By on June 8, 2015

2015 Infiniti Q50S Exterior

When Infiniti launched their original G sedan, the brand started gaining a reputation as “the Japanese BMW” due to its sharp handling and V6 engine that loved to rev. Today, the Lexus IS and Cadillac ATS have taken the 3-Series’ place as the compact luxury sedans with the sharpest handing and best feel. What of the Japanese BMW then? To answer that question, Infiniti sent me a 2015 Q50S with all the options, including the controversial steer-by-wire system.

It’s my opinion the run-away sales success of the 3-Series (142,000 sold in the USA alone last year) has more to do with BMW being the ultimate marketing machine, not making the “ultimate driving machine.” The current generation 335i is certainly fast, but compared to the E36, it’s bigger, softer, more numb, more luxurious and better built than ever before. That’s not a slam because those qualities are exactly why I like the 3-Series more now than ever before. Rather than chasing the “old 3-Series” as Lexus and Cadillac have in many ways, Infiniti decided to create their own definition of the ultimate driving machine.

Before we go much further, you should remember when Infiniti launched the Q50 as a “replacement” for the G37, they kept the G37 around and renamed it the Q40 (still available as a 2015 model). This is an interesting twist on the norms in this segment. Most of the competition simply drops a lower output engine in the same vehicle rather than keeping the old model on as the discount alternative. This means the IS 250, 320i, A3 and CLA 250 all start below the Q50’s $37,150 price tag and compete more directly with the Q40. Although some have called the Q50’s sales “weak”, when you look at the whole picture, the Q40 and Q50 combined have outsold the Lexus IS 250 and IS 350 by 4,000 units and together are nipping at the Lexus ES’ heels.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Exterior-005

Exterior
Styled after Infiniti’s Essence concept, the Q50’s exterior combines sleek, flowing lines with an enormous maw and angry LED headlamps. Although I know that some of our readers have referred to the Q50 as an “angry fish,” I actually like the look. I don’t think it’s as aggressive as the ATS or as refined as the new C-Class but it is far more distinctive than the 3-Series and A4 and less controversial than the IS 350 F-Sport. For some reason, the side and rear of the Q50 remind me a great deal of the Mazda6. Let me know what you see down in the comment section.

Infiniti’s entry in this segment has always been on the larger side of things and that continues with the Q50. At 189.1 inches long, the Infiniti is a hair bigger than the Audi A4 and slightly smaller than the 3-Series GT hatchback. In case you were wondering, that’s still several inches shorter than the Acura TLX and Lexus ES which are 5-Series sized but 3-Series priced.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Interior

Interior
The Q50 wears the best interior that Infiniti has ever made. While no hands have rubbed silver dust into the Q50’s optional maple trim (as in the Q70), this cabin is easily one of the best in the segment. The new Mercedes C-class still wears the interior design and workmanship crown, but the compact Infiniti climbs up the luxury ladder to a place above the Acura TLX and a small notch above the BMW 3-Series. (The maple trim is only offered on top-end trims.)

Thanks to the Q50’s generous exterior dimensions, we have rear seats with more leg room than any of the compact luxury sedans, but you will find more room in the 3-GT. Unfortunately, like many compact luxury entries, rear headroom suffers due to the car’s sexy side profile. If you were hoping for a large trunk, you’ll be disappointed. The Q50’s trunk holds just 13.5 cubic feet, only a hair bigger than the Mercedes CLA or BMW 3-Series despite the car being larger in general. If you opt for the Q50 Hybrid then trunk volume shrinks to a decidedly convertible like 9.4 cubic feet, a hair less than BMW’s ActiveHybrid 3.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Infotainment-003

Infotainment
The Q50 is the first Infiniti to receive the new 2-screen InTouch infotainment system which uses both an 8-inch touchscreen LCD and a 7-inch touchscreen LCD. Like the last generation Infiniti systems, you can also control most of the system’s functions via a joystick-like button on the steering wheel. But wait! There’s more! Infiniti also includes a new navigation control wheel in the center console behind the shifter a la iDrive and MMI. This gives the driver three different input methods to choose from. However, not all features can be accessed via the steering wheel control or the control wheel, and some options will need to be ‘touched’.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Interior-001

Some passengers were truly and permanently perplexed by the 2-screen layout, but I adjusted to the software quickly. While this sounds like Acura’s 2-screen system, Infiniti’s solution is better thought out and both screens are touch-enabled rather than just one as in the Acura system. Acura’s advertised goal was to allow you to keep the top screen for navigation while you used the lower screen to play with your audio device, but that’s only half true as the top screen is needed to perform a large number of audio functions. In the Infiniti, the function overlap between the screens is large, so you can browse your media device and perform select other operations via either screen. This level of choice seems to be what confuses some shoppers. I have never seen a car infotainment interface that has so many ways of doing the same thing. On the flip side, by the second day, I settled into the system preferring to ignore the controller in the console and use a combination of steering wheel controls and the lower touchscreen.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Engine-001

