By on April 28, 2017

2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport - Image: © Timothy Cain

2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport

1.6-liter turbocharged inline-four, DOHC (201 horsepower @ 6,000 rpm; 195 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm)

Six-speed manual transmission, front-wheel drive

22 city / 30 highway / 25 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

10.7 city / 7.8 highway / 9.4 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

30.2 mpg [7.8 L/100 km] (Observed)

Base Price: $21,650 (U.S) / $26,804 (Canada)

As Tested: $21,650 (U.S.) / $26,804 (Canada)

Prices include freight charge in the United States and $1,805 for destination and A/C tax in Canada, where trim and equipment changes make for an Elantra Sport quite differently equipped than it is in the U.S.

This is not the 2017 Hyundai Elantra GT3 Superleggera Stradale Competizione with an optional N Performance Package.

The 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport is not hardcore. It’s not SCCA-certified. It’s not extreme. It’s not uncompromising. And thankfully, it’s not obnoxious, ostentatious, outlandish, or overcooked.

The 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport is not a Ford Focus RS alternative; it’s not a replacement for your Subaru WRX STI; it won’t satisfy your Renault Sport 230 Renault F1 Team R26.R import cravings.

The $21,650 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport is, instead, a remarkably balanced junior sports sedan with classy styling and a terrific value quotient, priced $5,100 below the top-spec Elantra Limited.

It’s the best version of Hyundai’s best product.

WHAT DO YOU GET?
Installed under the hood of the Elantra Sport is the 1.6-liter turbo encountered elsewhere in the Kia Soul, Kia Forte, and Hyundai Veloster. The Elantra’s 1.6T is worth 201 horsepower, an impressive figure in the recent past but now only just enough to garner interest in a car this size. 195 lb-ft of torque peaks at 1,500 rpm.

2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport rear - Image: © Timothy Cain

It’s enough, particularly with a pleasing six-speed manual shifter and a friendly clutch, to put clear distance between itself and the regular Elantra and its 147-horsepower 2.0-liter.

A seven-speed dual-clutch automatic costs $1,100 extra, and based on our experience with that powertrain combo in the Veloster, we strongly urge you to save $1,100.

Rather than the rear beam axle of other Elantras, the Elantra Sport makes use of multi-link rear suspension, plus a 15mm rear stabilizer bar, rear disc brakes like the Elantra Limited, and bigger wheels than any other Elantras wearing 225/40R18s.

With unique tuning of the suspension and steering plus 54 extra horses, the Elantra Sport is operating in an entirely different sphere from regular Elantras: quicker turn-in, even-keeled cornering, sufficient shove out of corners, and a surprisingly evocative exhaust note that urges you on.

2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport profile - Image: © Timothy Cain

WHAT DON’T YOU GET?
You don’t get a Volkswagen Golf GTI. You don’t get its pace, you don’t get its immediate responses, you don’t get its communication.

That’s not a chink in the Elantra Sport’s armor. At this low price point — GTI pricing starts $4,800 north of here — the Elantra’s dynamic repertoire is noteworthy.

But livelier steering, which will surely be helped when the Michelin X-Ice tires come off, would dramatically improve the Elantra Sport’s somewhat isolated personality. A modest increase in roll stiffness wouldn’t go amiss. Slightly shorter shifter throws would add to the performance aura. 20 additional lb-ft of torque would allow the Elantra to never feel wanting for extra gumption.

2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport front - Image: © Timothy Cain

Yet the items from my wishlist missing in the Elantra Sport permit Hyundai to build a balanced car with a low price of entry.

For a car with this much cornering appetite, ride quality is exemplary. Less aggressive steering response enables the Elantra Sport to be a possible alternative for less enthusiastic Elantra consumers who want the extra power without any edginess. Hyundai’s noise/vibration/harshness work resulted in a car that feels far more closely linked to the Sonata than the previous Elantra.

2017 Hyundai Elantra sport rear badge - Image: © Timothy Cain

WHAT WOULD YOU RATHER GET?
At $21,650, you can’t easily and objectively compare the 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport with distinctly more costly performance-oriented compacts such as the Volkswagen Golf GTI, forthcoming Honda Civic Si, aging Ford Focus ST, and rather obvious Subaru WRX.

The comparably priced Ford Fiesta ST is undeniably the better driver’s car, but given the Elantra’s expansive rear seat, the Fiesta ST is a less family friendly vehicle.

