By on April 4, 2017

2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid

2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid

3.0-liter V6, SOHC (257 horsepower @ 6,300 rpm; 218 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm)

Three electric motors (119 hp; 217 lb-ft)

Combined output: 321 horsepower

Seven-speed dual-clutch transmission; all-wheel drive

26 city / 27 highway / 27 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

26.0 mpg (Observed)

Base Price: $52,935

As Tested: $58,975

Prices include $975 destination charge.

You might look at the 2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid and think, “Hmm … maybe it’s just me, but that looks a lot like the normal 2017 MDX.”

But don’t be fooled. This seven-passenger midsize SUV is just an incognito NSX; a tiger in Montessori parking lot camouflage. Hey, sometimes you have to ferry around the kids — and, holy God, have you ever tried hauling groceries in a two-seater? Those multiple trips eat into “you time.”

Okay, maybe that’s a bit of a stretch, but that’s what Acura wants you to think. Honda’s luxury division is in the midst of overhauling its image, and it’s doing so by injecting a little NSX into its products — both spiritually and mechanically. While that supercar, reborn as a hybrid last year following a decade’s absence, might seem totally removed from Acura’s popular — and tastefully refreshed — MDX, some familiar DNA appears beneath the new Sport Hybrid’s sheetmetal. (It also appears in the RLX sedan, if you weren’t aware.)

Oh, you’ll get better fuel economy with the MDX Sport Hybrid, but don’t talk to your friends about that. You bought it for the power. Capisce?

2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid

When it shows up on dealer lots later this month, Acura expects the MDX Sport Hybrid to woo a small but not insignificant number of buyers with the promise of guilt-free performance. Rather than following the tried-and-true route — shoehorn in a larger engine, or maybe strap on a turbocharger — Acura went a different direction. Why not use technology you already have on the shelf?

More specifically, why not use glitzy hybrid technology borrowed from a highly marketable mid-engine supercar?

That’s more or less what Acura has done here, only with the drivetrain configuration reversed. Instead of a gasoline engine and electric motor powering the rear wheels, with dual electric motors providing power to the front, it’s the opposite. The setup quickly sends torque to all four wheels, while boosting the power quotient well above a stock MDX. Combined fuel economy grows 28 percent over the gasoline-only all-wheel-drive model. Again, the all-but-invisible RLX Sport Hybrid boasts the same setup, albeit with a larger gas engine.

The question you might be thinking is, “Why bother?” All this hardware adds cost, and the MDX remains an exceptionally stable sales performer. Hybrids aren’t the easiest sell, either. Meaningful styling updates, on the other hand — like swapping out the much-loathed “shield” grille for a newly corporate “diamond pentagon” mouth for 2017 — seem like an easy way to save a seven-passenger SUV from wallflower status.

2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid

For the most part, yes. But the Sport Hybrid’s role is twofold. Foisting go-faster electrical bits aboard existing models might help Acura craft (or rekindle) a high-tech, high-performance image, but it also gives it an entry in a fledgling segment. One simply can’t leave the higher-end hybrid SUV field to Lexus, Infiniti, Volvo and zee Germans.

“In the premium segment, especially family SUVs, this is an emerging segment,” explained Gary Robinson, Acura’s product planning chief. “In one year, the size of the market has effectively doubled.”

Robinson’s referring to the likes of Lexus’ RX450h, Infiniti’s QX60, BMW’s X5 Xdrive 40e, Mercedes-Benz’s GLE 550e, and Volvo’s top-rung XC90 T8.

The automaker’s marketing eggheads are pretty sure they know exactly who’ll shell out for a MDX Sport Hybrid — affluent, young folks (in the premium SUV sense of the term) with one or two precocious offspring; the type who demand the kind of prestige that’s only delivered by technology, with those extra miles per gallon serving a lifestyle image first, and bank accounts a distant second. The added grunt serves any driver’s ego, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

“It’s not so much about puppies coming out of the third row seats,” said Jon Ikeda, Acura vice president and general manager, about the ads lined up to tout the Sport Hybrid’s performance prowess.

