By on July 31, 2014

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Time was, a pickup truck like this would have beat a man senseless.

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This heavy-duty Chevy can tow till your heart’s content. A big-rig underscore is provided by the 6.6 liter Duramax diesel and stout Allison 1000 transmission. Take off from a stop, and the variable-vane turbocharger goes “tweeeeeee” just like a mini Kenworth, and those vanes can also close down and act like an exhaust brake. With modern emissions controls, the diesel powertrain is clean, too. At least until some knucklehead makes it belch clouds of particulates.

This isn’t the only heavy-duty diesel pickup, everyone’s got one, but for now it’s the newest. Technology and engineering advances have given us 700 hp ponycars that are housecat tame and four-wheel-drive pickups with impressive press-release talking points.

  • 397 hp and 765 lb-ft of torque.
  • Allison 1000 6-speed automatic
  • 19,600 lbs towing capacity on the factory hitch
  • 23,200 lbs fifth-wheel capacity
  • 7,374 lbs maximum payload
  • Integral exhaust brake and trailer brake controller

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The Silverado 2500HD is a big slab of pickup. That’s no surprise, you expect a heavy-duty pickup truck to be rugged and capable; they always have been. The biggest surprise is how little it makes you pay for the ability to tow that 45-foot New Horizons Majestic you’ve had your eye on.

The Silverado HD will lighten your wallet efficiently. There it was on the sticker, a $60,000 bottom line. That’s not even fully-loaded, but a crew cab 2LT with some options including MyLink, navigation, and Bose audio. The four-wheel drive system is the kinder, gentler kind, actuated by electronic minions engaged by a knob on the dashboard. Refinement is also not new  to heavy-duty pickups, but the 2014 Silverado HD elevates the practice.

No matter how many phone calls I started with “hey, you know that car/trailer/scrap metal you need to move…?” I didn’t stand a chance of stressing the high payload or tow rating. The spray-in bedliner, soft-opening tailgate, hydroformed frame, factory tow hitch, front suspension made up of forged steel and cast iron control arms and all the other big-muscle details were forlorn and lonely. Instead, I basked in the way this truck serves as a refuge. Shut the door and the clamor of the jobsite is effectively sealed from the cabin. There is no transfer case lever protruding from the floor, the seats are ventilated and upholstered in perforated leather. An enormous center console with a row of USB ports and a 120-volt AC outlet sits in between the very comfortable power front buckets. The pedals power-adjust to meet you. A man could get used to this.

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Instead of pounding the kidney stones out of you, the ride is benign, even riding high on the jacked-up Z71 heavy-duty suspension. It’s a truck and you know it, but these things used to churn milk into butter. The easy way I could chew highway and achieve fuel economy around 20mpg has done nothing to blunt the dream of hauling some of Murilee’s highly-restorable Junkyard Finds back to the rust belt for fun and profit. Long miles pass beneath the Silverado 2500 HD without penalty. The 6.6 liter Duramax is strong, but feels laggy. You need to be firm with it if you need all the power, and the peak torque number trails the Ford and Ram offerings. The Allison transmission, on the other hand, is very smooth.

One area where the Silverado lets you down are the electronic extras. The audio system is slow to respond to the hard-to-find controls that are on the back of the steering wheel spokes. It’s a nice idea cribbed from Chrysler, but it’s not done as well here. It’s also a long reach to the tuning knob. The climate system has a bunch of small buttons with pictograms arrayed around the fan knob. It takes a second to figure out which one will give you what you want, and I have my doubts that it’ll be easy to operate with gloves. I also kept setting the alarm off when opening the door with the key. Weird.

It’s easy to get hung up on the facts and figures, or become offended by the idea of leather and navigation in a working truck, especially when the final tally pushes $60,000. There’s more configurability and choice in the truck market than anywhere else in all of autodom, and Chevrolet says the Silverado is the king of having it your way. You can configure this thing a zillion different ways, and the price drops to around $50,000 if you skip most of the options. Go for the gas engine instead of  the diesel and you’ll save over $7,000, putting you around $43,000 before the astounding incentives start. The Duramax is one expensive steroid, but have you seen the kinds of deals they’re making on anything with wheels lately?

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No wonder sales are juiced beyond belief. Get in on it now, before it totally collapses. If you do pull the trigger on a Silverado HD, you’ll get a brawny truck that can mix it up on the commute with surprising ease. You’ve got to take some care with the following distance and braking, but that’s because the Silverado 2500HD is so docile otherwise. It’s big, sure, but other than that, there’s little difference between driving a Malibu and this truck. That agreeable nature coupled with the quiet cabin and smoothed-over ride put the Silverado HD right in the middle of the field. A Ram 2500 Laramie with the 6.7 liter Cummins can be dressed up with an interior that feels more luxurious for around the same price. The Ford F250 Super Duty Lariat gets to diesel 4×4 with leather upholstery territory a few thousand dollars sooner, but it feels dated and cheap inside.

