By on March 17, 2015

04 - 1989 Nissan Pulsar Down On the Junkyard - Picture By Murilee MartinThe Nissan Pulsar NX was a weird little two-seater sold in the US market for the 1983 through 1990 model years. Now, the coolest thing about the Pulsar NX was the Sportbak wagon-conversion option, available on the second-gen version, but I have yet to see a Sportbak in a junkyard. So far in this series, I’ve photographed this ’83, this ’87, and now today’s ’89.
15 - 1989 Nissan Pulsar Down On the Junkyard - Picture By Murilee MartinThis being a California car, it’s not a bit rusty. Maybe it wouldn’t pass the smog test, maybe it broke something costing more than a few hundred bucks to fix, maybe it picked up too many San Francisco parking tickets, or maybe it just plain wore out.
09 - 1989 Nissan Pulsar Down On the Junkyard - Picture By Murilee MartinOver 200,000 miles.


Someone please explain: why is 1980s nostalgia big these days?

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91 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1989 Nissan Pulsar NX...”


  • avatar

    Taylor Swift. Millennial kids bizarrely nostalgic for a time they never lived in. They can reshape it in their image. All of the fashion, none of the Reagan.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      Actually, Ronald Reagan, and the height of optimism in our country he brought with him; would be number one on my list. The U.S.A. has not looked better for many years before, and not since.

      The rise of the Space Shuttle, and unfortunately the fall of the Challenger in 1986.

      The Blues Brothers, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Chariots of Fire, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home; or in other words; some of my favorite movies all came out in the 1980s as well as a couple of years proceeding it.

      Goodbye Malaise era; hello Jelly Bean era. It was exciting times watching the Audi 5000s and Ford Taurus appear to transform the automotive landscape; as well as the return from the dead of Chrysler with its K-Car based lineup and Ford’s new aero lineup. For good or for bad, cars have never been the same.

      The 1980s, and even much of the 1990s was still a time of great optimism before the internet and Japan real estate bubble burst and of course 9-11. Many of us were in college then, bought our first cars, and remember those years fondly as a result.

      In the past year, I acquired a Hot Wheels Ford Aerostar. When I received it, I took a look at it and thought “That’s not what it looked like, was it?” Well, just this past weekend, I was in Houston, and while waiting for the grandbaby to be changed and feed, I was looking around downtown and right there on a corner were a pair of Aerostars; looked like ex-City of Houston vehicles. I took a close look at them, and realized “Why yes, that is what they looked like!”

      This Pulsar and the Aerostar with its brittle PVC bumpers may not have aged well; but they were exciting at the time; and still bring back fond memories.

      • 0 avatar

        I remember those Aerostar TV commercials where they’d superimpose the van’s nose over that of the space shuttle.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        The 90s were a great time for Gen Xers. They partied through college, got jobs in revitalizing and energized cities after, and ended up in dot.com’s with foosball tables, leased Boxsters, and seven figure paper wealth.

        That all spectacularly went to shirt in 2000-01, of course, but those who bought property during that era did more than well in the real estate boom, until that gravy train ended in 08.

        So, comparing that trajectory to the very murky one we’re facing at present, I’m surprised there isn’t more nostalgia for cars of this vintage.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Hmm 2008 sounds familiar as a time in my life. Probably because that’s when I graduated from college, at the end of May.

          Ugh.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            Yup, they had a big shirt sandwich waiting for you at graduation on a paper plate, heh. Sorry man. Having lived through both eras in a state of stunted maturity (and in a big city), there’s a HUGE difference in energy between 1995 and 2015.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’ve made it through okay. I just had to leave the country for a year to get work.

        • 0 avatar
          kvndoom

          Ain’t it the truth! I graduated high school in 1989, and I had just enough knowledge of programming that I could have gotten into that field when it was HOT. Early 90’s you could write your own paycheck as a skilled programmer. I thoroughly wasted that decade.

          Even manual laborers had good jobs waiting for them back then in factories when they entered the workforce. Things are so crappy now that my fiancée and I tell her kids that we won’t hold it against them if they never have children.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            “…my fiancée and I tell her kids that we won’t hold it against them if they never have children.”

