By on June 14, 2017

Ford Taurus Police Interceptor

Despite what y’all may think sometimes, we do listen to you guys around here. Take this week’s Ace of Base as an example: Suggested by an alert reader, Ford’s current foray into the fleet of police forces across the nation do fit the Ace of Base ethos: a sparsely equipped example of a mass-market car offered at a rock bottom price.

Seven investigations on Autotrader quickly turned up several examples of current model year Ford Taurus Police Interceptors with under 100 miles on their clocks for around $22,000.

Barren interiors, steel wheels, plus Blues Brothers-style cop car modifications? Watch your head getting in, sir; we’re going for a ride.

Clad in Oxford White, these low-mile Interceptors haven’t seen their Charcoal Black interiors sullied by the bodily fluids of America’s finest miscreants. That’s usually the (valid) knock against buying a used-up police cruiser: the thing has probably seen more perps than Night Court at 100 Centre Street in Manhattan.

Not these. With scarcely a lap around the block under their base-model belts — one example is listed with only 18 miles on the clock — it would seem their engines haven’t even burned a cup of gasoline, let alone a full tank. A 3.7-liter V6 with a six-speed automatic is standard equipment on all-wheel-drive models, while Interceptors with 3.5-liter V6 send power solely to the front. Want more power? A 2.0T does its civic duty as the optional engine for front-drive Taurii, while a 148 mph EcoBoost V6 roams the streets for those wanting some turbo-go in an all-wheel-drive package. Check under the hood before you sign on the dotted line.

It’s not a complete and barren wasteland inside the Interceptor. A single USB port and Line-In connection reside waaaaay over near the passenger, but means riders need not rely on vapid terrestrial radio. A backup camera embedded in the rearview mirrors helps prevent drivers from reversing over hapless pedestrians.

Lost your key? No need to pony up big bucks for a gee-whiz chip enabled proximity unit here. A simple metal and plastic ignition key is on duty, just like the one in my father’s 1995 Aerostar. Keyless-entry fobs are cribbed from a 2001 Focus.

Air conditioning is on tap, natch, as are power windows, pedals, and front seats. Speaking of seats, hearty cloth buckets are installed in the front row, with a full 9 inches of space between them designed to house all manner of electronic equipment for the local constabulary. Civilians will find there is plenty of space for McDining. A handy flat plastic surface on top of the dash, intended for a radar gun, is a handy spot on which to rest your Big Mac. The vinyl rear bench makes for easy clean-up after a night of debauchery.

Included is an A-Pillar mounted spotlight, perfect for blinding random winos and gutter dwellers, plus an honest-to-gawd column shifter like nature and Henry Ford intended. The steering wheel is a standard Ford design but dispenses with volume buttons in favour of AUX switches. This means you can wire in some annoyingly bright LED bars (for off-road use only, right?) and toggle their operation without ever taking your hands off the wheel.

Police Interceptors tinted a natty shade of blue allow drivers to indulge in gritty undercover detective fantasies. Bonus points will be awarded to any member of the B&B who buys one of these Interceptors and paints it with a jaunty theme.

Cop tires, cop suspension, cop shocks … although today’s cruisers definitely have catalytic converters. Just make sure to fix the cigarette lighter.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones that have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown priced in American dollars. As always, a dealer may sell for less.

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60 Comments on “Ace of Base: Ford Taurus Police Interceptor Sedan...”


  • avatar
    seth1065

    why would these things be for sale w such low miles? There is a story there , I am sure. I had a friend in collage who bought a ex beat up cop car, best part was everyone moved out of his way on the roads.

    • 0 avatar
      S197GT

      not very exciting stories.

      they are likely just cancelled orders from departments or security companies.

      not uncommon at all. you can youtube a guy that purchased a new police utility and he talks about the pros and cons of owning a police fleet vehicle. there are quirks…

      • 0 avatar
        tonyola

        In 1988 I had a chance to buy a new red Mustang SSP notchback coupe at an Orlando, Florida Ford dealer. It was a cancelled order from a police department – I assume Florida Highway Patrol since they were big SSP customers back then. I passed on it because I didn’t really have the money.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Maybe the story on these is in the MSRP…

      Why does the MSRP on these run $30k+, while the civilian Taurus starts at $27k and is far better equipped? Is the running gear on these significantly more robust than the civilian cars? Or are the prices jacked because they have a captive market?

