By on August 21, 2014

Opel_Cascada_1.6_EDIT_Innovation_–_Frontansicht,_23._März_2014,_Düsseldorf

With the departure of the Volkswagen Eos, Chrysler 200 Convertible and Volvo C30, Buick is looking to enter into the now dead front-drive four seat convertible segment. Buick dealers were recently shown a version of the Cascada, which is said to be arriving Stateside in 2016.

According to GM Inside News, the Cascada will be powered by a 1.6L turbocharged 4-cylinder engine, and imported from Germany, rather than built Stateside. This would make it the second imported Buick, after the German-built Regal.

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65 Comments on “Buick Shows Cascada To Dealers...”


  • avatar
    dkleinh

    I think you mean the Volvo c70, not c30.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    1.6L…sigh…no 2.0 turbo 4.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Puketastic abomination. May it rust from God’s tears before burning in the flames of hell.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    i think it looks ok for what it is

    however no man can reasonably buy this

    the sole clientele seems to be upper middle class housewives and so many of them have love affairs with the CUV/SUV

    also the 1.6 turbo four is the same one in certain markets of the ubiquitous Cruze

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      “no man can reasonably buy this”

      Unless, of course, he is comfortable with his gender and doesn’t need his car to prove how manly he is.

      Or maybe he can get away with just buying Old Spice deodorant or some other consumer good to remind himself of his chromosome mix.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      @TonyJZX

      I’d have to see it in person but I’m not getting a female only vibe from it, although a weak sauce motor isn’t helping the male case. FWIW I loved the ’93 Lebaron V6 Convertible I had in 2004, and one of these with a real motor and reliable seems somewhat appealing (which looks negatory in both cases being 1.6 and Opel).

  • avatar
    TurboX

    Rental car companies are in desperate need of a replacement for the Chrysler 200. I suppose this will be it.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    If I were in the market for a convertible, and if I can see out of it with the top up or down, I’d buy it in a heartbeat.

    Why? Because I can’t see out of the Camaro convertible with the top up or down!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Buick convertible” Those are two words I never thought I’d see together again… it’s even better looking then a Crosscabriolet

  • avatar
    Waterview

    I suppose it will take the place of the Camry Solara. I’m not sure why it has what appears to be a Chrysler grill (from a Sebring), but I’m not in the design business . . . . .

    • 0 avatar
      claytori

      That is an Opel grill, and the photo is of an Opel Calibra. Look for the lightning bolt on the logo in the middle. Be sure that the Buick grill that replaces it will not look anywhere near as good. The Calibra name will likely not survive the Atlantic transit as well.

      • 0 avatar

        That’s not a Calibra; it’s a Cascada. And GM has announced that the Buick version will also be called the Cascada. I was hoping for another Riviera. Then again, the Riviera always was a large coupe (except for the 7th gen), and this isn’t….

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Love me some 90s Calibra – way better than this.

        • 0 avatar
          bomberpete

          The Riviera was a “personal coupe.” By today’s standards, is there a reason a car of this size wouldn’t fit that spec?

          Personally, I hope the dealers push GM for the continuity of Riviera name. It’s a lot better than their futile pattern building up equity in another name that means nothing, no one’s ever heard of, and GM will abandon anyway if there’s a next generation.

        • 0 avatar
          bosozoku

          Good going, GM. Name a convertible after the rainiest part of the country (Cascadia; aka Pacific NW)

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      This is much smaller than a Solara if this is based on the Delta II platform.

      Toyota would be wise to bring a Solara back – given they are now not adverse to cranking out tens-of-thousands of Camrys a year to the rental lots, and the death of basically all the other front drive convertibles on the market, they could probably juice Camry sales another 60K units a year with a convertible Camry again (36K units a year to fleet, 24K units a year to retail)

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Looks aside (they’re subjective; I happen to find it inoffensive as the Verano, if a bit tall in haunch), if it does not suffer the usual ragtop problems of cowl shake, getting out of its own way, and protecting its occupants from wind and noise, I see a couple thousand of these selling per month.

    Thanks to their family-friendly CUVs a more diverse (read: younger) array of people are entering Buick showrooms than ever before. Having a bit of variety in the cars won’t hurt.

    Just don’t build too many of them. There’s a reason everything else in its class is dead: not a lot of people want them.

