By on May 3, 2017

Fleet of Ford Crown Victorias, Image: www.government-fleet.com

Anonymous writes:

I have a question about fleet replacements. Currently, we have a vehicle fleet that includes:

  • 2010 Ford Explorer, 103k miles
  • 2006 Ford Crown Vic, 78k miles
  • 2006 Buick Lucerne, 82k miles
  • 2005 Chevy Impala, 76k miles
  • 2014 Ford Explorer, 40k miles
  • 2009 Dodge Grand Caravan, 65k miles
  • 2008 – Ford Crown Vic, 70k miles
  • 2011 Chevy Impala, 18k miles
  • 2014 Jeep Patriot, 28k miles
  • 2014 Jeep Patriot, 18k miles
  • 2014 Jeep Patriot, 23k miles
  • 2011 Chevy Impala, 46k miles
  • 2007 Dodge Caravan, 123k miles
  • 2012 Chevy Impala, 24k miles
  • 2012 Chevy Impala, 22k miles

Our budget only allows to replace nine vehicles with a 2014 equivalent version of each.

What would you decide to keep and replace? What guidelines would you consider?

Personally, I believe that Bluetooth should be a required feature now on all cars especially ones that have employees driving them. I want to use it as the first requirement and then move on to mileage and year — but what say you? What criteria would you use to decide order of replacement?

Sajeev answers:

Son, let’s first address the perimeter-framed elephant in the room.

I’m dumbfounded at your lack of Panther Love: sell the riff-raff to get seven more 2011 Crown Vics!

Seriously though, Bluetooth isn’t tough to add. New units are cheap and older stereos with CD-changer inputs are covered. Let’s stick with the mechanical/electrical bits that keep a fleet running, earning their masters that sweet, sweet federal green.

Assuming you’re a stereotypical fleet owner that partakes in religious vehicle maintenance, here’s my take:

  • 2010 Ford Explorer, SELL: Do you need a body-on-frame truck? Sell, especially before gas prices go up.
  • 2006 Ford Crown Vic, KEEP: Put this in a museum, preserving its instant classic status.
  • 2006 Buick Lucerne, SELL: Sell immediately if it’s a Northstar, even if it’s the improved version. Sell it if it has a 3.8L. It’s no fleet-sweet W-body.
  • 2005 Chevy Impala, KEEP: Somewhat low miles, cheap, easy to keep running, and heavily depreciated. Keep it until it dies.
  • 2014 Ford Explorer, KEEP: Or sell? You’ll buy a lot of Panthers with the proceeds. Just kidding. Probably.
  • 2009 Dodge Grand Caravan, SELL: I’d keep it, but a newer Caravan with lower miles sounds appealing if this needs even modest repairs.
  • 2008 Ford Crown Vic, KEEPSeriously, how is this even a question?
  • 2011 Chevy Impala, KEEP: Low-mile W-bodies are a balance sheet’s best friend.
  • 2014 Jeep Patriot, KEEP: Concerned about long-term durability of the CVT gearboxes, but it’s new and valuable.
  • 2014 Jeep Patriot, KEEP: But do you know how many Panthers you could buy?
  • 2014 Jeep Patriot, KEEP: Or how many W-bodies?!?!
  • 2011 Chevy Impala, KEEP: No need to sell a well-maintained W-body.
  • 2007 Dodge Caravan, SELL: At some point a newer one needs less work, but it’s cheap considering depreciation.
  • 2012 Chevy Impala, KEEP: Again, W-bodies are great fleet machines.
  • 2012 Chevy Impala, KEEP: See above comment about cheap Bluetooth upgrades.

Sorry, I can only (hypothetically) sell four from the fleet. Maybe you could unload more of the older units if your fleet exists in the rust belt … but never sell the Panthers.

What are your thoughts, Best and Brightest?

[Image: government-fleet.com]

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58 Comments on “Piston Slap: Upgrading The Fleet?...”