Drivetrain
Rather than starting with a turbocharged four-banger, Infiniti skips entry-level power and makes a 328 horsepower 3.7L V6 standard on all Q50 models. (Other world markets get a Mercedes sourced four-cylinder turbo gasoline mill and four-cylinder diesel as well.) The engine’s 269 lb-ft of torque slots between the 2.0L turbo and 3.0L turbo competition. Should you need more oomph, Infiniti’s answer is not forced-induction, but hybridization. The Q50 Hybrid uses the same hybrid system we first saw in the M35h. Engine displacement drops to 3.5L and power to 302 horsepower. The engine is then mated to a 67 horsepower electric motor for a combined 360 horsepower and an undisclosed torque figure. (I estimate it at 380-400 lb-ft.)

Both engines are mated to essentially the same 7-speed automatic transmission and an optional mechanical AWD system. The key differences in the hybrid model (aside from the electric motor) are the additions of a dry clutch between the engine and the 360V AC motor and a wet clutch inside the transmission case that allows the wheels to be decoupled from the transmission. This allows the batteries to charge while the car is stationary and smooths out EV-to-gasoline mode changes.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Exterior-0011

Drive
Our tester was the “S” model which “sported” sport brakes, sport seats, sport suspension, magnesium paddle shifters staggered summer tires (245/40R19 front and 265/35R19 rear). Even with 3,675 pounds of curb weight to hustle, the Q50S corners exceptionally well and the double wishbone suspension and dual-mode dampers keep the suspension settled over broken pavement. Opt for the standard all-season rubber and grip is a little lower than the more athletic competition. Where the Q50 splits from the pack is in the feel.

Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the optional Direct Adaptive Steering system. That’s what Infiniti calls their steer-by-wire system in the Q50 and, to be perfectly blunt, it makes the Q50 feel “video game-ish.”

2015 Infiniti Q50S Interior-002

Unless the system detects a fault, there is no mechanical connection between the wheels and the steering wheel. If a fault is detected, or if the power is off, a clutch pack closes giving a mechanical connection. This allows the steering system to “compensate” for things like potholes, cross winds, grooved pavement, etc by keeping the wheels pointed the direction you’ve indicated by the steering wheel regardless of slight inputs from the road. The car can send back as much feedback as it wants, but this is kept to a minimum. This reduces driver fatigue on long trips, but the feeling of the car moving slightly in the lane in response to external forces while the steering wheel does nothing is unusual to say the least.

In addition to the steer-by-wire system, the Q50 gets “active trace control”, which uses the brakes to slow individual wheels “vectoring” you around the corner. The result of all these systems together is steering that may almost be “too precise.” In a corner, at even eight-tenths, you expect to get a slight hint of understeer. You may not even realize that your car is doing this because it is so “normal.” The Q50, however, goes exactly where you point it, something that takes some getting used to. Infiniti’s interpretation of the “ultimate driving machine” philosophy seems to be one that prioritizes actual steering precision and road holding over feel and connection.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Exterior-010

Steering feel aside, the Q50 acquits itself well in every other area. The S model accelerates with the best in the segment, posting a 5.05 second run to 60 in our RWD tester and a 60-0 distance of a scant 111 feet. Non S rear-wheel drive models will be a hair slower due to the reduced traction. Also, since there was essentially no wheel slip in the rear-wheel drive Q50S, the AWD model will actually slow the 0-60 time by a hair. If you want something faster, the hybrid model will dip below 4.8 seconds. There are few entries faster than the Q50 and if you want to get to highway speeds faster than the Q50 Hybrid, you’ll be left with just the 335i, C400 and S4.

Fuel economy in the Q50 is similar to the other 300+ horsepower entries in this segment, with the exception of the Volvo S60 T6 Drive e and BMW 335i that can average in the mid 20s when driven gently. Jump in the hybrid and you can average over 30 mpg if you keep your highway speeds under 75 mph. The economy is similar to the GS 450h but 0-60 and passing performance is dramatically better.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Exterior.CR2-002

For 2015, the Q50 starts at $37,150, which is closer to the less powerful four-cylinder competition. That is just $600 more than the sluggish IS 250, $910 more than an ATS 2.0T and manages to actually be $350 less than a base 328i. Audi’s A4 is a decent deal starting $1,650 less than the Q50, but you get 108 fewer ponies and they are all prancing through the front wheels via a CVT. When it comes to the 300 hp crowd, the Infiniti is $5,000 less than the ATS 3.6 and $2,000 less than even the Volvo S60 T6. Start adding options to your Q50 and some of the discount shrinks, but the Q50 remains the discount RWD alternative. The Q50 Hybrid is $4,400 more than a comparable gasoline Q50, but $10,000 less than a comparably equipped BMW ActiveHybrid 3.

