By on February 21, 2017

Harman HALOsonic Engine Order Cancellation

Craig writes:

Hey Sanjeev, (*facepalm* –SM)

I have a 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, and I’m bit of a music buff. One of the first things I dispensed with was the factory Harman Kardon speakers. I replaced the sub with a JL stealth box. Now I have a pretty big problem with the factory stereo and its the automatic noise cancellation.

When the transmission is in normal D mode and or eco mode is on, it uses the factory stereo to cancel out the drone of the engine. Unfortunately, the noise cancellation is calibrated for the weaksauce factory sub. Now it sounds like one of those bass CDs from the ’90s as I hold speed or decelerate. I’ve asked the dealer how to get rid of this thing, to which they said “you can’t.”

I’m not so convinced.

Any ideas?

Sajeev answers:

I totally get this. Sanjeev is I am a bit of an audio buff, too. Even my regular cab Ranger has small, 6-inch woofers in the back, aftermarket tweeters up front and a ghetto fabulous, 6-channel amplification system.

Chrysler’s noise cancellation certainly eliminates drones and rumbles, but engineers never consider owners upgrading to Audiophile grade hardware. That’s why I normally ditch all the factory stuff to go full aftermarket with a plug-and-play interface harness for a clean install, but Crutchfield says they have nothing for you.

And that’s bad news. Now you have two choices: acquire factory wiring diagrams or see if an aftermarket tune can delete it. Ask these guys if it’s doable. You might get a free performance tune in the process.

Regarding the diagrams, find where/how the audio system converses with your powertrain control module (PCM). I reckon it receives inputs regarding vehicle speed, throttle position or a similar input to determine engine load and provide noise cancellation. From there, in theory, you can cut some wires to defeat it.

Don’t laugh! It’s been done to re-instate digital clocks in Lincoln Continentals. Just make sure you solder/heat shrink/etc the wire(s) back to factory configuration if the hack fails to kill the noise cancellation or has unintended consequences like warning lights or error messages.

My take? Cut wires, be ready for the repercussions, possess a heat gun, soldering iron, and the necessary skills to return the wiring back to factory. If you don’t? Then don’t!

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice. 

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72 Comments on “Piston Slap: Cancelling Chrysler’s Noise Cancellation?...”


  • avatar
    kvndoom

    The cars I’ve had with ANC (and yes it is truly the devil) had a microphone, sometimes two, that fed into the processor. On my Accord, disconnecting the mics solved the problem.

    Have you checked the Jeep forums to see if someone else has done this to defeat ANC? That’s generally the first place I’d look.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    it depends how it’s implemented. if it’s an external module, it might be that simple. if it’s built into the radio or amplifier, then all bets are off. if it was a Ford or Lincoln, it’d be pretty simple to just use the factory/dealer bus tool to turn it off in the module’s configuration.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      As the owner of a 2016 Mustang EB, this interests me greatly. I would love to turn off active noise control. Would an aftermarket bus tool do the job? One such as this one:
      http://www.scantoolsoftware.com/ford-scan-tool.html

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it looks like it can access the other CAN networks, but doesn’t say whether it can read or write the Method 2 configuration bytes.

        • 0 avatar
          DevilsRotary86

          Thanks. I am going to guess for $200 it doesn’t do what I need it do. Suppose I could ask them though.

          So I am guessing that this would do the trick:

          http://www.ebay.com/itm/FORD-IDS-VCM2-SCAN-TOOL-NEW-DEALER-LEVEL-DIAGNOSTICS-AND-REFLASHING-/232188181366?hash=item360f7e7b76:g:~GAAAOxy7RBRXjlG&item=232188181366&vxp=mtr

          Or I guess I can politely ask the dealer to do it for me when I am in for my next oil change.