            How magnanimous of you.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That was my thought – like either of you should have anything to say on whether they have children or not.

            x.x

          • 0 avatar
            kvndoom

            We were not suggesting, only saying that we’d respect their decision if they chose not to. I don’t see where you got the idea that I’m trying to tell them what to do with their lives.

            Conversely, I suppose we could be like so many crappy parents who coerce their children into becoming baby factories solely because THEY want grandkids. I know those types are SO much better, yeah?

        • 0 avatar
          Mackie

          I’m a gen x-er and I assure you my ’90s was nothing like that.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        I occasionally see Aerostars on the road, still, in Portland.

        Honestly, they’ve aged pretty damned well; better than the Pulsar.

        (My parents had one – an Aerostar – and I drove it a bit in the early 90s. Wasn’t bad at all, for the era.

        And the looks would be good even today.)

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I dunno, even in AWD Eddie Bauer guise:

          http://0-60.reviews/wp-content/themes/alyoum/images/cars/1992_ford_aerostar_eddie%20bauer%20awd_03.jpg

          the Chrysler vans looked better at the time:
          http://img3.findthebest.com/sites/default/files/4315/media/images/t2/1992_Dodge_Grand_Caravan_3dr_Minivan_3591933.jpg

          and the GM vans were much more modern:

          http://img1.findthebest.com/sites/default/files/4315/media/images/t2/1992_Pontiac_Trans_Sport_SE_3dr_Minivan_3751556.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          jhefner

          That shovelnose design was definitely early aero, along with the “dustbuster” GM minivans. It just looks dated compared to the big nose cars of today; though I prefer it too.

          But the bumpers are a big problem; just like the ones on my Taurus. If you just look at the those bumpers wrong; they crack and shatter. One of the two I saw had a broken front bumper cover. Both the Mercedes and Fords of this era used PVC in thier bumper covers; and they would shatter rather than bend a little.

          I can’t remember the last Mercedes from the 80s I have seen; but most of the remaining Taurus, Tempo, Aerostar, and their Mercury/Lincoln counterparts have cracked, broken, or completely missing bumpers.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I hope one day I’ll be able to do the same selective editing on the times in which I lived.

      • 0 avatar
        319583076

        :D

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        You don’t want to know about the personal crap that went with growing up at the time. But that was how I felt about living the times back then.

        The fact that I was in college and looking forward to a bright future (never mind the growing up I had to do to get there) probably colored my outlook. But they were fun times.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          We all have our own amount of personal stuff, although I agree some things are era dependent vs others.

          I’m envious of you though because you believed you had a bright future during your youth/early adulthood. I know better today.

        • 0 avatar
          Rick T.

          I’ve got a job waiting for my graduation
          Fifty thou a year — buys a lot of beer
          Things are going great, and they’re only getting better
          I’m doing all right, getting good grades
          The future’s so bright, I gotta wear shades

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I have no real complaints about any of the decades I have lived though.

        So much doom and gloom among you kids today (and yes, mid-30s is still a kid). Lighten up for God’s sake! I didn’t have two nickels to rub together until I was in my mid-late 30s, you will get your turn too. Do the best you can and try to have a good time on the cheap.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    A work friend of mine had one of these in these in the early nineties. She was older than me, married, no kids – seemed to be perfect for her.

    I’ll take that V6 200SX from the commercial please!

    • 0 avatar
      cls12vg30

      Can’t have mine! ;)

      I loved the Pulsars when I was a kid in the late ’80s (graduated HS in ’95). Those unique diagonal taillights, removable roof, removable hatch…I remember being jealous of them when cruising around in my ’82 Datsun 200SX in the early ’90s.

      I wonder if an SR20DE would fit in a Pulsar NX engine bay. They look so much better than the B13 NX that came after…

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Yes, but there is a lot of fabrication involved. Might be easier to look for a Twincam.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Not only will the SR20 fit, it came standard in the Pulsar NX SE model. The SE was pretty much a Sentra SER in better looking do duds.

        And that hatch was also designed to be removed, along with the standard t-tops it was a nice little convertible for beach days. It was also not a 2 seater, it has a small back seat. I wanted one in high school for cruising the beach and picking up girls.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          I had 4 people in my Pulsar once. The back seat occupants were extremely uncomfortable.

