By on April 10, 2017

ROLLS-ROYCE WRAITH AT THE GOODWOOD FESTIVAL OF SPEED 2015, Image: Rolls-Royce

Three and a half years ago, I found myself blitzing down Wilshire Boulevard behind the wheel of what was then the only Rolls-Royce Wraith in the country. There was much to admire about the car: the saturnine (as in Saturn V, not the dour deity) thrust of the blown V-12, the transcendent sound system, the Starlight Headliner that makes every late-night date a romantic one. Truth be told, I expected all of that. What I did not expect was to be utterly smitten by the Wraith’s two-tone paintjob.

What was the last mass-market passenger car to be sold in the United States with an optional two-color finish? Don’t tell me that it was the ’90s Explorer Eddie Bauer, because I don’t want to think about that despicable slug of a trucklet. Perhaps it was the ’80s Town Car? The bustleback Seville? And could two-tone paint jobs ever make a comeback? I think they might, and I’ll tell you why.

Recent history tells us that car buyers tend to favor bright colors when the economy is having trouble. Despite the earnest protestations of the Silicon Valley set and their pet banksters, it’s not exactly Morning in America now. There’s some room for the return of aggressive coloration, and I think we’re already seeing it in examples like the lime-green Honda Civic Coupes out there.

There’s also some history to indicate that vehicle exteriors become more elaborate as available performance diminishes. We’re already on the far curve of the family car horsepower war, so maybe now’s the time for a little Laudau, a bit of Brougham, in our everyday haulers. And as Polonius once said, two-tone paint jobs follow vinyl tops as the sun doth follow the day.

Rolls-Royce never truly gave up on the two-tone look; in fact, one good way to tell a Spur from a Mulsanne at a distance is by color. The Wraith and Ghost are rather fetching in contrasting shades, if I do say so myself. Which means there is reason for someone to copy them. Don’t count out the Germans … if the Maybach misadventure taught us anything, it’s that there’s some love in the Fatherland for a pimped-out paint job.

What say you, dear reader? Would today’s CUVs be improved by a beltline contrast? I rather think they would. At the very least they would look longer and lower, even if that somewhat defeats the point of putting a box on stilts.

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110 Comments on “QOTD: A Tale of Two Tones?...”


  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    ” ’90s Explorer Eddie Bauer, because I don’t want to think about that despicable slug of a trucklet.”

    Them’s fightin’ words Jack. I love me a clean gen 2 Explorer, saw a cherry one in my neighborhood this weekend and was quite smitten by it. A nice “Cayman pearl” green XLT(?)

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Well, two can play the fighting words game, and this isn’t intended at you gtem.

      I can’t believe J.B. (Fletcher?) doesn’t remember the vile, revolting regurgitated trash that was the 1990s Camry, ES, Avalon and even Corolla that had gold (sometimes grey IIRC) lower tone.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “revolting regurgitated trash that was the 1990s Camry, ES, Avalon and even Corolla that had gold (sometimes grey IIRC) lower tone.”

        Hey now, even more fighting words, as I just sold a beige over silver ’96 ES300! The black over slate would have been a much nicer shade, but I thought mine was quite handsome. Hell of a overbuilt car too, just incredible how well everything was holding up.

        just like this:
        goo.gl/images/ySyAtt

  • avatar
    Speed3

    I would like to see a woodie rolls.

  • avatar
    whynot

    You can buy a two toned F-150 today in King Ranch guise (maybe other trims, I didn’t check).

    As for whether it makes the car look better, it depends. It works on boxier, truckier designs. Not sure if an Edge, for example, would wear the two-tone look well.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Ford did the “Arizona sand metallic” under some other color well into the 2000’s I think on the F150. Don’t recall any two tone models when I was shopping for one in 2014, and in fact went all blacked out because that’s what my baby wanted, and we did end up with a good looking truck.

      At that time, the snazziest color on the lot was “Blue Jeans” on a $60k platinum.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      It worked on cars with un-boxy finned bodies in the 1950s. Chrome spears and other brightwork helped define the color contrasts. Google “1956 Dodge Coronet photos”, and you’ll see two tone, and even three tone paint jobs, separated by chrome strips.

      Incidentally, that era also included the first V8 engines available in mass-market Fords, Dodges, and Chevrolets (along with a host of options formerly seen only in top line models), so the paint schemes accompanied horsepower, they weren’t a substitute for it.