      • 0 avatar
        RSF

        take a look at Forscan. You should be able to disable your active noise control with this.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          doesn’t appear so. it can read PIDs and do diagnostics on MS_CAN and I_CAN, but it doesn’t look like it can read or write configuration DIDs.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yes with the FORScan extended license for the windows version you can read and write configurations. However since it is open source that people have used various methods to determine the addresses for the various items that function may or may not be developed yet. The other question is if it is even a configurable item.

            I’ve used FORScan to change the tire size on my F250 and have played with turning DRLs and Dark Mode on and off on my E150. When I connect to my F250 it asks what radio since anything above the AM/FM unit does talk to the CAN bus and won’t operate if the VIN programed into it doesn’t match what is being broadcast on the CAN bus.

            The other option is AutoEnginuity which replicates most of the IDS functionality if you have the enhanced Ford license or one of the combo packs of enhanced licenses.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Also if you want to use FORScan on a newer Ford I highly recommend the OBLink MX as the tool of choice. Their included software is much better than most consumer grade scan tools should you need to diagnose a non Ford vehicle. If you consider yourself a gearhead and you are a Ford owner you really need FORScan to play with unless of course you have IDS or AutoEnginuity already.

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            Thanks Scoutdude, that is some good info!

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Thanks Scottdude. I have a 2015 F150 with the base (4.3) inch sync system. I didn’t want the MFT and Sync 3 wasn’t on the street yet. I have been dutifully waiting for a fit kit for the dash to put a nice double din in only to see that when it finally got here it was a steaming pile. As such I’m waiting for a sync 3 to hit the junkyard and am going to fit it. Non nav should make it easier but I’m sure there will still be issues. That and some aftermarket leather will remedy my 2 regrets on the truck.

        • 0 avatar
          Ol Shel

          Most have had their Forscans removed.

      • 0 avatar
        Orangecar Blackheart

        Fellow EB owner – I’m pretty sure you can just unplug the microphone placed above the rear seats.
        https://www.reddit.com/r/Mustang/comments/3c8xqx/2015_ecoboost_mustang_install_of_aftermarket_amp/
        Your mileage may vary.

        • 0 avatar
          DevilsRotary86

          I heard about that, but I also heard it doesn’t shut off the whole system. Just the rear speakers.

          I would love it if I could just go in to software settings, select “Active Noise Control” and choose “Off”.

  • avatar
    jberger

    The ANC for Dodge,Chrysler,Jeep & RAM appears to be produced by the UConnect head unit. It’s using QNX’s ANC system and QNX is already running the UConnect so I’d bet it is integrated into the UConnect system as an optional feature.

    I’d get in touch with a UConnect hacker like Customtronix and see if they can give you an option to turn off ANC. They offer a jailbreak to add/remove features, and trigger options available in the head unit that were not part of the factory setup, so they can already have access to the core features and understand the option codes.

    http://customtronix.com/

    It looks like the ANC uses the engine computer to sense loads in addition to cabin noise to send out cancellation frequencies below 150Hz. Since it’s active you can’t just block it with a notch filter and since most of the cars control options are in the head unit you’ll have to figure out a way to turn it off directly in the head unit rather than just pulling a fuse.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Here’s some decent info on your system:

    wk2jeeps.com/wk2_active_noise_cancellation.htm

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I guess the first step I would take would be to unplug the mic and see if that helps; certainly less drastic then hacking away at the wiring harness.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Was stock so terrible that it’s worth all this hassle?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      +1, my thought also. But I also don’t care about car audio – at all.

      • 0 avatar
        MPAVictoria

        Count me in here as well. I haven’t sat in a modern car that didn’t have a livable sound system. Totally not worth the hassle for me.

        /However we are all different. Good luck with whatever you decide.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          How is the S80’s?

          • 0 avatar
            MPAVictoria

            I have the base system with 6 speakers plus a center channel in the S80 and I think it is great. Better than the Blaupunkt “11” speaker audio package in the G8 by quite a bit.

