By on March 4, 2016

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Front 3/4, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

The promise of improved performance and tree-hugging fuel economy has made turbocharged engines all the rage in luxury cars. Despite the often failure of those boosted motors to meet their lofty, published fuel economy ratings in the real world, forced induction has a significant — and positive — impact on performance.

It seems Infiniti had gotten the memo.

This segment is split with the Cadillac ATS 3.6 and Lexus IS350 holding membership in the naturally aspirated camp and the BMW 340i and Audi S4 leading forced induction team. The naturally aspirated group requires 5.4 seconds on average to hit highway speeds, while the boosted bunch drops to the 4.8-4.9 second range. Infiniti’s Q50, in naturally aspirated guise, splits the difference by running to 60 miles per hour in 5.05 seconds in our previous test, but that wasn’t good enough for the brand often called “the Japanese BMW.” So Infiniti’s engineers went back to the drawing board and created an all new engine lineup for 2016 — and they tweaked the steer-by-wire system while they were at it.

Exterior
Styled after Infiniti’s Essence concept, the Q50’s exterior combines sleek, flowing lines with an enormous maw and angry LED headlamps. I don’t think it’s as aggressive as the ATS or as refined as the new Mercedes-Benz C-Class, but it’s far more distinctive than the 3 Series and A4 and less controversial than the IS350 F-Sport.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Interior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Interior
The Q50 wears the best interior that Infiniti has ever made. While no hands have rubbed silver dust into the Q50’s optional maple trim (as in the Q70), this cabin is easily one of the best in the segment. The new C-Class still wears the interior design and workmanship crown, but the compact Infiniti climbs up the luxury ladder to a place above the Acura TLX and a small notch above the BMW 3-Series.

Thanks to the Q50’s generous exterior dimensions, we have rear seats with more legroom than any of the compact luxury sedans. Unfortunately, like many sexy sedans, rear headroom suffers due to the car’s slammed side profile.

If you were hoping for a large trunk, you’ll be disappointed. The Q50’s trunk holds just 13.5 cubic feet, only a hair bigger than the Mercedes CLA.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Infotainment, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Infotainment
The Q50 is the first Infiniti to receive its new two-screen InTouch infotainment system, which uses both 8-inch and 7-inch touchscreen LCDs. Like the last generation Infiniti systems, you can also control most of the system’s functions via a joystick-like button on the steering wheel. But wait! There’s more! Infiniti also includes a new navigation control wheel in the center console behind the shifter a la iDrive and MMI. This gives the driver three different input methods to choose from. However, not all features can be accessed via the steering wheel control or the control wheel, and some options will need to be touched.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Interior-001

Some passengers were truly and permanently perplexed by the two-screen layout, but I adjusted to the software quickly. While this sounds similar to Acura’s two-screen system, Infiniti’s solution is better thought out and both screens are touch-enabled rather than just one. Acura’s advertised goal was to allow you to keep the top screen for navigation while you used the lower screen to play with your audio device, but that’s only half true as the top screen is needed to perform a large number of audio functions. In the Infiniti, the function overlap between the screens is large, so you can browse your media device and perform other select operations via either screen. This level of choice seems to be what confuses some shoppers. I have never seen a car infotainment interface that has so many ways of doing the same task. On the flip side, by the second day, I settled into the system, preferring to ignore the controller in the console and use a combination of steering wheel controls and the lower touchscreen.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Engine, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Powertrain
Now let’s talk engines. 2016 kills the familiar 3.7-liter V6 in favor of three all-new turbocharged engines. The first is a 2.0-litre four-cylinder that’s related to the engine in the Mercedes CLA. Infiniti has tweaked the design and manufactures it at the Nissan/Infiniti engine plant in Tennessee. Producing 208 horsepower and 258 pounds-feet of torque, this engine is targeted at the BMW 320i, and not the 328i as you might have expected.