If you know me, you know that I love a bargain. The very word “value” causes my loins to burn. The Q50 is the best RWD value in this luxury segment. Period. We get more standard power and performance, a well-appointed cabin, standard LED lamps and two screens for less with reasonable resale value expectations.

Perhaps the most important thing to know about the Q50 is Direct Adaptive Steering is not standard – you do have to select the $3,100 “Deluxe Touring Package” to get it. On the downside, that package includes real wood trim, auto dimming mirrors, power tilt/telescopic steering column, memory seats, parking sensors and the nifty 360 view camera. Not selecting that package gets you a steering rack that is still un-engaging but feels considerably more traditional. The rumor mill tells us that the G37’s hydraulic steering rack is likely to be resurrected and grafted into the S trims of the Q50 for 2016. Let’s hope that happens soon.

2015 Infiniti Q50S Exterior-003

While the ATS and IS 350 are more dynamic options, I suspect I’d buy the Q50 instead due to its interior, infotainment system, performance and price. I have to admit that I would also buy the model with DAS if I was unable to wait for 2016. No, I don’t actually “like” DAS, but I like the features bundled with it more than I dislike it. If there’s one thing that becomes obvious when you drive over a hundred cars a year, it’s that actual buyers adjust to the way a car feels much more readily than journalists do. Is the Q50’s steering odd feeling? Sure, in a comparative sense it is, but you’ll also get used to it after a few days and then it will feel perfectly normal to most shoppers. I wouldn’t call the Q50 the ultimate driving machine, but if my money were on the line, I’d get the Q50S AWD Hybrid.

Infiniti provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 2.1 Seconds

0-60: 5.05 Seconds

1/4 Mile: 13.45 Seconds @ 104.2 MPH

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

90 Comments on “2015 Infiniti Q50S Review (With Video)...”


  • avatar
    YellowDuck

    Nice review. My wife is in a Q50 (non-S) AWD and adores it. No steer by wire, but otherwise very much like what you have described here. Personally I find all the inputs for the infotainment system to be mind boggling and I have yet to press any of the buttons on the steering wheel, but then I don’t get to drive it much. It is a gorgeous car with an outstanding engine. On price vs features and performance, it blows any comparable BMW away. Plus she has been keen on Nissan / Infiniti styling for years. I had to talk her out of an ATS and we are now both glad that I did.

  • avatar
    ajla

    To me, blowing $40K+ on a new car and having to “get used to” or adjust to something like video game steering, odd shift behavior, terrible visibilty, crashy ride or whatever else seems like a bizarre way to spend money.

    I straight out didn’t buy a Genesis because I didn’t want to personally adjust to its infotainment system or pedal placement.

    Maybe I’m just picky.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Your first sentence describes what is now inescapable in any new car.
      But you don’t need to spend 40K to get that, no.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      RideHeight is probably right. Without doing a whole lotta research this morning, 40K is now the going price for these luxury entry cars.

      And you are so right…IF you have to go here, then the getting used to all that crap is nonsense. Poor visibility and option packaging is especially bothersome to me. Why isn’t much of the add-ons part of the base car…like back up cameras and navigation?

      The last thought…I wonder why I am such an anti-rear drive guy? Is it the loooonng hood look? Perhaps the forced long hood followed by the forced small cargo/trunk/rear seat that irritate me the most. This considering I have never, ever had a performance car that I took to its limits or even partially close. I wanted power when I want it but most of the time I want the day to day important details.

      I love the look of this car, then I listen to Alex tell me the limitations brought on by the RWD and I think..just give me NEAR luxury/performance and a daily drive I can use.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Whats wrong with you Alex. You know you are not allowed to like anything Infiniti around here. You of all folks should know that all you are getting is a gussied up Altima. Heck it even has 95 percent of the Altimas parts doesnt it?
    Nobody here in their right mind would buy this since its resale value is so bad and you know that 100 percent of all people buy cars to get rid of them right?
    Alex my man, I dont know whats wrong with you. Infinti’s are like RWD Acura’s no ones wants them. Didnt you know that already? Geez.