            That said I listen to mostly classic rock, country, Americana and CBC (Think Springsteen stuff plus Canada’s version of NPR). Maybe if I was really into Techno or R&B I would think differently.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      For discerning ears, sure. A lot of stock systems, even high end ones, use cheap components and heavy EQ/processing. Some people want a purer, cleaner sound. I don’t see the issue. No different than any other modification.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        I do this for a living. 90% of equalization is to correct for what the vehicle cabin and installation do to the sound. You can put a $1,000 Focal component set into your doors and it’ll sound like crap until equalized.

        people really don’t understand this stuff. I’ve lost track of people who wanted to show me their awesome sound system and “treated” me to a screechy, thudding mess. Unfortunately, like not wanting to call someone’s baby ugly I just smile and nod. people have this idea that ripping out the factory speakers (most of which are poor) and throwing whatever they get from Mickey Shorr in there (which is as bad or worse, but in different ways) is the way to go.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          There are aftermarket equalization solutions. And there are degrees to it. All OEM systems aren’t bad, but some definitely are, especially at low frequencies.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I’ve benchmarked countless OEM systems. Some base level ones have no EQ at all and the cheapest possible speakers, and sound terrible. Some are EQed and sound reasonably OK, but as you say lack output and bass. Some unbranded ones with subwoofers and increased power are tuned well and sound pretty good, but the OE world can’t afford the $$$ and space for subwoofer power required to get output and extension.

            There have been some which measured dreadfully but didn’t sound that bad (Honda does this regularly.)

            Then there have been some really, really expensive systems where I got out wondering “why would you spend that much on speakers, watts, and DSP horsepower only to end up with dreadful garbage like this?”

            and most aftermarket EQ solutions are of limited usefulness. If you want to actually try to achieve *accurate* sound reproduction (nearly impossible in a car, but you can get close) you need *full* parametric EQ with all of the common biquad filters (boost/cut, high pass, low pass, all pass, notch, high shelf, low shelf) along with time and phase correction. most aftermarket stuff is either x#-band graphic EQ (might as well not bother) or their “parametric EQ” can only do boost/cut and locks you into discrete center frequencies along with very coarse Q adjustments.

            the best one I’ve found (and bought) is the miniDSP cDSP6x8.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Being an audiophile is a heavy burden in today’s vehicles without double DIN stereo openings and new-fangled noise cancellation hoo-hahs. I’m not an audiophile but I do appreciate clear and balanced sound at normal volumes. My VW’s stock 10-speaker system was good enough, but I’m less pleased with my current vehicle’s.

      Yet every time I consider upgrading something, I look up how to pry apart interior panels, transplant speakers, modify the mounting brackets to accommodate them and I think “I don’t have time for this sh*t”

      And that’s not even considering the extra layer of complexity an ANC system adds. This is an interesting thread.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        most “audiophiles” I’ve encountered can’t see the forest for the trees, and treat the equipment they buy as the end itself instead of a means to an end. I know of an individual who spent quite a bit on his home audio system and sits there listening to recordings of *trains going by.*

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          The only time I’ve ever swapped a stereo was because it was the early 90s, I had just gotten my licence, the car was from 1982 and didn’t have a tape deck.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Only stereo I ever swapped was to pull a factory double DIN for a single DIN and a storage pocket.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            During my high school years a buddy swapped the low end factory unit in a Pontiac 6000 for the top of the line factory unit from the end of production.

            It took him a week to figure out why his tail lights wouldn’t work after he was finished.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Your quote above: “people really don’t understand this stuff” certainly describes me. I only have an incomplete notion of the ends and therefore no clue about the means. You made some very interesting comments in this thread, Jim, and certainly convinced me that a simple speaker swap won’t do much to improve the thin overall sound quality and overblown muddy bass in my 4Runner’s system.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Custom audio means battery drain, loose radios, and butchered wiring. Audiophiles may get picky about noise but they don’t know a thing about craftsmanship.

      I’ve had to mess with at least a few used cars to undo messy aftermarket speakers, slooppy wiring, usually left with nice holes too.