Like the Elantra Sport, the 2.5-liter-equipped Mazda 3 is lacking a degree of outright performance. But while the 3 is the more willing partner, the Elantra’s turbocharged powerplant is noticeably more flexible at every point on the rev counter.

2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport interior - Image: © Timothy Cain

WILL ANYBODY KNOW YOU GOT WHAT YOU GOT?
For some buyers, whether real performance is the goal or a superficial styling statement is sufficient, the 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport’s subtle exterior alterations may not be enough.

The Sport badge isn’t hiding, but nobody actually thinks “Sport” means anything anymore, do they? The turbo text in the front grille is partially hidden by slats, and again, even turbos don’t automatically suggest performance the way they did in 1987.

Yet the fact that the Elantra Sport provides only faint enhancements to an already attractive car is an intrinsic aspect of its appeal. Far too many pseudo-performance cars shout loudly about levels of sportiness they don’t actually possess.

The 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport, on the other hand, styles softly and carries a medium-sized stick.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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95 Comments on “2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport Review – Best Version of Hyundai’s Best Vehicle...”


  • avatar
    davewg

    It is good to see Hyundai improving over time.

    I prefer the coming Elantra GT Sport for utility, but like this interior better as it doesn’t have all of the superfluous red accents on the dash.

    For the price, I don’t see how the Fiesta or Civic is an option except for slightly better handling that the average buyer won’t ever need on actual roads.

  • avatar
    cblais

    To my knowledge the 7spd DCT in this model is the newer iteration as seen in the Tucson and Sonata incarnations of this power train. If so, its actuslly quite decent, and reviews of this car which mention trying it seem to agree. Quite a difference from the DCT which was terrible in the Veloster.

    • 0 avatar
      dougjp

      Correct. I own an Elantra Sport with DCT, its excellent. This article is most unfortunate in mentioning the opposite without having any knowledge.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Early DCT units in the Tucson were bought back due to false neutrals, horrible shuddering, and constant overheating warnings.

      Software updates took care of some issues, others it did not. For mine, software did some improvement, but not enough to enjoy the vehicle better.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Funny this review was just done. Rented a SE spec Elantra this week and kept wondering what the experience would have been like in a Sport. The Elantra I had was competent enough and I even played a bit with the “sport” setting on the transmission. The base engine makes decent power, but grows course as the revs climb and the steering was as numb as novacaine. But I kept thinking that with a bit more power and a more weighted steering, this would actually be a fun daily commuter. Glad the Sport exists.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I had an Elantra rental as well recently. Pretty decent car in my opinion. I’d have no trouble buying one if I needed that kind of car. Now add more power, better suspension, and subtly improved good looks? Yeah, that’s a winner.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    IIRC Alex Dykes got this thing to 60 with the stickshift in ~6.3 seconds. Over a second faster than the 3 2.5. Hopefully they come out with some kind of N package with more aggressive suspension tuning and the like. I like having some edge in my daily driver, and it’s pretty remarkable how far you can push both the refinement and engagement sliders on a well designed modern mainstreamer before having to choose one or the other. At least where roads are smooth and snow is rare.

    Good for Hyundai. The Genesis I test drove showed they finally started to get it together with tuning. Final piece of the puzzle.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      “N” package Elantra GT cars were shown in a presentation in Korea with 240+HP and an 8 speed dual wet clutch.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The first model to get the N-performance line is the new i30 (Elantra GT), but it remains to be seen if Hyundai will do an N version for the Elantra sedan or just keep it to the hatch.

      Aside from those drivers who only care about getting from point A to point B, the Elantra Sport is the one to get in the Elantra line-up.

      The improvement in ride and handling over the rear-beam Elantras is a must for anyone who cares about such things.

      Just wish that Hyundai USA had used the Australian tuning which supposedly is even better (esp. the steering feel).

      Only other thing to fix is to add a little more padding to touch points like the door arm rest and center console.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Poor little Sentra Turbo doesn’t even make the comparative set list.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    Interesting car. Will be curious about the upcoming GT version. Too bad about the Henry Ford “any color you want as long as it’s black” interior though.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    I like the subdued look of this car versus the over style, boy-racer look of the Honda Civic. Two other things that make this better than the Civic: those great looking wheels and a volume knob.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I just tested it. It drives well. Has plenty of grip and pep. But the interior leaves a lot to desire. The doors panels scream “rental”. Ok, here it is.