  • avatar
    deanst

    If you’re going to have a fleet of sad, uninspiring cars you might as well emphasize reliability and fuel efficiency. Trade them all in as you can afford it and move to a fleet of Camry hybrids – minimizes your repair times as well as time wasted refuelling.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    As it stands, your question is far too vague. Following Sajeev’s statement could see you eliminating perfectly good vehicles and keeping some you should eliminate. The very FIRST thing you should do is determine how reliable each vehicle has been so far. I had access to a fleet one time that included a 1964 4×4 Chevy Step Van and a 2-year-old 1978 Ford F-150 Crew Cab 4×4. The difference was that one of those two trucks spent more time in the shop than in the fleet and it was NOT the Step Van. So before you do ANYTHING, get rid of the garage queens.

    As for things like bluetooth, there are aftermarket radios available for every vehicle you named that include bluetooth capability; far, FAR cheaper to simply replace the radios than swap vehicles just because they don’t have it.

    Finally, when it does come down to the replacement vehicles themselves, choose vehicles with known reliability. Don’t rely on rumor, reputation or a pat on the back, try to determine the reality for yourself. Which ones hold up the longest? If you choose to look into Consumer Reports or any other commercial reviewing source, pick their reviews down to the bone; they have a bad habit of giving low marks to some remarkably good vehicles simply because a buyer doesn’t know how to use the radio or some other stupid stuff that has nothing at all to do with reliability.

    Am I going to name specific vehicles? No. I have no idea what your fleet is used for, nor do I care. The vehicle is there to meet some perceived need so it’s up to you to choose the vehicle that best meets that need.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Excellent point. Shop time should be the first consideration. The second consideration should be whether the vehicle actually fits the job it’s intended to do.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “1978 Ford F-150 Crew Cab 4×4.”

      No such thing.

      Ford released the first crew cab F150 in 2001.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        He must have meant F-250. In 1978, the only crew cab Fords were F-250 4×2 (short bed only), F-250 4×4 (short bed only), or F-350 4×2 (long bed only). There were no factory F-350 4×4 models in any config until the 1980 bullnose trucks.

        Also, since this gave me an excuse to page through some ’70s and ’80s ads again: You could get a SuperCab/short bed (139″ WB) F-250 light duty until 1983 or ’84, then it went away and wasn’t available again until the ’97 jellybean. F-250HD SuperCab/shorties reappeared in 1995, along with crew cab/shorties.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Ok, it MIGHT have been an F-250. That means very little as far as I’m concerned since the only real difference was the maximum load capacity.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            And you would be absolutely right. Before the ’97s, the F-150, 250, 250HD, and 350 were basically heavier versions of the same vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Why do I find your response so hard to believe, Lou? Believe me, Chrysler was not the FIRST to create a crew cab truck; Ford built them too but they were extremely limited and used by major fleets where their purpose was for work, not play.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Vulpine – I wasn’t questioning anything you said other than the bit about “1978 Ford F-150 Crew Cab 4×4”

          My neighbor has a 1979 F250 Extended cab long box 4×4. 1979 happens to be one of my all time favourite Ford 3/4 ton pickups. My dad had a ’77 reg cab.

          My apologies.

          I should have worded my reply differently.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Accepted. And as I said above, to me there is little difference between any of the F-series outside of load capacities.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Keep the ’14 Explorer, All the newer Imps, and the 3 Patriots. Buy Camrys as replacements (LE, or Hybrid if budget allows) for everything else.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    I would keep the W’s (minus the Buick) and the Crown Vics and dump everything else. All are either gas guzzling SUV-ish cars that are still worth something, but not exactly paragons of reliability. If I wanted a reliable fleet, I would not want a bunch of FCA products laying around. Replace with a fleet of newer Fusions or Altimas to get the most bang for your buck.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      ” Crown Vics and dump everything else. All are either gas guzzling SUV-ish cars”

      I’d say the Crown vics guzzle with the best of them. Out of all FCA vehicles, a newer Patriot would not be the worst choice for reliability. Fairly simple and made for over a decade now with the same basic underpinnings. Aside from somewhat weak front ends (typical Chrysler) and some electrical issues (TIPM, again typical Chrysler), they’re not bad IMO.

