep and immediate that they can’t be accused of trying to set perceived value high in an unsettled market. Even for GM, this doesn’t look accidental. It’s infanticide. Some way, some how, (they at least think) it’s a money game, and the ELR had to loose for it to work. I just don’t know where they are making the money.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “I just don’t know where they are making the money.”

      Silverado, Sierra, Tahoe, Yukon, Denali, Escalade, Suburban, Traverse, Equinox, Acadia, SRX, Enclave, Encore…

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