      Bad:
      – Interior panels. Even soft panels look hard, all black
      – HVAV controls, they feel like ones on my garden tractor
      – clutch uptake is right off the floor, and it is too light to my taste
      – manual brake handle is 1985
      – MPG

      Good:
      – analog gauges
      – handling
      – comfort
      – power, it was urging forward with 3 people inside
      – almost no floor hump in the middle, in rear
      – seats ok but I don’t like leather period

      • 0 avatar
        R1600Turbo

        Just bought a 6MT, last tank was 35mpg. Pay no attention to the EPA ratings.

        • 0 avatar
          ponchoman49

          The current EPA ratings are nonsense in many cases. The 30 highway rating of this car is highly suspect. If these can’t easily put down 35 or higher numbers then there is something seriously wrong.

          On another note the base SE is only rated for 37 but a recent rental easily saw 41 going 73 MPH.

          A recent test drive in a brand new Colorado with the new 3.6 V6 and 8 speed saw 26.3 going the same speed as the Elantra on a steady 30 mile highway run. It’s rated at 24 on the sticker.

          My friend had a rental 2017 Impala LT with the 3.6 and it was reading a solid 31 going 75 MPH on a 100 mile trip. The sticker says 28.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I like everything about this car. It’s honest and looks good. And while I’m not a fan of turbo engines anymore, it’s getting to the point where you can’t avoid them.

    The biggest concern I would have would be resale. There’s still a bit of a stink on small Korean cars. If I buy this, will it be worth $11k in three years despite only having 22k miles on it?

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      Ok, there’s one other issue I have with buying a Hyundai:

      Price includes: $500 – Military Program – Active Duty, Reservist/National Guard with LES or Retired, Veteran with DD214 of the U.S. Military Personnel OR THEIR SPOUSE – to qualify. Exp. 01/02/2018
      $1,000 – Uber Driver Coupon – Customer must be a registered Uber Driver and able to provide an active status printout from the driver dashboard as proof of registration to qualify. Exp. 05/01/2017,
      $400 – College Graduate Program. Exp. 05/01/2017,
      $500 – Valued Owner Coupon – WE/SO. Exp. 05/01/2017,
      $750 – HMF Bonus APR Cash – Standard – must finance through Hyundai Motor Finance to qualify. Exp. 05/01/2017,
      $2,000 – Retail Bonus Cash – National. Exp. 05/01/2017

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Hyundai pricing is definitely a turnoff. I wish they’d just “value price” them and be done with it.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        It bothers me but it doesn’t at the same time.

        I’m probably one of the only people who most of that applies to in the country though (active military, wife has a Santa Fe, got my masters last spring, and I could totally drive uber for a couple weeks in order to qualify for the last $1000).

        That said, some of the dealers around me are advertising obscenely low prices with that subtitle ($14k range), which I know is probably $3k lower than anyone will walk out the door for.

      • 0 avatar
        Sceptic

        Very good point. This kind of discriminatory pricing is always a huge turnoff. Nobody likes to pay more than the other guy.
        Advertising those after rebate prices is an absolute bait and switch. Somehow it is still allowed, you can advertise any price you like,it’s still a free country after all. But this small print/after special rebate advertising complicates comparison shopping.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          This. But at least Hyundai’s being up front about who qualifies and who doesn’t. In my case, the dealer I bought my VW from last fall played the “you don’t qualify for this rebate even though it’s in our advertised price” game. If I hadn’t wanted the car I ended up with, I’d have walked (and almost did).

          I can tell you the Honda and Toyota stores I worked with were far better in that respect.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        That looks the same as just about everyone else. I’d sign up for Uber for an additional $1,000 off.

        • 0 avatar
          jpolicke

          Same here. I wonder how long it will take before Hyundai realizes how easy it is to game the system.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          How many rides do you have to give to qualify for the extra $1000?

          NVM, just found this on a forum about the rebate:

          >>For those of you just going through the Uber motions for the G, you register, upload copies of your license, registration, and proof of insurance. A day or few later after a background check, Uber approves you for driving and puts your account into the “Active” state (this is all Hyundai needs).