  • avatar

    I think it’s very good-looking. But—especially when it’s going to be imported from Germany—why will it be 2016 before we see it? GM has known for a while that it was going to sell that car here, so I’m sure the engineers have already started federalizing it…

  • avatar
    danio3834

    And it shall be named…Reatta!

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Without Riviera you can’t have Reatta. What would they chop?

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Riviera would be acceptable too, if not more so.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          A “real” Riviera convertible?… Nah, needs a boattail

          • 0 avatar
            bomberpete

            The only official Riviera convertible was made 1982-85, long past the boat-tail era. Besides, can you imagine the folding mechanism for a boat-tail? Less trunk space than the Pontiac G6 or Infiniti G37.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            It may have been “official” but it was still a decapitated coupe made off site

          • 0 avatar
            bomberpete

            They were the only Riv convertibles ever sold through Buick dealers and met GM “standards,” however deficient those may have been in the Roger Smith era.

            Please correct me if I’m wrong, but weren’t all the first “Eighties Renewal” U.S. convertibles — Riv, LeBaron, Mustang, Eldorado, etc. — made by authorized outfits like ASC, before the automakers tooled up to take them in-house?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Of that list, I do believe the LeBaron was designed in the 80s as convertible from the start, and I don’t think it was built then chopped.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Riv convertibles ever sold through Buick dealers and met GM “standards,”

            Yeah, and we know how high those were in the 80s

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            First year LeBarons were chopped, then Chrysler went in house after

  • avatar
    LALoser

    Hardtop, AWD, 2.0T, 6M & 6DCT option, change the lightening bolt for a simple Tri-Shield…I would be interested.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Eh, why bother with a DCT. Even the best mainstream ones (GTI) still suffer at low speed, and a domestic DCT (Powershift) was not well received at all. Me thinks that a well programmed torque converter auto would be sufficient and probably better to live with.

    But yes, 6M would be perfect in this car.

  • avatar
    LeBaron

    According to Wikipedia the Cascada weight 3,700 to 4,000 lbs. Could that possibly be right? Size wise it slots between the Cruze and the Malibu and both of them seem to be <3,300 lbs. And yes this is a near luxury car, but 700 lbs of luxury?

    That 197hp 1.6L is going to be worked hard.

    Paul

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Agree, LeBaron. I think the styling is terrific, but it just doesn’t have enough engine.

      I wouldn’t buy one of these undersized turbos in a larger car. Ford and GM ain’t Honda and Toyota. A decade from now, we’ll be seeing a lot of blown engines in more ways than one.

  • avatar

    My guess (based on absolutely no concrete information) is that they will sell enough of these to make it worthwhile. 4-seat convertibles aren’t a huge market, but there are still enough people buying them to keep the Germans building them.

    I don’t know what GM thinks is an acceptable number, but between rental companies and people who just simply want a convertible there are almost certainly enough to justify the cost. Especially now that Chrysler isn’t making them anymore.

    And just like every other type of car out there: if you don’t like it, don’t buy one. I’ll always consider more variety a good thing, so if a company wants to build a convertible and sell it I’m happy to see that. The Murano convertible thing wasn’t something I would buy, but I’m glad to see Nissan made it. A Buick convertible is no more foolish to build than an E63 Wagon or an F350 King Ranch – there’s a market for it, so why not?

    As for me, I love having a 4-seat convertible. And when it’s time to get rid of my current A4, it will be nice to have the option of another car with 4 seats and a soft top that isn’t a Mini.

    • 0 avatar
      pbxtech

      A 4 seat convertible with front wheel drive would have been something I would have shopped when I got my wife’s Mazda6. We looked at the EOS but it was $12K more than the Mazda; at that point you’ve got to look at a second car for your top down motoring pleasure. It would be nice to only insure one car and not have an extra vehicle underfoot all of the time. When the Mazda is paid off, we would certainly consider the Buick. We shopped the G6 convertible in 2007, but needed the extra room and doors for kids.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    The Cascada name will be fine. Cascada is Spanish for “waterfall”, not “rainiest part of the country”. I already checked with the California DMV website to order CASCADA license plates-they’re already taken.
    The Casacada is currently built in Poland, not Germany.
    The 1982-1985 Eldorado, Toronado and Riviera convertibles were custom built by Hess & Eisenhardt, which went out of business in the 1990s.
    The Cascada needs the bigger engine and Buick will hopefully do that. I am certain they read our posts here.
    There will be a special lease about four months after the initial production. $299 a month! Count me in!!

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