By on May 18, 2017

2018 Subaru WRX STI, Image: Subaru

Earlier this week, I fielded a question regarding German hot hatches. A few commenters suggested that I had made a mistake by not recommending the Subaru WRX or STi as an alternative to the Golf R and Focus RS. After all, I’d been perfectly content to recommend a Subaru as an alternative to a Volkswagen just a week before. So why not suggest an STI in place of an RS? Was it the long-dormant Euro-snob in me surfacing unexpectedly, like a Kraken slouching up from dark water to terrify the innocents on shore with its repugnant and vicious countenance? Or had I simply forgotten about the mere existence of the twin turbo compacts?

With regards to the first of these two scenarios, I can only assure the readership I’ve repented of my youthful Euro-snobbery to a degree that would make a post-Room-101 Winston Smith weep over his Victory Gin. With regards to the second scenario, I will only say this: somebody has forgotten about the WRX and STi, and that somebody is the corporate person known as Subaru of America.


horsepower

Exhibit A, ladies and gentlemen: this highly complex Excel spreadsheet I made a few minutes ago, showing the available horsepower in several different enthusiast-oriented nameplates over the past 16 years. As you can see, the “horsepower war” is real, and it’s spectacular. Unless, that is, you’re a Subaru fan. The WRX is less than 15-percent stronger than it was sixteen years ago. The STi has, for all intents and purposes, the same amount of power it boasted on its debut back in the Bush Administration — although there was a minor change in how SAE measured horsepower a while back, so maybe the current car has 10 more horsepower instead of 5 more. Maybe.

It gets worse, because the WRX is now about 300-pounds heavier than it was in 2001, give or take a couple of pounds depending whether you are comparing the new car to an old sedan or an old wagon. The current STi is about 200-pounds chunkier than the “peanut eye” STi that appeared in 2005. It’s no wonder then that most people seem to think that it’s a little slower than its predecessor. Can you think of another new car that cannot match its decade-old progenitor in a straight line? Maybe the Cruze RS against a Cobalt SS Turbo. Other than that, nothing comes to mind for me.

Twelve years ago, the STi was a legitimate trackday threat that could haunt the mirrors of Porsche and Corvette drivers even before you turned up the boost. Even the base WRX was enough to cause trouble for 2.5-liter Boxsters and such. Nowadays, the WRX is easy meat for family sedans and the STi is a distant memory in the mirrors of sporting vehicles as diverse as the Mustang GT and the Macan Turbo. Forget hassling 911 drivers; nowadays, you’ve got to crank the boost on these cars just to make sure you can drop a Camry V6 in the quarter-mile.

I don’t want to overstate the situation. The base WRX is still good value for money and it’s dirt-cheap to effectively upgrade. The STi is very close to being a performance contemporary of the Focus RS and Golf R and it sells for a similar price. But the days when the little blue sedans punched like heavyweights are long gone. It’s easy to forget that Subaru created a massive enthusiast fan base in just the space of a few years. In 1999, the only “performance” Subaru out there was the tepid 2.5RS and the only people excited about it were the so-called weaboos. By 2005, every autocross and trackday in the country had 10 guys wearing blue windbreakers. Last year, I attended a Global Rallycross event in Washington D.C. and I was nearly trampled by the hundreds of people fighting tooth and nail to get a free Subaru T-shirt being tossed in our general direction.

That kind of insane enthusiasm wasn’t generated by chance or accident. It was the product of good cars that kicked ass and didn’t cost a ton of money. The current cars might retain some of those long-time fans — what else are they gonna buy? An Elantra GT? — but they won’t do much to increase the size of that fan base.

It’s a shame the way Subaru messes around with the hearts of its loyal performance-oriented buyers. The company can and should do better by them. I’ve been told by people who should know that Outbacks and Crosstreks are selling faster than they can be built. That’s good news and I’m happy for Subaru. But that’s no reason to neglect the blue-windbreaker crowd. It’s another case of a marketing department that cannot understand people who are even slightly different from them. Your average STi owner might not be an LGBT assistant professor and he might not buy coffee from a quaint little shop in Williamsburg named after a sans-serif font, but that doesn’t mean his money isn’t real and it doesn’t mean he’s beneath notice as a customer.