Our tester had Infiniti’s new VR-series V6. Based off the old VQ engine and the engine that powers the GT-R, the new 3.0-liter twin-turbo mill shares very little with anything else at Nissan or Infiniti. For the moment, there will be two different tunes: one producing 300 horsepower and 295 pounds-feet, the second (and the one we all care about) cranks out 400 ponies and 350 pounds-feet of twist. Infiniti is still offering the 360-horsepower Q50 hybrid, which now slots between the two twin-turbo engines instead of sitting at the top of the chart. All four engines are mated to a seven-speed automatic and all can be equipped with all-wheel drive.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Wheel, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Drive
The first and most important thing to know: the Red Sport 400 is not an Infiniti M3, although I suspect many will see it as a discount alternative. The 300-horsepower V6 is designed to compete with the C300, IS350 and ATS 3.6. The 400 horsepower V6 slots between the 340i and the M3 in terms of power. The main reason this isn’t an M3-type competitor: aside from cooling changes, the Q50 remains essentially unchanged. You won’t find massive six-piston brakes, carbon fiber body parts, sheetmetal changes, or interior upgrades. Opting for the Red Sport 400 just gives you the more powerful engine and the same sport brake setup as last year.

Because Infiniti doesn’t tweak the body, 245/40R19 front and 265/35R19 rear tires are all that will fit under its fenders. The stock Dunlop tires are less grippy than the Pilot Super Sports you’ll find in some of the competition, and this makes the Q50 an extremely lively sedan — with massive wheel spin — once the turbos start spooling at around 2,500 rpm. You’d better have a firm grip on the steering wheel.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Engine Cover Off, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

To be clear, the Q50 certainly handles well. The chassis is balanced and it’s a solid match for the 340i comparably equipped. It’s just that handling doesn’t live between the 340i and M3 in the same way as engine output.

The re-tuned direct adaptive steering (DAS) still has a “video game” like quality to it, but it’s more natural than before. In a corner, at even eight-tenths, you expect to get a slight hint of understeer. You may not even realize that your car is doing this because it’s so “normal.” The Q50, however, goes exactly where you point it, something that takes some getting used to. The main selling point continues to be the way the system can “filter out” cross winds, bumps and grooved pavement for reduced highway fatigue.

On the bright side, you can completely avoid DAS now if you want to since it is now a standalone option. However, Infiniti said you will likely have the dealer order you a Q50 if you want everything except DAS since it’s part of a standard set of options for the dealers. Opting out of DAS does not get you ye olde G35’s hydraulic rack, but instead an all new, rack mounted, electric-assist system that’s no better or worse than what we find in the Lexus or Cadillac.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400s in Parking Lot, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

When pushed in the corners, constant attention must be paid to the throttle. Not only can you steer with your right foot, the Q50 is eager to be steered with the loud pedal. This is the biggest difference between the BMW 340i, which seems reluctant to play hooligan, and the Q50, which seeks it out. Thankfully, the electronic safety systems are quick on their feet and Sport+ lets you have about as much fun as you should in a five-seat family sedan.

Infiniti’s seven-speed auto has been reprogrammed for 2016, but the shifts are still not as quick and crisp as the ZF eight-speed in the BMW and Audi. Because of the transmission’s programming and the massive wheel spin during our impromptu performance tests, the fastest 0-60 time we could get out of the Red Sport was 4.8 seconds. That time is in line with a BMW 340i with its automatic. The difference is that the BMW had no wheel slip at all, meaning 4.8 is “all she’s got,” I suspect the AWD version of the Red Sport will shave 3/10ths off the time. By the time the 1/4 mile is finished, the Infiniti is nearly a half second ahead of the BMW.

2016 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 Rear 3/4, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Pricing has yet to be announced, but you should expect the Q50 to maintain its historical value position. I expect the 2.0t trim to start round the same $32,000 price point as the 320i while delivering similar performance. The 300-horsepower tune is likely going to start somewhere between the BMW 328i ($38,350) and 340i ($45,800). Infiniti said the 400-horsepower Red Sport 400 will start “under $50,000” and be “well equipped in the mid-fifties.” My translation here is that the Red Sport will run from $49,999 to just under $60,000, where the ATS-V starts.