      As for the basic premise of the article, I wholeheartedly agree. We need more color combinations, both outside and inside the car. Unfortunately, makers have standarized to black, white, gray, and silver exterior monochromes, with similar interior choices. Giving the customer what he/she/it wants costs too much to build.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        Yes, but things like chrome strips along the side of the body work are generally not in anymore, unless they are framing the greenhouse glass. Today’s flame surfacing and “organic” styling doesn’t not lend itself well to two tone applications.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Chrome strips and two tones go hand in hand. To bring back one, you need to bring back the other.

          What Jack is advocating, indirectly, is dumping the “organic” styling that prevents the two tones from coming back. It’s no accident that he mentioned and showed the RR Wraith, definitely NOT an organic styling exercise.

          So Jack is using the paint scheme idea to attack the dominance of wind tunnel induced jelly bean design, and advocate for more distinctive design language. Because chicks love distinctive.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      You can get a 2 tone F-150 in any trim (with a Magnetic grey lower part)

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Ford and Ram both offer “two-tone” paint. Ford XLT, Lariat, and King Ranch.
      Silver is XLT, Caribou (brown) with Lariat. I’m not sure of King Ranch. I think it is same as Lariat.
      Titan also offers two tone.
      GM and Toyota don’t offer two tone.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I like the way you think! I would literally give my right teat to see the return of the personal luxury era. And the time is ripe because let’s face it – no ones buying CUVs for performance. They just want to be comfy and high up. Like they’re in a big throne. So make the throne more bling and plush. It makes sense. The American people deserve no mor…I mean no less!

  • avatar
    ...m...

    …if you count two-tone roofs, there were several introduced in the 2000s: the FJ cruiser, the mini, and the thunderbird, for starters…i saw a proper two-toned scion xD last month, but i’m not sure whether it was a factory paint job…

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    If a ‘King Ranch’ Ford Expedition counts as a ‘mass-market passenger car’, then you can still get a two tone ‘mass-market passenger car’ in the US today.

    But yes, two tone paint is another thing we miss from the past. I have the skills and spare time to make one f my own if I want to, but I doubt most people do. Also, I tend to end up doing a flame job or a dragon mural instead, but a nice two tone would help even a CRV or a Mercedes look good.

  • avatar

    Ford Flex and Toyota FJ, no? Minis can also be had with white tops still, I believe.

    Done with taste, two-tone looks good. There’s also subtle variations, like non-body-color cladding on some cars to add a bit of drama.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Yas. Someone sees the manufacturing PITA that is the Ford Flex roof line.

      Ford loves two tone.

    • 0 avatar
      newenthusiast

      I alos instantly thought of the many Ford Flexes (Flexi?) that have contrasting roof and body colors, as well as an stainless steel looking tailgate. I keep thinking my next vehicle will be a Flex. I like the look, and it appears to remarkably boxy and practical.

      “There’s also subtle variations, like non-body-color cladding on some cars to add a bit of drama.”

      I don’t know if it’s dramatic, but my Q7 has this. Its not the black wheel well stuff a la Subaru, but a gray metallic lower level cladding that seems to take all the rocks and mud that a painted area would get damaged by.

      Mine looks EXACTLY like this:

      http://usedmotorzcity.com/carpics/2008-audi-q7-premium-wnav-rear-camera-90310-miles-dk-gray-awd-42-premium-qu-6.jpg

      By comparison, here is a one without that gray cladding (although, this a black, not blue paint job):

      https://cdn04.carsforsale.com/3/1008509/9171793/thumb/865746355.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      FJ is dead, and Flex isn’t far behind.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    As mentioned, Ford, Chevy, and Dodge have done gods work maintaining the two-tone paint lifestyle well past the expiration date. You could pick up any one of the afore mentioned in the 90’s with multiple multi color options. Dodge up until the 03′ redesign in fact. Ford, I believe, kept it as an option the longest.

    • 0 avatar
      BigOldChryslers

      You can still get a 2-tone Ram, silver lower colour on the Laramie, light gold on the Laramie Longhorn and black on the Rebel and Outdoorsman. Outdoorsman used to come with gunmetal grey lower colour, which I prefer to the black they offer now.

      Back when Laramie was the top trim level and SLT was one step down, 2-tone paint (silver lower colour) was available no-charge on Laramie and for added cost on SLT. I know this from shopping for a used 06-07 RAM2500.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I stand corrected. Thank you.