  • avatar
    Car Guy

    Some assumptions in my answer:

    1) The person asking the question does not list any specific requirements the vehicles need to preform, other than to move employees around.
    2) Assuming from this list the person only buys US nameplates and not imports.
    3) The vehicles all appear to be mid/full size models with the exception of the Patriot, a small CUV
    4) “Our budget only allows to replace nine vehicles with a 2014 equivalent version of each.” Not sure what a “2014 equivalent” means. He can only buy used cars for replacements? Unclear.

    So if a mid size vehicle is needed for transportation:

    1) Sell the 10MY and older vehicles.
    2) If the fleet manager can only buy used cars with American nameplates, I would look at some 14MY Ford Fusions. Can pick those up in SE trim for $10-12K.
    3) If he’s buying new vehicles look at new Fusions/Malibus. Cars have little love right now and those are the best deals. CUV’s will cost more and would only buy if a CUV was really needed.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    2006 Buick Lucerne, SELL: Sell immediately if it’s a Northstar, even if it’s the improved version. Sell it if it has a 3.8L. It’s no fleet-sweet W-body.

    Why the lack of love for the 3.8? I can understand if it was the N*. This vehicle is fully depreciated and Buick generally has ‘better build quality’ than many other GM products. Please explain.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The prophets of the Church should be here shortly to deal with this (potential) heresy.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I assume he is meaning that the Lucerne itself wasn’t as fleet-focused as the W-bodies or the Panthers, so the various parts won’t be as cheap or plentiful to come by.

      The 2005 Impala likely has a 3800 (and a worse version than the Lucerne’s at that) and he put that in the “keep” category.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “The 2005 Impala likely has a 3800 (and a worse version than the Lucerne’s at that) and he put that in the “keep” category.”

        If it’s a fleet car, I’d bet it’s a 3.4L. Not terrible, but not without some weak spots.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          My in-laws had a “3400” (3.4 by another name) in their 2009 Torrent. It developed an overheating issue that the dealer didn’t seem to be able to properly diagnose and that was at 108,000 miles.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Sounds LIM or even headgasket sourced (not unheard of on the 3.4).

          • 0 avatar
            operagost

            Indeed. My Alero with the 3400 had both problems.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @getmnykh, I could tell the service department was just throwing parts at it.

            First they tried to say it was a bad battery that was making the sensor freak out, when the problem came back they did a thermostat, then claimed it was an issue with a coolant hose, and then when it resurfaced my mother-in-law traded for an Acadia Limited.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Only Impala LS came equipped with our LORD.

  • avatar
    Thatkat09

    Dont the 2014 Patriots have the 6 speed Hyundai transmission? I know the CVT is available with the top of the line AWD package but I doubt any of those found their way into fleets.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “2006 Buick Lucerne, SELL: Sell immediately if it’s a Northstar, even if it’s the improved version. Sell it if it has a 3.8L. It’s no fleet-sweet W-body.”

    I can’t even believe what I am reading.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Repent!

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Heed Brother Freed’s words unbelievers, for thou mileage is nigh.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I do believe my Buick is coming up on the head gasket repair…

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The only way to blow a head gasket on a 3800 is to run it with the temp gauge pegged for several miles. I’ve seen ONE FWD Buick V6 HG failure ever across my life and various model forums.

            If you have a gasket problem in a SII, it is 98% related to the intake gaskets. (Although with a coolant loss issue, you might just have a cracked coolant elbow or leaking freeze plug.)

            This is important because doing the intake gaskets is *considerably* easier than doing head gaskets.

            So if you are farming out work on a 3800 and a shop tells you that you need “head gaskets” that either means they don’t know what they are talking about or they are trying to screw you.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Series II had an issue where either the intake gasket or the steering rack would leak and ruin the coils [?]. I can’t recall exactly but this may be what you are referring too.

    • 0 avatar
      Joshua Johnson

      Brother 28, I come as a true believer in the almighty 3800. It saddens me to report that the Lucerne is not blessed with the correct transmission. The 4T65E is far too inferior to the 4T65E-HD to own long-term.