The BMW 340i will feel more refined, more polished and will handle better from the factory if you check the box for the premium summer tires — but the Q50 is quite simply more fun. The stock choice and abundant low-end power combined with a stability control program that’ll let you get a little sideways before stepping in made me giggle like a 12-year-old schoolgirl. (Maybe I shouldn’t admit that.) While the BMW is buttoned down in appearance and manner, the Q50 is eager and just a little insane. And that’s how I like my cars. If you wax poetic about your first Infiniti G sedan, this is the replacement.

Performance data as tested

0-30 mph: 2.25 seconds (massive wheel slip)

0-60 mph: 4.8 seconds

0-100 mph: 10.78 seconds

1/4 mile: 12.85 seconds @ 113.0 mph

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76 Comments on “2016 Infiniti Q50S Red Sport 400 First Drive – The 400 Club...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Not that I was an Infiniti buff, but these developments have turned me off. I’d also add, when the auto show came to two I sat in a Q70 and Q50 and my the Q70 seemed light years ahead in interior quality and visibility. I came away thinking those three cheap LCD screens are hurting more than helping.

    “the new 3.0-liter twin-turbo mill shares very little with anything else at Nissan or Infiniti”

    The Nissan Northstar?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Indeed not sharing anything else is a -bad- sign. As well, I’d much prefer all engines are made in Japan for Infiniti products.

      So you were impressed with the Q70 interior eh? How’s it compare to a current GS? I won’t put it up against the LS because it’s so much cheaper.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I couldn’t get into the GS at the show because it and the RC were constantly being mobbed by proles (I did get seat time in the LS though).

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I could possibly get behind the RC in certain colors. I applaud them for making powerful PLC.

          I’m sure the Q70 interior falls down against the LS one.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Q70 also started at 54K per the sticker IIRC whereas LS starts at 72 and the model they brought was something ridiculous like 88K on the window.

            I’d give Q70 a look depending on needs/budget.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I always forget how much the LS has got up to these days. It’s good that the Q70 now has the L option, which will truly put it on size class with the LS. With the SWB it’s just a bit too small.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m going to guess this latest series of Infiniti engine “up” grades were planned under the JdN administration, we can only hope the current leadership isn’t as myopic and says “lets cancel Q70” as this would also be a Johann move.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Lol we no need large sedan. Just make Q50L, that’s enough.

            #winning

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I don’t think a single buyer would cross-shop Q70L and LS. The good traits about the LS would alienate a Q70L buyer and vice versa.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Well I would!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Q70 to me seems like the Infiniti worth looking at, at least at this point (which means it will be culled, because the beatings will continue until morale improves).

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I think LS vs. Q70L is *exactly* analogous to W140 vs. E38, which was the situation in 1995-98. So, so different.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            W140, all day long in that situation.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Someone shops for a Q70? Did they lose a bet?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Tough call about MY96.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Why so down? Turbo V6s are a different animal from the boring, ugly-sounding 2.0Ts that are taking over this class. I know which I’d rather have of a 300-hp Q50 or a 328i.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        They should have kept the 3.7 and offered another V6 in turbo guise and left the I4 out of it. If the turbo would outsell ye olde VQ, then i’d accept it but they took option out of the equation. Infiniti needs to understand it is unwise to do exactly what everyone else is doing in the segment when you actually have a product which stands out.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Now I like the VQ line – they’re reliable and proven, and not flim-flam turbo stuff. BUT, they lack in refinement and in fuel economy. I think they have done about all they can do without a major do-over on the roots of VQ.

          So that’s why we have VR now. Should they have made a 3.5VR instead of a 3.0? Yes. I wonder if they’ll make any bigger ones, closer to the size of the GTR.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Good points from one of our resident Infiniti guys but how “new” is this VR?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That part I’m not sure on. Need Sajeev to do VQVR Deep Dive. The only Wiki info now is on the announcement of the VR30 for the Q50, and the VR38 in the GT-R and Juke-R.

