By on June 2, 2014

As part of its efforts to move the Genesis Coupe out of the lineup in the least noticeable manner possible upscale, Hyundai has canceled the turbo 2.0-liter four-cylinder that accounted for approximately half of its sales.

Automotive News reports that the 3.8-liter V-6 will be the sole engine available in the Coupe for the 2015 model year. Doing so will “allow us to reposition the coupe with a more premium performance buyer” according to company spokesperson Derek Joyce. However, a V-6 coupe with “adjusted” equipment will be made available to offer a cheaper GenCoupe to buyers who might have taken the 2.0 in the past.

It’s difficult to interpret this as anything other than the beginning of the end for Hyundai’s Mustang competitor. The Coupe has always been an oddball product, sharing a name with a mostly unrelated sedan in true Cutlass Calais fashion, and it’s never done much volume. Presumably the company is sick of warranty hassles from young buyers turning up the boost on the turbo, but that’s the price you pay to recruit those kids into your brand for a lifetime. Ask Subaru. It’s also hard to see how it’s an “upscale” move to settle on a single engine then cut equipment to make the car nearly as cheap as it was before, but that’s how marketing people earn money; by marketing ideas like that to the automotive press.

You know what would be a truly brilliant upscale move? Dropping that five-liter from the R-Spec sedan into the Genesis Coupe. And by “upscale” I mean “redneck”, and by “redneck”, I mean “brilliant”.

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60 Comments on “Hyundai Deep-Sixes The Genesis Turbo...”


  • avatar
    stryker1

    ‘And by “upscale” I mean “redneck”, and by “redneck”, I mean “brilliant”.’

    +1

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    Nice idea, and it’s definitely been done before (http://www.carthrottle.com/sema-2011-rmr-stuffs-5-0-into-genesis-coupe/) , but for some reason Hyundai seems really opposed to the idea. No one inside is talking. I think you’re more likely to see an eventual 3.8 Turbo go into both the sedan and the coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Well…it actually takes some significant modifications to get the 5.0-liter (or even the discontinued 4.6-liter) to fit in the Genesis Coupe’s engine bay. The entire front end and engine bay have to essentially be re-engineered. I’m not quite sure why Hyundai didn’t accommodate or use the V8 engines in the coupe. Perhaps it’s because the company didn’t want its fleet fuel economy numbers dragged down by such models.

      • 0 avatar
        Aquineas

        Ah well I’d be lying if I claimed to know how difficult it was; I just assumed that because it had been done that the problems had been solved. Heck, in a world where putting LS1 V8s in Porsche 911s is a thing, putting the Hyundai V8 in the Genesis Coupe would appear to the layman to be relatively easy in comparison :-).

        • 0 avatar
          Jellodyne

          Pushrod V8s like the LS series are significantly smaller than a DOHC unit like that Hyundai Tau motors. Which is why they fit in places like 911, Miata, and Fiero engine bays.

          • 0 avatar
            Aquineas

            I hear what you’re saying, but this is the same manufacturer, heck even the same BH chassis. Ah well, what do I know.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      More likely the 3.3L Turbo that Hyundai is working on and slated for the Genesis sedan.

      Remains to be seen whether Hyundai engineers the new RWD coupe to fit a V8.

      A bit split about that – while that would enable Hyundai to compete against the RC-F (which will be getting a V8), might be better to stick with a turbo 6 and keep the weight down and have better balance (not to mention better fuel economy).

      A V8 would be better suited for a Genesis sedan sized coupe – not that Hyundai is working on that anytime soon.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Funny, just yesterday I watched an old Top Gear from 2007 and they announced the new “Hyundai Coupe” in the news section. Holding up a photograph of the car which became the Genesis Coupe in the US, they announced it would have RWD, and that Hyundai was seeking to take on the Mustang by putting a V8 in it.

    So I wonder at what point they scrapped this idea.

    I think they should’ve called it something else, since it doesn’t sync with the (boring) Genesis sedan at all. I like a name they used in the SK market, Tosca.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      I’m in agreement about a name change being necessary. The Sedan and the coupe are so totally different in character I can’t understand how they share the same name. I still wonder if they ever really hope to spin the high-en lineup off into its own luxury brand, or continue to see them thought of by most potential buyers as inferior badges to the Japanese and European luxury brands.

      But on another note, I’m completely on board with dropping the price of the V6 slightly and shoehorning the 5.0 into the engine bay – that would be awesome. Nothing wrong with a Korean Mustang in my book.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Well, they do, at their deepest roots, share Hyundai’s “BH” platform…but I’m not sure why that constituted them sharing the same name.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      The Tosca was a mid sized Daewoo/GM sedan.

      Maybe you’re thinking the Tuscani, which was what the Tiburon was called in Asian markets.

      The Genesis Coupe was never hung with the Tuscani moniker.

    • 0 avatar
      WildcatMatt

      “I think they should’ve called it something else, since it doesn’t sync with the (boring) Genesis sedan at all.”

      Hyundai likes to do this for some reason, witness also the Elantra Touring which wasn’t terribly related to the Elantra.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    no big loss.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      If you mean the 2.0 – agreed. The 3.8 is a sweet engine, without the complexities of a turbo.

      • 0 avatar
        johnhowington

        i certainly enjoyed the 3.8 in my ownership of a 2008 kia sendona minivan.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I think the 3.8-liter is a bored-out version of the original 3.3-liter Lambda V6 (in the same way that the 4.6-liter Tau became the 5.0-liter Tau). The 3.8-liter Lambda was also used in RWD applications, such as the final years of the first-gen, BOF Kia Sorento and the short-lived Kia Borrego.

          I’m surprised the Sedona doesn’t have the 3.3-liter, which seems to be for use in larger FWD vehicles, such as the current Azera and LWB Hyundai Santa Fe.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      +1. The 2.0T was a rough motor, and took premium gas to get the full hp.

    • 0 avatar
      ctg

      I agree. I actually own a 2013 2.0T base 6MT and I like it overall. But if there had been a “base” 3.8 6MT I would have bought that in a heartbeat. It’s a much better engine. I just didn’t want to pay ~$8K more for the track model (with lots of goodies I didn’t care about) or pay ~$4k more to get the 3.8 R-spec with its garish red seats.

      As Jack noted the only people who will be upset are the tuners who liked that you could crank up the boost on the 2.0T. Its not a terrible engine. It makes decent power, its just unrefined and laggy. I think most prospective buyers would be a lot happier with the 3.8. If they price it starting around $26K, I think it makes a decent proposition as a discount G37 coupe.

  • avatar
    dwford

    The Genesis Coupe truly was an oddball. When it came out, the 2.0T has 210hp and the V6 had 333, so it was right on top of the Mustang for power – for 1 year. Then the Mustang got the 3.7 300hp V6 and the 420hp V8 and Hyundai was left overpriced and underpowered. The name implied a luxury performance coupe version of the sedan like a G37 sedan/coupe, but when buyers sat in the Genesis Coupe it was clearly downscale and a disappointment. So it was underpowered and overpriced as a Mustang competitor (with NO sales support from Hyundai), but too cheap inside to be a viable luxury coupe. Hyundai needs to pick a direction for the next one, or make 2 different coupes. I think with the axing of the 2.0T Hyundai has opened up a big gap between the Veloster Turbo and a base Genesis Coupe V6 that could be filled by another car. Perhaps a hi-po Elantra GT with the Sonata 2.0T motor?? Hint, hint, Hyundai…..

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Not to mention they bumped the price of the car by $2000 for no other reason that to.. well… make $2000 extra dollars.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        so true. If Hyundai had ever made a decent lease on the Genesis Coupe, I’d probably be driving one now. But with crappy leases, no rebates or dealer incentives, there was no point. And I worked there!

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Albeit the interior of the original G35 coupe wasn’t much better than the refreshed Genesis coupe (neither was entry-level luxury quality and that’s saying a lot for the segment at the time).

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You’re comparing different generations of vehicles. The original G35 was 2002. The refreshed Genesis coupe was what, 2011?

        As usual, desperate to drag down a Japanese marque in your efforts to prop up Korean marques.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          The Genesis Coupe got refreshed for MY2013. For what it’s worth, I think the refresh makes the car feel substantially more upscale from a fit-and-finish standpoint. But they’re right that the interior of the G35 coupe wasn’t that great. Neither was the G37 coupe (now Q60).

          But *none* of last-generation’s entry-level coupes were that great interior-wise. That includes the previous 3-Series, the outgoing C-Class, the previous IS, and the better-redesign-it-soon A5/S5. I feel like the interior of the G37/Q60 is on par with the competitors of its era.