          >>A month or so later, Uber demands you get your vehicle inspected and certified for around $100 or face the vehicle being barred from Uber service. A month or so after that with no fares (from what I hear), Uber cancels your account.

          Looks like no actual work is necessary.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Easy to overlook the fact that this is an “all new” model – the side profile looks quite similar, and the front and rear look like slight evolutions from the last model. ( but unquestionably better looking ). That being said this car has a few issues for me:

    Only offered with leather seats (at least in Canada)
    No red in Canada, but we do get orange!
    The mileage for the manual car is 1 mpg above an accord V6 (city)

    I notice that the veloster has $6000 on the hood – in Canada. Similar discounts on this car would make it quite compelling!

    I guess the hatchback is still based on the old model?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I’ll be honest, I didn’t even realize this thing existed. I was ready to lambast it for being yet another “big rims and interior trim” ‘Sport’ package, before reading it had a 200hp motor and 6spd manual transmission. I really liked the rental SE I had a few months ago, just a totally competent and comfortable commuter that got an indicated 42mpg in 75-77mph cruise controlled driving. Those low pro tires and oversized wheels on this Sport make it a non starter for me unfortunately. I distinctly recall a higher spec Elantra stranded at night on a desolate stretch of I86 in Western NY when I was driving out to visit family for Christmas, with a blown out tire from simply hitting a good sized pothole.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Something like that, I’d take it home and put the bling wheels in the garage (if leasing) or flip them on CL (if buying) and hunt down a set of 15s or something.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Slightly shorter shifter throws would add to the performance aura.

    Do the Hyundai experts out there know if they offer a performance short throw shifter through their parts department? I do recall the lowly Accent GT offered a B&M Shifter through the dealership.

    This must be a heck of a vehicle. The reviews have been overwhelmingly positive. Not just the kind of positive that most new model reviews are but positive like magazine tests were when GM would give them a ringer and then buy 10 pages of advertising.

  • avatar
    cheezman88

    Interesting that you bring up the Mazda3 2.5. I just purchased one of those myself. How does the Elantra Sport compare to the Mazda3 when it comes to handling/refinement?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      The Elantra Sport, in particular, maintains much of what makes the Elantra a compelling product: ride quality, NVH, rear seat space. The Mazda 3’s 2.5 doesn’t feel nearly as quick, not because it’s THAT much slower, but because it’s slower at every point in the rev range. The Mazda is the happier, more joyous, more communicative car car to drive, and I prefer that. I also prefer the Mazda’s interior design. But most people would likely appreciate that extra on-ramp power in the Elantra and the superior NVH. Indeed, many more Elantra buyers should consider this car than will.

      • 0 avatar
        cheezman88

        Yea that sounds about right. Looking at the dyno plots for the Mazda3 2.5, the peak torque is very narrow. A tune is supposed to make it much more uniform, with a huge boost below 3000rpm. Like you, the interior design really did it for me. It actually swayed me from getting a Focus ST. As for the road noise everyone mentions, the car seems to quiet down quite a bit with better tires.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          My 2010 3 is on it’s 3rd set of tires now.

          I’ve gone from the OE Yokohamas to Kumho Ecsta 4X to my current tiers, BFG G-force Sport Comp 2.

          The BFGs are by far the best and quietest tire I’ve had on the car up to this point, but it only does so much when considering the sound deadening in the car is otherwise nonexistent.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Not quite apples to apples as the tuning is different (at least for the Elantra), but Australian comparisons of the 2 give the edge to the Elantra SR (Sport) in ride, NVH and of course, power, but the 3 has the better steering feel and interior.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    A comment/question, because this car just made my test drive list.

    Does it take regular gas? what is the real world mileage?

    The EPA highway numbers are 30mt and 33dct, which is still pretty bad for a compact, and worse if it requires high test. Highway mileage is one of the myriad of reasons I want out of my current Mazda3 2.5 pre-skyactiv (road noise and lack of heated seats being the other main 2).

    Are those numbers realistic? Considering I commute 80 miles a day 5mpg is significant to me. At the right price I could still definitely consider it, especially considering I qualify for basically every factory incentive right now.

    Either that or I feel like I should look at the Sonata Limited, but this seems a lot more fun. The Elantra Limited looks like a poor marriage of price to features, so I wouldn’t consider it.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Regular fuel is fine. We did 30 mpg (check Fast Facts above) in a real mix of highway/urban/suburban. And we were driving… swiftly.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Is it actually significant to you?