If all you want is a work truck from one of the leading brands, just throw a dart. They’ll all pull their guts out and get the job done. On the other hand, if you want something that straddles the line between burly mechanicals and baroque cabin luxury, the differences become more clear. On that measure, the Chevy is firmly in the middle of the road for the class.

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69 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD...”


  • avatar
    Johann

    Eh?! You kept setting the alarm off by opening the door with the key? That there is not rocket science to figure out. Only the most Neanderthal of people would even realise that silver thing has an orifice to enter on the outside of the driver’s door and fewer still will be stupid enough to put said silver thing in it and turn it without pressing the unlock button on the keyfob first (that also switches the alarm off on any car known to man). Gosh. Teaching grandma to suck eggs or what?!

    • 0 avatar
      Winston Braithwaite

      That’d be great, except this one didn’t come with a fob. So it was just the key. No integrated fob, either. Pretty much the same key you got with your ’98 Intrigue.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      It means that GM doesn’t give you a door key sensor for your $60,000+.

      What’s confusing everybody here is that door key sensors have been around for over 20 years, and the only reason not to have one is cost. I can see this happening in a $12k econobox, but it’s a dick move on this rig. Thanks GM.

      • 0 avatar
        segfault

        It should have a door key sensor to deactivate the alarm. Most recent cars have them on every keyhole. I remember my mother’s Volvo 960 only had them on driver’s door (and possibly the trunk). There was a keyhole on the passenger’s door, but it wouldn’t deactivate the alarm. This was intentional and it was specifically mentioned in the owner’s manual. Probably some type of cost-cutting.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I’ve always meant to ask: why do modern trucks ride so high? I’m 6’8″ and I’d be challenged to reach into the bed of a contemporary half-ton.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Perhaps an subconscious game of king of the hill? The dominant male sitting up on the throne looking down on all of the lesser folks?

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        I figured it was a chassis/frame issue; looking below a modern truck, I can’t see how you could possibly lower the bed; the rails themselves are high. IIRC, older trucks had a lower frame that just arc’ed up over the wheel wells.

        Why do the frame rails incline higher up in the bed?

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          http://crottyblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/12chsl30037.jpg

          Looking at this photo of 2013 GM HD frames, it could be that the frame rails are taller under the bed because they’re protecting the fuel tanks, a liability issue for GM in the past. Considering the payloads mentioned in the article, the substantial rear frame serves a purpose. I don’t recall any 7,700 lb payloads when I was selling Dodge trucks in college.

          • 0 avatar
            cdotson

            Modern truck frames are a lot taller than older truck frames. Wheel/tire overall height has increased a lot since the 1980s as well, moving axle centerlines up and further increasing the height of the bottom of the extended-height frames.

            Ford’s trucks up until the 1996 redesign were notorious for displaying a noticeable “broke-back” appearance where the bed to cab gap at the top of the bed was almost zero while remaining noticeably larger at the bottom of the bed. The taller frame rails prevent this from happening while increasing payload ratings. Dodge’s 2002 redesign implemented a hydroformed boxed frame (earlier trucks were largely C-channel frames) that was stronger and more rigid, but I can attest to the harmonics that set up in the frame and cause considerable bucking on concrete highways if your speed and the expansion joint spacing decide not to play well with one another. Further beefing up the frame reduces the likelihood that this will occur below Mach velocities, and so in chasing payload ratings and improved highway ride and fuel economy, trucks have to get higher to accommodate their more rigid frames and semi-truck tires.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            It’s not so much the frame rail size as the design. Older trucks, IIRC, had a relatively straight frame that “bumped” at the wheel wells only

            Modern ones seem to step down from the engine bay to the cab, then up from the cab to the bed, forcing the bed (and good) to be much higher.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            IIRC GM has to drop the frame rails the way they do to make it simpler and stronger to tie in the torsion arms.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Tangentially related – I used to carpool with a guy that drove a 2009 Dodge Ram crew cab. It had the retractable side steps which were useful to get in and out of the cab. What defied explanation was how such a large vehicle with such an elevated cab still had a huge transmission tunnel hump that severely reduced passenger footwell space. And…I’m a short guy, 5′-9″.