    PS great reveiw as always. I got a chance to drive one of these this past weekend locally ( needed something to do after I came back from marriage retreat) and I enjoyed it. Would I buy one for me …nope but only due to overall size and preference for larger cars…good job Alex

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    “The current generation 335i is certainly fast, but compared to the E36, it’s bigger, softer, more numb, more luxurious and better built than ever before” The same has been said for every single generation of 3-series since the e21 replaced the old 2002 waaaay back in ’77. Yawn.

    This seems like a decent enough car, there are no bad choices in this class of car, they are all pretty nice. I prefer the German look and feel, but I can see why people buy these too, especially at the price. At least in pictures the interior looks much improved over the G37. I’ve had a few as rentals, they sure were fast but they also looked and felt cheap. Hopefully fixed now.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      what is the German look and feel?

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Look at the interior of this car. TWO big screens, lots of buttons scattered all over the place. Look at the inside of a German car. Simple, more straightforward (though less so today than historically). I think they are two very different aesthetics, and people seem to gravitate towards one of the other. I actually LIKE that I don’t have to have every whistle and bell known to man in the car, even if that makes it “poorer value”. I don’t love iDrive, but I LOATH touch screens.

        Even with lighter steering (which I like), German cars still seem more planted in driving feel than the Japanese equivalent. It’s just one of those “certain something-something” things. Hard to describe. I also like the efficiency that BMW in particular is squeezing out of their cars without giving up any performance. Nice to see that Saab was right all those years. I would rather give my money to the car maker and maybe a mechanic someday than to the oil companies.

        I did actually get Nav on my new car, but only because I wanted a couple of the other things that came in the package (ugh, packages). I can pretty well guarantee that in the world of Google Maps on my phone, I will likely never, ever use the cars Nav system once it is Stateside.

    • 0 avatar
      ctg

      I own a 2011 G37 (purchased used last year), and recently had a Q50S as a loaner car. The interior is DRAMATICALLY better than the G. In particular the Q had zero squeaks or rattles (my biggest complaint about the G). The improved materials and assembly in the Q (much softer, better fitting) also make me think that squeaks are less likely to crop up over time in the Q. Getting back into the G after the service, it felt about 15 years old in comparison. I still like it for other reasons (especially at the used price), but I think the Q50 is a huge leap forward for most shoppers in this segment.

      Agree that between the G/Q and the Germans, its mostly a question of feel, though the Q is much closer to the Germans in terms of solidity, ride, etc. compared to the G in my opinion.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I realize yours is an MY11 and it was refreshed in MY06 (V36) and all, but the V35 on which your G37 is based came out in 2002 so it *is* nearly fifteen years old. I don’t know enough about Nissan/Infiniti to tell you if the V37, aka Q50, is built on the same bones or just uses the next number in naming progression and is in fact new all around.

        • 0 avatar
          ctg

          True, although the powertrain feels mostly the same between the G and the Q. I don’t believe that the VQ engine got any updates, and the 7-speed auto seems to be mostly the same with the exception of slightly taller gearing in the upper gears (which helped fuel economy a bit).

          I was just taking about the interior styling and feel. And you’re right that the same basic interior has been around since 06 (with minor updates to the gauges in MY10, I think). What I was trying to get at was that the Q50 felt very modern, and in comparison the G37 feels very old and, frankly, uncompetitive with a new 3 series, Audi A4, Lexus IS or MB C-Class.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I concede your point, being a brand new model I would hope the interior/materials are more refined than the outgoing one, even if it is sitting on a revised V3x platform and uses the same drivetrain. The irony would be though if it is just a revised V36 G37 and enough buyers were wooed by the interior/exterior changes as you were, that they didn’t know the difference.

        • 0 avatar
          cpthaddock

          I wondered about the platform as well and was told that it’s entirely new from G37 to Q50. This would underscore the traveling gypsy automotive name changing and headquarter relocating titan Johann DeNyschen’s comments (in relation to the Eau Rouge) about the Q50 platform being capable of handling significantly higher power.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think they’re doing two new platforms, RWD larger for Q70 and FX, and RWD small for G and EX. While the bastard FWD JX is of course a Nissan platform.

            Get outta here, JX.

            Oh, and the G interior needed updating way before it got it with this new Q50. It looks old in there.

      • 0 avatar
        cpthaddock

        I had the reverse experience, spending a day with the Standard Q50 versus my G convertible with upgraded everything.

        I like the interior, started getting used to the myriad controls (an extra day would have helped) and started coming around to the angry fish styling – except for the awkward bulge / crease under the side mirrors that struck me as the same kind of fop to “fashion” as the fender vents in the QX70 and QX80.

        It was a nice place to be, but the driving experience left me longing for the steering, handling and braking in my G, despite all of it’s extra weight. Next time I’ll hit them up for a Q50S.