      Prior to my Lucerne CXL Special Edition, I had a Park Avenue Ultra. Thinking only of the holy 3800, I overlooked the glass 4T65E when it came time to replace the Park Avenue. I bought the 2008MY Lucerne early in its life (40k miles) with the anticipation of 200k+ miles ahead of me. Acquainted with the prodigious torque and driving style of the Park Avenue, I drove the Lucerne in a similar fashion. The day of reckoning came, when the 4T65E shifted no more.

      As a devoted follower of the Church, I dutifully replaced the 4T65E, and drove with more awareness of the transmission’s limitations. Nigh, long-lasting ownership was not to be. As a result of GM’s pre-BK cost cutting, suspension bits and other seemingly random items began breaking that never broke on the Park Avenue in driving it hard from 120k to 220k miles. The Lucerne had only been driven from 40k to 80k before we parted ways. The 3800 never once deprived me of its glory, but annoyed with GM’s failure to honor the spirit of the Park Avenue, I went to Infiniti.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Rejoice as Brother Joshua has found his way home!

        4T65E-HD is not much different than 4T65E, and 4T65E is a descendant of 440-T4 which was designed for our LORD. In N/A guise, 4T65E is sufficient for 230 ft-tq/205 bhp, however L67s were known to break the transaxle (as you found out). GM should have changed the transmission for supercharged models (i.e. 4T80), but they did not. This is a sin which cannot be forgiven.

        http://www.3800pro.com/forum/fwd-transaxle-components/24539-4t65e-vs-4t65e-hd.html

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_4T60-E_transmission

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo-Hydramatic_125

        “As a result of GM’s pre-BK cost cutting, suspension bits and other seemingly random items began breaking that never broke on the Park Avenue in driving it hard from 120k to 220k miles.”

        I had the same were going out of business issues with the GP, but I fixed them with quality aftermarket.

        “GM’s failure to honor the spirit of the Park Avenue, I went to Infiniti.”

        GM will pay for their dishonor of our LORD.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Park Avenue is a beast and the styling has held up remarkably well IMO.

        I got flamed by some people on the GM forums when I said that my Lucerne was worse than my 1980s LN3-powered cars, but I stand by that statement.

        If you really want to experience the GLORY of the 3800 an ’88 – ’95 H-body is the best place to do it.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    What kind of fleet buys used vehicles???

    Also, let me chime in with the required “Panthers are the herpes of cars, and absolutely terrible in every way except for looking like white trash that wants to look like a cop”.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Sell all the W-bodys and buy one new Lacrosse with all the toys.

    Keep the nicest Patriot (one that’s 4×4 at least).

    I’d like more information. Base Crown Vics? Sell. Ex cop cars? Keep. Rare Crown Victoria LX Sport? Keep. Crown Victoria with HHP (dealer code 41G)? Keep.

    And don’t replace everything. Are you trying to end up on an episode of “Hoarders”?

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Methinks you misunderstood. The guy literally manages a fleet for a business. Not in the way a lot of us refer to our families’ collections of vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Sorry I’m not used to a fleet that is that old.

        I don’t think that there is anything older than about 2009 in the current district fleet unless it is BOF and has an American V8 under the hood.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I remember there being a gen 1 Explorer in the USDA fleet at Cornell back in the late 2000s. The research facility where I worked for a year still had a ’94 F250 with the 300ci and a ’94 Chevy 1500 w/t (4.3) when I left there in 2013, both pretty rotted out. My friend scored a rusty but inspected shorty passenger ’94 Ram Van (3.9L) with working A/C for $375 in a silent auction. It was an ugly beast but the deal of the century as the university fleet had insured all mechanical things were kept up on, tires were good, etc. To be fair it had a crazy amount of slop in the steering.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            University fleets can be pretty bad. In 2004, the research program I was involved with still had 1982 Ford F150s long ago offloaded by the Forest Service. They ran, kind of. I think most of the fuel left unburned through the tailpipe. The 1999 F250 that was the spring chicken is still in their fleet now.