            How you can give a Juke 550HP without it just instantly flipping over is beyond me.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            By making it much wider.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I didn’t look at the pics enough then. It must have ended up the shape of a rolly polly.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            All the width was in the mechanical bits. They just made the track almost a foot wider and slapped on fender flares that look about 4″ wide on each side.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Yea I agree. I would have preferred a naturally aspirated V6 with about 320hp in between the turbo4 and the 400hp turbo6.

        • 0 avatar
          Gardiner Westbound

          +1

    • 0 avatar
      b534202

      Yep, multiple screens just seem cheap, looks like the designer just put an off-the-shelf screen here and there wherever there is space.
      Go with one customer size bigger screen if you need more screen space …

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Personally I think parts of the car are carryover from the G37 which is why multiple COTS screens were used as opposed to one free flowing design as you suggest. Simply not using a cheap looking LCD for the dash cluster would go a long way IMO. Just could have kept the G37’s, who gives a snark…

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The latest iDrive with the big splitable screen is still the one to beat. No way could I stand sitting behind that cliff-face of a dash.

        I’ve rented a number of G37s, no thanks. Spent the entire time thinking how the extra $10K for a 328i is money well spent, even if it isn’t as fast. Not out to win a race. These new ones don’t impress me any more.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I must say, I’m impressed. I haven’t driven this, but I would probably pick it over a 340i or a C400.

    • 0 avatar
      cbrworm

      Agreed. This looks interesting. Possibly one without DAS.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      No C400 for you. Now C450 AMG, with more badges!

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      It’s sad to see the G37 gone, because with it we lost the stick-shift option. I wouldn’t say any of these rolling living rooms are as much fun as rowing your own gears. So, its down to a 340i and S4 now?

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @SunnyvaleCA – Cadillac offers a stick, but sadly its only with the out of place in a premium sedan 4 cylinder 2.0t. If you want a proper engine, unfortunately those are your only two choices and it sucks. This segment used to be the stuff of enthusiasts dreams. Now it’s a choice between a big rather dull and soft BMW and a noseheavy and burdened by AWD Audi. No more proper RWD sports sedans with sticks.

        P.S. this is excluding the ATS-V and the M3. However, if you want to keep your out the door total on the reasonable side of $60k, this is it.

      • 0 avatar
        JRobUSC

        Sorry but no, the new S4 is no longer available with a stick.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          The RS4 will likely be the only version of the new A4 family that gets a stick in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            tjh8402

            That will be the case in starting in 2017. 2016 is the last year for the stick shift S4. Supposedly, the new turbo six has too much torque for anything other than a torque converter automatic….which is bull!@#$%^

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            “Supposedly, the new turbo six has too much torque for anything other than a torque converter automatic….which is bull!@#$%^”

            You’re misunderstanding what they said. It has too much torque for the specific DCT used in the A4 with the 2.0T and in the 2016 S4 with the supercharged V6. That is what they said. They didn’t say anything about manual transmissions with that statement or anything global about DCTs. It’s about the specific one in their parts bin.

            They have one that fits larger V8 engines that takes more torque that is used in cars like the S6 and RS7, but presumably it cannot be fitted to the V6.

          • 0 avatar
            JD23

            Considering that the current RS5 is not even offered in manual, I think it is highly unlikely that the B9 RS4 will be.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Despite the rumors of their demise, you can still get a stick in the 228i, 320i and 328i. But if you want AWD and a stick, it is a 340i xDrive for you. Only AWD stickshift car they still sell here. No great loss, xDrive ruins how these cars drive anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          tjh8402

          @krhodes – I can’t speak for Sunnyvale, but he may be looking at six cylinders (that’s what I was referring to), as the ATS 2.0t is also available as stick (dunno about AWD), but I’d never buy a $40k+ luxury car with a 4 cylinder, whether the dull uninspiring BMW N20 or the unrefined and excessive NVH Cadillac 2.0t. The G37 was one of the only proper sport sedans on the market left (RWD, at least six cylinders, and a manual). Now, you only have one choice, the 340i, unless you consider the Audi’s AWD an acceptable substitute.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Agreed, the q50 does look, at least on paper a great auto. But the latest Consumer Reports gives the 2015 Infiniti q50 reliability rating, a very worse than average score. Infact almost every Infiniti has a very bad reliability and customer satisfaction ratings. Lexus is on the other end of the spectrum with perfect scores.