        • 0 avatar
          ctg

          cpthaddock,

          To be clear, I still prefer my G37 for the reasons you stated. Its a livelier, more enjoyable car to drive compared to the Q50. My point was, I think for most shoppers in this segment the Q50 is a huge step up in terms of what they’re looking for (interior materials, technology, road isolation, modern styling, etc).

    • 0 avatar
      QX1

      335 has also quality issues. You will not that so cheaply and without drama.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    The Infiniti dealer near me is offering a lease on the non-S Q50 AWD for $299 a month for 39 months with no money down. An interesting deal. It also demonstrates that they’re probably not moving many of that particular model.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You don’t want the S anyway. Don’t need ghetto wheels and trim. And previously with S trims, you couldn’t get wood, and had to settle for weird brushed aluminium instead. I’ve never been a fan of their S trim.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        “Premium” trim gives you some really “poverty spec” looking rims instead. There’s no wins in wheel selection on this model.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          These ones don’t look too bad. They aren’t my favorite, but better than these graphite 370Z wheels above.

          http://releasedatecars2016.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/2015-Infiniti-Q50-Side.jpg

          Oh, the uplevel wheel option is these, which I like.
          http://www.infinitiusa.com/st/infiniti/images/assets/2015/q5/accessories/695×325/14TDI_Q50a009.jpg

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Alex, maybe I missed it, but what was the MSRP of the model you drove?

  • avatar
    John R

    This is sharp, but, to me, the money is spent more smartly on the old school G thir…er..Q40 RWD.

    Same motor, more straight forward driving experience and probably a little lighter on its feet, too. Best of all brand new ones can be had for quite a way under $35k – http://goo.gl/PBZ8aZ.

    The first thing I would do (and probably the only thing most people would do) is change those stock wheels, bleh.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      There’s no “S” package for the Q40, and that is a very big improvement inf you’re after driving engagement. The 2 door versions can still be had with it, though they masquerade under the Q60 name now.

    • 0 avatar
      cs21

      I drive a 05 Saab 9-5 Aero sedan. 163K on the clock. I’ve always liked the Infiniti because of its deliberate intent to not copy Acura and Lexus.
      I do all my own maintenance on the Saab because I can. It runs great, the turbo still pulls like new. I would imagine it would go head to head with these stout 6 cylinders at highway speeds from 60 on. That’s pretty much the only time I tap into the 2.3 potential. Yeah I can tune it, but how often will I use/need it. 32 hwy to boot.
      I can change the trans fluid simply by draining it. No filter, pan or gasket to mess with. Plugs can be changed blindfolded. I like cars that are simple and just do the basic stuff well. I will continue to buy late model Saabs because they are easy to work on, unique, good on gas, and with the bigger Mitsubishi turbo are pretty quick for the driver who doesn’t need a high hp # to make a statement. Lastly, they are reliable (pre 06) if taken care of.

      • 0 avatar
        QX1

        Saab has problems building new models and is like married several groom now. My friend has 1987 9000. Nothing special everything starts to shake already.I have seen in my country only one new 9-5. Poor results.Saab is aging legend.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Does the Q40/G37 (V36) still use a conventional stereo? I see the Q50 does not.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I looked at one of these last year and found the Q40 to be much more engaging. The Q50 is more of a gadget loaded luxury car than a sports sedan.

    My advice would be to look for a two year old used model as depreciation on Infinities can be a little steep.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    “The very word “value” causes my loins to burn.”

    Excellent review, but the above information is best kept between you, a specialist, and the prescribed ointment.

    Infiniti keeps sending people cars with the drive-by-wire steering, and they keep handing back poor reviews of it. I can’t recall seeing a thorough review on the Q50’s traditional hydraulic steering, but your quick mention of it suggests it isn’t as good as the G37. That’s a bummer, because I think this car looks fantastic inside and out.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    MY14 Q50 Sedan 2WD base trades 23,7 avg/rough-29,0 xc, all under 40K otc.

    So at 37 + dest (additional packages notwithstanding) you’ll lose a minimum of 8K in almost two model years, I’d say on avg more like 12. ATS will lose about 15 in the same period and sucks in almost every other metric in comparison.

    However, MY13 G37 2WDs are trading 20,2 rough-23,2 avg, all 13-26k otc. So the additional model year aside (there doesn’t appear to be a G37/Q40 in MY14 for some reason) it appears the avg Q50 trades at about a 5K price premium to its predecessor G37 (which surprises me as I expected G37 to be worth much less). 28CL says: spend the 5Kish and target MY14 Q50 2WD for around 30 CPO under 25k miles this summer.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoom

      “trading 20,2 rough-23,2 avg, all 13-26k otc.”