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        What’s the actual fleet transaction price?

        Back in 2012 when my district was buying a few fleet W-Impalas (civilian cars but fleet spec) the actual transaction price was less than $20K. The car still had automatic headlights, 6-speed auto, and the 3.6 VVT engine.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          If you are a gov’t agency in my state the current contract price for a pursuit rated Sedan Interceptor is $22,720.92 plus $250 if they have one in stock and you want it delivered now. But you need to act quick as 7/05 is the last day to order the 2017 model year and you’ve already missed the date for an actual special order.

          In comparison the Impala police unit would have set you back $22,396.08 and a Charger would have run you $21,681.23 if you would have ordered them on time. If some of the spec units are stil available again there would be an up charge of $250 for in stock units.

          Now if you just wanted a full size sedan in base form their contract prices were:

          Taurus SE $21,080.60
          Impala Limited LS $22,396.05
          Charger SE $21,505.77

          Though at this point you are either ordering the Taurus for a few more days or hoping to find that the winning bidder did stock up on the Impalas of Chargers.

      • 0 avatar
        Malforus

        My understanding is that all police vehicles require a very robust (pick-up truck like) electrical system to handle all the cop goodies.

        I also recall hearing the Cop spec ones had an oil cooler….but now I can’t find that reference.
        http://hooniverse.com/2013/08/12/comparison-ford-taurus-sho-vs-ford-taurus-police-interceptor-sedan/
        Retooling for the specific asks regarding column shift and other changes can account for stuff like that.

        Oh and of course the “government premium”

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          The police vehicles use the same basic electrical system as the other vehicles except for a higher output alternator. If desired most can be ordered with auxiliary fuse panels already installed, or at least with 50a power feeds to the center console, glove box and/or trunk. Typically the engine calibration will be different having a higher P/N idle speed than civilian models to improve alternator output when the vehicle is left idling with all the lights going.

      • 0 avatar
        brn

        Thinkin,

        MSRP on a Ford PI Sedan is $28K. As someone else stated, fleet prices are going to be even lower.

        The civilian Taurus isn’t better equipped. It’s differently equipped. It doesn’t have the following:
        – 75mph rear crash protection
        – Approach warning (someone sneaking up on you)
        – Ballistic door panels
        – Stab proof seats
        – Oil cooling
        – Transmission cooling
        – Higher capacity engine cooling
        – Heavy duty brakes (except on SHO)
        – Performance suspension (except on SHO)
        – Heavy duty skid plates
        – 40mph curb rated wheels
        – Pre-wired for lights, sirens, remote door release, etc
        – Silent mode
        The list goes on. This is not simply a stripped down civilian Taurus.

        While I haven’t crawled under a Ford PI Sedan, I have crawled under a Ford CVPI. The amount of frame reenforcement was impressive.

    • 0 avatar

      Many years ago, we had a base Caprice as a company car. It had a very wheezy six, but there was no other trim or frippery.

      Now, back then CB radio was a thing. I used to hear myself and location called in “bear with plain brown wrapper” all the time……

  • avatar
    brettc

    If I could get one in whatever colour Maine state police use, might be worthwhile.

    People still freak out whenever they see an old blue Crown Vic even if it’s being driven by a hipster.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Black with the 3.5 TT please

  • avatar
    jh26036

    $22k, full size sedan, full warranty, uprated suspension, V6 engine. This isn’t too shabby of a deal. Thumbs up.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Same dealer has a loaded-up ’16 (leather, roof, snazzy alloys) for a grand or so more. That’s a far better deal.

      • 0 avatar
        jh26036

        There’s some dealer in MO that is asking $26k for a 2015 with 7k miles but is a EB 3.5TT w/AWD (though poverty spec interior). I say knock off 15% and that is a really sweet cruiser. Tune it and it’ll be nearing 400tq crank. That Is a quick land barge.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          FreedMike has it right. The Taurus is the current “price per pound” champion, replacing the ancient W-Impala when it finally exited the stage.

          If you absolutely have to have a sedan, want it to be as large as possible, brand new, and the lowest possible transaction price – every trim level of Tauri is available.