  • avatar
    Snail Kite

    I find this car exceptionally boring to look at. Infiniti seems to be stuck with a dated, doughy look while other luxury makers move forward with crisp lines.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      I don’t agree the exterior looks great. The interior does looks dated. Also, Infiniti Consumer Reports ratings have also taken a nose dive in the past few years. The q50 gets very poor reliability and customer satisfaction scores. Lexus and just about every other luxury brand is destroying Infiniti.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Generally I don’t care for their new styling direction. But – at least they are controlling the gaping maw much better than Lexus is, the current IS is offensive to my eyes. I’ve always found the G a little small. And unlike Lexus, there is no middle option. Stick with a compact or step up to the full size (which I did).

    The rear reflectors look too indented, and are really going to stand out on cars which are not red. It’s like someone pushed them in further than they meant to when the plastic was still soft. And the wheels are ugly.

    What I do like:
    Value proposition over other options.
    Good drive, like Alex said (too sporty for me).
    Real wood in interior.
    AWD
    Nice gauges

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Does anyone know where the turbo 3.0 comes from? Did Nissan develop it in-house, or with MB, like the 2.0T?

  • avatar
    JRobUSC

    you guys referenced the tested figures of a 340i several times, but I don’t recall reading that review on here, nor did I find one when searching the archives. Where might we read this 2016 BMW 340i review?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Not sure why anyone would buy a 2.0t over a C300 with a stronger tune of the same engine.

    The turbo V6 cars look more compelling. At each price point you get more engine than the competition, and the case for the 300-hp version is especially strong; it’s priced across from premium-optioned 2.0t variants of a lot of the competition. If I were looking for a new near-lux sedan this engine change would put both six-cylinder Q50s on the must-drive list.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      Certainly if the 300/400 hp versions are the exact same motor I’d pick the 300. An aftermarket reflash is guaranteed to be a cheaper option.

      • 0 avatar
        Alex L. Dykes

        It’s not *exactly* the same. The 400HP model gets another water pump for cooling which improves intercooler performance, it also gets optical speed sensors in the turbos so it can monitor them and get as close as possible to the max boost allowed.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        A 33% power boost likely means at minimum a larger turbo (and possibly intercooler), and possibly stronger forged internals and stuff. They aren’t just chipping the same engine to 300 HP and 400 HP when they could save money on some cheaper components on the 300 HP engine.

        edit: ah, Alex beat me with actual details.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    “…this cabin is easily one of the best in the segment”

    I really was expecting a punchline after that. Styling is subjective, but the Q50 to me looks equally dated and bland inside and out. This has nothing to do with its capabilities mind you, but it just looks like it fell out of a 2009 Motor Trend spread.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Must have missed it in the review…but does this have run flats?

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    I have no problem with the turbo engine, but the death of the manual transmission on the sedan is what kills the car. Infiniti fixed the mandatory nature of that horrible steer by wire, now if only they’ll offer a proper gearbox. Otherwise, no way this can be more fun than the 340i.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Are those single zone seat heaters with no ventilated option?

    Also the tail lamps have too much red in them, they should have broken up somewhere by doing a clear portion that’s for an amber turn signal—or at least on the “S” smoke the lenses.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You know I wanted to say no way on the heated seat thing, as in current models they are heated and cooled and have three or four settings for each.

      But I think you’re right. Big downgrade.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Not on the Q50. The “climate-controlled” seats are a Q70 and Q80-only feature. The current Q50 has heated seats, but no ventilation.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Can’t edit — that should be “QX80” above.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Boo! The G37 had heat and vent seats.

          Edit: Nope it didnt, me wrong.
          http://www.tastyautos.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/car-photo-2009-infiniti-g37-coupe-sport-seat-warmer-controls-dials-close-up.jpg

          I figured the dial had both red and blue – took me a minute to find a close enough pic.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            But you have many settings in that photo—not just “ON”. Unless there’s another way to control it.

