By on March 8, 2017

2017 Toyota Prius

2017 Toyota Prius Hybrid

1.8-Liter Atkinson-cycle-style inline-4, DOHC, VVT (95 hp @ 5,200 rpm; 105 lb-ft @ 3,600 rpm)

Permanent magnet AC synchronous motor (71 hp; 120 lb-ft)

Hybrid system net power: 121 hp

Electronically-controlled Continuously Variable Transmission, front-wheel drive

54 city / 50 highway / 52 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

4.6 city / 4.4 highway / 4.5 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

49 mpg / 4.8L/100km (Observed)

Base Price: $25,575 (U.S.) / $28,980 (Canada)

As Tested: $28,975 (U.S.) / $34,290 (Canada)

Prices include $890 destination charge in the United States and $1,790 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada.

Attentive readers will have, by now, recognized that my automotive choices tend to run towards the, shall we say, flamboyant side. Our family daily is an inky-black Dodge Charger with a vanity plate which is guaranteed to enrage bumper-ogling Methodists. New, oversized rims are scheduled to be fitted the minute all this snow goes away. Meanwhile, the Ram 1500 with which the Charger shares driveway space is painted Look-At-Me Red, accented garishly nicely with chrome 20-inch rims. I drove a Lincoln Mark VII with an uncorked exhaust for many years. My neighbours love me.

So what am I doing in a Prius when my tastes tilt to the extrovert end of the spectrum? Well, it’s always fun to see how the other half lives, and in this case, I wanted to see how the thing would fare on a 1,000-mile journey in the dead of winter.

2017 Toyota Prius

If I sought winter conditions to test the Prius, then the Canadian East Coast did not disappoint. The day before I was scheduled to leave, well over two feet of cold and misery fell from the sky, blanketing everything in a deep white power and making the place look like a record producer’s office. The Prius would be out of its element, then.

For 2017, the Prius’ Hybrid Synergy Drive combines the output of its gasoline engine and two motors/generators that shuttle power to its front wheels through an electronically controlled CVT. This shift-by-wire technology is controlled by an odd dash-mounted shifter, which sprouts from beneath the climate controls like an errant Atari joystick. The 1.8-litre four-cylinder gasoline engine makes 95 horsepower and runs on regular fuel while working in concert with the hybrid system to create a peak combined power output of 121 hp.

2017 Toyota Prius

Spread out before the driver is a digital buffet of data, simultaneously creating some great information displays and odd ergonomic excrescences. Speed and hybrid system details are presented in large Day-Glo readouts; this, I like. But the array of warning lights that are actually closer to the passenger than the driver? Not so much. A large touchscreen in the centre stack controls audio and nav functions, and will be familiar to any modern Corolla driver.

Our tester was equipped in mid-range trim and delivered niceties such as rain sensing wipers, Softex (read: leather) seats, and a nifty heads-up display. The HUD was quite useful and offered a multitude of different displays, such as clear and animated navigation info that would usurp the planet-saving admonishments when necessary. The seats were astonishingly comfortable, definitely fit for 12-hour stints behind the wheel. This is significantly more than I can say for the driver’s door mounted armrest, whose surface is the only substance on the planet harder than a diamond. It wasn’t long into the trip that I stuffed my winter toque under my elbow to forestall discomfort.

2017 Toyota Prius

An oddity in the Prius’ interior was its emergency brake. An old-fashioned foot pump, and not a modern electric unit, seemed extremely out-of-place in such a futuristic car. It was not unlike strolling onto the bridge of the Enterprise and finding Captain Picard tending to a wood stove.

The wind-cheating exterior shape of the Prius is, like haggis or cod tongues, an acquired taste. Its convoluted assemblage of sharp angles and flat surfaces assure drivers they won’t lose it in a parking lot. Suddenly, then, the Prius appears on this extrovert’s radar in terms of outrageous looks, particularly the soaring lightsabre taillights.

2017 Toyota Prius

Think what you will of Toyota’s latest sojourn into creative styling cues, but at least we’re talking about them. The previous-generation Prius had some interesting design choices, especially compared to the original Prius. In Gen-2, it was as if your sedate math teacher suddenly started wearing Under Armour hoodies and turning his cap backwards. The effort was made but it was still easy to catch a whiff of Ben-Gay. With the current Prius, that same math teacher went and got two tattoo sleeves and a nose ring. It’s extroverted, jarring, and controversial.