      Gimme noise cancellation anyway over a day of tracing down electrical drains.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Maybe for a crap install. With harness kits wiring shouldn’t be an issue. My current car is the first of 6 I haven’t done any audio work on, and I’ve never had any of the problems you speak of…. and this includes, in my youthful exhuberance, booming subs and the like.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        …Custom audio means battery drain, loose radios, and butchered wiring. Audiophiles may get picky about noise but they don’t know a thing about craftsmanship…

        Speak for yourself. I’ve spent many an hour modifying auto wiring, dashboards, and the like to improve sound quality or to add options from a wreck. Like Sajeev, I get great pleasure in figuring this stuff out and without question the craftsmanship of my work is outstanding or I just won’t do it. Audiophiles actually get this more so than most.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        You’re talking about kids and hack stereo installers, not audiophiles.

    • 0 avatar
      s_a_p

      In a word. Yes. Had it not been equipped with the hk stereo I would have never ordered the jeep this way. The is in a ⅜” thick abs plastic enclosure that basically makes the car sound like it has rattles. The front door 6×9 “subwoofers” couldn’t handle the power from the factory amp and would bottom out at ½ volume on certain source material. They also we more successful at rattling the interior panels than sound output. I replaced the factory speakers with 6.5″ separates. I built custom passive high pass filters to filter below 100 hz in the doors.

      I drive about 3000 miles per month and most of that is rush hour traffic. I don’t need perfection in the factory stereo but it was very fatiguing to listen to. I’m wanting to keep the stock appearance so replacing the factory head unit is not really an option. The jl stealth box sounds really good and I put a 500 watt mono amp on it with a LOCon the sub channel. The problem is that the factory ANC doesn’t expect meaningful 50hz output from the factory sub so it’s boosted 10-15 db and sounds like a sequence of 40-60hz sine waves. FWIW putting the transmission in sport mode turns this off.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        “I don’t need perfection in the factory stereo but it was very fatiguing to listen to.”

        I know what you mean. I’ve done highway trips delivering vehicles for friends where I hit the road looking forward to listening to something I’ve been craving, and after a couple songs I just turn it off because it becomes physically uncomfortable at any volume. Bose has been the worst offender. That’s the one brand where I would pay extra for the base stereo if I could, even if I didn’t want any future upgrades.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    I don’t like the factory audio system in my Buick Enclave either but am hesitant to go aftermarket for this very reason. Alternatively, I’ve found “premium” factory stuff on ebay that I’ve considered swapping in. The thing is, the premium system is all touchscreen and has GPS. My current unit doesn’t. Would it still swap right in and work?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Maybe, maybe not. Some GPS systems have a separate GPS reciever/antenna so you would need one of those for that to work. Not sure about GM but Ford and some others have their radios VIN locked and if the VIN that the ECU is sending over the bus doesn’t match the one programed into the unit it won’t work.

  • avatar
    jmo

    And, after you’ve gone and rewired it courtesy of a diagram you found on the internet, please don’t rant online about all the electrical gremlins in your new Jeep.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    I ran into the exact same problem with my MKZ. In the end, I gave up. The biggest issue was the sensitivity of the speakers, it confused the ANC logic resulting in a weird booming effect. I suspect it can be done without any modification of the ANC provided you can match the sensitivity and frequency response curves of the original speakers. That’s a tall order. It would involve a lot of testing to find good matches. It’s made even harder by the whole “167 speaker” thing that is, more often than not, done to impress people who think that more is better.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      no, because phase matters greatly as well.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Care to amplify that point, I’m not sure what you mean? Phase, WRT speakers is easy, just reverse the polarity or add (or remove) a pole to a crossover circuit.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          phase and polarity are not the same thing. the phase response of the speaker shifts pretty drastically as it passes through resonance. also, EQ filters using biquads are infinite-impulse-response (IIR) filters which alter the phase response of the audio signal. and the phase variations are continuously variable from -180 to +180 degrees. if you change the speakers and change/remove the EQ (even if the speaker polarities are the same) then you’ve altered the phase response of the system and your ANC/ESE calibration will no longer be suitable for your car.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            Ah, thanks for the clarification. ANR is a tricky beast.