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          OK I think my nostalgia got the better of me. After thinking about it, I realized I was mixing up my NX models. Apparently the t-top one had a 1.6 standard and the 1.8 optional. The later jelly bean shaped one had the SR20 in the top model.

          I still wanted one back in the day!

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            You could get t-tops in both generations.

            This one is the N13 Pulsar NX: standard engine was the same boring E16i (87-88) or GA16i (89-90) that the B12 Sentras had. Optional Twincam SE model had the CA16DE (87) or CA18DE (88-89).

            Next model was the 1990-93 (N14 Pulsar-based) NX1600 (GA16DE) or NX2000 (SR20DE), same engines as the B13 Sentra. NX1600 had the optional digital dash.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    I loved these things as a kid. My parish priest had fairly clapped-out one and would frequently reference it in his homilies.

  • avatar
    319583076

    My third car was similar to this one – I had a manual, I think it was an ’88. It was a decent car, pretty great for a college kid in the mid-to-late 90s. Quality wasn’t that great. The car was about 7 years old when I bought it and full of small problems which multiplied during my university-impoverished ownership.

    I have fond memories of popping the T-tops and cruising around campus on sunny days.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Looks like a GA16i with an automatic, no great loss here. The Twincam version had a CA-series DOHC engine, which makes them good parts donors for a B12 Sentra turbo build.

  • avatar

    One of these is on my must-have list of small sporty cars. I love designs like this for some reason. The first-gen MR2 is my favorite in this style.

  • avatar
    tlccar

    Love that eighties Nissan commercial! Does anyone remember the very rare Pulsar sedan? My wife’s friend’s mother had one and they used to go out in it very often when they were teenagers. She often commented on that car, that it was very slow but very reliable too. I think their son ended up totaling that car. You very rarely saw the sedans at all!

  • avatar
    Nick

    I had one of these. In yellow. I bought it before I went back to school because it was the onl economical car I could fit into. It was badly underpowered, lots of rowing of the gears. However, it was as reliable a car as one could hope to find. Even with all season radials it was IMPOSSIBLE to get stuck…my friends and I used to try just for fun and never managed. And finally it had BY FAR the most powerful heater of any car I’ve ever owned; it was blast furnace.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I remember reading about the Sportback model being like a “life-sized Transformer” for adults! Thought it was pretty cool myself as I drove around a red one on my way home from work in my 1981 Reliant one fine day.

    I’m 64, and the 1980s were great for me. Young family years, good music as long as you avoided Madonna, beginning a new career in packaging, raising our kids, et al.

    I’m always “Walking on Sunshine”!

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      The death of Disco was also as welcome a development as the end of the Malaise era. The rise of disco did cause me to turn to listening to classical on the local NPR station; and that was a big plus as well.

      Somebody also gave me a Mannheim Steamroller tape in 1978; and during the 80s; they could still do something besides Christmas music.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        “The death of Disco…”

        You got that right!

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I love disco – I was born 10 years too late, I would have been out shaking my groove thing if I had been older. Not much you can dance to these days.

          But then again, I pretty much love most music other than country and rap.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Something good came out of disco: The Ethel Merman Disco Album. She said nice things about disco publicly, but hated it.

        Her agent recorded her singing while wearing headphones, listening to a big band. Then he had a disco band dubbed in. She sang all her old standards, but with a disco beat added: There’s No Business Like Show Business(thump. thump. thump.)

        Today, if you have a party and there are stragglers staying late and ignoring hints to leave, just put on Ethel, and they’ll be gone in five minutes or less.

        The CD is still available on Amazon, the last price I saw was $4.78.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m a little thrown off, I thought the wagon version was always called the Pulsar EXA Canopy. Was that the JDM name or something? Sportbak sounds junky to me.

    I still want one, a lot.

    Edit: And I’d park it in the garage next to my Sera.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Sera#/media/File:Toyota_Sera_AMI.JPG

    • 0 avatar
      roverv8i

      In the US at least it was call a sportback. I am not sure it they sold them on the lot this way or if it was only an option. For those that do not know the rear hatch is meant to be customer removable and then you can replace it with the sport back which makes it into a wagon. Or just remove the hatch for close to open top motoring.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yeah, the “EXA” name was used in Japan and Australia to distinguish it from the regular Pulsar sedans and hatches. “Sportbak” was undoubtedly something Nissan USA’s marketing team came up with.