2017-acura-mdx-17

Even premium buyers aren’t immune to nickel and diming. Putting on its Hyundai hat, Acura figured a lowest-in-segment price might sweeten the pot — hopefully making the Sport Hybrid “the vehicle people think of,” said Robinson.

At $51,960 (plus a $975 destination charge), the vehicle’s base MSRP sits just $1,500 higher than the AWD gas model. The gap’s the same when both vehicles are outfitted with the ultra-lux Advance Package, and hybrid fuel economy gains could potentially erase that premium after a few years of ownership.

More importantly, this ute rings in at more than one-thousand clams below its Japanese competition, and five figures below its European rivals. Young Brayden and Brittany’s college fund applauds.

So, after flying us out to Seattle, Acura allowed us to stretch the MDX Sport Hybrid’s legs in the highly variable topography of the Pacific Northwest. First, we played spot the difference, drinks in hand, at a rave-like dining venue (you’re so trendy, Seattle). Minus the new grille, the meaner, creased face, the elegantly integrated tailpipes and interior wood — “crafted” wood, we were informed — there’s little to give away the hybrid system’s presence save for slightly more aggressive side sills, sport pedals, and small “Hybrid” badges borrowed from the RLX.

2017_acura_mdx_sport_hybrid_063

I suggested to Ikeda and Robinson that if the performance angle of the new powertrain is what Acura wants to flaunt, perhaps the model’s full name should appear on the fender — instead of the eco-weenie label of “Hybrid.” (I’m sure industry types just love this kind of advice.)

There may have been murmurings of what seemed like agreement from both men — for whatever reason, the badge was kept off the NSX after the RLX Sport Hybrid bowed — before a helpful PR manager quickly intervened to avoid any juicy quotes.

“We want the whole brand to be about performance,” said Acura’s PR head Matt Sloustcher. “The hybrid just brings things to a new level.”

Gotcha.

The drive up to a Snoqualmie Ridge country club provided ample opportunities to test the vehicle’s electrically bestowed torque vectoring, or so it should have, had slow-moving farm vehicles and torrential rain not turned the twisty roads into opportunities lost. Oh well, Washington State remains a charming place.

That’s not to say the triple-motor hybrid system didn’t do its job. It did, but it did so with a seamlessness that made it go unnoticed to the driver, which is what all engineers hope for.

06-powertrain-chassis-layout

Crawling away from a stop up an Everest-like incline in downtown Seattle, the twin motor unit driving the rear wheels brought us up the grade under oh-so-gentle throttle pressure; its combined 72 horsepower and 108 lb-ft of torque providing a gentle push. You could expect greater distance on flat ground, with the twin motors (connected via a one-way clutch) drawing as much range as throttle input will allow from the 1.3 kWh battery pack — “Intelligent Power Unit” in Acura parlance — located under the front seats.

While cruising down the I-90 back to the city, we noticed the tach needle suddenly fall to zero at speeds below 55 mph, with no impact on forward momentum. It’s small interventions like these where the Sport Hybrid makes its economy gains. Rated at 26 miles per gallon city, 27 highway and 27 combined, the hybrid MDX tops its gas-guzzling sibling by 8 mpg in the city, 1 mpg in the city, and 5 mpg combined. We hit 26 mpg for the trip.

If you’re curious to see where all that juice is flowing in real-time, simply bring up the power delivery schematic on the SUV’s upper media screen.

Strap on a lead boot (like when passing slow-moving farm vehicles), and everything joins the party. The 47 hp electric motor built into the seven-speed dual-clutch transmission — which works as the starter — comes online, along with a 3.0-liter V6 that’s smaller and lighter than the stock MDX’s 3.5-liter unit. Gas-only power equals 257 hp and 218 lb-ft.

2017_acura_mdx_sport_hybrid_1079

In an all-motor dance, the Sport Hybrid taps a combined 321 hp and 289 lb-ft. Compare that to the stock rig’s 290 hp and 267 lb-ft, saddled with all the power delivery delays inherent with gasoline engines and automatic transmissions (in this case, a nine-speed).

There is one significant drawback to this vehicle, though it’s easily solved by purchasing a stock all-wheel-drive MDX. The Sport Hybrid won’t tow. Sorry, ecologically sensitive, power-hungry boaters. (Acura claims less than 8 percent of buyers in this segment ever bother to hitch up, so it’s not likely to break many deals.)

Throughout the drive, power and responsiveness felt natural and substantial, and the cross members straddling the vehicle’s battery and power control unit (PCU) lend extra stiffness to an already well-composed structure. It’s just a pleasant-riding vehicle. Road craters and fissures, while harder to find in this temperate region, didn’t overtax the Sport Hybrid’s active damping system, which Acura claims boosts ride comfort to the tune of 25 percent. Having an extra 220 lbs of gear below the floorboards also lowers the vehicle’s center of gravity, improving balance and handling.

Make no mistake — you’re not likely to see a 39-year-old family man drifting this rig through the Bed Bath and Beyond parking lot anytime soon. Still, there are four soft-through-sporty driving modes to choose from, including Sport+, should that father of two (or one) feel like stiffer steering, more damping and maximum power delivery. In Sport+, the engine stays on continuously to feed the battery. As Ikeda told me, sometimes your wife is driving, and sometimes you’re driving.

Age and responsibility has a way of taming the urge to cut loose, but that button remains just aft of the push-button shifter should those rebellious feelings arise. Meanwhile, you’re just riding in a top-rated premium midsize SUV with plenty of comfort, extra power, and greater fuel economy. Even if that fender badge doesn’t scream it, you’ve reached a good spot in your life.

2017 acura mdx sport hybrid

[Images: Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars; Honda North America]

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58 Comments on “2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid First Drive Review – Power to the Little People...”


  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Looks well implemented even though I have no interest in this class of vehicle. That front end, though…oof. It’s horrible, simultaneously bland and revolting. Should have stuck with the beak. I hope this isn’t the face of the refreshed TLX.

    “The drive up to a Snoqualmie Ridge country club provided ample opportunities to test the vehicle’s electrically bestowed torque vectoring, or so it should have, had slow-moving farm vehicles and torrential rain not turned the twisty roads into opportunities lost.”

    This is why I a have a 4Runner instead of a GTI. We have good roads, but you are lucky to get two good turns before the next slowpoke.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    Ugh. just when I thought Acura’s new design language would be more attractive, they go and prove me wrong with this thing.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    Sorry Acura – but that nose is still ugly.

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      Much much uglier than before. I think they need to make the Acura badge a little bigger…

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Sorry, disagree. Speaking as an Acura owner – i.e., in recent years, a frequent vomiter – this grille is a vast improvement by omission over the incomparably despicable Beak. You have no idea how long and how futilely we’ve railed to Acura to get rid of that accursed thing.

      This is positively cause for celebration (not to mention a marketing necessity for Acura, now that they’ve basically played hand-me-down by inflicting beak-like noses onto Honda models including the Accord).

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I agree on the ugliness. I also miss the boxy look. All those softened edges, really just make it look routine, instead of somewhat unique.

      And the grill with the big emblem? Seems like a Cadillac move. Never thought I’d say this, but I miss the old (formerly ugly) grill.

      • 0 avatar
        Nellakwah

        I agree – it is overdone. By the time the current RDX (which I have), TLX and pre-refresh MDX were out, I actually think they figured out how to tone down the beak enough – they are fine to me, and not the first thing I see (it’s the headlights). I think it was just the previous iterations that were so hideous and that taste has stayed in people’s mouths because the lineage can still be seen.

        This new one is neither distinctive or original.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      When I first saw the ads, I thought it was a Buick.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Those multiple trips eat into you time.”

    Typo.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Face looks related to the C-HR. That *can’t* be praise.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Still ugly, but the impressive MPG and nice interior would interest me if you could tow with it. Shame, I’m curious why the engineers don’t think it is suitable for a task that just about all vehicles in this class can do. We will be looking to replace our Enclave in the next few years. This would be very compelling but we tow a boat and a small cargo trailer at least once a month.

  • avatar
    deanst

    “Road craters and fissures, while harder to find in this temperate region, didn’t overtax the Sport Hybrid’s active damping system, which Acura claims boosts ride comfort to the tune of 25 percent.”

    I hope you asked them what is the standard unit of measurement for comfort. These advances in science are hard to keep up with!

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    “Road craters and fissures, while harder to find in this temperate region”

    Since “temperate” just means you get both witch’s tit and satan’s crotch within an average year, craters and fissures are all over *my* temperate region.

    So, is the ride Buick cushy or no?

    • 0 avatar
      Steph Willems

      In Comfort and Normal mode, you might recognize the ride (assuming you’re used to a *new* Buick). Stiffens up in Sport, Sport+, which I wouldn’t expect to see too many people make use of.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Steph, amid all this powertrain news, this “crafted wood” mention isn’t to be overlooked.

        While some Canadian Acuras have sported real wood, there’s been none available in the U.S. on any Acura model for years. Are you saying the hybrid version has real wood? And if so, is that the only version that has it?

        • 0 avatar
          Steph Willems

          All 2017 MDX variants come with real wood – a choice of it, in fact. And it’s nice wood. I fondled that grain for a while after a driver change.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            You got me curious enough to look it up.

            The short version: Wood is an option.

            The long version: The MDX comes in three trim levels, called Standard, Advance and Technology. The latter two come with a choice of two real wood veneers. Evidently the Standard’s is still fake. This is, at least, better than the “leatherette” upholstery in the base Acura RLX “Luxury Flagship Sedan starting at $54,450.”

        • 0 avatar
          tlccar

          No. Currently the 2017 MDX Advance models in the U.S. have real wood trim and it has been very well-received.

          I love the nastiness on here about the grille….get rid of the beak, keep the beak, it was nice, its ugly, the new one is ugly, WTF is wrong with everyone? I know these forums are for opinions and such, but the Acura bashing is getting old and tired.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            “WTF is wrong with everyone?”

            Nothing. Acura replaced an ugly design language with a worse one. The reaction is shocking only to apologists.

            I look at the last picture in this review and think “WTF is wrong with Acura?”.

      • 0 avatar
        OldManPants

        “(assuming you’re used to a *new* Buick)”

        Thanks. So it’s as I feared.

  • avatar
    993cc

    Why is it that hybrids can’t tow?

    I own a Tdi now, specifically because of its combination of carbon efficiency and towing ability. Obviously this will not be possibility in the future, and I will always need to tow occasionally.

    Is there a technical reason why Hybrids can’t be made to tow, at least a light load? Or do they only not exist because drivers who tow mostly don’t care about climate impacts?

    • 0 avatar
      Halftruth

      Something to do with the available braking power in and out of regen mode. If a battery is fully charged, regen is turned off and std braking is applied. What I don’t know is if the available brakes are simply not rated for towing loads. I could be wrong but feel free to correct me here.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The base model’s foundation brakes are almost certainly used on the Hybrid so I don’t see them as a limiting factor. Also it is possible to use the motor(s) for braking even if the battery is fully charged.

      • 0 avatar
        993cc

        In which case a simple fix would involve some sort of secondary braking system for making long descents down mountains or such, or as a backup in case the service brakes overheat. In a system like Toyota’s HSD, or GM’s Voltec, a brake band around part of the power split device could divert the energy coming from the wheels to the engine, rather than the motor/generator, causing something very much like engine braking as we use it now.

        It seems a small price to pay, to have access to an entire market of occasional tow-ers. I’ll be damned if I’ll buy an extra crossover just for the once a month I need to hook up my utility trailer, or tow the small boat that I don’t own yet.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The Escape Hybrid was rated to tow, but only 1000 lbs. You can bet the upcoming F150 Hybrid will also be rated for towing.

      • 0 avatar
        Steph Willems

        Acura says in *most* situations, it uses regenerative braking to slow the vehicle. Friction braking kicks in below 9 mph.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I think you misunderstood that, it is the regen braking that stops at 9mph. The amount of braking for regen braking can generate is proportional to the vehicle speed so it is largely ineffective at low speeds. I guarantee that the friction brakes are engaged at speeds higher than 9mph if the pedal is depressed far enough. Regen braking is limited in how much force it can apply and won’t stop a vehicle quickly on its own.

    • 0 avatar
      stevep2000

      If the tesla model x can handle towing (albeit limited to the reduced travel distance from increased load), then there is NO reason the MDX couldn’t be made to tow. More likely they did not want to design the hybrid components to be regularly submerged in salt water, and/or they are covering the standard hitch mounts areas with hybrid components and didn’t want to be bothered with finding a work-around.

      For me, this is indeed a hybrid deal-breaker. I’ve been waiting ten years for Acura to finally enter the market with a hybrid MDX. But it’s a darn SUV, and it needs to behave like a UTILITY vehicle. And while I may not need to tow often, like MANY other SUV owners, I do use the hitch for a bike rack and a cargo rack. My snowblower sure as heck isn’t fitting into the back of the MDX, and a hitch carrier is the only solution. And if I’ve got my cargo box on the roof, the bikes can only go on the hitch rack. VERY short-sighted Acura!

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    I don’t know what it is about Acura but I just can’t get excited (or even mildly interested enough to check out their website) about them.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Unlike the other mid / full-sized luxury hybrid SUVs, this one’s a no-brainer for the price premium, and added performance. It’s the one I’d get, were I in the market for an MDX.

    • 0 avatar
      Steph Willems

      MDX>MKT?

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I would definitely say so. Never mind that the MKT is the SUV version of my own MKS, I really don’t like how the split-wing grille was implemented on the MKT. The MKT does have the better interior. But I find the MDX to be the better-handling of the two, and better styled as well…even with the shield grille.

        Really, though, I’d get an XC90—which is also FWD-based and in that same price range—over both of those.

        • 0 avatar
          ZCD2.7T

          Have you actually driven the XC90? To me, it looks WAY better than it drives…

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I have, in T6 AWD guise. I thought it handled better than my X5. Owing to your namesake, a real shocker in terms of midsized-SUVs-that-handle-surprisingly-well is the current MKX with the 2.7TT. I quite liked that one. Of course, it’s not a three-row vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          ZCD2.7T

          I drove our Q5 TDi (yeah, I know, but it’s a great vehicle) over to test-drive the XC90, and while the Volvo’s design is nice, the driving experience was underwhelming, particularly the ride. It “clomped” over bumps that the Q5 doesn’t even notice. I also drove one with the air suspension, and while better in that regard, it still doesn’t approach the Q5’s refinement.

          I also felt chassis quivers (and I’m not the only one who’s noticed this) that are out of place in a luxury vehicle regardless of price…

          IMO, of course.

          What year is your X5?

        • 0 avatar
          ZCD2.7T

          What did you think of the ride quality of the XC90, or for that matter, of your X5?

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    I’ve had several MDX Advances as loaners while getting our cars serviced, and while it’s nice, I can’t shake the feeling that for nearly $60k it should be nicer. Not necessarily an indictment of Acura, because I realize it’s basically the value play in its segment, but I just couldn’t stomach spending this much money on any of these “compact 3-row CUVs.” Call me old or out of touch, but in my mind once you crest the $50k barrier, you should get something spectacular. This is too prosaic.

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      MDX is mid-sized, no? Still not saying it’s worth $60K, but the MDX isn’t playing in the X3/GLC/NX class.

    • 0 avatar
      Nellakwah

      I can see where you’re coming from. We almost went with an MDX instead of the RDX, but couldn’t stomach spending $50k on it (or any car, really). This hyrbid w/the tech package is a great value relative to competition at $52k….but it’s still a lot of money. The problem is the practical side of my brain knows I can get two nicely equipped cars for $25k, if the need was there.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, since people who buy these aren’t interested in fuel economy per se, maybe it makes sense to push it as a performance enhancer.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    This is one of the ones I have been waiting for. Unlike the RX from Lexus this gives you the option (even if small) to carry 7 folks. I am not ready yet but if I were this is what I would get.
    However with that being said I still pray for my unicorn of a Flex diesel/hybrid before they kill it off in three years.

  • avatar
    DearS

    I like looks just fine, reminds me of a Honda or a VW. Expensive, but SUVs are pretty expensive.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    52 grand base.
    Man I’m getting old.
    That’s how much my first house cost.

  • avatar
    someoldfool

    Ugly? Looks positively charming compared to any Lexus. Toyota has achieved the impossible — make a vehicle better looking with a license plate on the front than without.

  • avatar

    That new front end design makes me actually long for the beak. And I never thought I would say that.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    Kudos to Acura for bringing out this technological tour de force.

    The article is, I am sorry, very poorly put together. Please head over to C&D to get a better write-up.

    There is genuine direct cross-pollination with the NSX hardware here and that should be discussed. The NSX makes alot more sense with this vehicle launch. Are there any other brands that have high-performance cars that share key hardware with mainstream models? This is huge.

    The TLX needs this power-train ASAP (but with the 3.5 310hp gas engine).

    The 7 speed DCT with integrated electric motor deserves its own write-up.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Oh man. This vehicle could have been custom-made for me. Three rows, well-equipped, pretty refined, and we love our hybrids (idling with engine off FTW). But $51k ($56k with Advance) is just too pricey. Maybe in two years I can get a certified one at a price I can swallow.

    (After test-driving what turned out to be a very good local example, I decided not to buy a Lincoln MKT. It wasn’t as refined as I remembered, and the nice interior materials felt too much like a surface veneer. My expectations have been reset by driving an LS460 for two years.)

  • avatar
    Fordson

    I get that the claim here is superior throttle response, for the most part, but the actual difference in power-to-weight ratio is 14.02 lb/hp for the hybrid vs. 14.73 lb/hp for the gas-engine model, if you use C&D’s weight estimate of 4500 lb. for the hybrid compared to 4273 for the ICE-only model.

    Not really that much – the torque-to-weight difference between the two is even smaller than that.

    Also, the electric motors decouple at 84 mph – they’re hitting their 10K rpm redline. From then on, if you keep your foot down, you’re pushing 4500 lbs with only 218 lb/ft of torque. Yeah, I understand this is not that common a scenario with this class of vehicle.

    I’m a lot more susceptible to the very likely mpg increases rather than the “ooh…NSX powertrain!” marketing pitch.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I guess if you can’t make headlight lense covers last, make them look foggy and hazed from new?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Hey, just realized you can see my office window in that picture of downtown Seattle! Next time stop by for a beer.

  • avatar
    EX35

    I can’t think of a better place to park $60k than on a tarted up Pilot.

  • avatar
    Coolcar2

    Friends of mine have a 2015 loaded MDX after trading in their Mercedes 2008 GL450. The things they like about the Acura are the efficient space utilization and the comfortable ride, but the convoluted technology (two screen interface, overly aggressive chimes and warnings from all safety tech) have them turning in their lease early to go back to Mercedes. Do people actually want all of these safety systems that seem to just anger the owners? Of course the systems can’t be permanently turned off. I think luxury brands are now struggling to justify the premium price with technology since many mainstream brands offer similar tech on lesser vehicles. If you want a loaded premium brand vehicle you now have to struggle with all of the safety aids that come along with the price.


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