      By my math even if you drive 25,000 miles a year the difference between 35 mpg using $2.20 regular gas and 30 mpg using $2.70 premium is only $56 per month.

      Not nothing, but it doesn’t seem like enough money that a potential $20k+ purchase should hinge on it.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        It’s not the money, it’s the time.

        I’m not in a position where $56 a month is going to kill my budget, but I’d rather not if I can avoid it. That’s a nice lunch out or a trip to the movies. Personally, I don’t see the point in the extra money if I’m spending it doing 70 in a straight line or crawling in traffic. If I’m doing it, it goes in the S2000 to fuel track days or backroad fun.

        More-so than that the cost though it’s about time. The difference between 30 and 35mpg for me is enough that I can do a whole week on one tank, rather than having to stop an extra day to fill up. Most of my weekend miles are in the wife’s SUV or my S2000, so it cuts down on time wasted.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          Pretty much every not-track-beast car these days only “recommends” premium to hit the advertised horsepower. Running them on regular will knock 5-20 ponies off, but won’t blow up the engine or anything.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      http://www.fuelly.com/car/hyundai/elantra?engineconfig_id=30&bodytype_id=&submodel_id=

      vs base engine:

      http://www.fuelly.com/car/hyundai/elantra?engineconfig_id=13&bodytype_id=&submodel_id=

      vs honda civic turbo:

      http://www.fuelly.com/car/honda/civic?engineconfig_id=37&bodytype_id=&submodel_id=

      vs jetta turbo:

      http://www.fuelly.com/car/volkswagen/jetta?engineconfig_id=36&bodytype_id=&submodel_id=

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      Did you try the Eco version of the Elantra? It uses the same 7 speed DCT as the Sport, has the torquier 1.4T engine comes pretty well equipped and will pull well over 40 on the open road.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    $21K for a low-six second compact sedan that’s big enough for a family of four, has an acceptable suspension beneath it, and you can get a stick shift if you want. That’s really not bad at all, kudos Hyundai. A Jetta 1.8 seems comparable but no more manuals for that car.

    I’d prefer the sharper looking Kia Forte5, but if you want the 1.6 turbo there you’re looking at a $24K starting price with a $2200 upcharge for the manual transmission. Then its $27K, in which case UP YOURS KIA!

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “priced $5,100 below the top-spec Elantra Limited.”

    Once you drive it for 6 years, it will catch up. Because you have to replace those expensive tires.

    Looks good. But I think, MPGs could be better for 1.6L. And since they give it away for 20K, it is nice. In fact, I am gonna test drive it today or tomorrow. Looks like practical sedan with hint of good handling

  • avatar
    stuki

    Man, this reads like the review of a current day 3-series… Just substitute X-Ice for Run-Flats. At $21K, no wonder BMW is holding “scare-the-troops” tent meetings :)

  • avatar
    nels0300

    I bought one of these, base model with 6 speed manual, for $18.5K. Hyundai has $2.5K rebate, plus $750 off if you finance with them.

    What else can you get for $18.5K? Mazda3 with the 2.0L (NOT the 2.5L). VW Jetta 1.4T. Corolla IM. Civic 2.0L with plastic wheel covers. Seriously, plastic wheel covers or heated leather seats, android auto, HID lights, torquey turbo engine, good looks inside and out, and a great warranty?

    Can’t believe I’d ever say this, but I really, really like my Hyundai. MPG exceeds the ratings, I am getting 27 mpg during rush hour commutes and easily get over 30 mpg in lighter traffic.

    It is an unbelievably nice car for $18.5K.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      And 2-speed wipers (Civic)

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Transaction prices for a base Jetta are more like $15,000-16,000 these days, depending on what incentives you qualify for (ask the man who just bought one).

      But, yeah, the Sport looks like a great deal.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      For the money I’d go with a Fiesta ST, but understand why people would want this instead.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        FiST will be a better performance car, but I bet the Elantra would be a far better everyday driver – more room, quieter, better ride quality, etc. The FiST would have better handling dynamics, but the two cars’ overall performance envelopes appear to be pretty similar. Plus, I’ll go with the Elantra’s interior (and the infotainment system, in particular) as far superior to anything found in any Fiesta.