      Please break that down for us dummies.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The price range of MY13 G37s sold on auction block was $20,200 to $23,200 plus buyers fees (used to be typically $250). The miles on these cars ranged from 13,000 to 26,000 (otc = miles on the clock). Black Book used to use these vehicle conditions which MMR does not but I still do in my parlance:

        extra clean (xc)
        clean (c)
        average (a)
        rough (r)

        MMR simply uses “Above”, “Average”, and “Below”, which roughly equate to clean, average, and rough (extra clean is a near showroom vehicle below 20K miles). These apply to the condition of the car as it is running through the block. This is key: condition as it runs through the block. Clean meaning front line ready, Average meaning typical reconditioning cost for front line ready, and Rough meaning damage, announcements, or some kind of other higher reconditioning cost to be front line ready.

        So in summation:

        MY13 Infiniti G37 base sedans were being sold at auction for at the cheapest $20,200 in rough condition (meaning damaged, with announcements (known defects) or higher reconditioning costs) with at most 26,000 miles to $23,200 in average (or possibly BB’s “clean”) condition with at least 13,000 miles.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        For 28’s next trick: translate the Miley Cyrus song “Wrecking Ball” into Klingon.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

               
              
               
             

          Well evidently WordPress doesn’t use the correct collation for Klingon.

          https://www.bing.com/translator/

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Question: Is that $37K+ destination based on MSRP? Or real transaction prices? Based on the cut-rate, no-down-payment lease deals on these that I see in my area, I have to think purchase prices aren’t close to MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Great question, the 37K figure I cite is from Alex’s article: “For 2015, the Q50 starts at $37,150”. I don’t have access to new dealer data to give you a real time transaction price, however TrueCar is saying the Infiniti Q50 msrps for 46,3 and the avg paid is 44,4 nationally. Check it out for your area I assume either this information is wrong or there are very few 2WD “base” models sold at 37K and the “average” Q50 is being semi-loaded up to 44K. Unfortunately when the model name does not differentiate the packages, we can’t know for sure who is getting AWD, navi etc just based on the name alone. For Manheim’s data, you have a choice of four models (Q50 2WD, Q50 AWD, Q50 2WD Hybrid, Q50 AWD Hybrid) and three trims (Sedan (base), Premium, Sport). If Alex is right on the 37K figure, then most Q50s are being sold in higher trims (Premium) but I quoted from the base “Sedan” trim choice.

        2015 Infiniti Q50 Price Report
        MSRP: $46,355

        MSRP
        $46,355
        Average Paid
        $44,442
        Factory Invoice
        $43,474

        https://www.truecar.com/prices-new/infiniti/q50-pricing/

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          A quick look at dealer websites in my area shows the “buy it now” prices at $4-6K off MSRP.

          One dealer is offering a 39 month lease on a Q50 AWD for $259/mo., $995 due at signing, 10K miles per year. I’ve never been interested much in leases, but even I’m tempted by that deal.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’d be curious to know if the “buy it now” was on the RWD 37K base model or if it was on a more loaded model in between Q50 and Q50S (i.e. Navi, heated seats, moonroof etc but none of the other “S” features). Even without the extras the 37K base model becomes 33-4K before TTL, you’re probably looking at 35 out the door. The previous G37 I believe started at around 33 but with the Q50 you get an upgraded interior vs if you had bought G37 in 2013. I too am intrigued.

            The AWD btw starts at 38,950 + 905 dest roughly $1800 more than the RWD model (options being a 1K moonroof), although “Premium” takes you right to 40 and the Tech, Navigation, Leather, and Touring packages are not available in the base model. Call the dealer and see which options are available on the lease special, it looks like all of the standard “luxury” fare may not be available unless the deal if for a “Premium” model car.

            This is the lease deal in my area which I think sucks:

            2015 Q50 3.7 PREMIUM
            3.7 PREMIUM
            $309 Per Month Lease
            For 39 Months
            $3,499 initial payment plus a $700 non refundable lease acquisition fee
            Monthly payments total 12,051, at least end purchase for $22K plus 300 fee.

            COCHRAN INFINITI OF SOUTH HILLS

            3220 WEST LIBERTY AVENUE
            PITTSBURGH, PA, 15216
            412-245-3636

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Same lease deals here in Cincinnati, and you get the AWD Q50 for the same monthly payment but $200 more due at signing.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Our deals suck, I like TMA1’s $259/mo with only $995 at signing. Depending on what the buyout value is fixed at it could be an all around win.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    How does the VQ sound in these? Have they made it less tinny and harsh than it is in the G37?