          • 0 avatar
            GiddyHitch

            I would say that there was a noticeable improvement in interior quality going from the G37 to the Q60. As in going from worse than to slightly better than my M45’s interior. The dual display in the Q60 is gorgeous, but I haven’t seen much of the current competition so maybe it’s just at par.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          No – just pointing out that the original G35 didn’t have a luxury grade interior (much less an entry-level luxury grade) and the G was supposed to be a (albeit entry-level) luxury coupe.

          I really liked the G35 coupe and almost bought one, but the interior was too cheap (and wasn’t just me – was roundly criticized by the automotive press).

          Infiniti kinda fixed with the refresh and mostly fixed with the G37 – but at the same time ruined the great lines of the original G35) ; I’m talking relative to the other entry level competitors (I agree that the interiors of the entry-level segment weren’t close to “luxury” until the new C Class; the 3 Series comes close, but not as good as the C Class).

          The 2 models that were criticized roundly for subpar interiors compared to the competition were the original G35 and original X3.

          I think the original Genesis coupe is bland and the refreshed one an ugly duckling; the original G35 had much better sheetmetal – so there goes you’re lame accusation.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            A much better description. And I certainly agree with your point about the original G35. It was far too close to the Nissan variant to be considered entry-luxury.

            And I felt even the 300ZX predecessor was more luxury oriented than the 350Z.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            The stuff that came out of Nissan in the early-mid ’00s was a result of their flirtation with bankruptcy, rescue by Renault, and Ghosn’s subsequent cost-cutting at the end of the ’90s. The original G35, 350Z, and 3rd-gen Altima were all examples of that enforced austerity. Took them a while to climb out of that hole, and some would argue that they never fully did.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I’m not the target market (for either car), but … damn, I always thought the Genesis Coupe was hideously ugly.

      The irony is, I think the Genesis Sedan is *lovely*; I don’t comprehend why they call them by the same name.

      They sure don’t look much like the same car.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    How do you upscale when you have fake hood vents come standard?

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    “… to reposition the coupe with a more premium performance buyer.”

    Why does every performance car have to be “premium” or “luxury” these days?

    I just need a seat and a steering wheel.

    I know that when I buy my first used car made after 2010, I’ll be spending my first afternoon ripping various electronics out of it. The infotainment system gets the axe first.

    My version of preventive maintenance.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      I’m with you – to a degree. All these touch screen systems are going to look so outdated in a few years as the tech advances, and all these cars will be stuck with these non updatable screens. I think it is definitely going to hurt resale on these cars. Not to mention as bluetooth advances, eventually the older cars won’t be compatible anymore.

      Imagine if GM went nuts back in the day and put that touch screen from the Buick Reatta in everything. Would anyone want those cars anymore? No. But you see plenty of 20-30 year old GM cars bumping around that are much simpler machines.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s difficult for the Asian automakers to make performance oriented RWD coupes competitive with the domestic pony cars on power and price.

      The automotive scene is littered with the discarded nameplates of Asian coupes (and the rest are low selling – like the 370Z.)

      Also, Hyundai always intended the Genesis coupe to move upwards and better be in line with the rest of its premium offerings.

      While it is the end for a Hyundai RWD coupe as a Mustang/Camaro competitor, the new RWD coupe (based on the HND-9 concept) will be the beginning of the Q60, RC, etc. competitor.

    • 0 avatar

      “Why does every performance car have to be “premium” or “luxury” these days?”

      Because the profit margins on an optioned-up or luxury model are a lot bigger.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      No kiddin… The TSX I briefly had ingrained a new buying rule into my top 5:

      If the factory stereo sucks it HAS to be replaceable with a phone call to Crutchfield.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        As a former TSX owner I’ll confirm the problem wasn’t the head unit, but the speakers. Phone call to Crutchfield (or ideally internet order from someone who doesn’t charge ludicrous prices for hand-holding I don’t need) and it’s fixed.

        • 0 avatar
          kvndoom

          I’m speaking in reference to the POS non-nav units they had in the 2004-2008 models. The ipod adapters that you could buy for it were all buggy junk, and yay for one line of text. It wasn’t till after I had gotten the car did I read and discover that the HVAC circuitry was integrated into the radio so replacement was impossible.

          Lesson learned.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      “I know that when I buy my first used car made after 2010, I’ll be spending my first afternoon ripping various electronics out of it. The infotainment system gets the axe first.”

      It’s an entertaining thought, but don’t most infotainment-equipped cars incorporate climate controls now? What about systems that interact with the instrument cluster or even more critical systems? Hope you have fun modding your ride to survive a Cylon attack. Should be even more fun trying to sell it.

