By on May 19, 2017

2004 Mazda MX-5 Miata GT - Image: © Timothy Cain

Silver was not my first choice. But after spending weeks on the prowl for an older Mazda Miata, I found the right car within walking distance of my childhood home.

Our new-to-us Miata is a 2004 model with a six-speed manual and only 43,000 miles under its belt. Always stored for the winter, as most Miatas are in this part of eastern Canada, the car is in ridiculously good condition, revving seductively and shifting like nothing else shifts this side of an RX-8.

I’m not a huge fan of the MY2004-2005 OEM wheels. I’d prefer cloth seats. It’s silver, not the black I was after.

But after considering German droptops and Jeep Wranglers and numerous vehicles that did not come close to fulfilling my list of requirements, I couldn’t deny my initial instincts.

I wanted a Miata for 28 years. I have one now.

What caused me to avoid the other cars on the list we showed you earlier this week?

The Jeep Wrangler was let down on a few counts. First, tedious softtop operation, combined with hardtop removal, make it less of a spur-of-the-moment convertible. Pre-owned Wrangler prices are also exceptionally high. I’m moving to an area with some exceptionally fun roads, and while the Wrangler would’ve been a great winter companion in Prince Edward Island, it wouldn’t have been any fun on the undulating rural roads of central PEI.

The European convertibles, particularly the BMW 3 Series, are undeniably desirable. But I was frightened by long-term maintenance costs for German cars that often appeared tired and worn when I’d examine them in daylight. I’d have appreciated the power of a BMW inline-six, no doubt, but power isn’t really what I’m after. Moreover, the rate of depreciation for these cars — cars which other buyers likewise believe to be costly to maintain as they age — wasn’t encouraging.

I couldn’t help but consider other four-wheel-drive SUVs: GM brutes and oddballs like the Land Rover LR3 and Volkswagen Touareg. There was even a Hummer H3 Alpha that intrigued me. Then there were Minis and Golf GTIs, tuned Preludes and RSXs. But we weren’t looking for a second vehicle so much as we were looking for a financially sane convertible purchase. Mrs. Cain and I both work from home; vehicles in our possession rack up very little mileage.

2004 Mazda MX-5 Miata GT - Image: © Timothy Cain

If, for some reason, our new Miata must be sold in the coming months or years, it’ll be a car without much more mileage than it currently possesses, a car that was stored in the garage all winter, a car that will be more fastidiously maintained than our 2015 Honda Odyssey.

If the $7,500 USD price I paid concerns you, consider the fact that there were other Miatas — older and more costly Miatas — selling around the same time. (Canada’s average asking price for a 2004 MX-5 Miata GT is $8,800 USD.) Finding a Miata that wasn’t roughed up or ostentatiously modified wasn’t easy for me, nor will it be for the buyer who’s looking for a Miata when I’m selling mine.

Selling? Nah, I certainly don’t plan to. I love this car.

Although it’s heresy among Miataphiles, I’m actually not a huge fan of the NA’s look. The NC is a sweet little car, and I’m a big fan of the style, but I don’t find the driving experience as engaging. Obviously, the new MX-5 Miata — the ND — is a spectacular device, but it was far outside my price range. This leaves the NB, the 1999-2005 car with its 142-horsepower 1.8-liter four-cylinder and sub-2,500-pound curb weight and 28 mile per gallon highway efficiency.

The Miata heads to the Mazda dealer this afternoon for an oil change. I’ve already de-fogged the headlamps, brought the drainholes up to snuff, and cleaned the roof.

It’s not perfect. The 12v outlet doesn’t work. The floor mat attachment doesn’t stay firmly in place. A three-year-old boy has already left crumbs in the passenger seat.

It’s also silver.

That’s okay. I’ll survive.

[Images: © 2017 Timothy Cain]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net and a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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81 Comments on “Introducing Tim’s Early-Life Crisis: 2004 Mazda MX-5 Miata Long-Term Test...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Congratulations! Even if a tad high by US standards, she sounds extra clean and well worth it. Next stop: Krown.