      • 0 avatar
        Russycle

        I thought the sportbak was pretty cool, hardly saw any, even living in LA in the 80s. Friend of mine drove a Pulsar, until part of the steering rack broke off, bounced off the pavement, broke through the floor and missed impaling her by a few inches. She got rid of it immediately, she didn’t want a car that was trying to kill her.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    When I think of the Pulsar I always think back to the early 1990’s when I was working at a Texaco station. This really lovely young lady, a regular, drove a white one. One night (I worked 3rd shift) she came in crying and even though she wouldn’t tell me what was wrong (relationship problems no doubt… it’s ALWAYS relationship problems at that age), I made her feel better by giving a big bear hug. She always gave me the biggest smile when she came by the store after that.

    No, I didn’t try to hit it, and I probably could have. Damn I was a fool 20 years ago.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    What’s the brown thing next door? Sentra coupe?

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    During the time of these cars, I was solidly brainwashed into thinking American cars were the best. A neighbor had one just like the feature car. I think it replaced a Mercury Lynx. When it was new, I thought it was unacceptably cheap and that thought has stuck with me to this day.

    No sir, my 1990 Pontiac Sunbird was a far far superior machine.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      If you had one of the new Chryslers or Fords; you may have ended the decade still feeling that way. GM was still dishing out Citation and Celebrity copies like your Sunbird, and was way behind both. Like Chrysler, their initial response to the new aero trend was to slap a new nose cap with flush headlights on their existing cars; though at least the K-cars and their derivatives were decent cars (our family had three K-car wagons, and all gave good service.)

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        While searching for a family car, we test drove a new 1988 Ford Taurus wagon (in gold). For whatever reason, probably because the demand for them meant they weren’t negotiating prices much, my mom felt slighted by the salesman and the manager. To this day she refuses to buy a Ford because they don’t know how to treat customers.

        A few years later we looked at some new ’93 Town and Countries, saw the price, and they have never again considered Chrysler anything.

        It only took my 10 year old rusted out hand-me-down from another relative 1990 Maxima SE, still one of the best cars I’ve owned, to break me from the same line of thinking.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The coolest thing about the Pulsar NX was its name.

    And I liked the TR-7/X1/9 look about it.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I don’t know if there is a more 80’s car than the Nissan Pulsar. From those OEM taillight covers, fighter airplane cockpit controls, eyebrow headlights, hatchback styling and under powered.

    The sportback version was odd looking, but now that I’m older I appreciate shooting brakes. Additionally, the Geo Storm also had a shooting brake option.

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Geo_Storm_wagon_–_03-02-2012.JPG

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You know, though the Pulsar comes close to being the “most 80s” car, I don’t think it can win – as it is missing 1) a funky digital dash, 2) crazy equalizer, 3) funky decals and 4) wacky hubcaps as well.

      I think the award for “Most 80s Car” must go to one of the Isuzu Piazza models, or a Subaru XT.

      http://www.bedug.com/pics/Subaru_XT_1_8e1.jpg

      I’m Doug DeMuro today.

  • avatar
    zamoti

    I take any reason to sh!t on the 80s where possible and now I’m being asked to?!
    Now that I have the the golden opportunity so many things are racing through my mind I don’t think I can collect them all.
    Ugly cars, ugly clothes, echos of the ugly late 70s, fake wood panel rooms everywhere, buster brown shoes, Night Court, horrible, HORRIBLE pop music (walking on sunshine my arse), suspenders, frosted tips, jams, square brown rimmed glasses, John Denver, Chevrolet Celerbrities, Citations, Chevettes, Ford Tempos, K-cars, bleah!
    The reason that these 80s Japanese cars are appreciated is that they were a welcome change to the beige Granadas we were used to. I see people getting a boner for Ford LTDs and I just have to wonder why, WHY on earth would anyone want such a fugly turd of a car?!
    Oh also don’t forget all the mfing divorces going on like it was the new national pasttime.

    The 80s can suck it, I’m glad they’re gone they were bad and have nearly no redeeming qualities (except for NES). I see why people liked the 50s, and 60s (cars, style) the 70s (music) and even the 90s (style, music, cars) but I just can’t see the same appreciation for the 80s no matter how far we put that ugly time behind us.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Things have never been better, but they’re improving.