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      The real unadulterated sound of modern direct injection engines today is a big step backwards from the glory days of inline 6’s. By comparison these days, any iteration of a VQ sounds like glorious symphony!

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Can’t agree there. I find the VQ sound in the G35/G37/350Z/370Z/FX37 unlistenable. They make the hairs on my neck stand up in a bad way, just like scratching styrofoam. Ugh.

        The front-drivers aren’t nearly as bad, which gives me hope that maybe the Q50 is also better.

        • 0 avatar
          cpthaddock

          I had pretty much that same sensation with the 428i.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I find the N20 too coarse for a luxury car engine, but not really that bothersome otherwise. Its NVH would be fine if it were in a mass-market brand.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            For V&H, I find nothing in it between an I4 N20 and my I6 N52. In theory, the I6 is better balanced, but between balance shafts, modern engine mounts and sound insulation there is really nothing in it between them for vibration and harshness. With neither engine will you accidently try to start a car that is already running. The I6 certainly sounds better, especially with the BMW Performance Exhaust as I have on my car. Stock, it did not sound like much of anything below 4K rpm, just a faint whine. But the N20 is both significantly more powerful and significantly more fuel efficient. I’ll take that tradeoff for a little less nice noise when I get on it.

            A 3-series is not a luxury car anyway, and if you must have the I6 sound BMW will still sell you one. With 300+hp. I don’t even have a problem with the four in the 5-series as the base engine, if you are not in a hurry why not? You can barely hear it, turn the stereo up a notch and you can’t tell the difference.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “You can barely hear it”

            Not my experience. I like the engine’s power delivery, but it’s a lot coarser than (for example) the EA888. You can both hear it, with a typical 4-cylinder exhaust sound, and feel it.

            After driving a 328i and an X3 with it I wouldn’t buy one. If I couldn’t afford a six-cylinder BMW I’d buy a different brand, either a Japanese brand with a six or a four-cylinder Audi.

            A neighbor also recently bought a six-cylinder X3 (xDrive35i), and that one is also surprisingly loud and rides harshly. My impression of BMW these days is that they are losing a lot of refinement in the quest for volume and profits.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The VQ35HR sounds a bit gruff under acceleration, but it’s not a bad noise to my ears. Keep in mind though they sound -very- different between start up in a warm temperature and being at temp operating level.

          Overall though the VQ30 sounded much nicer and more refined.

          Neither compare to a nice 4.3 Lexus V8 or an Audi 4.2.

    • 0 avatar
      ZCD2.7T

      “Have they made it less tinny and harsh than it is in the G37?”

      It’s better than in the G37, but still sounds bad enough (to me) to make me take a pass on the car altogether when I test drove it.

  • avatar
    TheBlueSoap

    I have only 2 issues with the Q50S AWD:
    1 – the steer wire by wire system does feel odd,and for the ’14 model the system would freeze up in winter and the backup system would also freeze up. Seems to be working fine after having to bring the car in twice for the same problem last winter.

    2 – the lower screen that takes care of the climate and entertainment etc…is slow to load upon startup of vehicle,and also at random times has frozen while listening to radio/ipod. The only way to reset is to turn off the car wait a few seconds then restart.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      I can’t comment on #1 since I’m not in the snow belt, but on #2 there was a hardware and software change that made the system much, much, much faster and our tester was so updated.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    Does the Q50S AWD have the same option goofiness as the G37xS had (in that the “S” part of it was only appearance items).

    All in all, I like my 2009 G37x and would definitely consider a used Q50 if I’m in the market for a sedan next time around (which is unlikely with the addition of 50+lb dogs).

  • avatar
    vanpressburg

    Q50 has a much nicer interior than BMW 328i or Lexus IS.
    Q50 has better visibility than Lexus IS.
    Q50 is worth to buy with hydraulic steering for $37 000, not with video game steering.
    Q50 2016 supposes to get better hydraulic steering for 2016.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Hey, don’t insult video game steering. Modern video game wheels have vastly superior steering feel compared to many new vehicles! Sadly, I’m not kidding. At all.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    If you are wondering about Infiniti quality and this car in particular, my buddy’s is sitting at the shop today because his AC quit working completely, so…

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Rather than starting with a turbocharged four-banger, Infiniti skips entry-level power and makes a 328 horsepower 3.7L V6 standard on all Q50 models.”