    It don’t matter, when you turn
    Gonna survive, live and learn
    I’ve been thinking about you baby
    By the light of dawn, and in my blues
    Day and night, I been missing you
    I’ve been thinking about you baby
    Almost makes me crazy
    Come and live with me

  • avatar
    badhobz

    Whats wrong with Silver!?!?!?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      There are just too many silver cars in this world. It’s so… easy.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Congrats, Tim, and don’t worry about the silver paint. Overly common, yes, but it has advantages. Looks cleaner longer. Hides small scratches. Looks like real metal rather than plastic. Paint won’t succumb to UV damage as quickly in the 360 days-a-year of torrid Eastern Canada sun.

        PS, each brag-post about motoring this little gem down the roads of PEI in summer must be offset by two wintertime posts chronicling the misery of grey sub-zero skies.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      There aren’t many color options on those Miatas. Every single NB I looked at in my recent search was British Racing Green, except for one I bought, which is burgundy. I was sick of looking at BRG after the first few cars.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      It’s boring. I had a silver S2000. I’m not going to say I was happy when i wrecked it and replaced it with another color, but I wasn’t sad either.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I do love how easy it is to find a Miata that was the toy of a responsible adult since new and is available for a fairly reasonable price.

    In my part of the country if you had $10K to spend on a used vehicle that was going to be used simply to put a smile on your face and the wind in your hair – it would be hard to beat a Miata.

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    I have one more data point to offer. Early this spring, my sister sold her MY12 Miata for $12K. It was in impeccable condition, garage kept and never saw a wet or snowy road. I believe it had about 25K miles on the odo.
    The first guy to look at it bought it on the spot so the pricing was about right. She said she looked up used prices of similar Miatas and priced hers under retail. She lives in rural NW NJ which has some very nice roads for a convertible.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      No PPI?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Ouch. No wonder the guy bought it right away, that’s a steal at that price. I sold my ’09 with similar miles last summer for more money.

      • 0 avatar
        Cactuar

        Great price, but no matter how good a deal it appears to be, all cars should be inspected before purchase without exception. That buyer was foolish.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          That would be ideal, but is it worth missing out on the deal? It’s a gamble, but someone else would have bought that car without a PPI. That car, even with some repaired damage, is probably still worth that price.

        • 0 avatar
          turf3

          Maybe the buyer is competent to inspect the car himself. Many of us are, you know. I always inspect carefully any used car I buy. I don’t need to pay someone.

          • 0 avatar
            Cactuar

            How do you lift a car in someone’s driveway?

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            “How do you lift a car in someone’s driveway?”

            Bring a jack, if you must.

            I think you’re overstating the importance of a paid PPI.

            There’s nothing a guy at a garage can see that I can’t, and little risk of something serious being wrong on a 5 year old 25k mile Miata AND it being detectable on a lift but not by a knowledgeable buyer.

        • 0 avatar

          Bought and sold 25 or so used cars in my life never had a ppi done and never had a buyer ask for one. PPI is one of those things every auto writer says to do but no one does.

          • 0 avatar
            cognoscenti

            I had THREE done on the E90 M3 I just bought. However, I was buying it sight-unseen from a thousand miles away, so I had to.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Congrats on the new ride. I’m with you on the wheels, fortunately that’s easy to change if they really bother you.

  • avatar
    nlinesk8s

    There’s nothing like driving a Miata into the country, on a nice spring or fall evening. My wife referred to ours as “4 wheel therapy.”

    One bit of advice: It’s a small car. Stating the obvious, but the tall trucks of today can’t see you at all in a parking lot. Park well away from everyone else, and walk more. Our car was hit multiple times, and finally killed, by trucks/suv’s in parking lots.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      I am already learning what motorcycle riders feel like. People just don’t see me down there.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        LOUD PIPES SAVE LIVES!

        Time for a cat-back exhaust on the Miata?

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          That’s what my Miata has, sounds great. My advice, don’t drive next to anything taller than a Camry for very long.

        • 0 avatar
          Waterview

          My Miata has an aftermarket exhaust as well. I like the extra volume, but if someone said “it sounds like a weedeater” I probably couldn’t disagree.

          Congrats on the new (to you) ride. I love mine (2006 NC w/6 speed). Just a fun ride and a great stress reliever.

        • 0 avatar
          JuniperBug

          I had a dual-exit Borla Touring muffler on my ’99, and found it embarrassing to be making that kind of noise while minivans outran me in a straight line. I find the stock exhaust (which may or may not have a slight leak somewhere) to fit the spirit of the car very well. It makes plenty of noise at 4,000 RPM and up, and you’ll be seeing those revs often to make any decent progress. That’s part of the fun of a Miata.

      • 0 avatar
        Hamilton Guy

        I installed Hella Supertone horns in my 01 Special Edition about 120 decibels each. I did that after twice in one week cars decided to change lanes into the side of me despite the fact that i was leaning on the weak ass stock horn. Fortunately I had an escape route both times.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      agreed. I was bumped a couple weeks ago in my S2000 because the guy in an F350 couldn’t see me over his front passenger side.

      Thankfully the only damage was to the wheel. his lugs made contact with the rim face, throwing off the alignment and gouging the hell out of it. He had those steel wheels that stuck out past the tire. I’m just glad there was no body damage, even if the repairs came out of his pocket.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        That sucks, but at least the damage wasn’t too bad. I nearly got clobbered by a RAV4 a few weeks ago that wasn’t paying attention. Can’t be shy about using the horn in these cars, that’s what saved me.

        • 0 avatar
          bobmaxed

          The stock Miata horn in the 1999-2005 wasn’t as loud as it should have been.
          But its not hard to upgrade.

          • 0 avatar
            nlinesk8s

            +1 I had forgotten about that. I thought the Miata horn sounded like I was strangling a duck. It just said: “Vexed. I’m very vexed with you!”

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I nearly got clobbered in the back of a Target, I pulled in and a Honda fit flew right in front of me, speeding sideways across lots at like 40mph. Mind you I drive a Crown Vic, not exactly a small car. Some people just have tunnel vision that badly.

      Cant forget shopping carts either, since pushing carts is hard work I guess.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Kinda figured , given your price range, and your “want list” you would go with a Miata…So with 70,000 Klicks and never winter driven , ya did okay.

    If your absolutely sure its never been winter driven, and you see no visible rust, a light application of Krown will suffice. Personally, I would be reluctant to drill any holes.

    Park it at the first indication of snow fall. Don’t be tempted to take out on those first nice spring days.. There is just too much residual salt, and sand still on the roads.

    For an excellent cruise cross the bridge, and go for a ride through the Cabot Trail, top down of course.

    Keep it pristine ..and it should hold its value. Good luck

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    Nice car!

    While I personally like the retro look of the NA’s, a friend of mine has a black ’02 with tan leather and 6MT that is similar to yours in condition and mileage, and it’s a very nice car indeed.

    It’s hard to beat the ownership cost of these, I would guess deprecition and maintenance on one that was used a seldom driven Summer toy would be around $1k a year or so. Unlike more “practical” cars that are used up quickly then discarded, it’s relatively easy to find one of these with low milage that has been well maintained and stored inside.

    I’ve got an old MGB parked next to the MINI Cooper S cabrio that @Kato mentioned in the other thread, but if I didn’t, I would almost certainly have a Miata by now.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      I’m fairly certain his is in the same or similar value position as my S2000. I bought it in 2012 with 75k on the clock, and I could sell it now with 105k for within $2k of my purchase price.

      There may be more floor to fall out on a Miata just due to lower power and higher production numbers, but it shouldn’t be much, especially on a car that doesn’t see any driving 5 months out of the year.

  • avatar
    Strippo

    My Miata already needs a new top. I am the original owner and I did purchase it in 1994, but still, I’m a little disappointed.

    Other than that, though, no complaints.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      That’s wild. S2000s usually need a top every 10 years if they see regular usage.