        • 0 avatar
          CobraJet

          You could really mix and match the two-tone colors on pickups up until about year 2000. My 94 Silverado is black with beige center body color. The cars of the 1950’s had the most dramatic and beautiful color combos. Basically any color that Crayola had could be found on a car back then. Interiors were just as colorful.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’m sorry, that color combo on that Rolls is ***HIDEOUS***.

    Full disclosure: I’ve never been a fan of two tone paint. To me, it just a way of covering up bad styling, and in the case of the Wraith, there’s no need.

    But it you’re going to do it, you need a better combo than bright red and silver, for sure. That paint job looks like it belongs on a 200,000 mile 2005 (V-6) Chrysler 300 that’s trawling the ‘hood. All it needs is the big chrome wheels and the fake-Bentley grille.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Funny you say that FreedMike. As the photo downloaded, at a quick glance, I thought it was a blinged out Chrysler 300 with obligatory fake Bentley grille

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “That paint job looks like it belongs on a 200,000 mile 2005 (V-6) Chrysler 300 that’s trawling the ‘hood. All it needs is the big chrome wheels and the fake-Bentley grille.”

      Haha nailed it 100%. Around here in addition to the 300s, the most common recipients of the cheap two tone job are Dodge Magnums (seems they all end up in the hood sooner or later) and 00-05 Impalas.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I mean, seriously…it’s a f**king Rolls Royce Wraith. Nothing further needs to be said.

        https://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/testdrive/gallery/rolls-royce-wraith-review-2014_67.jpg

        (Drops mike)

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      One of the reasons I never pulled the trigger on a 300 is because of uh, this association. eg – most of the older 300s I see are on the “other side of the tracks”.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Aren’t Rollses and Bents supposed to look like 300s roaming the hood?

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Yup. Daimler came up with the 300 boxy design, then BMW “borrowed” it for the RR, and Volkswagen copied that for the Bentley. Germans stealing from Germans stealing from Germans. It was the only way they could get their vehicles in the ‘hood, a place they could never “crack” before.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I think it’s the other way around, stuki…

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Indeed, it wasn’t taken from the 300 by anyone lol

          but IMO nobody really “owns” the boxy big luxury car. Everyone has had one at one time or another (including Chrysler before the LX cars) and they usually do a fine job of looking the part with that manufacturer’s styling on the same basic profile.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I like it.

      And I would drive a two tone 300 with some moderate wheels on it. V-8 of course, unless I get a triple black SRT8.

      No fake rolls grille on any 300 of mine. You know how I feel about false advertising.

      I’m smiling as I type this I hope you know, I’m not trolling you, I promise lol.

      Different strokes…

      Really a 300 is my favorite Chrysler/Dodge in recent memory. But, I’d rather have a better-than-new Olds 98 B body.

      If I had to have a Panther stand in to fill the spot, 95-7 Town Car. But, honestly its pretty low on my list for an admitted Ford guy.

    • 0 avatar
      Thorshammer_gp

      Couldn’t agree more on the Rolls at the top (two-tone or not, I find it a ghastly-looking car anyway). On the other hand, I think the last generation of the Subaru Outback Sport was tastefully done, though I do find it odd that it was available with two shades of silver at one point. I can also appreciate that it made use of something other than black cladding a la the Avalanche or Crosstrek:

      http://bestcarmag.com/sites/default/files/2011-subaru-outback-sport-1456173-1133362.jpg

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    It would be a marketing funded push unless some OEM has a bunch of old two wet or one wet application paint shops. All shops that spit out modern cars and SUV’s are three wet- as in the prime, enamel and clear get applied all at once without curing or prep work in between.

    You can only do two tone if you can re run after prime, cure, scuff, enamel and clear the lower, cure it, scuff it, mask it, run through enamel one last time then clear and cure.

    You could get creative with your conveyors and just loop through a 3 wet booth- but… you need massive capital and prep labor that would be idle frequently. I could see it being done but at a big capital cost. A Lincoln plant in Mexico would be a sure fire place to start with lower overhead.

    Two tones nuke your OEE. Line availability in a booth and output to final is what paint shops live and die by. But man are they worth it.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Thanks for the information.

    • 0 avatar
      BigOldChryslers

      Yes, thanks for the background information. I guess that makes lack of 2-tone availability the modern equivalent of “any color you like, as long as it’s black”.