            Another department was suffering through an early 80s Plymouth Reliant wagon. They called that one the Blue Sh*tmobile.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I spent some summers in college (summers of ’96-’98) working in university housing, where dorms get used as conference housing for the summer. Dorms were in two locations at opposite ends of the very large campus, about a mile and a half apart. We had access to “Van 51,” the world’s worst ’82 Ram, to move people and miscellaneous crap between the two locations. It had only about 106k miles on it but remains to this day the most clapped-out vehicle I’ve ever driven. The key was optional to start it, both front seats had a few inches of play in their mounts, the back seats had more foam than vinyl, moving the steering wheel was more a vague suggestion than a command, and the starter only caught about every fourth time you turned the key. I don’t think third gear in the transmission worked but maybe we just never got moving fast enough on the 20 mph campus road to trigger a shift into it.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Dal – I worked college maintenance in the 1995-1999 time frame while working on my bachelors. We had a small fleet but we had a 1979 Chevy truck (rusted to the point there was a hole in the floor) it was originally an I-6 truck that had been converted to SBC – god knows why. We had a 1984 Chevy Scottsdale with the camper package (it had the little tepee emblems and everything). The pinnacle though was a late 80s Econoline 15 passenger van that had all the seats ripped out of it so we could haul stuff. The 351 had more valve clatter than a Detroit Diesel – I swore it would shake itself to pieces one day but never did.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Then your district must like spending more money on vehicles than the ones around here. The district my kids went to still has a fish mouth Taurus for the driver’s ed car and some 90’s Caravans. I’ve seen another district’s cars come up on PublicSurplus.com that recently included a 92 CV and some K cars.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Well Scoutdude the district is 5,000 square miles with only about 75,000 people living in it. You can make a 180 mile round trip and only visit one school.

            Most trips for professional development are minimum 3 hours one way maximum of 5.

            We do rack up the miles.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            But what you describe is far from the norm. However we do have a few districts in E. WA that are spread out like that and they too still have 90’s vehicles in their fleet.

  • avatar

    I’m a fleet sales guy at a dealer and I got confused when you said you can only afford 2014 and older units. First question I would have is have you priced out new ones? You’d be eligible for a fleet number with most makers (Ford requires 15 total units (you got it!) or buying at least 5 units in a year(you got that too!) Fleet numbers mean you can get close to full rebates at any time of year, and they cut off the advertising cost on the invoice as well. I would think the difference between this cost and what you can buy used stuff for isn’t all that much. If it’s a problem with monthly expense, you can do commercial leasing too, which does not have mileage restraints (open lease), or if you’re not putting too many miles, just go for retail lease and be done with it. New vehicles cost some more, but that’s generally offset with lower repairs, better fuel economy, and not having to add features (like bluetooth). Big companies don’t buy new because they’re lazy, it just makes more sense and cost less. Sure part of that is the cost of time in finding suitable used units, but there’s much more than that. I can’t imagine many scenarios where used makes sense for a fleet.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    I don’t see 9 vehicles that are not viable here.

    The Caravan and Explorer with 100K+ and the older W-body’s are the only red flags that stand out to me.
    Bluetooth usually means the trim package one step up from base, and since decent car radios with bluetooth are about $100, and I know all the cars you have listed there have a regular radio compartment in the dashboard (new Fords are very unfriendly with this), save the few thousand apiece and get splicing.

    Or you can buy those crappy speakers that you clip to he visor.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    What is the purpose of the fleet? It looks like the inventory of a well stocked wrent-a-wreck place but you have employees driving them? Where are they going? What are they doing? Why do you have minivans and suvs? For the love of G-d why do you have a Patriot?

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I remember the USDA satellite facility where I did summer work ended up with a few Patriots in 2008 in the middle of the bankruptcies and all that, we replaced a ’98 Explorer XLS that had some shift flare issues at 58k miles. Our patriot was a pretty loaded up one with fancy alloys. Everyone universally hated it compared to the Explorer. Much smaller trunk for tools, weaker A/C, and just less fun to bounce around the field in.

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    I don’t know why, but the photo of that fleet of cop cars in a giant excavated space reminds me of the terracotta soldier army buried with China’s first emperor.
    Plus I guess wherever that array is located, they must never have flash floods.

  • avatar
    George B

    The most important question is what do the vehicles need to do? If the cars only need to transport one person plus a small amount of stuff, I’d be looking for unloved domestic cars that were basically solid, but uncompetitive in their market segment. For example, the previous generation Malibu with insufficient rear seat room might be a good fleet car for one person while the W platform Impala would be better if there are rear seat passengers.

    I’d sell the cars that spend a disproportionate time in the shop. I’d sell the 2010 Explorer with 103k miles to somebody who wants/needs a truck more than the company does. If the Patriots fetch a good price in the CUV Era, I’d sell them and replace them with unloved sedans with lower operating costs.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Keep the Patriots, the ’14 Explorer, and the ’11-’12 Impalas. Replace everything else. Both age and mileage contribute to fleet maintenance costs in a substantial way. I don’t think you want any vehicles over about 7-8 years old in the fleet, and I would also avoid >100k miles.

    From an operating cost standpoint a Prius is the best you can do, but I expect they are too expensive to buy used, and probably your best choice in terms of TCO is something proven and domestic like a Fusion SE or non-turbo Malibu.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I’d say look at the maintenance log books. Ditch anything that is showing a trend to increased repairs.
    Look at durability data. Vincentric and others will sell fleet buyers durability data. Even Consumer Reports is a guide to use. Ditch anything that shows you are heading towards trouble.

    Randomly buying vehicles to replace this fleet isn’t the best way to get replacements.
    Take a honest look at usage and pick vehicle’s that match that usage but with good durability data, is cheap to insure, and is easy on gas.
    Once you make that decision put out a request for fleet bids to all of the car makers with products that make it on your short list. Buy the same vehicle. Not an assortment. That is better in the short and long term.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I think in order to properly answer the question we really need to know the mission of the fleet. If the mission is simply longevity I would do something to this effect:

    Keep 3800 Lucerne
    Keep all 60V6 W-bodies.
    Keep one or both Panthers
    Keep 2010 Expy
    Keep one or both vans.

    Sell all Jeeps.
    Sell MY14 Expy.

    Why?

    -The keeper vehicles will not fetch as much as the Jeeps and new Expy.
    -The sell vehicles are not durable and I don’t think they will fare well in long term fleet use.
    -The vans despite known Chrysler Kwality and transaxle issues are useful to move large or bulky cargo. The MY10 Explorer as well. Jeep Patriot cargo capacity is much less than these.
    -Ford supposedly exiled the Exploder out of Explorer by the final refresh. The current Explorer has been exploding in police use in my city.
    -I would probably only keep the better of the two Panthers, although if your climate permits perhaps keep both and drop the lesser of the Ws.
    -The Lucerne serves as the foreman/manager’s car, and 3800 will grant believers eternal torque.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Sorry 28 but I think that’s the most ass-backwards way of looking at it. Reselling anything newer because you’ll get more money for it is highly flawed logic: the resale on any one of those Patriots will not buy you anything equally new/low miles in return. The 2010 Explorer with 103k miles is a liability IMO, given the litany of things that likes to break on them with regularity. Caravans are the definition of disposable vehicles that need to be used up while under warranty then discarded as soon as possible. Regardless of reputations for ruggedness and reliability dal is right, higher miles and age will always catch up to you in terms of maintenance cost, downtime for repairs and such.

      I’d stick everyone in firesale Prius Cs for the rock bottom TCO and excellent reliability, but I’m not THAT mean, and OP never specified what the vehicles are used for. Perhaps a few Prius Vs for cargo hauling (67cu ft), 2 new AVP Caravans, and the balance in whatever midsize gas 4cyl sedan is cheapest. There’s also something to be said for a consolidated manufacturer/drivetrain, in which case a Prii and Camry Hybrid fleet would make some sense.

  • avatar
    Salzigtal

    Alhambra CA it is: http://www.truckinginfo.com/blog/fleetspeak/print/story/2015/01/wondries-fleet-on-stocking-1500-crown-vics.aspx


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