            The moral of the story is that we have to live with whatever high-end audio system the manufacturer supplies. I just wish they would spend a bit more money on better speakers. The slavish devotion to cost-cutting even on “premium” systems has a real, negative, effect on audio quality.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            here’s an impedance/phase plot for what appears to be a woofer:

            http://www.axino-tech.co.nz/images/Bass%20speaker%20impedance.gif

            resonance is about 48 Hz, and as it passes through resonance the phase shifts about 80 degrees.

            and ANC/ESE uses the woofers, which by necessity are operating with the resonant frequency in the passband. so changing the speakers to different ones (which will have a different resonance and Q, most likely) totally alters the phase response of the system.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Lots of great info! For me it’s a car, not a sound studio.

            So with every new acquisition, I’ll crank up the factory/existing stereo, with most of the bass turned down. Most newer cars sound real impressive, for what they are, just listening for the highs.

            If those are acceptable, I’ll go for aftermarket bass “enhancement”. Cheap and easy, quickly removed (for possible reuse) when it’s time for trade-in, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            This explains how transmission-line designs work. I’ve been playing with quarter-wave TLs for a few years now. That quarter-wavelength lines up nicely with the phase shift at the woofer resonance.

            Having said that, I think that by measuring phase shift as well as the Q and the parameters I’ve already mentioned that it could be made to work. Theoretically, that is.

            Also, phase shift is less of an issue for ANR at higher frequencies (where it is less effective). I could see replacing tweeters with ones that have a lower Fs and applying a low-pass filter to the existing woofer to move the crossover point to where more of the spectrum is covered by the tweeter. One could, perhaps, even go with a three-way design using this approach.

            In the end, it’s an awful lot of work and is, almost certainly, not worth it.

          • 0 avatar

            I’d love to see the results of the benchmarking, even though I’m sure it is all NDA…..

            Some factory sound (base Acura) conflates boom with quality, sort of like a loudness switch you can’t shut off. This is the most common low end stereo error.

            The toughest thing to get is accurate mid-highs. BMW puts the tweeter up high with the uprated systems and gets this right, but most don’t bother. I’m amazed that most car sound systems are still the product of a bet (“I’ll bet you can’t do the whole system for $20″…You’re ON !)

            Done wrong, you shut it off as it get tiring, as others point out.

            The great opening for aftermarket used to be that you could replace the OE crap (and it is factory-cheap) with something probably more accurate and back it up with a clean 25-75 watts, not a square wave 20 watts. Now, of course, that the sound system is all custom, it’s like heart surgery to remove anything. I’ve read of guys trying to replace BMW stuff-there is active cancellation of noise from the car’s electronics, which you don’t get in aftermarket bits, so the new stuff “hums” (one of my ham radios picks it up, but for that use it isn’t fatal). There are three or so Bose amps in the Caddy, I would not even try to replace that stuff. BMW uses a bizarre three bolt system, so when the midranges went, there was one company (who luckily is very good-Bavsound) who made a bolt in replacement for the odd mount and odd impedance speakers.

            I replaced sound in every car I ever had, up until the last batch, where you need an EE degree to do it correctly….and I’m a ham. I’m resigned to having to pay the $1k upcharge on a car to get $150 worth of sound. A recent drive of a 535i with base stereo was painful…60k car and boom-sound ? Really ? You have to check the $800 H/K system just to have a usable setup !

            I blame an early job at a Stereo Store (remember those ?) where the staff used a set of Klipschorns, fed with a reel to reel or a half speed mastered disc, through a McIntosh tube amp for background music when there weren’t any customers asking for demos. Don’t even get me started on earbuds and kids listening to music on the computer speakers.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    What about noise cancellation for other environments?