    I think this is an overlooked bit on all Infiniti models, especially in the past couple years with engine downsizing – you get a LOT of engine as standard. Never a 2.0T/etc like the competition.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I think this is because Nissan/Infiniti wants to ride out its drivetrains/platforms as long as possible because it is far cheaper than reinventing them every six years or so. I’m sure eventually this will come to an end and Ghosn will drink the turbo fail kool-aide.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Nooo. Don’t say that! I’m telling you Infiniti continues to be a value leader in the RWD + luxury + AWD segment.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          For the time being, I agree. Although I question some of the atypical behavior where one is forced to spend 7K over base to get what should be standard options at this point.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Is that considering a True Delta type pricing thing, comparing with the Merc and BMW options? I always found the Tech and/or Nav package of Infiniti better off than the options pricing strategy of the German brands. Audi is bad at that too.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Personally the only thing I’m ever interested in are heated seats and a moonroof. I recall the moonroof is standalone but for the heated seats I don’t remember now. However it seems in general mfgs are bundling heated seats with other pricey packages I as the buyer don’t want.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    For more than a decade, Infiniti was everybody’s go-to reasonably priced quasi-luxury performance car. Ask 90 percent of people who owned a G or even FX, and they tell you they wanted a good driver’s car. But now that Infiniti is moving towards the “fly by wire”, “cruise, steer, and brake by itself” type of sleep inducing car, what are the reasons to buy a new Infiniti? People who want a performance sedan already know that G was the last good own, while most of those who want a badge on wheels will by-pass the Infiniti brand, will head straight into a European car dealership.

  • avatar
    QX1

    i am very much puzzled why Infiniti did not tune in their engines VQ37HR the torque until 295 that Porche Panamera did on their 3.6 V6 with 300hp. Infiniti considers itself as rising star. Torque is the one that makes from engine a engine.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      Ever heard of direct injection? The Nissan V6’s don’t have it – a typical 3.5 V6 port injection has about 250 to 260 lb-ft. Adding DI gets you to about 270 to 275 and so a 3.7 would have about 290 lb-ft, like the new GM 3.6 V6 in the 2016 Cadillac CTS which is about 3.65l.

  • avatar

    Aha ! The Q was much on my mind this summer. We rented a car from Sixt, and after a two and a half hour debacle checking out at the rental counter, we received a battlefield promotion to a Q50. My family of six footers fit nicely, even the back seaters didn’t complain. Big Trunk.

    The Q was a base model. Hydraulic steering and RWD only. I found the chassis responsive, and the engine/trans combo to be super smooth, moreso than my 2010 CTS-almost the I6 of the old NA BMW motors. The suspension was set up comfortable, although I’d have gone a notch stiffer on the rear shocks. That only showed up over 85 mph, though, so I realize I’m the outlier. I tend to prefer Sport package settings, FE3, or whatever the magik code is for that model-YMMV

    Inside, everyone loved the quality-base seats excellent up front. The ICE was kind of stupid. Sound quality of the radio was very good, but since the car didn’t have nav, it had two huge screens in the dash with really not much to do. They could delete the top screen without any impact-it was a lot of kit to show me an analog clock.

    We drove from the roller coaster streets of SF to the flat plains of the central state to LA traffic. (Waze isn’t your friend, it is a requirement in LA) The car was quiet at highway speeds, would hoon if asked, but wasn’t “tossable” on PCH. Overall a very good light sport sedan other than on PCH, which, truth be told, was so full of traffic any tossing wasn’t for long….

    When I was car shopping, I drove a G37. I thought it would be same as Q, but it wasn’t….so it was cut from consideration, RWD and nice 6 notwithstanding. Infiniti moved a bit upmarket with the Q50 and it showed.

    I only found one peeve, that would be an issue if I were to buy this. Memory Seats, which one would think are standard in this class, are missing. You need to get an upmarket package, which IIRC, requires the electric steering….ack…shades of the evil BMW option groupings. They got the steering perfect in the base car, too….

    A very credible competitor in the class, probably more enthusiast if you keep the options off of it.

    The standard tires were well matched to the car. I’d not want staggers or any sort of 19 inchers, and wish mainstream car makers would get that it only makes the car ride hard and in normal use is just a PIA. I had staggers once…can’t rotate tires…wasteful. 19 or 20 inch low profiles won’t survive in the NY Metro area, and, I am sure, others….

    A very pleasant car, and a good deal on lease. I’ll even go so far as to say better steering than a friend’s 428i. Oh, and IMHO, a four cylinder belongs in an economy car, not something approaching 50k.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Rick T.: I continue, as an old fogey, to be shocked at how many young people are talking from the phone when they...
  • ajla: I’ve read many “insider” things over the years saying that direct sales would not be a net...
  • dwford: Seeing how way too many people can’t even pair the bluetooth in their cars, even after more than a...
  • 28-Cars-Later: I’d say its because they are in another time zone, but they are not (unless they moved).
  • Lightspeed: Nice press-release.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber