By on April 26, 2017

Image: Chevrolet Celebrity Eurosport VR

Last week, I asked you to think back to your formative years and your driving experiences therein. Many of you responded with tales of when your nervous fingers first gripped the wheel, and the happy experiences (sometimes dangerous if you’re Chris Tonn) you had in whatever vintage automobile you piloted that first time.

Now it’s time to talk about even further back. Knowing how old most of you are though, hopefully we can keep the stories of Conestoga wagons to a minimum today. What vehicle brought you home from the hospital, your first-ever actual ride in a car?

Of course, all answers will be from hearsay, stories, and perhaps photographs (lithographs?) from the time when you were a brand new person.

I know you were fooled by the excellent headline photo featuring the Chevrolet Celebrity Eurosport VR coupe, its racing pedigree special trim, and my mom from her modeling career. The actual vehicle that brought me home from the hospital was a 1985 Buick Regal. It was blue, and had a blue velour interior. I’m thinking it was a V6-equipped version, as there were not T-tops nor power windows. I’m sure it had the half-landau so popular at the time, so it was a bit brougham, and still rear-wheel drive!

1986 Buick Regal, image via eBay

This one’s an ’86, and the color is wrong, but you try finding exact photo matches for a vehicle that old, one for which the Olds Cutlass-type modding community has long ago ruined stock examples.

1986 Buick Regal, image via eBay

Now I’m wishing we still had model-specific logos like you see here on this superb wheel cover.

The Regal that brought me home was the same car I rode in regularly as a small child. It was there for the first few years of my life, up until it was replaced with something more family-friendly but worse in every other capacity. That’d be a 1988 Dodge Dynasty, in medium grey over grey velour.

So what was the first ride of your life?

[Images via Ebay]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

134 Comments on “QOTD: What Vehicle was the First Ride of Your Life?...”


  • avatar
    jh26036

    1979 Honda Prelude automatic in Hong Kong. The car that brought me home in 1982.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    1954 Ford Crestline Country Squire, vanilla-white woody. Replaced with a ’59 version of same (sans “Crestline”), standard white.

    I vaguely remember the ’54 but wholeheartedly imprinted upon the ’59. It would talk to me.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Eurosport!

    It’s the Eighties. Do a lot of coke and vote for Ronald Reagan!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    62 Beetle (white), in 1963.

    My dad had that car until it was totaled in 1970, with the whole family in it. The brakes failed, and we rear-ended a Falcon. Good thing they don’t build them like they used to.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Damn. Mines a VW Beetle, too.

      I was conceived in Germany (American parents, dad was stationed there), but my mom flew home while pregnant (dad was retiring after me, his third child) and I believe it was a 1971 Beetle, red. There is a picture of it with my two brothers (I believe around 4 and 8 at the time) standing against it in Germany I believe stashed somewhere. If we could add pics, I would go and try to locate it.

      He sold that car to his niece, who over-corrected when the passenger side tires dipped off the narrow paved road, and she rolled it. She had some fairly major injuries, but suffered nothing long-term that I know of.

      My dad had replaced the Beetle with a turbo Monte Carlo, which was a total lemon, but my first memory of being in a car (if I’m honest, my earliest memory period) was looking up at our new house in a new development in an Atlanta suburb from the back seat of that Monte. I want to say it was a grey interior and silver car, but I have no clue really. Ha

      It was traded in shortly after buying that house for a 1985.5 Escort base 3D hatchback manual (vinyl, no A/C) and a 1985 Ranger 2.0L manual (also vinyl, no A/C).

      I guess I missed the other thread about first car you drove, but mine was that Escort in the early 1990s. It was totalled in 1992, so it had to have been 90-91. We were in our neighborhood (subdivision) in Stanwood, Wa, and I sat on my brother’s lap and steered while he worked the pedals and shifted on a long straight and then around a curve and into our driveway.

      A few years later, my uncle (actually the father of my cousin who went for a roll in the Beetle) did the same thing (let me “drive” on his lap, I was fairly obsessed with cars even as a preteen) with my late grandfather’s old 1971 F-100 390/3spd. I even shifted the column shifter (where he told me to).

  • avatar
    tonyola

    My first ride home would have been Dad’s 1953 Pontiac Star Chief sedan. Unfortunately, I have no more details and no memory of it. The first car I can remember is a black 1957 Mercury Colony Park wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      montecarl

      Mine would be a 1966 442… The first car I remember ridding in was a 1968 Ford Galaxy 500

      • 0 avatar
        CobraJet

        1952 Pontiac Chieftan pea green 4 dr. Later traded for a 55 Oldsmobile red and white 2 door which I remember riding in. Standing up on the front seat between my parents. Would be considered child abuse today.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I can remember laying (at least once) on the package shelf of our Escort. 4 passenger car and 5 person family.

          Dad luckily had a safer solution. We 3 boys rode in the Ranger’s bed with the canopy on it while he and mom rode in the cab.

          Like I said elsewhere, the 1990 Aerostar was a nice upgrade. It was like a limo van being extended length model, having arm rests, comfortable (grey cloth) seats, rear audio controls with headphone jacks, dark tinted windows, man it was like a Rolls Royce van to us boys.

    • 0 avatar
      56BelAire

      My Dad had a 1960 Pontiac Star Chief sedan when I first got my license, that’s the car I learned to drive on. First car I owned was a 1963 Pontiac LeMans Convert.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    My dad’s friend’s pea green 1980 Lada 2101. Over a decade later we took a fun roadtrip in this car to the Altai mountains, many fun memories including the blower fan self destructing with a fantastically horrible sound, passing rows of slow moving Kamaz trucks on the right side of the gravel shoulder, getting hassled by GAI inspectors (paid off with a 40 ruble bribe, this was in 2000 or so).

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Completely OT, but your dream ride has landed:
      https://www.japaneseclassics.com/vehicle/1992-toyota-crown-majesta-2jz/

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        JDM air suspension from 1992? Ehhhh. :)

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Man that is a steal for those low miles and that condition. Interesting hugely obnoxious no smoking sticker on the passenger side of the dash, was it a corporate fleet vehicle or something?

        dat velour tho

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          That could explain the blackout tint.

          It’s a shame that the buyer will probably put stanced chrome 20s on it with some ugly ground effects and LEDs.

        • 0 avatar
          Land Ark

          “Man that is a steal for those low miles and that condition.”

          Do yourself a favor and never look at the actual prices for used cars in Japan. It will probably kill you.

          I was ogling this car (along with the Cedric) the other night. That place is tantalizingly close to me, less than 2 hours away. Plus, I visited it when I was in town a year or so ago (when they still had the beautiful blue Cosmo) and I was totally surprised by how nice and accommodating they were considering I just showed up on a random Saturday and just wanted to look around.

          Oh, as an example, two years ago I got to sit in and fire up a ’97 Skyline GTR V Spec on a used car lot near a US Air base. It had something like 53k miles on it and they were asking just over $13k for it.
          Get away from the US price influence and get a relatively normal car and it’s jaw dropping.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            The tax and inspection regulations in Japan definitely depress used car values there, though there is a slight price bump at age 15 (Canada) and a bigger bump at 25 (USA).

            The landed price looks much larger than the auction price because it includes the cost of the auction itself, storing the car, negotiating the costs and bureaucratic regulations involved in exporting the car, prepping and shipping the car, dealing with a second complex bureaucracy at the receiving port, transporting the car to the shop, and final prep and cleaning.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That feels like a buy.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Oh man the want. Look at that Toyota Golden Age build quality.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Hey now that’s a trademarked gtemnykh term. Royalties in the form of OEM made in Japan Toyota parts or Japanese whiskey are accepted.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I can send some of those awful OEM Lexus engine cover fasteners. Just the thing to decorate your Ranger.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Gtem, thought of you when I ran across this one.

            High miles, but being a coupe/manual might be up your ally
            https://mobile.craigslist.org/cto/6105446853.html

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      gtemnykh,

      What is/was GAI?

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “Gosudarstvenaya Avto Inspektsiya”

        Government Automobile Inspection, a holdover term from Soviet times, unit of the non-military police force specifically focused on vehicles (unlike “militsia,” for dealing with non-automotive law enforcement.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Directorate_for_Road_Traffic_Safety_(Russia)

        They’d have actual brick and mortar police checkpoints set up on highways (which were/are just two lane paved roads in rural parts of Russia). You’d reduce speed to 10-15mph or so and roll through, an officer with a baton could either let you through, or signal for you to pull over into the inspection area where you’d have to show them your documents/license. Notoriously associated with corruption and bribery, especially through the 90s and early 2000s (generally much improved in the Putin years). On that particular trip, that Lada 21011 didn’t have current registration, and had a hole in the exhaust that caused unwanted attention. Lastly, my dad’s friend insisted on wearing a hat associated mostly with ethnic groups from the predominantly Muslim-North Caucus region (where was fighting a war with Chechen extremists at the time). So we’d be driving up on these checkpoints, my dad’s friend would put the car in neutral, take his hat off, and coast through with minimal exhaust noise. We only got hassled the one time, it was late in the evening coming back from the mountains. My dad got a bad case of food poisoning, less than ideal circumstances. The officers manning the post were nitpicking the car (“your tread is low, these anti-magnetic strips are illegal,” etc) and basically stalling until the motorist throws their hands up and asks what it costs to get out of this predicament. The price in question was 40 rubles back then, or a bit over $2.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      gtemnykh,

      Lol! I had copied the Majesta link so I could look at the ad, but then I accidently pasted your handle into a Google search (I copied your handle for the earlier question about GAI). Anyway, I found all your pics, videos, etc.

      A Lada 2107 crossing a stream in Altai? Tell us more!

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yeah that was from a later trip to that same neck of the woods near Mongolia. The car was a rental, barely 1000km on the clock when we got it. But boy does it put any sort of complaining about build quality/reliability here in the States in perspective haha. One of the seat belt retractors didn’t work, there was wiring hanging out from under the dash, and most egregiously, exhaust fumes would seep into the cabin. In spite of that the car with its carb’d 1.5L engine making 75hp got 5 full sized guys with 40+lb packs over some mountain passes, and then through the steppe including the water crossing you see in the video, through some very rocky trails to the main area just short of the Aktru glacier base camp. The last 8km is only passable by serious offroad vehicles (think 6×6 ZIL army truck or fairly serious 4wd). We were driving that Lada through my grandma’s village and my dad hit a massive pothole, enough for the whole front end to bottom out and strike the oil pan on the pavement. We were aghast at the horrible sound and stopped immediately, watching for the seemingly inevitable oil puddle of death underneath the car. That didn’t happen, the oil pressure lamp never came on, so we gingerly drove back to my gma’s to inspect the carnage. To our relief, all we saw was a minor scuff on the stupendously thick feeling iron oilpan.

        For how outdated the “classic” rwd Lada platform is (unsafe, ill handling), it is a VERY rational choice for the road conditions out there. A Lada on stock dampers/springs will absolutely embarrass any US market vehicle short of something like a LX570 on air suspension for ride quality over truly terrible roads. The soft springs and long travel just swallows stuff up, it’s incredible for such a small car. Russian Volgas are even cushier (and even worse handling).

  • avatar
    zoomzoomfan

    ’85 or ’86 N-Body Cutlass Calais coupe. The first year or two of the N-body itself (platform shared with the Grand Am and the Buick Somerset Regal/Skylark). It was cream-colored with matching Oldsmobile wheels and a gray velour cloth type interior. I have a photo of it all decorated at my parents’ wedding reception. It had the Iron Duke and my mom had to rev it at stoplights to keep it from dying. And it was a two-door, which made putting me in and out of the backseat a chore.

    I was born in November 1989 and in July 1991, my father passed away in a car accident. My mom used part of the life insurance money on a new house for us (next door to my grandma so she could help with me) and a new car for mom – a ’91 Chevrolet Corsica LT with the super rare Z52 Sport Package. That’s the car I basically grew up in.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I’m sorry to hear about your dad.

      But that Corsica sounds interesting. Do tell.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Yes, sorry about your dad. And, the Corsica does sound interesting. I drove a brand new ’95 as a rental car on a business trip to Atlanta (it was so new that it had white on red “LICENSE TAG APPLIED FOR” plates on it, instead of a real Ga. plate).

        It only had the 2.2 engine, but it had no problem doing 80mph on I-75/85, and had automatic headlights, which I found strange, its being such a lowball ride.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Ha the first real drive I had outside of driver’s ed. in a Corsica was going to a Chevy dealer in Jasper, Ga. to pick up a Z-71 (I had brought my cousin along to drive it back).

          I went through Atlanta (was coming from South of it), I ran 80-90 MPH on 65/85.

          On the way back, the Silverado’s governed top speed was significantly lower than the Corsica’s. If we both ran as fast as our respective Chevys would go, I would out run him.

          GM was weird about putting automatic headlights in base model cars. They came on in that car way before I would’ve normally turned them on, and were in high beam of course so I blinded people for 30-45 minutes before noticing the blue icon had come on.

          Other than that annoying crap (and the rotary dial wipers were on the opposite side of where they were in my 1994 Tempo, lol), it was a good car that made the trip with no problem. I had chosen to drive it over a newer Cavalier and I’m glad I did.

          I ended up letting my brothers in-laws get it. Had the 2.2L. They put a lot of miles on it.

          Edit, more about the 4 cylinder Corsica I sped through Atlanta with, it was a super dark purple. It looked black most of the time. The “CORISCA” sticker (by 1996) was missing. I had a dealer sticker that had “SS” right next to each other in the name, so I cut out the SS and put it where the Corsica badge should’ve been. So I was driving a Chevy SS!

          My brothers FIN wanted the Corsica sticker like it was supposed to be originally. So, I ordered him one from the parts department and applied it myself. No SS anymore. :(

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The romantic in me likes to think it’s a ’63 Riv, but I do believe it was a late ’50s Buick Mom and Dad had when they were first married.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Wow…just wow…honestly I am struggling with this. For all my love for cars the reason I do love them is because when I was a small kid we were rather poor and for a few years didn’t have one (actually several years). The first car I remember was some type of Chrysler convertible late 60’s early 70’s and the year was 72. I used to sit on top of the folded roof and my dad would drive down the street and him with a Colt45 in his hand.

    After that was a 73 Plymouth Fury. (yellow with black top) It was new however it was the last new car they we would own. It broke down every week even new and when my dad and mother only made about $1.60 an hour it was hard to hold on too.

  • avatar
    Demon_Something

    ’94 Accord in 96. Dad eventually sold it to a college student in ’01 when the clear coat peeled.

  • avatar
    ajla

    1983 Buick Skyhawk 2-door. White over red, don’t know which engine but it was an automatic.

    It was the main family car until ’89 when we were in a bad car accident. After that my father (who was still in his 20s at the time) bought a Chevy Caprice (which my mother hated). Then once his Ranger died he took over the Chevy for commuting and we lived the minivan lifestyle from there on out.

  • avatar
    scuzimi

    1956 Ford Country Squire wagon.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    1970 Volvo wagon – offbeat vehicle for a Michigan family.

  • avatar
    Ermel

    NSU Prinz TT, blue, year unknown. First memories however are of a yellowish-golden late-model Renault R 16 TS, which I adored and actually wept for when it was totalled and replaced by a ruby Audi 100 LS in 1976, when I was six.

  • avatar
    TybeeJim

    In the year 1942, that first ride from a Quonset hut on the Army base to home was in a 1939 Ford sedan. This was also the first car I “drove” in 1947 by sitting on the floor in front of the driver’s seat and repeatedly pressing the floor starter button until I was in the neighbor’s backyard!

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Wow, you scamp! There’s something to be said for clutch start switches.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Nice.

      War baby, huh? My dad is a 1942 model as well. What an uncertain time to be having a baby, but it turned out alright (thank God, and thanks to our veterans).

    • 0 avatar
      haroldhill

      ’39 Ford Coupe in ’43. Dang, I thought I was going to get the conestoga trophy. It was black, of course.

      Sometimes I was allowed to work the steering wheel OR the gas pedal (not on that first ride, but later). I still like a stick shift.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    A white 1960-something IH Travelall, so the 20th century version of the Conestoga wagon. My folks ditched it two years later when the reverse gear broke and gas got really expensive, and the first car I remember is the maroon Plymouth Horizon that replaced it.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      An Olive Drab 1962 IH 4-door US Air Force Flightline truck, with the markings still on the door.

      Bought for scratch at the Remarketing and Distribution Auction on the Air Base.

      Amazing what a trip to the Base Auto Hobby Shop did for that truck, with a little help from my friends.

  • avatar
    2manycars

    Earliest I can remember riding in as a kid is a bullet-nose Studebaker, probably a 1950 model. Don’t know what engine or transmission, would like to think it was the mighty Studebaker V8!

    • 0 avatar
      2manycars

      Correction – the Stude V8 did not come out until 1951, so if what I’m remembering is indeed a 1950 model it would have come with the old flathead six. Probably three on the tree trans, perhaps with overdrive, though Studebaker Automatic Drive did become available that year.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    I don’t know what car I came home in.
    My parents have pictures of me as an infant on the trunk of my grandfather’s turquoise and white Olds – so probably from the late 50’s.
    I also have memories of sitting in the back of my father’s 63 Buick LeSabre – which he got from my other grandfather. I recall him saying it had the Wildcat engine in it – which didn’t mean anything to me at the time. What I thought was cool – was the radio speaker in the rear parcel shelf and the speed limit buzzer.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    1956 Ford Customline, 2-door (Tudor in Ford speak). With the Victoria, two tone option. Black and white. With grey upholstery. The Old Man bought it new with the optional V8 and added dual chrome tailpipes.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    My Dad’s 1953 Buick Special, black with a red interior. As I was his first child, it was his “bachelor car” pressed into service as a family vehicle. I remember the day he sold it in 1964. Many tears were shed…

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    1963 Mercury Comet
    http://s.hswstatic.com/gif/1960-1963-mercury-comet-6.jpg

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Renault Alliance/Encore.

  • avatar
    cls12vg30

    I assume that I would have taken the ride from NASJAX base hospital in our blue 1973 Pinto on that Christmas Eve of 1976. I clearly remember that car, it had a couple of “teeth” missing from its waterfall grille. The Navy even shipped it to Spain when we were transferred to Rota, and shipped it back to Charleston a couple years later. Soon after that, it was traded for a ’78 Corolla SR-5 Liftback, which my father drove for the next 12 years.

  • avatar
    Big Ed

    First ride in ’76 was a 1976 Plymouth Volare Premier wagon. Took many weekend trips between Long Island and western Mass in it over the next 8 years. I still remember always giving the hood ornament a 1/4 turn and how that would irritate my dad when he saw it.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Although much of Mom’s pregnancy was driving a SS 396 Chevelle, by the time I was born it had been sold and there was a 1973 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme coupe with Olds 350 and 3 speed auto. It was that sky-aquamarine-turquoise color that the older members of the B&B would swear 50% of them were painted. (FYI it was 1977 when I was born.)

    By the time it was traded (I think I was about 3) Dad had it repainted in a metallic silver. That is what sticks in my head, the ethereal glow that car had when the sun was hitting it just right. As if it was not of this world.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Most likely it was our Ultramatic-equipped ’52 Packard 200 4-door. My mom’s first husband bought it new ($3800), trading in her Powerglide-equipped ’50 Chevy. He wanted to surprise her; instead, she was pissed. She divorced him the next year (he was also an alcoholic), then married my dad in ’55. They drove the Packard until the Ultramatic bit the dust in ’65, then borrowed cars or rides for several months while they scraped together the down payment for our ’66 Rambler American 440 4-door (232 2-bbl, auto, a/c, AM radio).

    The Packard sat in the garage (while the poor Rambler had to sit on the driveway) until ’69, when my dad passed away, then my mom sold it for $25.

  • avatar
    RobbieAZ

    A white Ford Anglia. I don’t know the year but it was probably a ’59 or ’60. I only have the vaguest of memories of that car but we do have a few pictures.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    1972 Ford Cortina. I think it was the last year for the Cortina here, replaced by the Pinto as Fords small car.

  • avatar
    TR4

    Late 1930s Wolseley 25:

    http://www.wolseleyownersclub.com/wolseley-cars/wolseley-series-iii/wolseley-25-hp-super-six/

    Nice car in its day, although well past its prime in 1955. (The 25hp was taxable, not brake!) My parents have a picture of Dad hoisting the engine out using a block and tackle attached to a large tree branch.

  • avatar
    pdieten

    1966 Buick Wildcat. 4-door hardtop, turquoise, 401 engine.

    My earliest memory was riding shotgun (no car seats or anything like that, it was 1971) next to my mom with my aunt in the backseat as they were going shopping, and I opened the door and looked out at the pavement as Mom was driving down the street. She hauled me back in, fortunately.

    The car lasted until it rusted out in 1977, when it was replaced by a brown ’74 LeSabre Luxus.

  • avatar
    70Cougar

    I win the Internet today! 1967 Shelby GT500 (427, dual 4s). Sadly, my dad traded it in on a Volvo wagon (at least it was a manual) a few months later.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I was brought home in a 1968 Chevelle SS 396 with a four speed and Midnight Blue in color.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    I was new, but car was not.

    1962 Ford Falcon

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    1954 Mercury “woodie” station wagon in a dark teal blue. Not one of my favorite cars ever but I do remember the taillights of that car even today. The second car I remember was a white ’59 Olds Dynamic 88 followed by my grandfather’s work car which was a white ’59 Impala with the teardrop taillights and smoothly-sweeping tail wings.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    1948 Chevy Tudor (as in “two-door”), black. My parents named it “Leapin’ Leana” I suppose because of its peculiar throttle response, or, more likely, its tendency to stall at inopportune moments. My father, a poorly-paid Navy Ensign, bought the car used. I’m sure I was riding home in my mother’s lap . . . in the front seat.

    I have a few vague recollections of that car, which my dad replaced with a 1952 Ford, my family’s first new car, also a “tudor.” (Four doors cost extra.)

    The front had bench seats (naturally) and the seat backs were split in the middle. They were hinged at the base, so the seat back could fold forward to allow entry to the rear. Of course, there was no lock on the seat backs, so one could only imagine what would happen if the car collided with something that caused it to decelerate abruptly.

    The rear was my domain, and I could stand on the floor with my hands holding on to the top of the front seatback, thereby allowing me to see what was happening in front of the car.

    Fortunately, my parents were careful . . . and lucky drivers. They never ran into anything.

  • avatar
    jhefner

    1961 Cheverolet Greenbriar van, white with a red strip around the middle. (So got to mention it twice today.) It had a picnic table bolted in the middle and the two rear seats in the back faced it; no seat belts.

    I remember we would go to Burger Chef on the north side of town for dinner sometimes. Dad would go in for the food, and bring it to the car; we would eat dinner around the table; while I looked at the red Montgomery Ward sign across the street at Northgate Mall.

    The sad thing is now Dad, Mom, the Econoline van, Burger Chef, and Montgomery Ward are all gone; only Northgate Mall is just barely hanging in there.

    It was replaced by a 1967 Ford Country Sedan station wagon. Dad later bought a 1971 Ford Econoline van, but he hung onto the Country Sedan till about 1986; it was obviously one of his favorites.

  • avatar
    philipwitak

    coming from a general motors dominated environment in the middle of the last century, my first genuine encounter with automotive exotica would seem to qualify as the first ride-of-my-life [and by that i mean the first time i rode in ‘something special’].

    it was a sunny summer day in 1969 and my new employer drove up from detroit to flint to meet me personally. the street life was vibrant at that time and downtown saginaw street was jammed with automotive and foot traffic along every block. and he elects to take me to lunch in his recently acquired maserati ghibli coupé [silver over black leather/suede dash/5-speed manual transmission/ansa exhaust]. i had never even heard of such a thing.

    but what a gorgeous car! people on the street simply stopped and stared seemingly everywhere we went. i had never experienced anything even remotely like this! and i still remember it vividly – like it happened only yesterday.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Very cool!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “…first ride-of-my-life [and by that i mean the first time i rode in ‘something special’].”

      See, that’s what I thought this was at first, but I reread and got it. I was struggling to think what mine would’ve been. The cars of my early life were pretty mundane sensible vehicles, not exotic or special.

      As I got older, I tried to drive as many cars as I could.

      I guess you could say by the speeds we obtained, the first ride of my life wasn’t in an exotic, but it was the first time I remember going flat out in a powerful (and in this case, light) car. It was a 1987 Ford Mustang LX 5.0L 5spd, grey over grey, with a pile of miles on it (over 250k by that point according to the original owner they got it from). My (quite drunk) friend was driving. We caught air and scraped the trunk pan when we landed. Crazy stupid.

      First car I personally attained three digits in was my mom’s 1997 Mercury Sable GS sedan, the silver bullet. LOL!
      I think it was limited to 112, but seeing that needle move past 100 was a thrill.

  • avatar
    Corco

    A dark blue 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera International Series. From 1985 to 1995, my Dad was issued a brand new Cutlass Ciera every two years as a company car.

    My Mom had a brand new 1988 Mercedes-Benz 190E, but Dad’s car took me home from the hospital. The 190E was traded in for a Volkswagen Golf and later a 1991 Oldsmobile Silhouette as my parents transitioned from DINKs in a condo to family people with a house.

  • avatar
    countymountie

    1976 Chevette. My impending arrival forced my parents to get rid of their Opel GT for something with a back seat. In a cruel twist of fate, my first car was also a 1976 Chevette. Not the same one though.

    An uncle bought a 1979 Chevette and that thing was traded within the family like an heirloom for years. Despite all of this, I still think I had a decent childhood.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    ’77 Plymouth Volare

    My parents had that car until my mom bought her new ’89 Sentra. We also moved down to Florida in that car in 1982 when it was just 5 years old. It was amazing how much rust that car had accumulated in just a few short years up north before spending the last 2/3 of it’s life in the sunbelt. I can still remember the sound of the slant 6 as my Dad mashed the gas pedal to the floor going up the Appalachians.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    A 1985 Buick Riviera, brown over brown leather, with the 307 V8. My grandma drove my mother and me home from the hospital in it. It is also the first car to which I paid attention, and the car which got me interested in automobiles in general.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I imagine baby Kyree was quite comfy in the Buick. :)

      My parents also had a Buick, but it was before I was born (it was a 1970s). My dad called it “baby sh¡t yellow”. He was not fond of the Buick.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Bahahahaha! Seems like you guys were a Ford family. By contrast, we were definitely a GM family…although my other grandmother drove a Mercury Topaz until she had to start carting my great-grandfather (her father) around, at which point she traded it in for a mid-90s Oldsmobile Eighty-Eight. At 4’8″, Nana had to pile several pillows on the seats to see over the dashboard of the Oldsmobile.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          My family was brand agnostic… except that as far as I know neither my parents nor grandparents ever owned a Chrysler product from 1954 to the times of their deaths (my mother still lives–and owns a Caddy.) My grandparents were strictly GM owners (Pontiac or Chevy exclusively) while my parents went spread out between Merc (1), Ford (2), Chevy (2), Olds (2), Buick (2), Caddy (2) and Pontiac (1). Not counting cars purchased for work purposes which were VW (5) and Chevy (2). These last were all purchased used and literally run into the ground within a year of purchase.

          Me? Chevy (2), Olds (3), Buick (1), Dodge (1), Mitsubishi (1), VW (1), Ford (3), Saturn (1), Jeep (2) and Fiat (1).

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          We had nothing but Ford’s after a Monte Carlo lemon. They had previously bought a new 1966 Mustang V-8 and a new 1971 Ford Torino GT coupe 351C. My grandmother fell in love with it when they went to visit and wouldn’t shut up until my grandfather bought it from my dad for her. That’s when they got the baby sh¡t yellow Buick.

          My dad was going to look at a new VW camper van around 1989/1990, but they were in short supply due to a factory fire (as I recall) and he bought a new (non-camper) 1990 Aerostar instead. It was a great traveling vehicle compared to what we had previously lol (single cab Ranger or 3 door 4 pass. Escort).

    • 0 avatar
      countymountie

      My aunt had a gold 85 Riviera and it made an impression on me as well. What a car it was with those curvy hips and the vinyl top following along. And that soft velour interior. Was so impressed that I recently picked up an 85 of my own, a T-type with the the fuel injected 3.8 turbo. You and your grandma have fine taste!

  • avatar
    dal20402

    A white, four-speed 1973 Mazda RX-3 wagon with a propensity to emit loud backfires after engine stop, scaring everybody in the neighborhood.

    My mom has an interesting vehicular history.

  • avatar
    ColoradoFX4

    Very likely my very first ride was in a mid- to late-70s Austin FX4, better known as a London black cab.

    In the States it would have been my dad’s egregiously green 1975 Civic CVCC.

  • avatar
    Hooligans

    1970 Ford F100. 360/auto, short bed, two wheel drive. My mother tells me it was common to do 100 mph back then with me standing on the passenger floorboard, holding onto that steel dash and watching the desert fly by. Whee!

    I can still lay hands on that old truck…it’s peacefully returning to the earth on my uncle’s place.

  • avatar
    Thorshammer_gp

    My first ride would’ve been in my family’s blue 1991 Chevy S-10 Blazer. We kept it until I was six, at which point my parents traded it for the Grand Prix that instilled my appreciation for the 3800 V6 (though obviously that came much later). They did also have an ’89 Ford Tempo at the time, but by the time I came along, it had become my dad’s commuter car, and we rarely if ever used it for general family transport.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    1978 Mustang II fastback/hatchback. 2.3L 4cyl, 4spd manual. Aqua metallic blue paint and white vinyl interior.

  • avatar

    I don’t know what I came home in, but I went out of my way 4 years ago to have our 1983 Chevy Malibu on site to pick my daughter up. No it’s not cool or flashy, but at least it was Rear Wheel Drive and had a proper carburetor. It’s paying off as she learns wrenches and tools and helps out in the shop. She’s quite comfortable peeing in a bucket too! I know my parents didn’t give any thought to this all important ride, but I did the best I could for my little one.

    The Malibu was originally titled 7 days before I myself was born.

  • avatar
    50fordbob

    My first ride home from St. Vincent’s hosp. in Indianapolis (1943) was in my dad’s 1934 Dodge 6 2 dr. In 1948 the Dodge took it’s last gasp in my grandparents driveway My brother and I* played in it and pretended to drive. That ended when I raised the hood, our mother came running out screaming that the hood would fall down and cut my head off. The Dodge left the next day. Dad then bought a like new 1935 Ford Standard 4dr which he drove until 1954. Next was a nice 1950 Ford 2dr. Those Fords started my love of flatheads. My first car was a 50 Ford and I have one today.

  • avatar
    TheDoctorIsOut

    1953 Ford RanchWagon, I think the paint color was coral. Replaced by a 1958 Plymouth Custom Suburban in all its finned and turquoise and white splendor.

  • avatar
    sckid213

    I think I have the distinction of being driven home in The Car With Which Brougham Jumped The Shark: a 1978 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz. White on white on whitewalls, AstroRoof, CB radio.

    Just like this: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/xgqlcAW80MM/maxresdefault.jpg

    With such a whip as my first car ride ever, I drive a (modern) Cadillac today.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    55 Buick Special 2 Door hardtop.

    When my father came to get my mother and myself at the hospital they realized that they didn’t have a blue blanket, only a pink one that was my sister’s. This wouldn’t do, so my mother sent my dad to buy a blue blanket. It was winter the roads were slippery and as he rushed to the store he was in an accident and got t-boned on the driver’s side. Fortunately both my father and the car survived and I rode home that January in a very cold but still running 55 Buick Special.

  • avatar
    zamoti

    I was born in the back of a 1975 Buick Century wagon and came home in the same thing.

  • avatar
    brentrn

    1956 Studebaker Commander

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I’m not sure about the car I came home in.
    The first car I remember riding in and seeing was a 1981 Pontiac Phoenix. Until recently I thought it was a Citation. It was dark green with an olive vinyl interior. A couple years ago my mom gave me a bunch of car related papers and among the pile was the sale write-up (window sticker?) for the Phoenix. I have it sitting on my coffee table at home.

  • avatar
    azfelix

    1965 Chevy Impala 4-dr. Likely had the 327 V8 but possibly the 396 V8. Bright red with a red and beige (or off white?) interior.

    Best memory of that car was the day the muffler rusted through and dragged on the ground while my mother was driving us downtown. It was winter and so she used the long wooden handled ice scraper to knock it completely free. She almost died of embarrassment from the noise it made getting us home but my four year old ears thought it was the greatest sound ever.

    When riding, I had to stand on the transmission tunnel in the middle to see over the front bench seat.

  • avatar
    raph

    Volkswagen beetle IIRC, my brother had the honor of riding shotgun in a 1970 T-5 Mach 1.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    1971 Ford Galaxie. They kept it until 1983 or thereabouts, and in hindsight 12 years is a pretty good run for a car of that vintage. My dad parked it on the street with a For Sale sign and sold it to the mailman. He told me later, when I could understand such things, that the guy wanted it for the 351 Windsor, which he was planning on transplanting into a pickup.

  • avatar
    EAM3

    A 1968 MB 280SE in August of 1969. My dad kept that car until we moved out the country in 1980.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    When I was born, 1966, my folks had a Rambler. The first car I remember was the ’68 VW camper that replaced it. We drove it all over the Midwest and Northeast, eventually leaving it behind in Sicily after 3 years of European traveling. Somewhere along the line was also a Green Volvo (142 I think). We came back to the states with a ’74 Dodge Adventurer 200 with a twin cab. That was the car I would later learn how to drive in.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    1971 or 1972 Buick Skylark Custom (coupe), Misty Burgindy with a Sandalwood landau vinyl top and interior. The only new car my dad has ever owned.

    I was too young to remember the details beyond that. Had an FM radio option and two bench seats. I assume it had the V8, since that’s what Wikipedia says was the only engine available.

    I remember by dad trading this one in around 1980 for a used 1976 or 1977 (?) Malibu Wagon. My parents had 4 kids by then, and two of them in car seats, and while we all fit in the Buick, the wagon’s extra space for stuff became more important for our annual vacation: a week at the Jersey shore. The Skylark was having issues, and we had to cram the trunk full. The Malibu had a roof rack for our bikes and just more room. Plus, when not hauling stuff, it had the rear facing third row and the tailgate with the glass that slid down into the door, which as a 4 or 5 year old, fascinated me.

    I miss that Skylark and would love to find a well taken care of example. Such a pretty combo.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    It is a toss up between a 1968 Galaxie 500 2dr hard top or a 1970 Reg cab F250. I can’t remember which I drove first.

  • avatar
    Chi-One

    1949 shoebox Ford.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    I think my Mom had a late-’60s Plymouth Fury convertible. The first car I really remember was her 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass “S” Coupe, Matador Red over Black, black vinyl top, Rocket 350 2-bbl.

  • avatar
    bickel84

    My Dad’s 82 malaise yellow Caprice. The drive to the hospital included an hour drive along the Mississippi River; we’re from NE Iowa. I was almost born in the front seat because my dad was taking his time watching for Bald Eagles along the drive.

  • avatar
    Beelzebubba

    I was born in 1975 and my mom had a 1974 Olds Cutlass Supreme 2-door. It was black with black bucket seats. She had it until 1980 and I barely remember it.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I came home in May, 1970, in a ’67 Mustang. In short order the Mustang was replaced by a Ford Galaxie, a fact that I heard over and over until the Old Man finally bought another red, convertible Mustang. In 2006. That was a long time to hear the same lament about having to sell his first fun car. He refused to drive my Porsche just on principle, I think.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    1985 Ford EXP Sport 5-speed. But there is a story behind the car, it is a bit cooler than it sounds (no not a turbo model).

    My father was an automotive engineer at the time with a company doing a ton of work for Ford. He was pretty heavily involved with the development of the Escort. My first car was a 1985 Ford EXP Sport 5-door, an X car.

    No, not the X paper employee purchase program. X, as the car had a big X on the windshield. The manufacturer plate had the rivets drilled out by Ford, and the car had about 500 miles on it.

    In the 1985 model year, Ford built 6 NA EXPs that had been modified. They received a large carburetor, a wider exhaust, different tuning, different gearing on the 5-speed manual. It had nothing. No power steering, no AC, no stereo, no speakers, only one mirror, what meager sound insulation that would have on an Escort EXP was also stripped out. Every possible ounce that could be shaved out had been.

    The 6 EXPs were never supposed to get into the hands of the public, but apparently all 6 did and dear old dad got me one of them.

    It is a bit hard to explain/describe. It still had the 13″ wheels and brakes of a regular EXP, and was ridiculously nose heavy with that God awful F/R weight ratio. It did have F/R sway bars, and with the weight reduction, different gearing and increased power (to what I don’t know) it was faster than a stock configured EXP.

    Only had it about 2 years. The lack of a stereo, AC, rear defroster, interval wipers, was too much. Today, I would see this car as beyond a penalty box on wheels.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    My uncle taking me out in my dad’s 95 Maxima SE. He ripped through the gears in a way I didn’t even know was possible. I was frightened, but I was hooked.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I was driven home in late 1960 in a 54 Plymouth Savoy 2 door with the flathead 6 and three on the tree.
    The other cars we grew up with was a 54 Chevy Bel Air in green with the 6 cylinder and Powerglide. I used to marvel over the Motorola radio in the dash. Since it had tubes it would take until up the block to warm up and play.
    A 58 Plymouth Belvedere 4 door in blue with the 318 and the pushbutton torque flight.
    And a pair of 62 Chevys. A Bel Air 4 door sedan in black with a red interior and dog dishes. It was powered by the 6 cylinder and three on the tree. The other was a Impala 4 door sedan with a 327 and Powerglide. The Powerglide had to be rebuilt so my dad used my skateboard to slide it out from under the car. It happened to be the last of the iron cased Powerglides which made it tougher.

  • avatar
    Vaggo

    1987 Australian Ford Fairmont (XF model) in 1989 in Brisbane, Australia.

    The car had quite a story:

    Geoff Polites (later the head of Ford Aus and then CEO of JLR until his death in 2008) was my parents Ford dealer in Aus (and a fellow Greek-Australian) and accidentally sold them a stolen car.

    My parents originally bought a white 1988 Fairmont as an approved used car (it was only 4 months old) but it turns out the car was part of a scam where a very dodgy dealership employee was tracking down recent customers, having his connections steal their cars and flip them to dealers as trade-ins with the VINs changed.

    My parents had the police show up to the house one day, ask some questions about the car and take it away (it also turned out the original owner whom the car was stolen from was one of my parents customers at our shop!).

    The next day Geoff got them another car in the same spec (albeit a few months older and a 1987 model). This was great customer service as many people stung by similar scams got nothing from the dealers as they werent legally obliged to do anything about it.

    Geoff went on to be instrumental in the BA Falcon and Territory models at Ford Australia (the last truly successful Aussie-produced Fords) and then to JLR where he was instrumental in approving the Evoque, X351 XJ and XF’s first facelift which banished the gooogley eyes.

    But more than this, he orchestrated the deal to keep JLR alive and sell it to Tata. As a current JLR employee I feel the company owes him a lot but unfortunately few remember him or credit him with some of our key products.

    I remember his very last interview with CAR magazine before his death, where he was discussing a speech he made to Tata and Ford Execs at the Heritage Centre museum (now the British Motor Museum) next door to our Gaydon Design & Engineering Centre (also next door to Aston Martin Lagonda actually).
    I’m paraphrasing, but basically he was in the conference centre above the museum and quoted that “downstairs are all the rest of the British Car Industry, they’re all history and we’re all thats left. We’re the last major british car manufacturer – and I think that’s something worth saving and fighting for”.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    A blue 1952 Vw Type 1. It had an extra heater that made loud bangs when started. I wouldn´t go near it until the noise stopped.

    Same as this: https://c1.staticflickr.com/4/3734/12192894894_3a9e8ee5c5_b.jpg

  • avatar
    Jamblastx

    I was born in 1964 and god bless my father for taking me home from the hospital in his 1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint. I on the other hand took my two kids home in a 91 Sentra SE-R and 95 Jetta GL….no wonder why they are not car enthusiasts (and yes, I hated the SE-R…most oeverrated car I have ever owned)

  • avatar
    adam_b

    1958 Morris Minor Tourer (convertible). We had it until I was 6 or 7, and I can remember the interior – central speedometer and banjo steering wheel. I don’t remember the top ever being lowered – as my mother said, it wasn’t very practical with children as toys and other small objects would be flung up into the airstream and crying would ensue.

  • avatar
    Salzigtal

    Ride – Fiat 600, drive – MG Midget aka Deathtrap. Knurling on steering box stripped, sudden deceleration via tree. Thanking of tree due to depth of arroyo behind it.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    Wait..you were born in a hospital and got a ride home?…I was born at home and got a ride to the hospital a week later…in a 5 year old 37 Ford sedan, after the 6 inches of snow melted away. The midwife who delivered me was hauled from her home 2 miles away to our cabin in a sled pulled by two mules..fact..A Conestoga Wagon would have been an upgrade.

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    I know I’m late to the party…

    I don’t know what my first ride would have been, probably a very large GM car, or possibly my grandparents early 60’s Mercedes sedan. The first cars I clearly remember riding in were my Mom’s late 60’s Nova SS, and my grandparents late 60’s Chrysler New Yorker, which they kept until they got their new, ridiculously tiny, ’77 LeBaron. It’s all about perspective.

    They have pictures of me in cars before that, that I have no real memory of. It seems like before I was 8 or 10, cars didn’t imprint themselves in my memory.

    During my formative young car-guy years, it seemed everyone in my family and most relatives were driving massive early 70’s GM cars. A couple of 98’s, a LeMans, a Skylark convertible, big Cadillacs, etc. Of course, there was always a sprinkling of Darts, Valiants, etc. It seems like most of my early childhood cars were metallic light green, metallic brown, or black.

    I remember riding on the back shelf of a car more clearly than I remember what car it was. I also clearly remember taking naps on the warm carpeted floors of cars as a kid. The other thing I remember, oddly, were the cars that had turn signal indicators on the top of the fender and/or turn signal/brake fiber optic lights in the headliner. I don’t know why that made such an impression on me.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • JohnTaurus: I don’t think Ford will be killing the F-Series anytime soon, no matter how many autonomous...
  • Prove Your Humanity 2+9=?: “Your diesel Fiat is no Volkswagen!” “Oh, yeah? It’s just as...
  • threeer: Yes. Easily.
  • Lorenzo: Aw, I was hoping for a Sentra-based Galant, with the rough sounding Mitsubishi 2.4 four. The 1.8 Nissan four...
  • JohnTaurus: An owner’s record including Trump, Obama, Bush (both) and Regan couldn’t make me pay $10k for...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States