GM Talks Up Hydrogen

gm talks up hydrogen

In an almost touching display of "follow me over this cliff" pathos, GM is urging industries and governments to sink money into the hydrogen infrastructure. Speaking at the National Hydrogen Association's annual conference in Sacramento, CA, GM R&D VP Larry Burns told the Truth As He Sees It ™ to what is probably the only crowd in the country that wouldn't laugh him off the stage. "It's no longer a question of 'can it be done?' or 'should it be done?'" said Burns. "We not only should do it. We must do it. It's now a question of collective will. Do we have the collective resolve to work together to solve the challenges we face rather than handing them off to future generations?" What does this "collective resolve" trope really mean? Cash money dollars yo, and lots of it. "We have reached a stage where we cannot continue to make significant progress on our own," opines Burns. "Our customers must have safe and convenient access to affordable hydrogen. This means the energy industry and governments must join the auto industry in our journey to produce and sell fuel cell-electric vehicles in volume numbers." Added Burns, "We have not discovered anything yet to suggest mass volume cannot ultimately be attained." Oh. Dear. God.

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  • Wolven Wolven on Apr 03, 2008

    Engineer, What are these batteries made of? How much do they weigh? What sort of range do they have? How much do they cost? Can I get them now? Why would you transport H2 anywhere? Just make it where it's needed, we already have water and an electrical grid. While obviously pro-H2 is pro-renewable, it isn't "generic". H2 is available NOW. It's completely non-polluting. It never runs out. It can power our current engines, jet engines (why isn't anyone pushing that option?), and any other fuel based engine we come up with. It's a fuel that ANYONE can produce, no need for giant, world controlling, oil companies. Which is why it will be fought tooth and nail...

  • Engineer Engineer on Apr 04, 2008
    While obviously pro-H2 is pro-renewable, it isn’t “generic”. H2 is available NOW. It’s completely non-polluting. It never runs out. It can power our current engines, jet engines (why isn’t anyone pushing that option?), and any other fuel based engine we come up with. It’s a fuel that ANYONE can produce, no need for giant, world controlling, oil companies. Which is why it will be fought tooth and nail… LOL! Thanks for the entertianment, Wolven, I don't think I have read such a bunch of ... recently. 1. H2 is available NOW. H2 may be available, but not renewable H2. All affordable hydrogen is made out of natural gas. Natural gas prices tend to be volatile. What will a HUGE demand increase do to natural gas prices? 2. It’s completely non-polluting. On what planet is that? Making H2 out of natural gas (CH4) means you are releasing the CO2 at the factory, instead of the tailpipe. 3. It never runs out. Misleading! Water may not run out, but water is not the most important source when you make hydrogen: your source of energy is. And those certainly do run out. 4. why isn’t anyone pushing that option? Perhaps because in the real world hydrogen is more of an expensive, dangerous pain in the ass, than existing fuels. Like I said, when we see aeroplanes converting to hydrogen, I'll start believing that were getting to the point where it could be considered a viable fuel. 5. It’s a fuel that ANYONE can produce, no need for giant, world controlling, oil companies. Sure. Anyone willing to blow up their surroundings that is. You still need an energy source to make hydrogen. As mentioned, the current favorite fuel is natural gas. Close second would be crude (hello OPEC). No large scale plants using solar power, wonder why that is? Oh yes, solar power is so diffuse (~1 kW/m^2) at best. Dream on Wolven. The only thing fighting tooth and nail against hydrogen is hydrogen's properties. And they are doing a "heck of a job".

  • Joeaverage Joeaverage on Apr 04, 2008

    Engineer: "So until we see hydrogen fueled airlines, I doubt it will make much of an impression on surface travel." Stand by folks... Things are a' changin'... http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7330311.stm A hydrogen powered plane in development...

  • Wolven Wolven on Apr 04, 2008

    I wasn't going to bother debating with Engineer any more, since he doesn't really seem interested in facts, or bothering to do a little google searching on the subject. But there is plenty of info regarding H2 powered vehicles, including jets. Although I can't find it at the moment, I read that Boeing successfully flew a H2 powered jet as far back as the 60's (I believe). The technology certainly isn't new, it just hasn't been pursued. Here are some links to info regarding jets powered by H2... http://www.flug-revue.rotor.com/FRheft/FRH9809/FR9809k.htm http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/72466_airbus30.shtml http://www.popsci.com/military-aviation-space/article/2008-01/green-skies-mach-5

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