          Dealers have quite a few 2016 models they’d love to be rid of.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            I hadn’t been looking and didn’t realize these were so heavily discounted.

            They don’t get much love, but I had a rental in Limited trim for an 800-plus-mile round trip and quite liked it. Seats were comfortable and the NA 3.5 had a lot of punch. (Side note: I started driving well before the current horsepower wars, so I’m pretty firm in my conviction that *all* of the 2.0T and V6 sedans clocking sub-7 0-60s are some flavor of fast.)

            The complaints about its being cramped are overblown. It’s not airy because of the high beltline, and the console is indeed too big. But in an absolute sense it’s still very roomy for four adults. In fact, the unswoopy-by-2017-standards roofline means that rear headroom is much better than in most other sedans.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            NO as always Chrysler is the price per pound bargain, weighing more then the competition and at a lower price. As the old saying goes the more things change the more they stay the same.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Scoutdude

            I have a tendency to forget there is a “stripped” Charger. It only exists in my mind in Hemi form – R/T is the lowest trim level I ever look at.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          True, jh, but you can get a CPO Taurus SHO for that kind of money. I don’t see the point of any of this unless you have a cop fetish.

        • 0 avatar
          maxxcool7421

          /smile/ Mine makes 420 hp and 525tq at the crank, 355whp/405wtq on a linked dyno jet. Runs 12.8 1/4 which is decent for non-prepped 4650lbs sedan.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Every once in a while I stop by this used car dealership that leaves the cars open even when the store is closed. Great for car shoppers like me who want to check things out without being bugged by a sales drone.

    Anyway, I was sitting in the police car they had for sale, playing with the spotlight :-) and thinking “this would make an interesting AoB”.

    You’re welcome?

    Is it true there are actually people in the US who buy a used cop car, dress it up like the real thing and then drive around checking license plates for people with arrest warrants?

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      Sadly, yes .
      .
      -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        S197GT

        how are they checking plates for warrants?

        unless they have access to secure bmv/dmv records? and even then, very few warrants are actually associated with registration data.

        yes, there are wannabes that are out there trying to insinuate there vehicle is some kind of law enforcement vehicle… some of the worst offenders are security officers. some actually pull people over, every now and then an actual officer, which makes for a funny news story.

        • 0 avatar
          TDIGuy

          > how are they checking plates for warrants?

          My understanding is that in some states you can look up contact info via license plate number. I suppose you could somehow cross reference that to warrants.

          There was some discussion, maybe here on TTAC, about barcoding on license plates and how the unintended side effect would be these bounty hunters or whoever they are would be able to just drive around and scan everyone.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Go try to look up someone’s info by using only their license plate. Unless you have access to information like a police agency does, you won’t get very far.

            Makes the idiots who use their hands/fingers/etc to cover the license plates of the car they’re selling on the internet look, well, idiotic. Do they not realize people can see their plate when the car is being driven? Or parked at a store? Its great when their hand or finger covers up 90% of the car they’re taking a picture of. Its like, why bother to take a picture at all? “Um, so its tan…and I believe its a sedan, but…” LOL

            They’re usually the ones telling you about the car being a “special addition” with only “154000K miles”. Damn, only a hundred and fifty four *million* miles? That’s nothing.

            Even better are the ones saying things like “new engine last year, transmission rebuilt a year before that, this replaced, that fixed, etc” and “never had any problems with the car.” Oh really? Yeah, I always spend thousands of dollars to fix a car that has 0 problems. Makes total sense. I think I’ll go rebuild my great running engine for…fun? To get rid of unneeded money?

            Almost as bad as “need a engine, but other than that, it runs great!” or the very similar “once the engine is replaced, it’ll run great!” lol, I sure hope so. I’d be disappointed if a new engine ran poorly.

            The kings of stupidity are the ones who list a pile of parts they’ve replaced, had a drivetrain overhaul done a while back, this fixed, that’s fixed, this needs fixing, that doesn’t work etc, but you should buy it because “Toyotas run forever!” Yep, ANYTHING will run “forever” if you keep fixing it.

            I saw a 2007 (I think it was, it wasn’t that old) Nissan Altima for $400 last night, only 140k on it. I clicked on it. Seller says she’s tired of spending money on this car, a list of repairs done, and a list of what’s needed (engine I think, among other things), at the end she says “I got so sick of fixing this car, I gave up and bought a new car.”
            I looked through the pics, guess what new car she bought to replace this horrible lemon? An Altima.

            And you guys complain about a guy who buys GM or Ford trucks one after another. “Blind brand loyalty” my @$$. At least they’re getting good service out of their trucks, or they wouldn’t be so stupid as to keep buying them. An example, my uncle (may he RIP) got a lemon Ford truck in the 1980s. He bought nothing but GM trucks until 2010 when he bought his wife an F-150 Lariat, at her insistence (he liked the truck too, but she had driven a friend’s F-150 and loved it). He probably bought a dozen or more trucks in the 25 years or so (he owned a logging company, so they had work trucks and his personal trucks, which were almost always GMC Z7-1s) until he finally gave Ford another shot. It took a helluva long time for him to forgive Ford for that §#¡ГГ¥ truck he bought back during the Regan admin. Blind? Hardly. That’s the people who lease a Corolla one after another. You think the Corolla is the only car you can get three decent years out of? Ha

            /rant
            :)

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Unfortunately, as our old friend George Zimmerman proved, there’s no shortage of people who like to play cop.

  • avatar
    TheDoctorIsOut

    If it comes with a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, and black sunglasses for when it’s dark, I’m in.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Every car these days seems to come with a “complimentary full tank” of fuel, so you’ll at least get 1 out of 3. Maybe the other 2 could be thrown in if they can put you in it *today*

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, if you have a cop fetish, I suppose…

    Still, a better deal is out there if you want to play policeman. How ’bout a ’14 Caprice with the 6.0 V-8, 960 miles, $25000. The URL is too long to paste in here, but it’s on Autotrader.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Not a bad bet. 2014 was when GM moved the Caprice (and the rest of the Holden Commodore variants) over to the Global A electronics architecture, resulting in—least of all—a much needed cabin update.

      Also, you can paste the URL here if you remove all of the silly URL parameters: http://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/vehicledetails.xhtml?listingId=446927211

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Ah, thanks for the URL abbreviation.

        That Caprice police car is pretty sweet. A few years back, someone ran into my back bumper ($1700 in damage for a cracked rear bumper on a 13-year-old Buick – pop quiz, did I fix the bumper or bank the $1700?), and the cop who handled the accident scene was driving a Caprice with the 6.0. Turns out, this guy was a total gearhead, and confided to me that it was faster and handled better than his mid-’90s Z28.

        If I could find the one they made for the detectives (http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2012-chevrolet-caprice-ppv-test-review), I’d buy it. Best Q-ship ever.

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    Did once drive one of these cars thinking the added parts (beefed up cooling, trans, suspension, etc) might make a good cheap handler. Not too good in the end, rough riding, loud (no sound deadening) and lacking even the basic modcons. I did like the black out look, or more clearly, lack of chrome trims and do-dads. Sone thing to think about.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    I love that Zeck Ford badge on the back of the 18 mile example. That’s the only time where I wouldn’t peel off the dealer sticker/logo as soon as I got home.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    As a former Fleet Commander in charge of 500 plus vehicles, I wrote specs for police vehicles, including paddy wagons, motorcycles, and other special duty units, I find the new Ford offerings quite attractive. Of course, we were required to write specs on which any of the big three could bid when it came to police sedans. During my tenure in that assignment, we had everything from full sized sedans, to manufacturers attempts at downsizing to what was considered mid sized compacts, and even a few real compacts…
    I have been impressed with the current crop of police units emanating from the big three in various configurations. The 80s era brought limited space and reliability to police agencies across the country from all makes. If I were 30 years younger, I would be happy with any of the current sedans…still not a fan of SUV police units other than special duty, canine, etc…

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Remember the Dodge Intrepid attempt at a cruiser? We had one as a [loaner] test unit. It fell apart. Got another. It fell apart. Got another. It fell apart. Didn’t want another.

      Perfectly nice civilian car. Not up to the rigors of police duty.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    If you can get over the straitjacket-mask look of the lower front fascia, even the simplified bumper isn’t bad-looking.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    I could see this making sense for a parent wanting to get a kid a car with all the safety features but few distractions with the ability to tolerate lots of abuse.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Sat in one, and unfortunately, it suffers from “console balloonitis” – the center console is SO wide, I can’t sit in it comfortably – it impinges on my right leg/thigh. And the legroom wasn’t that great either, even in the back, IIRC. None of us could get comfortable.

    For comparison, my family all liked/loved: G37, SS, CTS-V, IS-F, ’15+ STI.

    The rental Fusion I picked up for my parents a few years back felt WAY roomier and comfortable.

    Somewhat of a pity, since it does seem like a good bang-for-buck cruiser.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That’s something a lot of people complain about in the later D3 / D4-platform cars (everything on that platform introduced in or after 2009). I haven’t had a problem with thigh space in my ’14 MKS, and I have rather wide thighs for someone of my build. However, people come in all shapes and sizes, and it’s definitely more cramped than a lot of cars. The console *is* wide.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      turbo_awd, the Ford PI Sedan doesn’t have a center console.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    I’d get rid of the light and get different wheels, but for 22k, a virtually new full size sedan with a far more robust suspension and braking system?* That’s an AoB winner.

    (* Can any one speak to what the typical upgrades are on a police version of a vehicle are vs the consumer version? I have always heard that the brakes and suspension are more ‘heavy duty’, but what does that mean? Are they throwing in stuff from the F-Series trucks or what?)

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I can’t confirm it either, but you might see how much stuff from the Taurus SHO shows up on a base Taurus PI; that might be the source from which Ford is drawing the high-performance / heavy-duty parts.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I was under the understanding that for the Crown Vic the civilian units used aluminium suspension components while the PI used cast iron. (But I’m sure Scoutdude can give us the straight story.)

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No the suspension thing was based on year, not application, so all of the 03-04 and early 05 models have cast aluminum lower control arms while the later models had stamped steel.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        @Kyree, if the EcoBoost option is selected on the Sedan Interceptor then yes the engine is pretty much the same as the SHO. However the suspension is police specific. Typically the spring rates are increased significantly and the vehicle has a resulting higher ride height. The sway bars on the other hand are typically less than the performance civilian version. For example on the later Panthers the police spec has a 17mm rear sway bar while the HPP cars had 21mm.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      They do have pursuit rated specific spring sway bar and shock rates, and usually that means softer sway bars to improve off-road articulation. Some have different friction material on the brake pads/shoes but otherwise the same foundation brakes, though some use steel pistons in the calipers rather than phenolic. The ABS and stability control may be tuned differently. The power train calibration will often be different with a higher P/N idle speed, later, firmer, shift points ect. Some add engine oil coolers, auxiliary or power steering coolers, or a larger radiator.

    • 0 avatar
      redmondjp

      Before you go and remove the light, drive the car for awhile. Marvel at the fact that when you are searching for a street sign in the dark, you can easily light it up like daylight. Oh, I forgot, your smart phone is telling you where to turn, nevermind!

      My 1969 Cadillac ambulance had two of those pillar-mounted lights on it, and they were awesome.

      • 0 avatar
        newenthusiast

        I don’t have a smartphone, but I also have never had issues seeing a street sign. I just think that the light comes off too much as ‘playing cop’, which makes me uncomfortable. I wouldn’t want to misrepresent myself, even unintentionally.

        I’m not in the market right now anyway. But if I were, this seems like a very good deal.

        @Scoutdude – thanks for the answer.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I’d want to turn the pillar light around 180 degrees to “gently” remind the person behind me to please turn off their high beams.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I used to want a P71 Crown Vic, but the detective version, with a normal back seat, instead of the hard plastic seat.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Actually all P71s came with a normal back seat, either vinyl or extra cost cloth that matches the front. Depending on the agency they either auction off the new unused seats, and often the bags of door linkages. Others would swap the seat from the new cars into the old when they transferred the plastic perp seat. Others store them and throw them in the cars when they go to auction whether with or without the plastic seat installed. I wish that the county didn’t auction them off as a single lot. Last time it was 7 pallets of the seats from the Utility Interceptors. In a few years I figure they will be worth a decent chunk of money once the vehicles actually make it to auction.


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