By on August 14, 2017

1986 Honda Civic in Colorado wrecking yard, LH front view - ©2017 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
The third-generation Honda Civic, built from 1984 through the 1987 model year, was a tremendous sales success in the United States. In places where rust wasn’t a big problem, they lasted for decades, and they were fun to drive for such frugal machines.

Well, some of them were fun to drive; the fourth-gen Civics and CRXs with the 1500cc engines accelerated respectably by mid-1980s standard, but base-model 1300cc versions were on the miserable side. For that reason, few bought these cars, so this ’86 in a Denver self-service yard is an interesting Junkyard Find.

1986 Honda Civic in Colorado wrecking yard, front seats - ©2017 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
I see many fourth-generation Civics in the Colorado and California self-service wrecking yards I frequent, but only the Wagovans and the occasional CRX really catch my interest.

1986 Honda Civic in Colorado wrecking yard, gearshift - ©2017 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
By 1986, four-speed manuals were yesterday’s news, and nearly all the three-pedal Civics sold then had five-speeds. But if you were looking to get the cheapest possible new Honda (that wasn’t a motorcycle), you got the 1300 hatchback with four-on-the-floor.

1986 Honda Civic in Colorado wrecking yard, engine - ©2017 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
Under the hood, a non-CVCC SOHC engine displacing 1,342cc and generating 60 horsepower. That’s a lot more than the 48-horse Rabbit Diesel of a few years earlier had under the hood, but these cars still required a great deal of patience when climbing steep grades or using short freeway on-ramps. Fuel economy was impressive, though: 34 city, 39 highway MPG.

1986 Honda Civic in Colorado wrecking yard, vacuum line diagram - ©2017 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
The CVCC system delivered excellent performance and efficiency but had become map-of-the-universe complex by 1986, due to the need for the dual-circuit rich/lean carburetor system to deal with far more variables than was necessary a decade earlier.

These cars became nearly impossible to get through California’s ultra-strict emissions-testing regimen, when the BAR tightened tailpipe-emissions standards in the late 1990s.

1986 Honda Civic in Colorado wrecking yard, rear hatch lock - ©2017 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
The presence of the key means this car likely got to the junkyard via an insurance total or a dealership trade-in. Nobody would bid more than scrap value on a rough 31-year-old non-Si Civic at an auction, and so this place was the logical next step.


A typically boring U.S.-market ad for this car.


The Japanese-market ads weren’t much more exciting, at least not by the standards we have come to expect.


What a wonderful world!

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65 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1986 Honda Civic 1300 Hatchback...”


  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    My first car was a 5-speed ’84 Accord with pretty much the same vacuum hose routing diagram. What’s amazing is it actually worked pretty well – she was a great little runner. Although… I lived in a non-smog state and who knows what was actually coming out of the tailpipe.

    Towards the end of the car’s life, which was well above 100K miles, it developed a “I refuse to start” condition if the ambient air temp was below about 30. I’m sure it was related to all the hose & carburetor madness. A little shot of starting fluid worked like a charm though. Great memories!

  • avatar
    hamish42

    We had an 81 5-sp hatchback, silver with red interior and one (1) speaker on what was supposed to be a radio. Living in the cold in Toronto, the heater sucked and so did the defrosters. The front discs kept warping. And, worse of all, if you lived where they used salt (and Toronto is the salt capital of the world) they quickly rotted out. It took them years to overcome the rust problem. I’m not sure they felt highly motivated about it. If it rotted out you came back for another one.

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      LOL at “Toronto is the salt capital of the world.”

      – Montreal resident

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        LOL at “Toronto (and Montreal) is the salt capital of the world.”

        – Ottawa resident

        • 0 avatar
          Wacko

          LOL at “Toronto (and Montreal, and Ottawa) is the salt capital of the world.”
          -Northern Rural Canadian. Abitibi to be exact

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            I’ve spent time in the first three cities (but not the tundra paper mill land of Abitibi, sorry), but the advantage Toronto has over the others is the temperature stays right around freezing all winter long. Montreal and Ottawa have a deep freeze lasting a couple weeks that practically stops rust… until it warms up outside at the next thaw at least.