This might all be a temporary state of affairs. You can argue Subaru has always focused on Mitsubishi as its competition and it will take it a bit of time to refocus on the Focus RS, Civic Type R, and all the other cheap-speed options out there. I sincerely hope that’s the case. I’d like to see the return of the no-holds-barred, bad-ass blue sedans I admired a decade ago. Let’s all cross our fingers for that. Until then — can I interest you in a CLA45 AMG? No? Where are you going? DON’T WALK AWAY FROM ME!

[Image: Subaru]

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84 Comments on “No Fixed Abode: Quo Vadis, STi?...”


  • avatar
    vagvoba

    It’s really beneath TTAC to spew hate for the LGBT. Especially with such a witless stereotype.
    You would be surprised by how many LGBT assistant professors had WRXs. I’m one example.

    • 0 avatar
      caelaorn

      So one sentence in a piece is spewing, and targeted marketing campaigns since the 90s is a witless stereotype – got it.

      It’s so hard to keep up with definitions nowadays.

    • 0 avatar
      Rasputin

      As to your first sentence, I did not see any “hate.”
      As to your second, I believe you have illustrated Mr. Baruth’s point.

    • 0 avatar
      Ihatejalops

      Uh what’s the “offending” passage?

    • 0 avatar
      jimble

      I’m about as gay as they come and I find lots of Jack’s writing offensive, but I just chuckled at that comment. It’s hard to hold a grudge against someone who writes “a quaint little shop in Williamsburg named after a sans-serif font.”

    • 0 avatar
      Null Set

      No hate at all. For decades Subaru has explicitly wooed the LGBT market in its advertising, marketing and community outreach. It was in fact a pioneer in this. As a result many gay people are fans of the brand. The author knows this (it’s his job to), and is simply reflecting that fact in his analysis. So chill.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      I think much of Jack’s writing is pointlessly-crude, purposefully pot-stirring, and sometimes downright offensive, but I thought the comment was pretty innocuous. There’s no put-downs, offensive slang, aspersions cast, etc. No hate here that I can see, not even a mild insult.

      “LGBT Professor” is totally the sort of “generic consumer profile” that marketing folks assemble all the time when trying to design ad campaigns, and certainly describes part of Subaru’s targeting. Is it a “stereotype”… I guess. But since ad campaigns aren’t written for specific individuals, building a profile to represent a group of consumers is totally normal.

      Chillax.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Wow, bullseye.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      Sorry you didn’t make full. Maybe if you spent less time on finding things on the Internet to be offended by and more time publishing you could get over that hump.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Plus Subaru no longer has a WRX/STi available in a hatch variant. Not sure why they dropped their “hot hatch”.

    Subaru should offer a hatch and a wagon oriented toward performance. But they probably won’t since people are buying everything else they make without much effort on Subaru’s part.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    A fun read as always Jack .
    .
    I too wonder about the LGBT bashing as it’s unnecessary IMO .
    .
    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      No hate, Nate.

      Just a recognition that Subaru very much prefers some customers to others and their targeted marketing reflects this.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Okey-Doke Jack ~
        .
        I wasn’t sure and I have Family members who are near and dear to me….
        .
        -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        vagvoba

        So it’s the 5% LGBT Subaru buyers, who made Subaru boring and not the 95% who aren’t LGBT, right?
        Also it was all the LGBT buyers who specifically demanded Subaru to build boring cars and keep hp low, right?
        And of course an LGBT person would never buy a WRX, an STi, or God forbid a BRZ, right?
        Guess what, I owned both a WRX and a BRZ, and I wasn’t fully happy with the power of my BRZ either.

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          Oh, my ~ I live in So. Cal., Los Angeles Metro area and there’s *so* many LGBT GearHeads, Hot Rodders and so on you’d be amazed .
          .
          -Nate

        • 0 avatar
          vagvoba

          Also it’s worth noting that Jack’s timeline doesn’t add up either. He says that in 1999 Subaru was a boring brand, but by 2006 everyone wanted World Rally Blue t-shirts and umbrellas (I had a couple of those).
          Well, the targeted advertising for Lesbians started in 1999, just when you claim Subaru started to turn around.

  • avatar
    pb35

    That last line cracked me up. As for a WRX, never wanted one, never will. Barely on my radar.