      • 0 avatar
        OneAlpha

        I never sell my cars. When I’m done with them, the junk man hauls them away.

        It’s quite liberating.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        “It’s an entertaining thought, but don’t most infotainment-equipped cars incorporate climate controls now? What about systems that interact with the instrument cluster or even more critical systems?”

        Right. Try replacing the head unit in one of the GM car that have the Global-A electronics architecture and see what you get.

        **Global-A electronics debuted on the 2010 Camaro, SRX, Terrain, Equinox and LaCrosse, and are now used in every genuinely-new model since 2010.

    • 0 avatar
      smartascii

      Easy – it’s because the “non-premium” or “non-luxury” buyer doesn’t have any money, so the competition is on value, which is not profitable. So-called “premium” or “luxury” buyers either have enough money to buy what they want with less focus on cost, or they’ve bought the marketing lie that you can define yourself with consumer goods. Either way, they’ll pay for your product, even if it’s a bad value, and you’ll make money.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        “or they’ve bought the marketing lie that you can define yourself with consumer goods”

        It’s not a lie.

        You (I assume) don’t define yourself that way – and neither do I – but one most certainly *can*.

        Entire groups of people seem to do so, if not necessarily happily, then at least eagerly.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Agreed, a “premium” Genesis coupe would have the 5.0L V8. Relegating it to anything less makes it no more than a RWD Tiburon.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Not having a V8 in the muscle car wars really is like showing up at a gun fight with a knife. Part of the reason the coupe languishing in obscurity is that they don’t have a halo performance edition. A V8 version would solve that problem and most likely sell a whole bunch of V6 and Turbo 4 versions in the process.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I’m not sure it would solve much. It’s a “muscle car” from a “not muscle car” manufacturer.

      Not many people say “Oh I need a powerful RWD coupe.”

      Even fewer follow it up with “I’ll head down to Hyundai and see what’s on offer!”

      • 0 avatar
        carguy

        Very true but if you intend to compete in this segment and you want to get buyers out of Ford, GM and Dodge dealerships then you need to lift your product profile with some bath**t insane V8 performance product that not only makes the right noises but also looks the part. Selling a V6 performance coupe with derivative styling will not lead to any significant sales volumes.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The new coupe is not supposed to be a muscle car and instead compete against the entry level luxury coupes like the Q60, RC, ATS, 4 Series, etc.

      All of them start with a turbo 4 (or will) and while the RC-F will be getting a V8, the M4 won’t.

  • avatar
    slow kills

    Didn’t a certain luxury performance car maker named BMW drop four-bangers from the US lineup in the late 90s? I believe that they changed their minds recently.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    They marketed it all wrong, playing to their weaknesses rather than their strengths.

    They can’t do handling or refinement, but they tried to market it as an Infiniti/BMW competitor.

    They can do engines and cheapness. They should have stuck the V8 in the coupe, marketed it straight up against the Mustang and Camaro (blockier styling, more machismo, cheaper price), and called it a day.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Nothing about the styling or construction of the Genesis says to me that Hyundai was ever trying to compete with the Mustang and Camaro…especially since those cars surely have much higher profit margins. I think the Genesis Coupe was always poised as a budget G37 coupe/Q60. And if that fact were just a *little* more obvious, Hyundai would have an easier time selling its coupe wares…which *again* aren’t likely to deter someone looking for a “muscle car”.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      It has definitely suffered from a lack of product direction. It’s sort of like the Altima Coupe. Who’s it for?

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The problem was that the Genesis coupe didn’t look the part of “luxury” (or entry-level luxury) from either the sheetmetal or interior.

      At least the 1G Genesis sedan looked the part – which is why the more expensive sedan has been outselling the coupe by about a 2:1 margin.

      Poor planning from Hyundai product planners at the start -should have made the coupe an entry-level luxury coupe from the get-go.

  • avatar
    Madroc

    As a longtime import fanboi I really wanted the GenCoupe to be in consideration when I bought my last car. I could.not.find a V6 with a stick in dealer inventory to test drive. That, and the user forums were leading me to believe that $500 off sticker was a great deal and $350 was more typical — at a time when Ford dealers were begging to sell Mustangs at invoice minus $4K factory cash. Not a great value proposition and not a lot of sales support. Too bad, I’d like to see more cars like this on the market.

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