          • 0 avatar
            statikboy

            You’ll all have to forgive hamish42. Toronto IS the center of the universe, after all.

          • 0 avatar

            It is Downtown Canada, while all other places are not.

          • 0 avatar
            JuniperBug

            It’s true; Montreal is but a modest 375 year-old hamlet, not even quite three times the size of Boston, having hosted only one Olympic Games, one World’s Fair, and having only one of North America’s two current Formula 1 circuits. If I want to buy a new Lamborghini, Ferrari, Bentley or Lotus here, I only have one dealership of each to choose from. We come only second to NYC in restaurants per capita here, and the only festivals of which we feature the largest in the world are jazz and comedy.

            But, you know, it’s cozy.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Pfft to you Canadians. Coast of Maine – temp cycles around 0C +/-5 all winter (to aid that oxidation reaction to no end), salt by the cargo ship load, AND salt air off the ocean for a year-round rust cycle.

            These cars didn’t rust here. They DISSOLVED. Second only to that vintage Subarus. Too bad too, I actually liked them a lot, they really were super fun to drive, like little go karts.

  • avatar
    threeer

    My cousin owned two gen 1 CRX. First, a 1984 white DX, and then a black 1987 Si. As a then 17-year old, I thought the Si was just about the coolest car ever. Two years later, my sister bought a new 1989 Si and I got a ton of driving time behind the wheel and just about fell in love with the little scooter. It was a true pleasure to drive, even if by today’s standards (or even the standards of 1989) it wasn’t the fastest car out there. I don’t think I’ve ever come across a drivetrain combo that was so easy and rewarding. I’d take either variant of Si today…providing you could find an unmolested one that wasn’t charging bitcoin-like prices.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    I always liked the styling of this Civic- really “smart” in the sense of clothing that is a tastefully restrained kind of stylish and fits just right. To me, this generation and the following generation got the styling just right.

    I have a feeling the four speed transmission option might have been that the five speeds sold better than they anticipated and they weren’t quite committed to closing down the four speed supply… old trick, make it a slightly “cheaper” option.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    I’m thinking that can’t be an original color.

    • 0 avatar
      Goatshadow

      I think it should have been baby blue metallic, like my first car, a 1500 version of this. I hated that car.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The paint on this is in better condition than on a lot of 10 year old Hondas I see.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The color inside and under the hood is the factory color – a light blue metallic. My brother car had a ’84 DX in this color, while I had the up model 1500 S in Red over Silver as all 1500 were two tones.

      I loved my 5 speed 1500 S, awesome little car!

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yeah that’s definitely not a factory shade of blue. I test drove a really clean (for Central NY) ’86 DX hatchback back in highschool, guy was asking $1200 which was not unreasonable for an unmolested not-rotted out example IMO. Much less refined and slower than the ’90 EF body wagon I drove out to the test drive, made me appreciate the big stride Honda took in the jump from 3rd gen to 4th gen Civic.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Growing up in the 90’s, one of my family’s two cars was an ’85 FWD WagoVan w/ the 5-spd. (The other was a ’77 Microbus.)

    My parents sold it to my older brother when he needed a car of his own, and I remember him saying that the reason he junked it was because it stopped running right and his mechanic told him he would charge by the hour and not guarantee his own work to last; I suspect that maze of a vacuum diagram was why.

    Was a viable fuel injection system simply not available to Honda at the time, or were they just stubbornly refusing to implement it?