      Since pickups can still be had in 2-tone, I take it that they are still assembled at plants with paint booths that still use an older process?

    • 0 avatar
      hands of lunchmeat

      correct. Theres a lot of things i could say being on the other side of the glass in terms of these cars, but the finish work is always stunning.

      as was said, the ‘three-wet’ method used in manufacturing makes having one body get two different colors a but more difficult. its also why your new X6 has the same horrid amount of orange peel an HR-V does. click up a few steps in the price ladder and this is no longer an issue.

      Personal opinion is that big brit coupes can usually get away with some fairly absurd colorways, a few years back we had a sandstone colored Wraith in stock, that color did such a car a disservice in its blandness.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        That orange peel is the plant being a cheap @ss. It’s thin paint and or too fast FPM and whipping your car through a booth like you’re Burger King. Check the finish on a Expo, Nav, Escape or MkC. 3 wet and liquid smooth.

        Edit: also waterborne paint doesn’t lay down as nice as solvent borne. Solvent = more VOC’s = more EPA permit $$

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Warren and Saltillo truck do it every day. Maybe not always greatly, but Ram makes a lot of two tone trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      TCowner

      I have a 2008 MGM that is Bright White with a Sandstone lower 2 tone paint job, and I think it looks pretty nice with the optional chrome rims and tan leather interior. I have only seen a handful of other newer MGMs that were 2-tone, so can’t imagine the actual cost of providing each one of these.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    My wife loves her any of the older Suburbans with the two-tone paint job.

    http://www.1990suburban.com/facts/exterior_colors/mojave_beige/images/1990_mojave_beige_suburban_01_03.jpg

    My Clubman is a faux two-tone; parchment white with a black top. Also black arches and black trim. It works, though I prefer my wife’s Mini hardtop in yellow with a black top and black hood/trunk stripes

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Wouldn’t the Veyron be the last two-tone car?

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Jack must have been listening in to a conversation I had just this weekend. With the general lack of differentiating style in new vehicles. And the lack of exterior ‘ornamentation’ like chrome accents, vinyl roofs, etc. we were discussing how so many vehicles look alike and come in the same bland colours.

    The conversation started when we parked beside an F-Pace and noticed how it looked the same as the other SUVs/CUV’s in the parking lot, most of which cost about half of the Jag’s price.

    We agreed that the first manufacturer to start offering cars in two-tone, pastel/coral colours could have a hit with the consumers. A return to the style of the 1950’s without the ostentation?

    • 0 avatar
      BigOldChryslers

      I thought ostentation was already coming back. Consider the current Lexus (any), Nissan Juke, Toyota Prius, Honda Civic hatchback, Corvette, pickup front ends…. all could be described as overwrought.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      The Spark has been attempting to bring back the pastels almost single-handedly. That’s definitely what got my and my girlfriend’s attention about it. She still wants one in Mint, the only car that comes in her favourite colour.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I’ve always been a huge fan of the blue/grey color scheme. Looks great on older Trailblazers and Outbacks.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    Subaru Imprezzas of a couple gens ago, and I think outbacks as well, sported 2-tone paint jobs.

    And you can still get them on F150s…

  • avatar
    r129

    The 2001 Toyota Camry Gallery Series and Collector Edition come to mind as relatively recent examples of mass-market two-tone cars. The Gallery Series was available in Antique Sage, Mineral Green or Diamond White Pearl, all with Lunar Mist lower cladding. The Collector Edition was available in Cashmere Beige with Lunar Mist lower cladding. There were also a number of two-tone Lexus ES300s around that time.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Ford would two-tone everything if people would buy it. I’ll take a Fusion King Ranch.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I think that two tone is best on vehicles with strong character lines that run nearly the length of the body. Only a smattering of vehicles fit that currently. Although character lines can sometimes call out obvious places for splashes of color. Like the the “scallops” on the side of the current Dodge Charger could be tastefully highlighted.

    • 0 avatar
      BigOldChryslers

      > Like the the “scallops” on the side of the current Dodge Charger could be tastefully highlighted.

      Today that is an application for vinyl decals. I’ve seen aftermarket decal sets for Charger and Mustang which do exactly that.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        That’s not as durable a solution as paint. Saturn had plastic bodies that held up pretty well. I wonder if a two tone plastic panel is possible?

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Certainly. I’ve seen more than a few gray plastic panels achieve a two-tone effect after several years in direct sunlight.

        • 0 avatar
          JRoth

          I feel like Saturn actually offered 2-tone in the early years. I can picture a red/silver SC2. But maybe not.

          My dad’s first sports car was an ’82 or ’83 Supra, black & silver. I was well into my 20s before it occurred to me that 2-tone wasn’t a perfectly normal color scheme.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Just a wild guess, but the piece cost and productivity hit of the two-tone paint process likely isn’t a factor for the RR, or for Bugatti.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Minis are two tone presently!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Technically, then, so are most of the Land Rover / Range Rover vehicles, which can be had with non-body-colored roofs.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        I don’t think I’ve ever seen a contrast roof Range Rover. Typing this is giving me deja vu right now though.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          You must have missed the one trolling the Arctic Circle, driven by the yuppie d**hebag in the light coat, who happens to come across the hottie with her sled dogs, who’s also wearing a light winter coat, and then proceeds to give them all a lift over the water. I do believe that vehicle had a different top color.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Haha. I have only seen the one where the man is racing a glider along the road, on paved surfaces only.

            He looks at it smugly, and arrives on the flat grassy field before the glider lands. Then he gives his other overdressed friend a lift home, abandoning the glider.

            My thought afterward was “Huh, that was pretty gay.”

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          My stepmother’s rusting, breakdown-prone ’79 Rangie 2-door was light beige with a black roof. Must not be a new thing.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Looking at the photo, I see what a Chrysler 300 coupe would look like, if those dummies at FCA knew what they were doing. The 392 hemi under the hood would be nice, and closer to the original 1950s 300 letter coupes. Of course if you must have a V12, Chrysler has the Viper tooling…

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      “Chrysler 300 coupe”

      You spelled Imperial wrong!

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I’m surprised no one has bolted a 300 front end onto a Challenger yet, the way Chrysler did with the Magnum for Europe.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Looking at the two of the same years, it wouldn’t fit, even if you swapped the hood and fenders too. The side crease is lower on the Challenger. It wouldn’t be that much of a problem for FCA to design a grille-to-windshield 300 front end for a challenger and call it a 300 coupe, but there would have to be other changes needed to pull it off. Still, it would be cheaper than a redesign of a 300 sedan. Considering the B pillar on the 4-door 300 is weak, you would think FCA would consider a 2-door version.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      A 300 coupe on the 300 wheelbase would be awesome, but would sell precisely 4 copies. 1 to me at least.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Probably not RR related, but what happened to the fad, more so in Europe than here, of hiring out your car as a billboard? Getting a 500 Euros discount, for agreeing to bop around Paris with “L’Oreal” slapped all over your car.

    At some point, spray-on oled circuitry may make the whole “what color should my car have” seem a bit quaint….

    With the F series now being Alu, I want one unpainted. Just raw. Like aluminum work boats. You’d think that would be possible on a car’s exterior panels, without having to drive around with zincs hanging off your doors and roof.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    I say “GO FOR IT!” Some two-tone would be nice change from the white, black, & silver paint schemes on all the car lots right now… not to mention the played-out “murdered-out” thang. Everybody’s gotta look “tough” these days. Pish. Swim against the stream… Would like to see a two-tone scheme on the new continental… perfect car for it.

    Two-tone could be pretty easily done these days, especially with the advent of vinyl wraps… could use a contrasting or transitional pinstriping tape between the two colors. And you could change colors/schemes easily.

    Back in the 80s, my dad gave me his 1978 Pontiac Grand LeMans coupe… two-tone in cream & bronze… factory mags… crushed velour interior. It was a sharp car. The 305 was a good engine. Sold that car around 1990 with 235,000 miles on it & still running like a top. Not bad for a “malaise-era” vehicle.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    Bear in mind that this is purely subjective, but I have NEVER seen a two-tone paint job on a car that I thought looked good.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I would gladly give up 2-tone paint for more color in the interior, with matching dash/console/carpet/seats/headliner. I love the way Honda used to do that in the 80’s and early 90’s. All blue, red, brown, whatever, just give me the option.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    I had a two-tone ’79 Impala wagon. Silver metallic on top and grey metallic below with the red pinstripe divide just below the belt line. In combination with the silver roof rack it looked quite classy.

    Of course keeping the rapidly exfoliating paint on it was a constant challenge. The paint could be vacuumed off.