    • 0 avatar
      ijbrekke

      Yeah, you only got 23 years out of the first one. What a ripoff.

    • 0 avatar
      stevelovescars

      I’m still shocked, but my 1990 (79k miles) still has the original top and plastic rear window. I love the simplicity of the NA (this is my second, I owned a silver 1991 for about 14 years before a 6 year hiatus until this one), but I think my favorite style on the older ones are the late NBs like this one. Still classic but with a little more aggression and nicer interior trim than the NA.

      Anyway, in my experience you’ll enjoy the car. They are easy and inexpensive to live with and on the right road on the right day they just make you smile.

      I don’t think you paid too much. Frankly, the price spread between mediocre cars and great cars isn’t very large on these… about the price of a set of tires on a Corvette. So buy a good one and don’t worry.

  • avatar
    rlplaut

    Congratulations Tim and welcome to the association of non-bragging owners of silver NBs.

    Sure, we do not have the pop up headlight cache of the Lotus Elan or the the Bug Eye Sprite like the NA does, but our trunk is a little more spacious than the NA (not a term used often with MX-5s) and we have a real glass rear window (with defroster no less).

    Enjoy your highlight silver metallic Miata in good health; they are a wonderful way to welcome the occasional warm winter (or early spring) day after a heavy rain has washed away the last traces of road salt.

    I bought my silver 5 speed 1999 NB new in November 1998 (there was no 1998 model) and it now has about 36,000 miles on it. I can’t image how I would feel to see its spot in the garage empty.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      I test drove a NB a few years back. It wasn’t fast, but the eagerness of the car made up for it.

      If I hadn’t found a good condition S2000 a few days later, I probably would have bought it.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Congrats! Sounds like a fun summer car. Install your favorite wheels and it’ll help you get over the silver color. Wheels really make or break a car IMO.

    I was going to purchase a summer car this year also, but we’re in the process of piling up cash for a downpayment on a house, so the timing isn’t good. Plus having a summer car with no garage to store it in wouldn’t be wise. Someday…

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’ve been thinking about getting one to replace my motorcycle. But to really do that I would need to do an Exocet conversion. I would love to test drive one though.

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      When it comes to nimbleness and confidence in the curves on public roads, a motorcycle has nothing on a Miata. You’d have to be pretty committed and skilled to get through a set of tight twisties faster on the bike.

      Once the road opens up, that’s a completely story. However, I’ve found that there’s something to be said about being able to wind out a couple of gears without worrying about jail or death. My Miata replaced a VFR800 and TL1000S and I don’t regret it. A Miata really is a lot more fun than the numbers suggest.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Given the price disparity between US and Canadian examples, it might have been financially advantageous to buy a USDM NB and import it under the 15-year rule?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I argued as such two days ago.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2017/05/car-buy-droptop-desires-got-better-time-supplement-family-minivan/#comment-9278992

    • 0 avatar
      dash riprock

      When we bought ours 6 years ago, for basically the same price, I looked long and hard at the US market. Most of the decent deals were in the South. While a road trip sounds nice, time would not allow. We bought in Vancouver and that also gave us the opportunity to see and test drive it without paying for a plane trip.

      We bought in August, think that buying at the start of convertible season adds a bit to the price tag as opposed to the end of the season

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      6 years ago when the Canadian dollar was nearly at par, people were importing them from the US and it was worthwhile. Now with a <$0.75 dollar it's not worth the hassle and expense of importing it, especially once you factor in that you'll have a speedometer which measures in Yankee-units and lower resale value than a Canadian car.

      When you buy an Eastern Canadian Miata, it's also very obvious if it's been driven in the winter, and most really haven't been. I've seen 2 year-old cars which were less clean underneath then my 18 year-old Miata. Southern cars are also more likely to have sun damage issues, like rubber drying out and fading interiors.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    What, it wasn’t a Nissan Murano cabriolet?

    (Mazel Tov…I had a feeling it’d be a Miata.)