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Honda did have a fuel injection setup (that was the “i” in Si), but they held on to carbs in the lower-spec models until the late ’80s.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I don’t remember how the FI in the Si worked but I’m pretty sure it was the same unit as their late 1980s/early 1990s grocery getters. Honda “PGM FI” was a rudimentary though reasonably capable and simple electronic throttle body system. Honda has always had a knack for building overly complicated stuff (CVCC, their early multivalve cylinder heads) but PGM FI was uncharacteristically simple. Funny thing about it was it was one of the last major EFI systems to not have oxygen sensor feedback. It just worked well enough that it could meet emissions standards without the feedback loop.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      I like to think there was some sort of side bet between a Honda exec and a GM exec as to whether CVCC or the CCC Quadrajet would stay in production to a later date.

    • 0 avatar
      psychoboy

      In the Civics (in the US), Honda held onto the carbs thru the end of the third gen in 1987. In 1988 all fourth gens featured the D series motors, and those were (again, in the US) fuel injected. The base models replaced the carbs with a Dual Point system that was a throttle body injection setup. The top trims, (EX in the sedan, Si in the hatch and CRX) got a Multi Point system that put the injectors directly upstream of the manifold-to-head gasket. In other markets, you could still find carb’d 4th gens, and some of them even featured mechanical fuel pumps!

      US Accords lost their base model carbs in 1989, with the F-series motor being MPFI in 90.

      As for the last of the US Honda carbs, they would be found in pairs in the 88-90 Prelude S. All other 88-91 Preludes were MPFI. In 92, the H series motors replaced the “bastard B” and were all MPFI as well.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Ah, thanks! I didn’t know the whole story of which model/model year/engine/market combinations got multiport FI.

        Trivia: Except for gray market imports in, there were still one or two carbureted Ladas you could buy in Canada until about the mid-1990s. Those were the last passenger vehicles in the U.S. or Canada to finally get fuel injection (GM Rochester TBI unit if you’re curious, and those were probably leftovers from excess production).

        • 0 avatar
          psychoboy

          if it’s not broke…don’t fix it.

          in many cases, carbs get the job done. as long as you aren’t worried about squeezing the nth out of economy or emissions at every given moment, they aren’t awful.

          Honda got too tricky with the CVCC setup and held onto it as long as they could get it to fit within regulations. But, as with all other progress, Honda knew CVCC wasn’t going to last, so they clean-sheeted their motors in the mid-to-late 80s, and developed the B, C, D, F, and H motors that ran the entire lineup until they decided they needed to build motors that turned the same way the rest of the world was turning in the very late 90s.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            @ psychoboy – I have to add that the owners I knew with both CVCC and CCC Quadrajet-equipped vehicles back then got good service out of them. They weren’t systems you’d design if starting from a totally clean sheet, but there undoubtedly was a lot of talented engineering that went into making the transitionary technology work reasonably well.

            In the examples I’m recalling, it likely helped that the owners had bought the cars new and that their mechanics knew enough not to monkey with functioning systems. I’m thinking of a Civic, a couple of Accords, and two Buick Estates with the carbed Olds 307.

          • 0 avatar
            sirwired

            I’d argue that that abomination of a vac routing diagram fully qualifies as “broken”.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I HATED MY CCC QuadraJUNK. But I had been spoiled by the simple and reliable fuel injection of the Iron Duke that proceeded it.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    We had 2 second generation 3 door Civics. Then 2 of these third generation 3 door Civics. And an ’87 Realtime AWD Wagovan.

    The 2nd generation vehicles were light years ahead of their competition. Personally I did not believe this to be true with the 3rd generation. Still fine vehicles.

    As for the Wagovan, it was a great vehicle but Toyota had a tallboy AWD wagon and Nissan had the Multi and the Access which while slightly attracted the same market. And Chrysler briefly sold the Mitsubishi Colt ‘wagon/microvan’ which also competed in the same niche.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      I am similarly biased towards 2nd Gen (83 Civic 1300FE). But, as this car shows, interior fabrics disintegrated quickly. I had mine reupholstered in a brougham-ish blue velour shortly after I bought it used in 88 or 89, with 100k. Car went on to 205k with no issue except eating 3 or 4 mufflers.