    • 0 avatar

      And unlike the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, the ’80s don’t seem to mean anything outside of the nostalgia of having lived through them. And since I’m a ’90s baby, the ’80s mean nothing to me.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        You guys clearly didn’t live then; only seen the fashion throwbacks.

        When I graduated from high school in 1980, I only knew one person that had a computer at home (an Atari XL.) By the time I graduated from college in 1988, I had a Commodore 64 at home, and many folks had a Commodore, Macintosh, Apple II, Amiga, or IBM XT at home. Today’s computer and video game culture orginated during this time; you no longer had to drive to an arcade and plunk down a quarter to play a video game, and most computers are not massive mainframes locked away in a server room.

        The 1960s had Moog synthesizer music (Hot Butter’s “Popcorn” anyone?) and the 70s disco, but electronic music came into it’s own with artists like Vangelas and Mannhiem Steamroller in the 1980s. Plus George Winston and other artists on the Windham Hill label.

        The 80s was the decade of Star Wars, Star Trek movies, and the Blues Brothers. Star Wars and Star Trek is still with us today. A series called “Cosmos” came out last year — based on Carl Sagan’s “Cosmos” series on PBS in 1980.

        I already mentioned the Space Shuttle; between the shuttle, low cost computers, Cosmos, and the all the science fiction movies, we just knew that the year 2001 would be like Stanley Kubrick wrote; reality had not kicked in yet.

        At the start of the 1980s, most cars were square and RWD. By the end of the 1980s, most cars were rounded and FWD. Lots of other safety features, fuel injection, etc.

        And then there is Reagan. Nothing else needs to be said.

        Anyone who judges the 1980s from wood paneling, Buster Brown shoes and the Ford Granadas and LTDs (all of which originated in the 1970s and were obsolete in the 1980s) clearly has no idea what they are talking about.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          I was totally alive and well in the 80s thank you very much, I know exactly what I’m talking about and don’t have my rose colored glasses on nor a strange Regan fetish to help me forget how ugly that time was.

          Blues Brothers started on SNL in the 70s as did Star Wars so can’t claim those (though I enjoyed them both). Star Trek started in the 60s, claiming the movies is a bit of a reach, but fine.
          As for the music, if you’re attempting to make a case that it was good, you’ve done nothing more than reinforce my point that it was terrible. It was the time when real instruments were replaced with synth trash and calling it electronic is a FAR reach. Walter/Wendy Carlos’ and Jean Jaques Perrey Moog contributions were more compelling and innovative. The 80s music stunk of cheap keyboards, corny saxophone solos and MFing impact drums. Anything that was good in the 70s turned to crap in the 80s. Best example: Chicago (the band, not the city). Sure there may have been bright spots, but they were the exception.
          I hold no expectation of disabusing you of your misguided notions that the 80s was good, but I will certainly offer some counterpoint.
          Fine, Granada and LTD off the list, enjoy a Hyundai Excel, Yugo, AMC/Renualt Alliance, putting k-cars on again because they were just that bad. Fuel injection, sure it was great–in the 90s. Don’t forget Ford’s botched attempts at CFI and that the early FI systems weren’t very good yet. Also, many inexpensive American cars didn’t get it until the 90s while many Japanese cars (maybe even this pulsar) had it in the mid to late 80s.
          You probably just like the 80s ’cause some girl let you in her pants.

          • 0 avatar
            ChiefPontiaxe

            Remember, nothing is as cool as the stuff from when you were 12 years old.

          • 0 avatar
            jhefner

            “You probably just like the 80s ’cause some girl let you in her pants.”

            No, I just wish I did; though in retrospect it was good I didn’t.

            We had three Reliant wagons in our extended family; one of them was mine. They were cheap and flimsy feeling; but the handling and gas mileage was far better than the Volares and Fury they replaced; and we had no issues with any of them. The throttle body fuel injection may not have been great; but was far better than the carbs they replaced.

            Two friends of mine had Hondas; one had a Prelude, the other a Civic. Both were flawless up to 70K; then everything fell apart. One was finally told by his father to stop throwing parts at it and buy something else. The other works at GM now.

            The first Star Wars missed the 80s by two years (1978); and Star Trek would be nothing but reruns were it not for the movies. I love the throwbacks to Star Trek II in the latest Star Trek Into Darkness.