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Miata is an excellent choice, and dropping the LSx in is even better.

      flyinmiata.com/v8-engine-installation-kit.html

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        While the work that Flyin Miata is doing is undeniably cool, I think the appeal of a car like a Miata is that is fun and engaging to drive, while having performacne limits that are low enough that those of us who don’t have Baruthian driving skills aren’t likely to get into trouble.

        If I wanted an LSx powered roadster, I think I would save myself some time and money and simply buy a ‘Vette.

        • 0 avatar
          Middle-Aged Miata Man

          I tend to agree. MOAR POWER! is seldom a bad thing, but at the same time my NC (167 hp) strikes me as having just the right amount of power for its mission. The LSx is overkill – glorious overkill, but still, overkill.

          Naturally-aspirated NBs could perhaps use a bit more oomph from under the hood, but they’re hardly slow.

  • avatar
    itsgotahemi

    I bought my wife the 2005 turbo she loved it you will love yours black SUV hit her and knocked into traffic and it was totaled

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Congrats on the purchase. I didn’t realize that NB Miatas had an optional 6-speed outside of the SE and Mazdaspeed models. All the cars that I had seen were 5-speeds.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Nice car. Congrats. One question, why do so many convertibles have black interiors? I cannot think of a worse combination. Especially if its leather, it must get seriously hot on sunny days.

  • avatar
    Trend-Shifter

    I bought a 1992 Miata recently as my late life crisis.
    After raising the kids and putting them through college it was a gift to myself.
    Now I am enjoying having my forever car that I can continually modify.
    And yes, you will start down the modification path, it is a natural progression owning a low cost car with tons of aftermarket and forum support.
    Now that it is spring time I will be back to working on the Miata again to prepare for a GM EcoTec 2.4 engine swap.
    Here is my tongue in cheek project…
    Link: http://mazdaroadster.net/showthread.php?13934-The-EUNOS-MANTICORE-SPECIAL-EDITION-build

    Join a forum to enjoy what others are doing to their Miata and be part of the family. There is Miata.net, clubroadster, turbomiata, and Mazdaroadster.

    So far I have accomplish little, but this summer that should change.

  • avatar
    bobmaxed

    Congrats
    If you haven’t already, check out Miata.net. It’s a great forum with a lot of good people.
    I had a 2002 base model. It was my first and hopefully last white car. I’ll take silver over white.
    I have the original wheels from this car. But they’re 15’x 6′ so not exactly up to modern standards.

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      I’ll second the miata.net recommendation – there really is an impressive repository of useful information there, and the people are largely friendly and fairly typical of what you’d expect the Miata demographic to be: old fastidious guys who love their cars.

      If you’re looking for a more contrarian site, I love miataturbo.net, even if you never plan on turbocharging your car. There are some seriously knowledgeable guys there, too, and some very fast cars. The vibe is a little… different… though. Let’s just say that they’re not afraid to embrace the Miata’s key stereotype, and they’re not as open to uneducated questions.

  • avatar
    StudeDude

    Great to hear about your NB Miata. I have a ’91 NA, also silver, and it has been a great car for me since 2003. Personally, I would keep it dead stock for anything other than maintenance items. It keeps the ownership costs down and preserves its long-term value in the future. Good luck.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Congrats. I owned one of that color and generation. The NB’s mechanical improvements are arguably worth it over the nostalgia factor of the NA, but you don’t like the NA styling so that is moot.
    The body is stiffer, the engine smoother, the gearbox is slightly slicker, they improved rear suspension travel, and you get a real glass rear window (although there are some die hard zip out fans).

    The NB2 already has the better OE header (99-00 had a precatted manifold commonly referred to as ‘the boat anchor’) good for 5-7hp, and the VVT didn’t add any extra power.

    As far as HP mods, the sky is as high as your wallet is deep. Personally, I wouldn’t go further than a decent header and if they have one by know, an ecu flash, and thrash it like you stole it.