  • avatar
    kurkosdr

    At least they would give you the schematic. That’s from an era when companies thought owners should be able to repair their cars by themselves.

    Nowadays, they would just cover the engine with a plastic sheet with the Honda logo, “nothing to see here, take it to your local dealership if it breaks”.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      To be fair I’ll gladly take a more modern Civic (minus the DI) as far as DIY maintenance and diagnosis versus that rats nest of vacuum lines and other work-arounds to meet emissions. My ’12 Civic was really pretty simple under the hood, with good access to most things, although the cowl was kind of intruding over the top towards the rear of the bay.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    In 1987, one Saturday morning, two little girls came to our door selling raffle tickets for their kids league softball team. My dad had no cash, so he borrowed $1 each from my sister and I (out of our piggy banks). Ended up winning a brand new ’87 Civic hatchback in a similar color. I vividly remember the sticker price being around $6900, and since it was too small the dealer who donated it allowed him full sticker value towards an ’87 Accord DX. My dad traded in their 1982 Celebrity with the slipping tranny too and my parents have owned Accords every since.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      That is a great story about your dad winning the civic. Since your parents have been buying accords ever since the late 80’s. How do they feel about the evolution of the Accord and quality of there latest purchases ?

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Well, they’re early boomers, so they’ve appreciated the changes along the way. The ’87 Accord was very bare bones (never had a radio, only one rear view mirror and the AC was a dealer add on) but dead reliable. They traded it in on a ’92 in white with blue interior. I’d probably have bought that one from them if it hadn’t been totaled in a wreck. The next one was an ’01 EX which they still have, and they’re going to sell it to me as soon as my BMW lease is up. The current and newest Accord is a ’13, and they love it, and I like it quite a lot myself, especially the cavernous rear seat. Too many sedans these days have cramped rear quarters, even if they are otherwise large cars. Not the Accord.

        My mom has been known to follow a trend or two, and she’s talking about a CR-V to replace the ’01 after I buy it, rather than another Accord. We shall see.

        Like many boomers they were in the prime age range to get burned by the domestics during the malaise era, so once the ’87 proved reliable they never seriously considered any other make. I’m the black sheep of the family – spent 10.5 years driving a Grand Marquis. My wife has an F150. I’m finding that as I age new cars are less exciting. I see old beat up cars and get more excited that someone is getting continued use out of them. My BMW is very fun to drive, and my dealership is truly wonderful, but it’s not me. I’m going fully depreciated rides from now on, so I’m thrilled to be buying their ’01 Accord.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          My folks are the same. Dad had a 1986 Century Limited with a carbed 2.8L Chevy 6, which had a dangerous cold hesitation, which the Buick dealer attempted to solve by throwing parts at the problem; my Dad got some flunkie in the office of the Buick Motor Division President on the phone and dared him to give him a reason not to go to the Honda dealer; my $500 outlay for a head gasket for a 1984 Pontiac Sunbird on a commuting, McBurger-flipping college student’s budget was the final straw! (Later, a TSB was discovered that would have fixed the problem, but the damage was done!)

          Dad traded that Century on my Mom’s 1990 Civic EX, a CR-X Si with an automatic and a sedan body! My Dad leased two Accords, and is now on his fifth; I’m on my fourth Honda (3rd Accord, all V6s), and after my Mom’s I’ll-advised dalliance with a 2000 Emm-Kay-Four Jetta, she’s enjoying a 2007 Civic EX.

          I just got the actual title to the 2013 Accord Touring in my avatar after paying it off, so I’m going to see how Honda’s seemingly I’ll-advised descent into “me-too, keep-up-with-the-rest-of-the-lemmings”-ism with the turbo nonsense goes — warts and all (Accord: now standard with an ugly hood cut — yuk), I’ll likely pick up my fifth Accord sometime in 2019.