            Ok; I retract Blues Brothers, and submit Ghostbusters, Back to the Future, ET, or any of the other smash iconic movies of the 1980s. Of course, taste in music and movies is subjective. To each their own.

            Tell you what — if you drive a square, slab sided RWD car with a carb and no on board computers; don’t own a computer, smart phone, tablet, or PDI; and hate Reagan; then nothing good came out of the 1980s. Otherwise, it may not have yet perfected; but all of these came out of the 1980s. And you may have been miserable at the time for whatever reason; but not everyone was. I sure wasn’t; and not for the reasons you are thinking. ;)

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      As I sit here watching Pee Wee’s Big Adventure with my two year old, I think it’s funny that all of the reasons you hate it are the reasons I like it. Sometimes things are so terrible, that they become fantastic. I was young back then, but I remember the adults around me having a good time, making fun of themselves amidst the rediculosness of the era. A talking, wood paneled Mark Cross Lebaron vert is an attractive option when you compare it to the government supplied styling of current cars.

    • 0 avatar
      macmcmacmac

      The Shuttle program. Senna/Prost/Mansell/Piquet,Lauda fighting it out on the track. The pc revolution. The Phoenix-like rebirth of the desirable automobile. Every year, cars, computers, life in general got faster and better. The 80’s and 90’s were almost unfathomably optimistic compared to the what-fresh-hell-is-this doldrums of life since the early 2000s. Some fundamental aspect of our society has broken, and I doubt it’s ever going to get fixed.

      Oh, and….

      THE END OF THE COLD WAR. Seriously, if you never lived through the more than slightly harrowing prospect of imminent global thermonuclear war you can’t appreciate how much the fall of the East block was a huge sigh of relief. Watching the wall fall was almost magical.

      Even though I was absolutely skint for most of this time, It was still a more promising era, by far. Progress wasn’t measured by the latest app or turtlenecked tech guru waving a new time wasting gadget around on stage.

      Being an older Gen-Xer, I can tell you the 80’s were a revelation after the bell-bottomed, disco, CB radio and trucker-movie infested wasteland of the 1970’s.

      yes, I know, many will swear the 1970’s were the greatest era, yadda,yadda, (see what I did there), but having lived through both, I’ll take the 80’s anytime.

  • avatar

    In the words of Xzibit from “Pimp My Ride”—“They named it after a pulsar, which is a collapsed star, so they were doomed from the get-go”.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Ugh that show.

      Look we put TV’s and velour on the mud flaps of the Datsun Maxima wagon you use to deliver food to the homeless!

      …but we didn’t repair the engine. Sorry.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        The Overhaulin’ guys at least fix up the motor…but then they still fill your trunk with speakers and put big wheels on.

        Then again, in more recent seasons, they seem to have stopped with the fake car theft stuff so now you can tell them how you want your car to be.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I like 80s music, 80s movies, weird 80s fashion, and neon.

    Guess that means I’m terrible.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Just means you’ve played GTA VC.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I love that game, but I do wish it had the better graphics and improved mechanics of San Andreas.

        C’mon Rockstar, a Vice City HD for the current consoles would make gangbusters! Well…I’d buy it, at least…

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Agree! All that 80sness in quality graphics, and crazy cars.

          I drove around in that LWB Washington all the damn time.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            I always liked the Sentinel XS. A virtual version of one of the best looking cars BMW ever made? Of course I want to drive that around!

            Ah…what a great game.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Of course, with that body kit and the standard rear window vent!

            The real successor to that currently is of course the Oracle XS, because the current Sentinel XS is coupe only, and much too small.

            Oh and whatever car that Audi Quattro was in there, that was cool too.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      Ok, the only thing about the 80s that was good is that the movies had way more bewbs.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I love the 80s and this car, especially the removable wagon back… it was BRILLIANT! Plus it had T-Tops the only thing missing was a turbo.

      Disclaimer: I was in high school from 1985-1989 so I grew very attached to the movies, music and cars from that era. Even back then I realized the 80s were going to be special, because my brother was 3 years younger then me and thus doomed to graduate in the 90s.