      Modern trucks seem really poorly designed in terms of utility and space efficiency. Of course, they seem tailor-made for enhancing or obfuscating certain male insecurities though.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Because the high stance is trendy these days. If you took 3-4 inches out of the beltline, and another 3-4 inches out of the ride height, you’d be back to the traditional proportions that trucks had from 1960-2000 or so.

      In a broader view, it reflects the transition of trucks from work- to passenger-oriented vehicles. The height/bulk wars may be reaching their peak, as CUVs are trending lower in recent years and BOF trucks are becoming physically inaccessible to aging and shorter people. My stepmom passed on buying a Ram because it was too much effort to leap up into the seat every day. She bought a Highlander instead.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        Pickups are about as big as they can possibly be, and CAFE means they cannot get any heavier. The only way to make them look even bigger is to jack them up, push the sheet metal up and out at all four corners, and give them tall, big-rig style bumpers.

        Stretching out the corners gives them a massive, block like appearance which is enhanced by the increased ground clearance and ride height.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Actually…….. GM’s tend to sit lower than Ford or Ram.

          These trucks sit high for reasons other than male enhancement and psuedoalphamalism.

          - The suspension which is designed to carry weight does not sag like a car. There is little static sag.
          - Clearance for tires.
          - Ground clearance on the job site assuming these trucks actually get used for work.
          - Try pulling a huge camper trailer or cargo trailer with the visibility of a Ferrari?

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    by far the ugliest truck on the market.

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    These things may be cizilized beasts now, but they’re beasts nonetheless. I’ve been driving around a family member’s 2012 Ram 3500 Cummins dually for the past couple of days while my car is in the shop. Perhaps one gets used to it, but I find it exhausting to pilot around town despite all the creature comforts– moreso than the 1996 version of the same truck, which this replaced.

    On a related note, if anybody cares you guys can come down and review it.

  • avatar
    matador

    You can tow almost 20,000# with this!? That would probably put you into a Class-A CDL territory.

    I can still remember when our F-250 was considered a large, capable truck. It could only tow a measly 9,000 lbs. Now, a half ton can do that!

    I am getting old, apparantly. No wonder I like Buicks.

    Carry on, and get off my lawn!

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @matador – yes and no. This is where car company PR departments sodomize the masses with obfuscation. They will lump the best statistics together making it look like any truck from that brand is a beast.

      This truck is a 2500 with the Duramax.

      Max hitch tow – 13,000 lb.
      Max 5th wheel – 24,500 lb.
      Max cargo – 3,082 lb.

      That is well off the posted:

      •19,600 lbs towing capacity on the factory hitch
      •23,200 lbs fifth-wheel capacity
      •7,374 lbs maximum payload

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    I had to laugh. My ’99 Super Duty diesel with the stick 6 spd was right out of corn binder heaven. But…between the screaming turbo D and the springs….Load Range E tires…that truck would beat you to death as a vibrating, quivering lump of protoplasm looking for whiskey. 15 years later? Their all sedans with big open trunks.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      My fave was an early 80s 3+3 cab one ton Chevy with a 400 and auto. Tougher than nails but didn’t ride right unless you had a truck camper in the bed.

      But damn it, it was a truck, and nobody in their right mind would have driven their kid to soccer practice in it.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        What is a 3+3 cab? Like…six doors?

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Nope they didn’t call them “crew cabs” back in the day they slapped loud red/orange yellow badges on them that said “3+3″ it was in reference to the bench seat front and bench seat rear. It had as much lumbar support as a church pew.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        SBC 400 in a truck? Sure it wasn’t a 454?

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Belonged to Dad’s boss but he had no problem loaning it out (he didn’t figure anybody could kill it). Dad always said it was a 400, I never lifted the hood. The rear suspension was modified with add-a-leaves and it had the 16.5 in rims with a single rear axle.

          Dad’s boss bought it new and when the truck camper was dropped in it (one of those huge heavy units) the rear sagged. He ordered the dealer to keep adding leaves until the rear stopped sagging! He might as well have had them weld the axles to the frame.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            I’ll chime in. I’m a fanboy for the 1973-1987 GM trucks.

            The 3+3 meant that you had two rows of bench seats, with 3 people per seat. Hence, it could carry six people. They came in the 3/4 and 1 ton trucks.

            You could also order a “Bonus Cab”- a crew cab missing the back seat. It gave you storage space only.

            The 400 (6.6L) was offered from 1970 to 1980. From what I’ve heard, it was a pretty reliable engine. It wasn’t a powerhouse, but it was torquey. It would have been a good choice for a work truck back then.