        Like Tim said, it’s kind of a junior-level GTI at an attractive price.

      • 0 avatar
        nels0300

        I have two kids in car seats, FiST is no-go.

      • 0 avatar
        axon890

        I currently have a FiST and damn is the NVH getting to me. It wasn’t bad when I had a 5 minute commute. But now it’s 20 minutes one way and I feel every slight imperfection in the road with the stock tires, even with a few more PSI than what’s on the door sill.

        I think it’s the short wheelbase because the four cars I had prior to the FiST had even bigger rims and about the same, if not smaller, sidewall profile.

        Going to go give this a test drive over the weekend. If the ride is better this will probably be what replaces the FiST.

        • 0 avatar
          bobmaxed

          Axon
          I own a 2015 FiST so I know about the NVH on the FIST. But it isn’t that hard to fix. When it comes time to replace the tires go to a 205/45-17 instead of the 205/40-17. That will help some. Then get some Koni STR.T REAR shocks and it’ll feel much better. A lot cheaper than buying a new car

  • avatar
    make_light

    I like this. A lot. I think it’s by far the best looking compact, and the sport model isn’t trying to be anything it’s not. The wheels are a little gaudy for my taste, but I feel like that’s an unfortunate trend everywhere. This will be high on my list for a new car next year. But I was in the back seat of the standard model recently, and the door panels felt shockingly cheap back there. I guess it’s not a huge deal in the scheme of things if the rest of the interior is up to par, but it felt inconsistent with the narrative of Hyundai’s huge quality gains.

  • avatar
    ACCvsBig10

    shoulda stuck the 2.0t from the sonata in there and make it like 235hp and probably still get the same gas mileage. then you have a gti/focus st competitor

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      We might see the 2.0T in the Elantra yet if Hyundai does an N-performance version, but if not, should get that 2.0T in the N-variant of the new Elantra GT (i30-N).

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Is this built on the i30 platform like the 2014-16 Elantra GT hatchback? If not, how do the two compare as far as the interior seating, legroom, etc. I’m rather smitten with the current hatch.

    I like the looks of the current GT more than the upcoming redesign, and I’m fine with the DI 2.0 engine. Just wondering if the sedan is better to “live” with.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      No, I believe it’s built on a newer platform, and it shows. It feels a lot more solid than the last-gen Elantras.

    • 0 avatar
      Mullholland

      This Elantra Sport is built on a newer platform than the current Elantra GT. The upcoming redesign will give the GT chassis and suspension some of the current Elantra’s mods. But I’m with you, I bought a 2015 Elantra GT in base trim and now have nearly 24,000 miles on the ODO. It’s been a great car. The combo of the 2.0L engine and the 6-speed Shiftronic make it a fun yet comfortable daily driver. And I agree with you on the visuals., Having seen pre-production versions of the new GT, I like the design of the exterior and the instrument panel much better on the existing car.

    • 0 avatar
      sacrat

      Hey Kvmdoom. I’m currently driving a 2014 Elantra GT and the ride feels very much “old Hyundai” (I’ve owned several). It is easily overwhelmed by undulating surfaces or uneven bumps. It actually feels disturbingly unsafe in some of these conditions. I’ve driven newer Elantras and Sonatas and they’ve adavanced light years.The Elantra Sport seats are too confining for my,um, generous girth. I will take a look at the 2018 Elantra GT when it arrives.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Kinda wish this car had been around last fall when I bought my new car…it’d have been a contender, for sure.

  • avatar
    TybeeJim

    Am I the only person on the planet that thinks this car is a copy of the Audi A3?

    • 0 avatar
      tylanner

      It looks decidedly Elantra-ish to me…but the ford focus sedan is the first thing that popped in to my head.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      It does have similar proportioning – particularly in that short rear deck. Hey, if you’re going to riff off another maker’s designs, you can do worse than Audi.

      • 0 avatar
        nels0300

        Exactly.

        I’d much rather have attractive, derivative styling than ugly and original (Civic).

      • 0 avatar
        sacrat

        This sort of thing happens all the time.Somehow Hyundai gets slammed for this while others get a pass.Check out first generation Genesis sedan tail lights compared to the then new 2013 Accord. No one called Honda out on that. And like FreedMike said, you could do a lot worse than referencing Audi in your styling.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Hyundai was doing the hexagonal grill thing before Audi and Audi is now angling its headlights more – like what Kia has been doing.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    This will be just the right amount of car for a lot of people and will prove to be an easy up-sell opportunity for dealers that already have someone in a $17,000-$19,000 Elantra. I suspect we will see a ton of these on the roads despite the mediocre performance across the board (mpg especially). Comparisons to other sport compacts will always end unfavorably for this car…except the price.

    Also, where do you find the $5,100 worth of Limited options to add to this?

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      A base limited costs slightly less than the Sport DCT MSRP-wise and you trade the engine and HID lights for dual-zone A/C chrome trim, and blind spot detection.

      They both offer a ~$2500 tech package for sunroof, fancy nav and stereo. In the Sport this gets you the passive safety. In the Limited it gives you butt-warmers in the back seat. The Ultimate on the Limited brings in active safety, which is the big (and overpriced IMO) difference.

      Personally, I think the base Sport is the best deal, with an argument to be made for sport with tech since it is a pretty good value for the equipment. Considering you have to step up to the top package on the limited to get the HIDs that come standard on the Sport, it makes the overall value even worse.

  • avatar
    scott25

    In Ontario at least, the Elantra is the ultimate “appliance” car, like the Camry is regarded in the US. The Corolla has the reliability reputation, the Civic is ubiquitous and has history in its name, whereas the Elantra is only bought by people, new and used, for whom cars don’t enter their minds ever, whatsoever. The definition of beige. I’m shocked when I see someone other than a 48 year old Asian woman driving an Elantra of any kind (it doesn’t happen often). So this will always have that stigma surrounding it.

    I consider the Elantra classically ugly, whereas it’s just sad and disposable looking, unlike modern ugly like the Civic is with all its vents and creases and nonsense proportions. Those wheels are atrocious also, like just about every Korean wheel design. The Forte SX also has awful wheels but at least it’s a better looking car, hopefully they continue it’s good looks when it gets the upgrades the Elantra has now in the next gen.

  • avatar
    ijbrekke

    It’s most direct competitor is probably the Civic Sport hatchback. The Civic has far less amenities and much more polarizing looks, but the price is almost identical and it carries the Honda brand equity that Hyundai aspires to.

    What I’ve read of the 1.6 engine, it’s always mentioned that it doesn’t feel like 201 hp. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Civic’s power “deficiency” is actually pretty evenly matched in real-world use.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Issue with the 1.6T is more the transmission. Hyundai programmed some pretty aggressive rev hang which kills shift times. The Forte5 SX with the 6AT is like 1.5 seconds faster to 60 than the 6MT version. It looks like Hyundai finally figured things out though as these are good for 60 in the low 6s with the manual.

  • avatar
    omer333

    One more reason to get the Elantra over the ST twins: cost of insurance. The Elantra’s premium in California is waaaay cheaper than the FoST, FiST, and WRX.

  • avatar
    MLS

    Nice to read that they’re decent cars nowadays, but “Elantra” is a truly bad name.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    “22 city / 30 highway / 25 combined”

    That’s ‘effing terrible. Especially for a subcompact car. My 9yr old V6 Altima does better than that. I get around 23 city, and well over 30 highway.

  • avatar
    Raevox

    The past year alone has shown, that the oft-forgotten (in review mags) Elantra is finally getting some attention. Especially with the favorable reviews, that at worst, get the “not bad” nod. In many cases, I keep reading that the Sport is “the” model to get because the IRS makes the overall ride and handling noticeably superior to the standard beam-axle model.

    There are two reasons why I skipped the Sport and just bought a Value Edition.

    One being that I simply needed a comfortable efficient and competent commuter car. Which it is. I’m averaging 32 MPG+ in mixed Bay Area commute driving.

    The second, is that I simply don’t trust dry-clutch DCT setups for any appreciable power [esp on a hot day], and they aren’t as smooth as a conventional automatic.

    Otherwise, I would have sprung for the Sport. However, I’m really happy with my Electric Blue V.E.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    Wouldn’t mind seeing this trim level in more of a sports wagon type configuration, something like the size of a 2005-2007 Impreza wagon. Neat car, I didn’t know this existed either.

  • avatar
    kevinl8888

    Completely agree. According to https://typeofcars.com/details/hyundai-elantra-2017 , the elantra is best not only in its compact cars class, but also the best Hyundai.


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