It’s worth noting the 2017 Prius features modern lithium-ion batteries and not nickel-metal hydride units in all but base trim, nixing arguments that building a Prius involves the messy matter of mining nickel out of the earth’s crust and shipping it to a factory halfway around the world.

I expected a Spartan experience in the Prius, mixed with a heavy dose of granola. It would not have surprised me if the Prius required me to wear a multi-ethnic, nuclear-free, world-peace burlap sack to realize any sort of meaningful efficiency. In reality, I enjoyed comfortable leather seats, satellite radio, all manner of USB connections for my tunes, and large sunroof. My own Look-At-Me truck is equally equipped with these features.

2017 Toyota Prius

The Prius acquitted itself well on the journey, handling like a typical front-drive hatchback in the snow (again, the lack-of-sacrifice theme emerges). Zipping through the French delights of Montreal, the Prius needed some hard prods of the go-pedal to keep up with traffic, causing the CVT to zing up in the power peak and stay there, creating an unpleasant mechanical moo.

Some back-of-napkin math revealed an astounding fuel-economy average of 49 miles per gallon (4.8L/100km), consuming 20.9 gallons (79 liters) of regular fuel over 1,028 miles (1,655 km). This dented my debit card to the tune of $84.51 CAD ($63.08 USD at the time of writing). I employed no hypermiling techniques and made liberal use of the defroster and heated seats. A few years ago, I did this same trip in a Fiat 500 Turbo, achieving an efficiency of 33 mpg (7.2L/100km).

2017 Toyota Prius

Will a Prius be joining my fleet of over-the-top machinery? Hardly. But I will concede it left me surprised by the lack of demanded sacrifice to achieve stellar fuel economy numbers in less than ideal conditions. Some Prius owners might be supremely smug and annoying, but I certainly came away with a different opinion of the car itself. It’s easy to make fun of nerds, yet, at the end of the day, they’re often the ones who think outside the box and create something popular … and make a ton of money doing it.

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68 Comments on “2017 Toyota Prius Review – Don’t Make Fun of the Nerds...”


  • avatar
    sirwired

    So… err… how did it actually drive? I wouldn’t expect the sort of data you gather when driving the car like it’s on a track (’cause, you know, it’s a Prius), but “I felt like I was going to die while merging onto busy highways”, or “gusty winds didn’t phase the handling”, etc. might have been nice.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If I had a silly long commute and wanted to do it as cheaply as possible I would entertain one of these as a daily driver just to see how cheaply I could drive it into oblivion and how many years/miles I could get out of it.

    Otherwise it has zero appeal to me.

    But I will say I’ve never talked to an owner who was unhappy with their Prius and I saw a Gen 1 Echo based version on the highway just a few days ago.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      I don’t understand why people put up with long commutes in sh1tty efficient penalty box cars. I refuse to spend 1/8th of my day in a car. In my city, a lot of the real estate costs (commutes) are associated with ‘bad’ schools. The ‘bad’ schools still qualify their curriculum, it’s just demographic / economic disparity that shows up in standardized tests. They’re not ‘bad,’ it’s just a population that is harder wrought. I’m not living in a mcmansion and spending money on some overpriced private POS school because I’m an idiot with statistics while contemplating suicide for 1/8th of my waking life. Shoot me and put me in the ground. The world is fake.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        virtue signaling? they want to show how much they care by driving a Prius on their 50-mile commute. Because moving closer to where they work is just out of the question.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Unfortunately moving closer to where they work is out of the question for many people. Either homes are too expensive, schools are less than desirable or in the case of my area right now there just isn’t any inventory of homes for sale. That means some people who would like to move are unwilling to list their house for fear of not being able to find a replacement.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            the people I’m thinking of not only don’t move closer to work, they move further and further away. and complain about how much driving they have to do.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            Blow money in rent and wait. Money isn’t everything in life. Time well spent is.

            I just bought a house on the exact street that I wanted to live when I first moved to town 2 years ago. Sure, I paid over 25k in rent, but good things are worth waiting and paying for. Never settle.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          People make these choices for a multitude of reasons. When I got married and we decided to start a family, my little bungalow in the city wasn’t going to cut it and buying a bigger house in the area was too expensive. So we built a bigger house 15 miles out and yes the commute sucks at times. But we have more land to play and suburban streets to ride bikes around. It’s safer for the kids, and perhaps once they’re off and married we’ll move back into town for the convenience or better yet another 100 miles out to the country since I came from a small town and prefer the quiet as I get older. I can see the symphony and ballet and baseball and football on our 75″ TV with surround sound.

          The Prius V was one of my semi-finalists – it was plenty roomy and had a decent cargo hold. I just wanted something a little taller. But getting 40-44 miles per gallon is very attractive to me – it’s a question of saving resources.

          And yes my kid goes to private school, not to avoid the riff-raff, but because the school she attends was best suited to meet her unique needs. Our neighborhood school would have been fine otherwise.

      • 0 avatar
        Willyam

        Mi Amigo,
        You’re a candidate for a little show called “Adam Ruins Everything”. It’s awesome.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Sheeple love ignoring reality while playing with iGadgets or getting sloshed or compulsively eating or whatever…

          Truth/facts/scientific method sets one free.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            …or heel-and-toeing…

            Seriously, guys. Don’t be all high and mighty, complaining about Prius drivers playing their video dashboard game while in traffic–while so many here do the same thing, but instead pretending that the off-ramp is a race track and trying to execute that perfect heel and toe maneuver.

            No doubt while making racecar noises.

            Life in traffic isn’t a game–not for the Prius drivers, not for the wannabe race car drivers.

      • 0 avatar
        Willyam

        The engineer in me agrees with you, while the little kid in me…

        Yeah, if I ever find myself in the two-hour a day commute situation again (bad economy, big state, cheaper than moving) I’m getting only one car. Avalon.

        My parents have had two of the things, and it’s essentially an isolation tank on wheels that gets 30+.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          I swore up and down I was going to drop a Coyote in a Crown Vic if I had to commute that long. I agree – any full size isolation chamber would be the only way to go. Thank you for the show recommendation.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        That’s just like your opinion man. (FYI the reviewer did say the seats are fabulous.)

        I’m speaking for myself. Personally I wouldn’t do such a thing. (Have a ridiculous commute that is.)

        I do get a laugh at my BIL and SIL who fret about the state of the schools in the area in which they live in TN. Currently their little darling is going to a Christian preschool. Neither one of the parents has likely been in a church of any kind since the last family wedding or funeral. (Although his Daddy is a pastor’s child.)

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          The seats better jerk me off or help me with furthering my education or give me a 45-60 min cardio work out because that’s how I’d rather spend my time than sitting in traffic.

          • 0 avatar
            suspekt

            The Prius is actually a total pleasure in traffic. Its silent and creeps along in total peace. I really enjoyed the Gen 2 Prius I had for a few years. Looking back, it was the best car for a commute.

            The low drag co-efficient at high speeds and electric only creeping in stop and go traffic made it a very peaceful commute environment.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        tresmonos, not all long commutes are equally bad. A somewhat scenic low-stress drive for 45 minutes isn’t too bad while I find spending the same time looking at concrete while stuck in congested stop-and-go traffic to be very stressful. School performance is more closely correlated to the students and their parents than money spent or the quality of the teachers. Schools with a large percentage of students from apartments tend to be bad. Schools with a large percentage of Asian students tend to be very good. Some parents push their kids to do well in school and others don’t.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          I agree about good commutes. I had one in the mountains of the upstate of SC (although still short – <30 minutes). When I would see post card quality scenery on my drive to or from work, it was uplifting.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Tresmonos, I’m not going to give up my job or move away from my kid in order to live up to your standards of authenticity or whatever.

        I completely agree with your statement as phrased: You indeed do not understand. Let’s just leave it at that.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          tonycd –

          Sure there are reasons such as custody, family burdens, etc. that keep people geographically tethered. Most reasons I have been witness to are controllable. And manufactured.

          Looks like I struck a nerve. Enjoy that commute today.

          • 0 avatar
            cgjeep

            I’m 13 miles from my work but that is easily a 40 minute commute inDC area traffic. But it is my guilty pleasure. I have twin 7 year old boys and am constantly on the run. The 40 commute is my private alone time to drink coffee and listen to a book on the stereo. I’m far enough along in my career that it doesn’t matter if I’m a little late so the traffic doesn’t stress me out. Food shopping is my other guilty pleasure now. Oh and getting the tires rotated. Tire place in same shopping center as a coffee shop. With 3 cars I’m there 9 times a year. Kids change you.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            I can see that. I’d just rather fill it with exercise so I can keep my bag of deficient bones alive longer for them.

          • 0 avatar
            Flipper35

            I have a 25 minute commute one way. Nice two lane through trees and fields. I could move a lot closer and have a 25 minute commute one way through concrete.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I wouldn’t say this car counts as a penalty box. Even most of the subcompact cars actually have merits apart from price and fuel economy that can make them desirable to plenty of people. Well, perhaps not the Yaris.

        Besides, some people get a thrill out of hypermiling and seeing how little fuel they can use. My best friend had a Fusion Energi from Oct 2015 to Feb 2017, and used to try and get as many all-electric miles as possible, and to keep his lifetime MPG up. Now, he has a 2017 Volt and really likes playing the fuel-efficiency games.

        Nevertheless, as Guy laid out for us, this Prius a car that’s perfectly comfortable and livable. In general, the appeal of the Prius has been the fact that it’s a spacious, everyday car that will nevertheless deliver low-40-MPG fuel economy at a minimum. Only recently, in my mind, has the styling turned toward unpalatable.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      In that scenario I’d probably do a used GS450h and live with the MPG difference.

      I like the Infiniti options too, but I’m not sure if their hybrid system is any good from a durability standpoint. So few are sold, I’m guessing there is no reliable data on it.

      Barring that, I’d maybe look into (*whisper it*) a diesel.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @ajla I do wonder what the TCO would be for a nicely optioned Cruze diesel in a super long commute situation. I had read somewhere that GM was going to offer a longer free subscription period to OnStar and Sirius radio with each Cruze diesel sold. That would make it more attractive.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          My brother has an Accord Hybrid – mileage is in the high 40s and sometimes crosses into the 50s. A penalty box car that is not, its a total normal (looking) and driving mid-size car.

          This current gen Prius is in a battle with Civic Type R for Japanese transformer of year award when it comes to over designed angles, creases and winglets. So much ugly here.

          • 0 avatar
            kychungkevin

            My wife works as sale in NYC and require to drive her car everywhere. It is 35 minute drive one way from our home without traffic or 70 minute+ every work day. If we move anywhere closer we would be living in tiny 2 bedroom (or less) apartment with no garage and worst school.

            In our case the city mpg is very important and can’t be an old beater that could break down in the middle of traffic. A Prius make sense here; although I rejected it cause of the style and got her Sonata Hybrid instead; but I wouldn’t question other people with our situation driving Prius.

          • 0 avatar
            sckid213

            @JMII, I would throw the new Eclipse Cross into that battle. Some more shots of it were revealed yesterday and the back end immediately reminded me of…this gen Prius :-(

  • avatar
    cartime

    Sorry, but no one is thinking “Look-At-Him” when they see you in your truck. A dodge, I mean Ram, is every bit invisible as a Prius.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Depends on where you live. In SC and KY, my bare bones work truck and cowboy boots have aided to my participation in ‘relations.’

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      http://blogsdir.cms.rrcdn.com/91/files/2016/06/2016-Mopar-Ram-Rebel-3.jpg

      http://media.wheels.ca/vehicles/1974/1821449/2015-Ram-1500-1821449-1-sm.jpg

      If that is invisible to you then you’re blind.

      • 0 avatar
        cartime

        The dude is in the Maritimes. If you ain’t driving a truck people be wondering.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        An orange Prius with racing stripes would attract far more attention in Western Canada, as it is a much rarer vehicle to begin with and, unlike a truck, people don’t expect Prius drivers to attach fifteen pieces of flair to their vehicles.

        I think the average person would notice an orange Ram in the same way they notice a yellow Cavalier; there’s a disconnect between the flashy color and the common vehicle underneath.

        Red hasn’t been an unusual automotive color throughout most of my life. I wouldn’t look twice at a stock red Ram with chrome wheels. The Laramies have included silly chrome plastic wheels as stock items for years, so that look is normalized. But red certainly does stand out a bit more than the typical dreary colors that are currently popular, so I think Mr. Guy’s description is fitting enough for this period.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    A boring, ugly appliance for those who find cars a necessary evil.
    .
    .

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Poked around in one at the dealer recently and it is certainly the nicest Prius yet. That’s a bit of a smartest-kid-on-the-short-bus argument, but the dash pad is now soft-touch, the steering wheel is nice to hold, the digital displays look only 10 years old now instead of 30, and the seat was fairly comfortable despite some lingering Toyota-esque driver ergonomics going on still. Just let the steering wheel telescope another 2 inches, how hard is it to do that, Toyota?

    So it sips fuel nicely on your long commute but still isn’t that pleasant a place to spend it otherwise. The liftback form factor is still a winner, though.

  • avatar
    Pete Skimmel

    I don’t care so much about the car, but Mr. Guy’s writing is delightful. Thank you sir for an entertaining review.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      As a long-time Prius owner, I found this article pretty useless.

      It was mostly about the author’s prejudices against the car and the people who own it, and his failure to reexamine them over the 16+ years the car has been available in North America.

      He took a Prius on a road trip and it didn’t suck. Not a big surprise to anyone who’s ever given the car a fair shake, or measured it against its intended purpose. And, yet, he’s still convinced that the car is a “coexist” bumper sticker with four wheels, even though he seems to know about as little about Prius as he does about the people who own and love this car.

      I didn’t find this article to be delightful. I found it to be a tedious examination of the author’s ignorance about cars not in his driveway. He made a little progress, but 90% of his journey is still ahead of him. And we haven’t really started talking about the car, yet.

      P.S. I deliberately used the word “own” to describe the driver’s relationship with the Prius. It’s an owner’s car, not a driver’s car. VWs are driver’s cars — I’ve owned both VW and Toyota, and I prefer an owner’s car.

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    “An oddity in the Prius’ interior was its emergency brake. An old-fashioned foot pump, and not a modern electric unit, seemed extremely out-of-place in such a futuristic car.”

    I vaguely recall reading that an electronic brake requires power to remain open. So if the battery dies, the brakes clamp down, preventing the car from rolling away. Since a mechanical brake doesn’t draw power, it helps the Prius with its overall mission.

    Score one for the wood stove!

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      The electric parking brake in my CR-V is just a motor (it just bolts onto the caliper) I can hear it whir every time I park.

      And the thing has an electric booster also, and I don’t think it fails like that either; I’ve read the failsafe mode, and it’s just a passthrough (same thing that happens if a vac booster fails.)

  • avatar
    philipwitak

    re: “I drove a Lincoln Mark VII with an uncorked exhaust for many years.”

    nothing to be proud of, i am certain.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Priuses are awesome. They’re totally honest about what they are, and what they are is useful to a heck of a lot of people. They’re very cheap to run, roomy for people and stuff, and dead stone reliable. They aren’t “driver’s cars” and don’t pretend to be. They’re my go-to recommendation for frugal people who don’t care about cars.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Priuses are awesome…. for frugal people who don’t care about cars.

      In Bill Burr’s words, a Prius is for “the guy you want straight across the board, even in the bedroom. Always making love to you missionary style like, “I love you, your hair is like an ocean.”

      What a life to lead.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      You can “care” about cars, not necessarily be frugal and still own and appreciate the Prius. For many people their commute is putting along from stop light to stop light combined with going 0, 10, 20 or 30 MPH on the freeway with occasional spurts up to 40 or maybe 50. So the Prius or another Hybrid is a great option to dramatically increase the comfort.

      Recently in Seattle we had a Tanker overturn and block both directions of I5 for the better part of the day. Then we had a nice little snow storm that was actually sticking on the streets of Seattle and outlying Freeways. Just by chance I had to take something large with me into town, so I took my wife’s Escape Hybrid. The luxury of not worrying if I was going to run out of gas from idling and creeping my way home was priceless.

      The Escape was actually purchased because it was a good deal and my wife couldn’t commit to what she wanted as a replacement for her car that had been totaled. My experience driving home that night made me decided that instead of selling it this summer once we have time to find her the exact right car for her w/o overpaying it will stay in the fleet for the foreseeable future. Heck we may even become a 2 Escape Hybrid family and just get her a loaded ’10 or newer and I’ll make our current ’08 my daily driver.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I walked home that night (3+ miles, 50 minutes). When I left my office at Third and University, a #2 bus, the bus to my house, was sitting in front of my office building. By the time I got home, it had made three blocks of progress according to the OneBusAway app. Feet FTW.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yup that is one where you got me being able to walk home. I was lucky on the one hand in that the decision was made to close up and go home at 4. That gave me a jump on sneaking down the side streets to make to the Rainer Ave entrance to 90 in “only” about 40 minutes. The problem was once over the bridge everywhere was already a parking lot and the snow was piling up quickly. So I made my wat to 18 only to find that the state patrol had failed to post the chains sign, not even for semis and a couple ended up in a big mess closing both directions.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Exactly. I’m not sure why people have the hate for hybrids. Personally the technology impresses me, and I am often curious why more vehicles don’t offer a hybrid option. I know if the Forrester or Outback did I’d be all over it.

        Different strokes for different folks. It’s a mountain some can’t climb.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “the messy matter of mining nickel out of the earth’s crust”

    Nickel is pretty cheap, plentiful, and useful. It’s the stuff which goes into lithium ion batteries that causes hand-wringing.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The “nickel” comment likely came from a (debunked, industry funded) study* several years ago that laid the blame for Sudbury, Ontario’s since-healed but mining-ravaged outskirts being caused by the Prius’ NiMH batteries. Sudbury was a nickel-mine town for more than a century, FWIW.

      But yeah, mining is ugly, be it for rare-earth metals or nickel and iron. So is petroleum extraction, while we’re at it.

      * Side note: Autoblog’s breathless, uncritical, blatantly-clickbaitish repetition of that study was why I quit reading Autoblog and started at TTAC. You can read into that what you will.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Cadmium is a pretty bad actor itself. There were restrictions placed upon us in one of my former jobs regarding the use of cadmium plated fasteners in high temperature services due to the risks of cadmium exposure.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Nickle isn’t bad compared to the miles and miles of copper wire in these things. Copper extraction is absolutely filthy.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          The difference between copper & nickel and oil is that you only have to extract the metals once for the life of the car. There’s also there’s a good chance they can be recycled once the car goes to a junkyard.

          Or, you can extract (more) oil every day, AND extract a lot of the same metals from the ground to build a more traditional but less efficient car.

          EVs move the needle even farther, and are agnostic about their power source. They can run off of coal one day, and solar power the next — just so long as you provide transform the energy into the right number of amps & volts & cycles.

  • avatar
    Chan

    The only people derisive of Priuses and their owners are the insecure man-children who think that driving anything small or cute is unbearably emasculating. They will also readily tell you which lifestyles and fashion choices are symptoms of cuckoldry.

    The Prius is excellent at its intended purpose–dirt-cheap running costs with compact-hatchback practicality.

    I personally find its styling horrific, but have never been in the market for this segment. Those who are do not really mind.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      +1, except that I liked the Prius styling up until the 4th generation (though I like the Prius Prime better).

      But nobody buys these things for the looks anyway. And definitely not for the machismo — I make my own, and don’t need to buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      +1. There seems to be this idea promoted by some that if you are interested in a car with the merits of the Prius (sips fuel, very reliable, fairly inexpensive) that you have your life’s priorities out of whack. You’re a flawed person.

      A lot of folks have more than one car, and a Prius might just share garage space with another car that is completely different. Some of those people might also have other interests in life, such as motorcycles, bikes, travel, computers, whatever.

      It is politically convenient to box all Prius owners into a defined space. They are all boring, they have no life, the life of a Prius owner is no life to live, etc.

      The folks I know who own Priuses (Prii?) seem to have fulfilling lives and numerous interesting spare-time hobbies. They are no more or less worthy of occupying space on this planet than anyone commenting here on TTAC.

      I’m glad I came across this Prius review on the site…it has served as a little tiny reminder to myself not to mentally pigeonhole people based on what car they drive, clothing they wear, whether they have a tattoo or not, etc.

      Oh, by the way, I agree the styling is weird. I’d live with it, though, to get 50 mpg.

  • avatar
    hamish42

    We live in Toronto, which is a pretty big city. When my wife bought her Prius I thought she’d be run off the roads by our SUVs and PUs. Quite the contrary, it has turned out to be a nimble little car well suited to the packed thruways. The quality is excellent, it works as advertised, and I actually enjoy driving it now and then. If nothing else it seems to work really well as an urban warrior in a city of 5 million maniacs. It’s too boring for me for every day, but there is a niche here it fills perfectly. It almost hurts to admit it’s a nice little car. Oh, and it is ugly as a brick.

  • avatar
    Rday

    I guess i don’t fit well into this crowd of elitist auto buffs. Since I don’t sleep in/with my car, looks aren’t all that important. And i don’t care what anyone else thinks. Cars are like women. The fancy looking ones are expensive to keep, hard to deal with at times, and often are a relief to get rid of. Average looking women/cars that can be counted on when you need them are much more rewarding overall and much easier to live with. Hence you will keep them for a longer time and even become attached to them.
    I bought a new 17 Prius type 2 last night for my special lady. My GF has a 13 Prius v and loves it but she wanted the better mileage since she drives so much and the technology on the new toyota’s is amazing. She loved the 17 from the start and will keep it for a long time and many miles. She drives over 30K per year and mileage is very important to her. I really like the seats and the visibility and these cars are pretty much bullet proof. I like a car brand where you never have to go back to the dealer for anything. Once i get to know the service advisers it is time to get rid of vehicle and never buy from that manufacturer ever again. Goodbye and good riddance to FCA!!!!Never will i let these a$$holes rip me off again.
    Nuff said. Good motoring.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    My car uses exactly twice the gas that this thing uses. That does give me pause.

  • avatar
    jdowmiller

    I looked at these to replace my XC90. I believed a gas engine would be much more cost-effective so went with a Corolla LE Eco instead for at least $6000 less. I’m not sure about city mileage yet as I haven’t done much but looks to be around 33 mpg. On the highway I get 45 mpg.

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    For every $100 you save on gas or anything else, you can retire from your 4 hours a day commute 1 day sooner.
    Of course, if you want to support big oil, keep burning $20/ day.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    Curiosity got the better of me last week and I took a new Prius out for a test drive.

    The vitriol toward this car is silly.

    The current Prius is far from a penalty box. Seats were comfortable, and while not a “quick” car, it certainly had adequate power for the daily grind.

    The technology was amazing, really, for the price. I think the car I drove stickered for something like $25k and change. By most accounts, the Prius is exceedingly reliable and durable.

    Realizing that it’s uncool to voice anything but derision for the Prius in these parts, it impressed me as a great value and a surprisingly good car. The fact that some people get rankled when they see a Prius on the road or the car mentioned in an article may indeed say more about them than Prius drivers or the vehicle itself.

  • avatar
    stickmaster

    My sister long had a 2005 Prius which she donated to my parents.
    It’s a good car…tons of useful cargo space and it runs forever on a tank of gas. But it’s slow. As long as you don’t mind that, you will have a reasonably good daily driver for the city.

    The Prius has two batteries, both the big hybrid battery and a secondary one. You will have problems with both and will have to replace them, but probably just once or twice.

  • avatar
    kokomokid

    I seem to like more “variety” in cars than Mr. Guy, having a Corvette and Mini Cooper, as well as a Prius. The Corvette and Mini are fun, for different reasons, but if I had only one car, it would probably be a Prius. I like the liftback utility and the 45-50 mpg “no matter what” efficiency. I also like the impossible-to-abuse powertrain with no clutches or shift elements. The new, 4th generation Prius even handles and rides decently, compared to most other FWD cars its size.


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