    As for the LGBT “hate”, Subaru has marketed their cars to the LGBT community for years. It’s no secret that Subaru actively decided to cultivate its image as a car for lesbians.

    My wife is an associate professor that drives a Volvo. It’s a stereotype for a reason.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      Making note of that gets you shown the door here. Or at least it makes for a convenient *causa dimittere*.

    • 0 avatar
      delow48

      There are articles out there in business sites/mags that cover the very specific decision of Subaru to heavily target the LBT123 demographic. Everything from Forbes to NPR have reported on this.

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    Brace yourselves, incoming hate from the tolerant people who want to punch anyone they decide is a “nazi”.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    I am a lesbian trapped in a man’s body. I reserve my anger for not fitting in a Subie.

  • avatar
    Ermel

    LGBT bashing, of which I honestly don’t see much, aside: the “quaint little shop in Williamsburg named after a sans-serif font” had me laughing out loud. Great writing.

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    Oh Jack, you messed up. Don’t you remember what happened to Bertel?

    Of course you do – you had to take over temporarily.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Humor from a stereotype.
    It s a common, basic, effective humor device.
    Can we be less over – hyper – sensitive. Please?
    Moral indignity looking for cause to jump on. I hope you all can get out of bed in the morning. Jeez.

    • 0 avatar
      delow48

      Hey, if they are not hyper sensitive they don’t get paid. The SJW perpetually offended profession is one of the few places many of these people get jobs. In my area there are a LOT of job listings for this type of thing as well as for the professional protesters.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      “Hey Mom! I’m gettin’ pretty upset down here in the basement at my keyboard lookin’ at what the Nazis wrote on TTAC. How’s ’bout bringin’ me another Hot Pocket and a Diet Coke? I need some energy to do some angry typin’!”

  • avatar
    aaronstein

    I’m buying a new outback when the 2018’s come out. my daughter says i’m the gayest straight man she knows and i consider it a compliment. i love shoes, shopping, broadway, and other ‘girly’ stuff. In March when I went to hear lesbian comedian Suzanne Westenhoefer, one of my favorites, she was complaining that too many of her friends have joined ‘the cult of subaru’. we just need to lighten up.

    though i will defend your right to be offended.

  • avatar
    Nikolai

    I’m not sure if he was trying to dig on LGBT specifically or just hipsters, but that was a lazy way to try to make the point.
    The point is Subaru neglected a part of their customer base to market towards one.
    And if they up the power of the WRX and STi, then there’s room to boost power on teh BRZ without cannibalizing sales.

  • avatar
    aaronstein

    anybody for a 400 HP outback?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      With a manual transmission?

      H@LL YES!

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Not a lot of market, but I’d be impressed if they slapped a turbo on the 3.6R (and it didn’t asplode).

      I mean, I think my XC70 [comparable in every important way to the Outback] is plenty powerful enough at 300hp/325lb-ft, enough so that I won’t pay ’em $1500 for an in-warranty up-tune to 325/350.

      They’d sell *dozens* of “Outback 3.6XTs” or whatever they’d call them, is the problem…

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    Dunno about LGBT, but I sure love my 2005 LGT…

  • avatar
    ajla

    “Can you think of another new car that cannot match its decade-old progenitor in a straight line?”

    REGAL.
    —————————–
    The STI still looks and sounds the part, so that’s got to count for something.

    And hatches are lame. Big wing 3-box forever.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    Those “gator/peanut/blob-eye” cars are holding their values pretty steadily, as well as the “hawkeye” STi/WRXs that came afterwards. Very purposeful-looking cars and they were giant-slayers when new.

    The third-gen Imprezas (’07-’11) lost that function-before-form graphic and toned way back. I know many enthusiasts shied away but I’m certain it picked up many new buy-ins with the sedate styling.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Right on Jack. Obviously the creature comforts have gotten better since I owned one, but my 2003 WRX is likely just as fast at the 2017. C’mon, Subaru, work with us here!

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    I had an STI hatch for 5 years until it blew. Until Subaru brings back a hatch or wagon without that POS 2.5l engine they will not get any money from me.

    Golf R and Focus RS have eaten their lunch. I’m not even sure why they bother anymore that are much more focused on CUV’s which are doing great for them.

  • avatar
    brenschluss

    When I bought my car last year, the Ford dealer was attempting to sell a used, not particularly clean 2014 STI hatchback for, hold… $36,000.

    Maybe it had low miles or something, who cares, but that seems as good an indicator as any that the money’s still green out there for these. In fact, the only reason I was even at this Ford dealer was because that no longer existed as a new car.

    Also, I’m not sure why you keep recommending the CLA45 when the GLA45 is obviously a much better bad Mercedes product.

  • avatar
    raisingAnarchy

    *Disclaimer: I own a 2016 STi. I love it, and I track it at Mid-Ohio and PIR with increasing regularity. I’m a very novice driver, but this car, in stock form minus brake pads/fluid, makes me look like a hero in the face of my fellow students driving 997s, C7s, and S550s.

    “the STi is a distant memory in the mirrors of sporting vehicles as diverse as the Mustang GT”

    I didn’t realize 0.1 seconds difference in 1/4 mile times qualifies as a “distant memory”. And that’s with a +130hp handicap for the Mustang.

    Obviously, trap speeds are telling as well, but isn’t that a bit reductive to qualify the STi solely on its straight line performance? And what about STi vs RS? Where’s that 45 hp advantage gone in the straight line measures?

    Sure, one can point to the massive gap in Car & Driver’s Lightning Lap between STi & RS, but what time would the STi run if equipped with the optional super car tires the RS had? (Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2, standard equipment on the Ferrari 488 GTB and the like, I believe)

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    An automaker can be any two of these traits: large,profitable,or a dealer of dedicated enthusiast cars.

  • avatar
    3CatGo

    I test drove a 2015 WRX next to the 2016 GTI I ultimately bought. The WRX felt big, ponderous, and was more “boosty” in an on/off manner. Not necessarily a bad thing, just a difference. It also sounded better – GTI is way too quiet. But the WRX interior and infotainment was a joke, like mid-00’s GM looks and feel. And the WRX was a few grand more (VW was dealing on GTI’s in late 2015).

    So for me it was not the horsepower war, but the materials and refinement war, the GTI is years ahead. Also: hatchback.

    As for LGBTQ, I felt the line was on-target with Subaru’s own marketing approach. NPR Planet Money did a great segment on it 6 months ago, it’s not exactly a secret, so what, nobody can even mention it?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Jacks stated reasons make me want to post the meme of SpongeBob holding a rainbow and the caption:

    NOBODY CARES

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Targeting gay car buyers. It’s what makes a Subaru, a Subaru.

    (And Outbacks / Foresters / Cross-whatevers clogging up the fast lane on I-25 and the Boulder Turnpike.)

  • avatar
    ccode81

    I’m scared to know insurance quote for 400ps “WRX”

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    Subaru has repeatedly claimed it has limited resources. Results include no hatch for the revised WRX series, limited engine updates (STI’s EJ25 motor dates from 1995), parts-bin interiors, etc. They have tweaked body panels, suspension and various sub systems over the years. They pay attention to what sells: when manual tranny Forester XT’s didn’t sell in the USA, they killed them off around 2008.

    As for LGBT, Subaru discovered these groups were buying their products, then made an effort to market to them.

    Subau has hinted of more STI emphasis (additional dealer-available upgrades, etc), but it hasn’t happened yet.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    what’s the significance of a blue windbreaker?

  • avatar
    deanst

    I wonder about the “loyalty” of Subaru’ performance buyers – does anyone buy these things after they hit 35 or so? Unless you have a fleet of cars, I suspect the car grows tiresome over time.

  • avatar
    srh

    Ah Subaru. I was never a fanboy, but certainly a fan. My ex-wife got an Outback XT, loaded with the manual, back in 2007 or so. In that era, that car was a sleeper. It was our first Subaru, and I quickly decided that an STI was to be the replacement for my ’07 MS3.

    Six Subarus later, including three Outbacks, that STI (pro tip: Don’t tell someone on Tinder you have an STI just because they have a Subaru), a base Impreza, and a BRZ and there’s nothing in the lineup that appeals to me anymore.

    The current STI feels out-classed by its competitors the BRZ needs more power, and AWD would be awesome. The Outback looks like a hippopotamus and is starting to cost Audi money for an upscale trim and the Impreza, while not as bad as its CVT and meager power would imply, is just.. well, I guess I’m no longer its demographic.

    I recommend Subarus to everyone I know who isn’t an enthusiast. But while I agree that the WRX manual is still interesting (though not very, lacking a hatch), nothing else in the lineup appeals to me, a relatively blue-collar enthusiast buyer, anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “The Outback looks like a hippopotamus and is starting to cost Audi money for an upscale trim”

      When you get the level of equipment and content that you get with an Outback Limited ($30kish going street price for the 2.5, $33kish for the 3.6), I think no one has room to complain. In fact, adjusted for inflation, I’m confident than an LL Bean Outback in the late 90s cost more.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Gotta disagree on the Outback being overpriced. Right now with the ’18s around the corner (some slight modifications), a ’17 2.5 Limited with the Eyesight package can be had for $31-32k. Add $3k for 3.6R. That’s a lot of car for the money.

      Don’t agree with the hippopotamus comment but can’t argue against it….my ’13 is lovingly called the aarvark.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    This is why Subaru never even entered into the equation for my most recent purchase.

    Why would I buy a WRX that was slower than one I had owned previously? It’s not like the interior or exterior styling has gotten any better.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    300 x 300 hatch, and I’ll start paying attention again.

    350 x 350 hatch, and my deposit will be forthcoming.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    Re: LGBT, made me laugh , but I’m a simpleton with above avg. car demographic skills.
    I would be interested in the STI if the interior color scheme was a bit more mature and the 2.0t massaged for STI duty. The latest Impreza interior looks to be an upgrade, haven’t seen /touched in real life though.
    The gas mileage, for me, needs to improve though, as an STI isn’t a weekend only car. No sports sedan/hatch should be.
    Subaru needs to Keep the chassis tuning/6MT and work on MPG and the interior

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    Like Porsche, Subaru is making bank with its more “boring” offerings. Unlike Porsche, they don’t seem to be spending enough of it to make their more fun offerings better.

  • avatar
    Coolcar2

    My brother had a Subie 05 WRX bug eye wagon (he is also gay and a band director at a HS so there goes that stereotype!) but I always loved that car so I recently went car shopping and stepped in a Subaru dealer showroom. Love the current version but come to find out I don’t fit in the driver’s seat. I am 6’6″ so not abnormally tall, but my head was hitting the headliner and my knees were splayed to the outside to fit the steering wheel in place. Ugh! I hope the new one has more leg and headroom.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Subaru needs to do what it did the first go round… punch the 2.0 out to 2.5L.

    Something to remember is the STI is still using the ancient EJ from 25 years ago, while the WRX has the new FA engine. Punching the FA out to 2.5L would pay dividends- it would give the WRX an even and safe shot to 300HP, give the STI a path to 400HP with a warranty, and most importantly no longer relegate the BRZ to “4 cylinder Camry meat”, sans turbo of course.

    Subaru is small though so I imagine such a move wouldn’t help their corporate FE average or whatever, espeically with that 3 row coming down the pike. Even with the new motors the GTI/Golf R are better cars anyway. The move to equal length headers killed their character.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    this reminds me that there used to be a second-run/art-house movie theater in Westland called the Quo Vadis. It had a reputation as a seedy dive apropos of nothing. I think part of it was the exterior design was ’60s “modernistic” which by that time looked really out of place. Plus, the sign in front said “Quo Vadis Penthouse” and I guess we were just too young and dumb to realize that just because part of its name was similar to a particular magazine didn’t make it a spank joint.

  • avatar
    Bazza

    I think Subaru lost the will to innovate vis-à-vis the WRX/STi when they knew the Evo was being phased out. With Mitsubishi out as their true foil in the AWD turbo wars, Subie obviously isn’t feeling any urgency to “bring it” against Ford or VW. Unfortunately, the WRX/STi continue to be brought up in most comparisons (as we’ve seen). Predictably, they come up short, so it’s puzzling as to what niche they see the cars occupying.

    Anyway, their carping about limited resources is half true, half excuse-making. If Subaru had the will they’d find the money.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I bought my LGT (no B) wagon in early 2010 – right when the good times were ending at Subaru. It’s a 2007 which is nearly hens’ teeth level rare because they had already decided to stop selling the Legacy wagon here before production started and not many of them made it out the door when the model year changed.

    I loved it and embraced Subaru. My wife drove it once and that was enough for her and she shortly thereafter bought herself a 2009 LGT. We both still have them but we will not be replacing either of them with anything from Subaru. Well, ok, maybe she’ll look at Foresters as she liked the loaner she had a couple months ago.

    And while I still love the way it looks, I’ve come to realize that everyone else has caught up and surpassed the driving performance it has. I fear for its long term life as these cars are fragile and break often. But, when I step back and look at the big picture, it’s irreplaceable with anything made in the last 5 years. It’s a moderately powerful, non-plastic clad, normal ride height, station wagon. Any thoughts I have of replacing it are shot down since I HAVE to get to work even in the worst conditions, more so BECAUSE of the worst conditions. I’ll probably hang onto it for a long time, not because I love Subaru though. But because I loved Subaru.

  • avatar
    Frank Galvin

    There is nothing inaccurate about the “LGBT Assistant Professor.” Subaru’s core demo at the time they decided to really step up the targeted advertisements to lesbian community was educators, health care types, IT, outdoorsy, and lesbians. The year after they signed Martina Navratilova, they had their best year to date.

    There was a time in the late 90′ early 00’s when it was more likely than not that a Subaru (Forester, to be exact) in my neck of the woods could be expected to have a human rights campaign sticker on the back, or something else reflecting sexual orientation.

    Funny though. The lesbian mecca of Northampton, MA has had a Subie dealership for years (though it just moved to the town next door). Their ads crack me up, owner Steve Lewis announces “we’ve sold over (some number in the tens of thousands) since we opened over 15 years ago, how did we do it?” Well, gee Steve, I’d care to take a guess, but could it be, I dunno, placing your store in the lesbian capital of the East Coast?

  • avatar
    Hogie roll

    Oh how you live life on the edge, Jack. The truth about Canadian queers will not stand for LBGT humor they weren’t clever enough to understand.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    Funny thing is, I looked at WRX at some point and thought it was too much. I would be fine with 200 hp in it, if it translated into better reliability and longevity.

  • avatar
    Synchromesh

    I own a ’12 WRX hatch I bought new. I absolutely love it. With a couple of minor mods it has been a great car for the last 5.5 years.

    I thought about getting the WRX. Got to sit in it and it was much nicer than my car inside. But no hatchback – no thanks. Never cared for the sedan, don’t like the ugly butt and I live in the city so every inch of length counts when it comes to parking. So until Subaru reconsiders and makes a practical hatch again I’m just going to keep my car. Or not. But I won’t buy another WRX.

  • avatar

    Maybe if the WRX and STI weren’t built like tin cans they might have more fans than the mouthbreathing flatbills in their blue windbreakers.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    @ Ricky ~
    .
    That’s overly harsh ~ my 37 Y.O. Son is a racer and bought his WRX Wagon a while back, it’s old and is still doing Yeoman Duty hauling groceries and my Grand Daugher around just fine thnkyouverymuch .
    .
    I’ve never seen him wearing a blue Subie jacket but he used to tear up the Autocross track in that thing pretty well .
    .
    ? Does the Forester come in a ‘Sedan Delivery’ model ? . looks like it might be good there .
    .
    -nate

  • avatar
    05lgt

    None of my ideas for replacing my 12 yr old (purchased new, 2nd ru) Subaru come from Subaru. I can’t make them want my money if they don’t want it. Jack nailed this, I didn’t walk away from them, they moved mainstream. For STI $ I can get a used awd L badged Toyota that has more useful life than a new Subaru, so ….

  • avatar
    tnk479

    If Subaru won’t increase the horsepower of the WRX engine, they should consider offering a nicer interior and a sporty automatic transmission, and positioning it against the A3/S3 and CLA. A 34-38k WRX with a nicer interior, 7-speed DSG, and paddle shifters would be no-brainer versus a CLA250 or an A3 Quattro or S3. There is something about the CLA and A3/S3 that screams “wannabe” or “trying too hard” that I just can’t bring myself to consider those cars. Also the price difference between these junior luxury models and the next rung up is way too small.

  • avatar
    DirtRoads

    Ever notice how the late-come comments never get commented on?

    Oh any my gay stepdaughter drives a Pontiac. Guess what “Pontiac” stands for? Ha ha ha… Geezus ppl …


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