      And yes clearly GTA:VC was the best version of the game, it not even debatable.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    I graduated college in May of 1989. In the Fall I started looking for a new car. Was sold on a CRX Si until my brother in law took me to a local Ford dealership for a ride in a Mustang LX 5 speed 5.0. Sold!!!! Loved that car. Traded it in on a Mazda Protege when I got married 3 years later. I remember giving around 13k, tax included for that mustang. If you find a low mileage example that hasn’t been abused, you soon realize the price hasn’t dropped all that much. Fun times.

    • 0 avatar
      Grant404

      I realize your comment is a few months old, but what you said reminded me of my own experience.

      In ’93, my then-gf (later wife) wanted to celebrate her recent college graduation and the landing of her first job in her new profession by buying a brand new “fun” car to replace her basic transportation (and I do mean basic) college-car Escort. Being a completely altruistic (ha!) car guy, I volunteered to help her look and offer suggestions, but I was seriously determined to not unduly influence her into buying what I wanted instead of what SHE wanted.

      For days we looked at a lot of sporty-ish small cars of that era (Honda, Nissan, J-cars, etc) that were in her price range (mid teens). At some point I suggested she also look at a pony car, a Mustang for example. She seemed interested in doing that, so I explained the different models, engine choices, and etc., all the while trying to not steer her toward my favorite, an LX 5.0 5-speed. Days later we stopped at a Ford dealer, and wouldn’t you know it, perched on the corner of the display area in front of the showroom (the show-off spot) was a beautiful, perfectly optioned, Electric Red LX 5.0 5-speed with a $16k window sticker. She was immediately drawn to it, and secretly, so was I. She test drove it, so did I, then we told the sales guy she was still “just looking” at that point.

      After another week or so of looking at just about everything in that price range, she seemed frustrated and tired of the process. She said “I liked that Mustang we looked at last week the best, but I know YOU don’t like it.” I asked her why she thought I didn’t like it, and she said “Well, you didn’t ACT like you liked it.” I told her I was purposely trying to not influence her, but now that she already said it was her favorite, I could tell her that if it was me, no contest, it was by far my favorite of everything we looked at, and if it was a car for me, I would have already bought it. She said “Me too, but I thought you hated it!” That was the end of the search. We went back and got the Mustang.

      Several months later we got married (you gotta love a girl who prefers cars that have a V8 and three pedals), and we owned that Mustang for ten years, most of which as a 2nd/3rd/garage queen car. After the birth of our second son (minivan time!) we sold it to her brother, who drove it for a few years then put it in storage, where it remains to this day.

      Now that our sons are grown I’d love to have it back someday, if he could ever be talked into parting with it.

  • avatar
    shadow mozes

    Wow, ads were so much better back then. Ads nowadays suck and so do the cars! They were much better back then.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      I wouldn’t go that far. I drove a 2015 Fusion for a week; then came home to my ’95 Taurus, which is not that much removed from the 80s; though it is quite worn.

      * The Fusion was more powerful
      * The Fusion was quieter
      * The Fusion was safer in an accident
      * The Fusion’s visibility was far better than I expected; thanks to the mirrors-in-a-mirrors
      * The Fusion had bigger cupholders. (If 80s cars even had a cupholder; it was sized for a coffee cup, not a 32 oz Big Gulp)
      * The Taurus is better looking, with bigger windows
      * The Taurus seats six plus two in the back in the wagon version; though the center passenger does not have an airbag; the Fusion only five.
      * Gas mileage was comparable
      * Would and have worked on the Taurus; probably would always take a Fusion to the shop
      * Too early to say which would be more reliable over the long haul; though as a whole today’s cars are more reliable than those of the 80s.

      I will buy a Fusion in the future; but keep the Taurus.

      https:[email protected]/sets/72157647552870342/

  • avatar

    I suspect that the reason for 80’s nostalgia is that people born in the 80’s are now in their mid-20’s to mid-30’s and are looking back fondly at the time they grew up in. It’s long ago enough that mostly the good memories have remained, and the nostalgia isn’t so much for the actual items of the 80’s as the time they spent as kids. The items are just parts of memories of childhood.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Here is a shooting brake Nissan Pulsar for sale

    http://abbotsford.craigslist.ca/cto/4915307004.html

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    If there is 80’s nostalgia then T-Roofs and Targas need to make a comeback. Especially since droptop sales are flat.


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