    Has anything come of devices like the “Sono” that slap on a window and use the glass as a diaphragm to emit cancellation frequencies?

    Noise in a car is fine; you’re supposed to be awake there.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    The sub in the 9-speaker system found in the Overland models is far more than anyone would need. How could the sub in the 19-speaker Harmon Kardon system be too weak?

    With how integrated audio systems are now, you’re best off to just leave well enough alone. The manufactures know what they’re doing. If you mess with it all you’ll end up doing is screwing up a very high quality system.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      ” The manufactures know what they’re doing”

      Except Ford. I heard Mark Fields beats his wife.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Except that to those of us with a critical ear, a lot of premium systems just don’t cut it. Especially those that overemphasize mid range bass which to an untrained ear sounds great initially. Perfect for a test drive but gets tiring very quickly. Too bad they don’t have a default “demo” mode that can be switched off. Sort of like the “vivid” mode for TVs being set up in a store. Excessive brightness in a TV is analogous to boomy midrange bass in a stereo.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      “The manufactures know what they’re doing.”

      They certainly do. They’re selling cheap components and “subs” that barely play below 60 Hz at a ridiculous markup.

      If you know what you’re missing and you care, you’ll want to upgrade.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    It was like the first thing you did when you bought a car in the 90’s, swap out the factory deck and ditch the paper speakers. That was the era though when a factory CD player was stupid expensive and usually only on luxury cars. And the factory cassette deck was junk.

    Factory audio now on even pretty lowly cars is so much better now, I really think most people are spinning their wheels unless the goal is just to make things rattle.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      for a mid-woofer/mid-range speaker, paper/wood fiber is one of the best materials for the speaker cone. at least if properly designed. it’s light for a given rigidity, and it has high internal damping to reduce the severity of modes above the cone break-up point. the downside to paper cones in car speakers is water absorption, but they can easily be coated or impregnated with materials to improve water resistance.

      plastic cones do not a good speaker make. I’ve seen some (fairly pricy) ones with some exalted pearl-mica filled poly cones, and the breakup modes and modulation distortion were so bad they were unlistenable.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Disconnect the sub, run a piggyback amp, tapping into one of the back speakers for signal, with the factory fader for volume.

    Yeah I know the regular guy cringes at the thought of cutting/splicing the factory wiring, but there’s a right and a wrong way to do everything. It’s no big deal, I’ve altered the factory wiring on everything I’ve owned, starting with the stereo. I’m just a hack, and no fires yet…

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Yep, I’ve done that many times to pair a factory head unit to an aftermarket sub and amp. Just trim off a half inch of insulation, snake the new wire around it, solder it together (I greatly prefer a mini torch to an iron or pen), tape it up, and tie the two wires together with a cable tie so there’s never any stress on the joint. Neither the connection nor the original wiring is compromised in any way. In fact, you will have actually reduced the resistance of that bit of wire by a negligible amount.

      Try to tap into it as close to the source as possible to minimize the damping factor effect – for lack of a better term – of the wire resistance. That’s not something you want to amplify. I usually go from right behind the head unit, and run a pair of RCAs at the same time if you think you might ever change the head unit. I suppose that consideration may not apply to modern vehicles with integrated infotainment units.

      The only problem here is whether the noise cancellation also plays through the speakers that you’re taking the signal from, and whether it’s even a full range signal.

      I’m just going to assume and accept that I may have to install a secondary audio system in future vehicles. The head unit can go in or under the glove box, or maybe even in the center console or footwell somewhere. There are few things I enjoy more than listening to a great album turned up very loud on a good stereo during a highway trip, especially after dark. I’ve yet to hear a factory system that qualifies, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t exist. All I can say for sure is that they don’t come from Alpine, B&O, or (*shudder*) Bose.