          • 0 avatar
            SaulTigh

            If you put a gun to my head and told me I had to buy a new car today, it would be an Accord, for sure.

            My grandmother had an ’86 Century too, but with the “Tech IV” (Iron Duke” engine. It looked good, and had an elegance to it, but was not a great car. She got the use out of it she did because it was garaged and she hardly drove it. Replaced it with a ’95 Sable, which is in my garage as we speak.

    • 0 avatar

      This is a better contest than my neighbor across the street won, when I was a kid.

      She got a Renault Alliance cabriolet.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Looking back in hindsight, it’s amazing this Civic was donated at all, because that was back in the “we sell every car we get for full sticker” era. I think they only had 4 Accords and maybe 5 Civics in stock the day he did the deal. I remember them talking about how hard it was to get stock. This same dealer also sold Buick and GMC, and had hundreds of cars and trucks in the adjacent lot.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    A reminder of how truly “basic” basic transportation was until pretty recently. No fuel injection, no ABS, no traction control, no A/C or radio (only dealer installed), no power steering, windows, seats, locks, no rust-proofing, no airbags – all of which are required or at least expected on even the cheapest versions of the cheapest cars today. That Honda would have been about $13,500 in today’s money, and you would be lucky to pay sticker given how popular they were in the 1980s, so no discount.

    • 0 avatar

      I do not comprehend your second sentence. It’s like you’re talkin in code.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        I think cars should go back to having equipment callouts on the body somewhere.

        • 0 avatar

          F U E L I N J E C T I O N

          Oooh, he got the new one.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Ha, check out this Presea:
            http://bestcarmag.com/sites/default/files/1990-nissan-presea-1315628-3155758.jpg

            “viscous lsd TWIN CAM”

            The back window of this Laurel has a callout for the automatic transmission:
            https://www.tradecarview.com/used_car/nissan/laurel/21377956/

          • 0 avatar

            That Presea has a disconcerting front end. I really don’t like it.

            I’m into the Laurel STRAIGHT 6 and engine code.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @bumpy ii, this…

          There is an elderly lady in Gallup (dark makeup, always has a scarf tied over her enormous hair, wears lots of polyester, so thin you think she’ll blow away) who daily drives an approximately ’67 Impala sedan in metallic green.

          I haven’t been able to get close enough to see if I can identify the engine by the badges.

          I miss being able to do that on modern vehicles.

          • 0 avatar

            I would love to see her time capsule home.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Speaking of well preserved little old lady cars:
            indianapolis.craigslist.org/cto/d/1979-bonneville-mint/6253742413.html

            I like that it must have been driven until fairly recently judging by the 130k on the odometer. I prefer that to the ultra-low mileage ones that have been dry-rotting in a garage for 15 years.

          • 0 avatar

            Oh look at that, that’s lovely. I’m gonna put that on Facebook.

          • 0 avatar
            operagost

            That Bonneville doesn’t have 131,000 miles showing… it’s 13,100. You younguns don’t remember cars with 1/10s on the odometer. That car looks so good, if you told me it was really 13,000 and not the more likely 113,000 I’d believe it.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      In 1993 I talked my Dad into an ’89 DX (used). I did this mostly because I had a crush on the blonde, teen (inexplicably), sales girl at Honda. This sale got me exactly one date.

      The DX got you four wheels, four speeds, four seat belts, no cold air and vinyl floor mats. Carpet was so bourgeois.

      It had been enhanced with super-dark tint and stereo, but with its red paint and stock 13-inch steelies it was actually quite pleasant to look at. We only added dealer a/c. It blew around the highway like a Styrofoam cup in the rain, but otherwise it went 129k trouble-free and slow miles at way over 30 per gallon.

      As much as I loved borrowing it for cheap road trips, I think I’d rather face today’s SUV’s in a Spark.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Such smooth clean styling.
    I guess that guy must have retired….