    • 0 avatar
      alexndr333

      First mention of the ’77-79 B-body GM cars. Yes, they were about as good-looking a two-tone mass-market sedan as has been produced. There were some odd combinations – greens and also yellows – but the black-and-silver and navy-and-silver examples were refined looking cars.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/09/curbside-classic-gms-greatest-hit-3-1979-chevrolet-caprice-classic/

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I think the horizontal, well-defined character line on the current GM K2XX SUVs would really define a two-tone well.

  • avatar
    carguy67

    Most Big Healeys were two-tone–mine are (red/black and white/black)–the character line was a natural borderline for two colors. A lot of single color Healeys got the two-tone treatment by the dealer or owners. And, early ‘Vettes–which some believe copied the Healey body style (or vice versa)–look pretty good with white coves.

  • avatar
    Robert

    “What was the last mass-market passenger car to be sold in the United States with an optional two-color finish?”

    Ford Flex – didn’t you own one? Mine’s a red with white top ’14.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Two-Tone is making a comeback at my house. My Laramie Longhorn 1500 is Luxury Brown with trim in white gold. The polished aluminum wheels even have gold pockets. The interior is probably the closest modern equivalent of Brougham there is.

  • avatar
    azfelix

    Does this count? Or does the faux wood make it tri-tone?

    http://1.media.collegehumor.cvcdn.com/20/54/4e5a888ca972faa4f9b16f184dae1e0a.jpg

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    The VW California comes in some nice two-tone options.

    http://vwt2oc.co/wp/wp-content/uploads/20150407vr005.jpg

  • avatar
    doublechili

    I had a 1981 Dodge (Mitsubishi) Challenger which was a true 2 tone color (light blue and black – kind of sharp IMO).

  • avatar
    Carzzi

    ’80s to ’90s Mercedes offered two tones, where the lower cladding was a shade different from the rest of the car.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    My old Mercedes (a 1976 W115) was two-tone, dark brown over tan.

    It looked *lovely*.

    (One issue today is the more complicated metalwork styling on many cars – two tone works best with a clear dividing line for the color, and *where would that even be* on many modern cars?

    On mine it was the greenhouse belt line, but that was also simple and flat and even, so it worked.

    http://motors.lukedarby.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/2014-08-23-15.08.05.jpeg

    Picture is the W123 version, but might as well be a W115 for this purpose.)

  • avatar
    taxman100

    I know Mercury offered two-tone on the Grand Marquis back in the mid 2000’s – I have a brochure around somewhere showing the various two-tone combinations available.

    I had an 84 Plymouth Turismo that was two-tone – metallic silver with metallic dark grey below the belt-line.

  • avatar
    Roadranger

    I always liked the two-tone Holden Calais of yore.

    http://s1301.photobucket.com/user/flux420/media/DSC03963_zps0fsjd5po.jpg.html

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c1/1985_Holden_VK_Calais_Sedan.jpg/1280px-1985_Holden_VK_Calais_Sedan.jpg

    Peugeot, on the other hand, should give themselves an uppercut for this effort.

    https://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/news/2015-peugeot-308-gti-confirmed-will-have-250-or-270-hp-87627_1.jpg

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    My 1987 Ford Tempo was two-tone from the factory. Dark blue up top, charcoal gray below the rub strips (bumpers in a matching color).

    I know you could get the Chevy S-10 in two-tone combinations from the factory to 1996, maybe even a touch later.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      My 1991 GLS was factory two tone, silver over grey. Previous owner had it resprayed solid silver, but I added a black lower tone myself, mostly to help blend in the used replacement front bumper.

      I know, shocking that a 1990s Ford plastic bumper was cracked and broken. Ha

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    Around about the late 80s, early 90s, when one piece coloured plastic bumpers became the norm, there was a brief popularity for “over grey” colours. (In the UK this was seen on Rover 200/400s and Ford Escort/Orions). A chrome trim would run around the car in a beltline that doubled as parking-ding door trim, providing a border between the two coloured areas.
    Over time that evolved to a single colour bumper and bodywork treatment with a black trim/beltline (eg. Xantia / 406), to a body coloured trim/beltline (eg. mk2 Octavia), to a minimalist modern no trim/beltline (to heck with car park door dings!)

  • avatar
    DirtRoads

    It’s Rolls Royce. How can you question them? *slapyerface*


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