      It’s unfortunate that Alpine sells their name to such things. I’m quite fond of their aftermarket products; especially their subs.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        I’ve considered a secondary/bypass audio system, but without a head unit. Starting with an 1/8 inch plug to RCA “splitter”, to a 3-way electronic X-over, 6 channel amp, etc.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I’ve gone down this road for people and it’s not worth the hassle. The Harmon Cardon system in this vehicle sounds pretty darned good, I have my doubts that these mods will make any improvement, more likely to make it perform worse.

  • avatar
    s_a_p

    Couple of things. First- Huge apology to Sajeev. This is quite embarrassing and I have no excuse for calling you Sanjeev. So I apologize profusely.

    Secondly, thank you for answering my question anyway and didn’t think it was ECU related.

    I’ve thought about some other solutions mosconi dsp but it’s 2k for that:
    http://mosconi-system.it/product/gladen-dsp-8to12-aerospace-2/

    I’ve generally wanted to go with a stealth installation but I may change my mind on that as it currently only sounds good on about ⅓ of the music I play. The fine folks at Houston car stereo have told me that my car is a “challenge” to make sound good, which is unfortunate. A big chunk of my life is spent commuting the streets of Houston.

  • avatar
    DavidH

    I have a 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT with the Harmon Kardon system. I just added a subwoofer and amp since I already had them from a previous car plus the bass was not very impressive from the 8″ sub. I too have the same issue with the ANC. The one thing I noticed though is that the manual says ANC is only on in ECO/Auto mode. However I get the humming sound when I’m just in Auto mode only. Has this been the case with everyone else?

    • 0 avatar
      s_a_p

      Here’s what I have found. If I leave it in Auto the Eco mode is activated automatically which causes the droning. If it is in sport mode it never goes to eco and only drones when the computer gets confused. What I mean is that there is a bug in the software that occasionally causes a slightly higher pitch drone that is independent of the sport setting. The only “fix” I have found for when this happens is to turn the car off and back on. As for the eco mode drone, I resorted to a low tech fix. My Rockford Fosgate amp has an option for a remote level control which I simply turn down when I’m not listening to music. If I want to rock out and jam I leave the car in sport or track mode. The main penalty is mileage has dropped from ~15mpg in mostly city driving to around 12.5mpg. I think the next step for me is to see if I can escalate this through FCA support if such a thing exists.

      • 0 avatar
        DavidH

        Thank you s_a_p for the response. It looks like what you’re doing is be the best option. In my case I plan to install a switch to the remote wire to shut off the Pioneer amp that powers the aftermarket sub when I’m not cranking up the music. Fortunately, the way the line converter is installed, the original HK 8″ subwoofer is still active, so I still get decent bass, albeit not the equivalent to the aftermarket 12″sub.

        I’ve been to the dealership to see if they had any idea how to disable or disconnect ANC, but they had no solution. One stereo installation place I went to said they turned away a couple of systems that had ANC because of the feedback issue that they didn’t want to get involved in.

        On a related note, and probably for another post, but is it just me or does it seem like the 19 speaker HK system requires you to crank it to at least around 30 of 38 before it seems somewhat loud and to get decent bass? It sounds great, but just not much volume. The Rockfort Fosgate that came in my Nissan as an upgrade sounded much louder and more powerful.

        • 0 avatar
          s_a_p

          I find the HK stereo very frustrating. The main issue is the WAAAAAY Over boasted low frequencies. On all 4 door speakers the low end causes my focals to bottom out, and they are good for 70w rms. This causes the overall volume to be pretty low unless the source material was mastered in a “Loudness War” style. For instance, Led Zepplin IV hardly gets loud enough to warrant raising my voice while having a conversation with a passenger even on 38, but if I play something like Run The Jewels I can probably hit 130db at least with the bass. I have been trying to tell myself it is fine and stop messing with it. Upgrading the speakers helped the sound quality quite a bit, but it kind of emphasizes the fact that the OEM radio/amp sucks. If I end up getting overly frustrated, I will probably rip out the stereo run all new wires and consider different speaker arrangements and a DSP preamp to fix the EQing/time delay. sigh…


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