  • avatar
    gottacook

    For years I drove a 1300cc 4-speed Civic in the earlier body style, a blue 1983 model. It was even more spartan inside: painted metal at the door tops, no rear window defogger, etc. (And 12-inch rims; new tires that size could be found for $20.) It was, frankly, the car that taught me that agility is often superior to brute force – that is to say, it helped wean me from my other longtime car, a 222-inch 1966 Bonneville convertible, which I eventually decided to sell (along with pieces of a parts car) rather than foolishly go ahead with restoration.

    As for the gosh-wow impact of the new-for-’84 style and the four different Civic shapes, I prefer the more refined 1988-91 versions of same.

  • avatar
    psychoboy

    My third car (after a 71 Mercury Montego and an 89 CRX HF) was one of these. Bought cheap to get back on the road after the CRX broke a cam, it took me daily to college an hour away, and never had a problem, even after I turned down the front torsions, cut the rear springs, and loaded it down with stereo equipment.

    I did skijump it off some railroad tracks one night, tho. Sailed 73 feet down a hill, crammed the core support into the motor and bent the bumper up enough to block the headlights. Drove it home, found a salvage radiator for it, pulled the core back out with a chain, telephone pole, and reverse, and drove it daily for almost two years after that.

    Guy I sold it to jacked it up and uses it for a hunting buggy.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    158k miles seems like an early demise, but it probably got hit and wasn’t worth fixing.

  • avatar
    r129

    When I was growing up in the ’80s, my mom didn’t have a car, so we always relied on someone else to drive us around. Frequently it was her best friend, who was always driving a different cheap, unreliable car. Between 1985-1995, she owned a VW Rabbit, some sort of Audi, ’67 Chrysler, Honda Accord, Plymouth Horizon, Toyota Corona wagon, 2 Ford Escorts, an S10 pickup and a Hyundai Excel.

    Whenever one of her cars was out of commission, she would drive her mother’s car: a 1984 Honda Civic hatchback similar to this one, with a 4 speed manual, no radio, and no A/C. I recall that the Civic was always in pristine condition, it had a saint medal on the dashboard, and I thought the warning chime had an odd sound. It ended up being the mother’s last car and went to the daughter, who eventually managed to destroy it as she had destroyed all of her previous cars.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The Morse-code “H” used for the key warning was always neat!

      The 4th-Gen Accord (1990-1992) headlight warning was cool as well — an almost delicate, hi-lo mechanical chime! 1990s Japanese kitsch at its finest! (The subsequent generations were electronic chimes, and they weren’t the same!)

      Then, around the advent of the 9th-Gen Accord in 2013, with the implementation of the keyless ignition, they dropped the novelty key chime in lieu of a unit which sounds just like that found in a 2000s VW product! :-(

      Could be worse: it’s not the focus-grouped, embarrassing noises found in Ford products since 2010 or so!

  • avatar
    Johnster

    When these Civic hatchbacks came out they were referred to as “bread boxes.” I’ve always thought that they were similar in concept to the Chevy Vega Kammback station wagon.

  • avatar
    John

    This car highlights the 2018 2.5 liter Camry, with its 200hp, 41mpg highway, and all the heavy safety gear mandated in the USA today.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    The older cars look so fragile now. It appears the car was treated to the cheapest of MAACO repaints, but props for trying to match the duct tape to the interior. I’d wager the typical elderly (female) owner based on the stickers.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    60 horsepower? Jeez…at least my 1987 Nova was rated at 75. Though I’ve also heard of the Toyota 4AC being rated at 90hp as well so I don’t even know how much power it was actually supposed to have, just that what it had during my time owning it wasn’t enough. And it was an automatic too!

  • avatar
    spamvw

    At this point (1986) the mighty VW was throwing down 54 Horsepower. I had the a ’78 and even that 48 HP was fast enough and could pull a dead Mother Jugs and Speed Ambulance at 40 MPH back from Ft. Lauderdale to the Navy Training Center in Orlando. Good Times, Good Times.


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