            I’ll gladly trade one of those screens for proper seat heat and ventilation.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I expect the Q50 is like many other cars (including several I’ve owned) where you cycle through three or so heat settings by pushing the button repeatedly.

          • 0 avatar
            Spartan

            The G37 Convertible had cooled seats. All others didn’t. I had a G37S Coupe for many years and was pretty bitter about not having cooled seats on hot black leather in the Summer.

            To add insult to injury, my wife would poke fun at me because her Taurus SHO has cooled seats while my uppity Infiniti didn’t.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “I expect the Q50 is like many other cars (including several I’ve owned) where you cycle through three or so heat settings by pushing the button repeatedly.”

            There’s 5 settings for it: Auto, Low, Med, High, Off.

            Status indication in through the climate portion. I’d honestly prefer the indicators to be not within a screen. But yes, mystery solved.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    The G series Infinitis really needed AWD to make effective use of the available torque. The problem for someone like me, who prefers a manual transmission, was that Infiniti offered AWD only with an automatic. Which to give up, the pleasure of driving a manual transmission or the power handling traction of AWD? Discontinuing manuals entirely wasn’t the answer I wanted. According to Infiniti’s web site, the Q60 coupe, which appears to be just a renamed G37, is still available with a 6 speed manual. At this point, I see no reason to trade in my 8 year old G37S coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      New Q60 coming, supposedly with turbo V6 + manual, for next year.

    • 0 avatar
      Spartan

      Infiniti won’t offer a manual with AWD because they don’t want to deal with the warranty claims. It’s fairly easy to grenade a transfer case with an idiot driver, manual transmission and AWD.

      I’m surprised Audi still offers the AWD/MT combo, especially in high powered applications.

  • avatar
    wmba

    The old VQ 3.7 V6 had VVEL, variable valve timing and lift, no conventional throttle. The variable valve lift was the throttle. Very clever indeed, compared to BMW’s Valvetronic, since it was not rpm limited by German gizmos adding weight to the valvetrain – and the 3.7 revs out to 7500 rpm.
    The only thing the engine did not have was DI, merely port injection.

    So this new VR engine’s dressed block is 40lbs lighter than the VQ, ditches VVEL (darn!) for conventional throttles, integrates the exhaust manifolds into the heads like all new engines, adds turbos and intercoolers, adds DI and ends up only 20 lbs or so heavier. But will it be as reliable? Lots more parts.

    A Canadian review from the same event Dykes visited found the new tweaked robo-steering much improved from the current Q50. I’m interested to drive the new one, not having been overly knocked out with the current MB C class or BMW 428i. If the 300 hp V6 costs the same as the 4 cylinder Germans and has the solidity of the G37, it should do well among folks not transfixed by badges. Those Germans are so 4 cylindery to listen to when you give them a bootful of gas, they really are, and maybe not so nice as the VW 2.0t alternative in the GTI and Audi A3, which seem creamy in power delivery and aurally better.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Interesting information. The extra complexity of the twin turbo engines would indeed worry me a bit. I like the 3.7 VQ and while 25 highway mpg out of the AWD version is almost shockingly thirsty, I’d rather pay for more fuel than suffer through reliability problems. If you do drive the 300 hp version, I’d be curious to read your impression in the comment section of a future Q50 article.

  • avatar

    You know how everyone keeps talking about how nice the Mazda6 looks? This is what it would look like if it had proper proportions and fit and finish.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    I want to dislike this but as a longstanding Nissan fan… I dont mind it, its like a return to how old Nissan RWD cars used to be. 400hp with more power than chassis.

    I dont even mind the slightly pedestrian looks. Everyone thinks its has a 2.0 four but it actually has 400.

    It does sound like a recipe for a car that eats brake pads and rear tyres though. 400hp close to 4,000lb… yeah.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    What I want to know is whether the new engine’s NVH has improved over the VQ?

    It was that NVH that dissuaded me from seriously considering a Q50…

  • avatar

    Maybe I missed it, but was there any mention of ride quality? This is frequently an Infiniti weak point, as far as I recall. Its nice that it handles well, but not if it breaks your back.


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