  • avatar
    Kato

    Congrats Tim,

    Nice car, solid choice. I think NBs look good in silver, however, silver is the least visible car colour. A small silver roadster is probably less visible to other motorists than a motorcycle. One of my co-workers has a silver NB and it’s been hit twice in parking lots since he bought it a couple of years ago. I’ve had to dodge other motorists multiple times in both the S2K and the MGB and they are both painted bright colours. Defensive driving is a must in a low, small car. If you don’t make eye contact, assume they don’t see you. Hope you have a blast this summer in your new toy.

  • avatar
    JuniperBug

    Congrats, and welcome to the Silver NB club – I have a ’99 in Montreal.

    If you’re interested in going to 15″ wheels as most performance-oriented NB drivers do, there are some nice choices for reasonable money. Although I still have the aftermarket wheels on my car that were on it when I bought it, I’m partial to the 6ULs sold by 949 Racing. They look good, are reasonably priced, come in a variety of good widths, and are tough and light enough that they’re a go-to for track cars.

    Believe it or not, at your mileage you may well be coming up on the need to change the shocks. The factory non-Bilstein shocks are said to wear out around 40-50k miles. I know mine were quite tired when I removed them at 65k. On a Miata the symptoms of worn shocks aren’t obvious, partly because there’s so little travel to begin with that you can’t rely on the bumper-bounce test, but you’ll notice the improvement when you install new ones. At the same time, Miatas spend much of their lives on their bump stops – the stock springs are quite soft – and the rubber/elastomer tends to disintegrate with age and mileage. The good news is that there are a lot of good choices in aftermarket parts, ranging from cheap, quality stock equivalents (KYB Excel-G) to race level stuff with 5 times the original spring rate on which you’ll hurt Porsches’ feelings. Personally I went with one of Flyin’ Miata’s suspension packages, and feel it’s good bang for the buck from a very reputable company. Swapping out the suspension is a pretty easy DIY affair on these cars; it took me about 4 hours the first time I did it with hand tools, a jack, and jack stands. I can imagine doing it in half the time with some practice.

    Don’t be afraid to explore the upper end of the tach. With the short gearing and power peak just before redline, that’s where the joy in these cars is found, and the power train is stout enough that guys are doubling the engine’s stock output without touching the internals. The 6 speed is known to be able to handle over 300 hp.

    My Miata was my only car for over four years, and I used it for everything from groceries, to driving 600 miles in a single day, to some light lapping at the local track. If you have any questions, I’m happy to share my opinion.

  • avatar
    shappy

    My ’99 10th AE Miata was the 2nd most fun car I have ever owned, only eclipsed by my ’16 Miata.

    Drive it in good health and enjoy!

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Congrats on the purchase!

  • avatar
    ItsJustaRide

    Congrats, Tim. That’s a sharp NB. I’m sure you’ll enjoy it for many years.

    I’ve owned an Evo Orange ’00 LS (love or hate the color, it’s still 1 of only 644!) since 2008. My wife and I flew from Central NY to Little Rock to buy and drive it home.

    It had only 26K miles on it and the OE tires were severely weather checked. We we had to scramble to find new rubber before leaving town. They got a proper workout on our minor (but essential) detour down US129 to Deals Gap on the way home.

    The previous owner had done some tasteful/useful mods and painted a white NA hardtop Evo Orange to match the car, but it’s garaged every winter so we rarely use that. I installed a new audio system and the FM butterfly brace/frame rails combo (works as advertised).

    With just shy of 63K miles on it, I’ve had to replace a single sensor (cam position, $15) and a seal where the driveshaft meets the differential. Aside from routine maintenance and a set of brakes to replace the OE setup, the car has asked for nothing and never fails to make me smile.

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    I was right! Congrats on your Miata. And a toast to more mid-life crises.

  • avatar
    nlinesk8s

    For weekend trips you can buy a strap on truck rack, or get one of those motorcycle trailers. We did a lot of backpacking trips by packing up the trunk and putting the packs on the rack. Enjoy!

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    The answer is always Miata (unless you’re over 6’1″). Good luck!

  • avatar

    although i’m driving and loving driving a 2017 roadster, the nb model is still the best looking mx-5 made. so you have a winner, mr cain. may your roads always be twisting cuz that’s the most fun.


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