            Of course, I am one of those guys that thinks that the 1973-1987 Chevrolet/GMC trucks were the best ever built.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            @matador: In terms of being useful for “actual work” as so many pickup aficiandos seem hellbent on promoting, you can never go wrong with a 73-87 squarebody Chevy/GMC.

            If you want something that’s both practical and a reasonable daily or weekly driver, I’ve always felt any of the Big 3′s offerings in the late 90′s/early 2000′s are the best. Jellybean F-150, “big rig” Dodge Ram, GMT800 truck. They still have timeless good looks, IMO.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    So this is what the big ranch owners drives in the usa.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      No, that is what the ranch hands drive. The boss gets something more like this:

      http://i964.photobucket.com/albums/ae129/DieselWMB/DSC_00612.jpg
      Gotta have the xx.5 rims.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Beautiful truck. Chevy had the good sense to move the High Country trim to the HD for the 2016s.

  • avatar
    kkop

    Those tow ratings: are they for the truck you drove (crew cab), or for a regular cab?

    • 0 avatar
      Winston Braithwaite

      Yeah, I might have grabbed the wrong towing/payload numbers, though they’re in the ballpark, and it depends on the rear axle you select.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I posted earlier what Chevy’s website says this truck is rated for.

        This is where car company PR departments sodomize the masses with obfuscation. They will lump the best statistics together making it look like any truck from that brand is a beast.

        This truck is a 2500 with the Duramax.

        Max hitch tow – 13,000 lb.
        Max 5th wheel – 24,500 lb.
        Max cargo – 3,082 lb.

        That is well off the posted:

        •19,600 lbs towing capacity on the factory hitch
        •23,200 lbs fifth-wheel capacity
        •7,374 lbs maximum payload

        Sorry for the repeat.

        The door tag will say what its ratings are.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The glamour shots are always of the luxo crew cab 4X4 pulling the backhoe, etc, but ‘max’ payload/towing figures are with the regular cab, 2wd. And properly optioned/pkg’d.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    To copy Cadillac’s unfortunate marketing slogan for the ATS long wheelbase model for China, I find that the grill/front end (in general) of both this & the F Series Superduty to “Come at you with LENGTH & HEIGHT, BRAH!”

    …way too overstylized & artificially masculine…should come standard with a giant pair of truck nutz & playboy silhouette mud flaps.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @DeadWeight – I don’t like the Ford Super Duty chrome snout. It screams WWF wrestling belt/cowboy championship belt buckle.

      Looks better monochromatic but that can be said for any of the current F Series trucks.

  • avatar

    I really don’t like four-spoke wheels, or eight-spoke wheels whose spokes are grouped so they look like four-spoke rims. They remind me of drain plugs.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I wonder if GM is still making the rear lights come on when operating the key fob. Always thought a GM truck was backing out when it’s just sitting there. Strange…

  • avatar
    Onus

    New trucks just look like toys.

    I’ll keep my 1990 regular cab long bed f250. custom. no options really. Works just fine.

    Plus for a $400 purchase price you can’t complain.

    Sure the N/A diesel isn’t fast, and the ride is downright horrible. It works just fine for everything I’ll ever need a truck for.

    For this amount of money i can rebuild this truck a few times over.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      You’re talking some obscene simplicity, reliability and DIY fixes on pre emissions and pre TDI diesels. We didn’t give it much thought at the time, but we really had it good. Those that wanted more ran ATS and Banks turbos. Plus Gear Vendor, 2-speed splitter/overdrives. I’m hoarding a sweet ’86 F250 with a 6.9, only because no one would give me anything for it, years ago. It’s starting to look damn good! I drive it around the farm a couple times a week.

      • 0 avatar
        Onus

        Yeah i did some work on it. Replaced the injection pump, and injectors. Had to buy a pulse timing tool for a couple hundred bucks. But dang does it run good when the timing is spot on and all new fuel system.

        Sadly my truck has the e4od, and it needs a new torque converter ( has a code) . Other than that its in good condition. Shouldn’t need a full rebuild. I do have all the parts to convert to zf 5 if need be.

        That’s a nice truck. I love the body style. I have a 83 as well for a project truck ( was my dads, getting a 351w, currently 300 6 ( dead ), love the six but have a good running 351w sitting around ).

        Now that its not my daily I’m going to get the transmission fixed, hydro boost, alternator upgrade, Saginaw power steering pump ( borgeson makes one for v belt ford v8s and what do you know the bracket is identical to the v belt idi bracket ).

        Then i have to fix the body.

        Maybe get a turbo ( awesome developments as of late in this area in idi’s. People are pushing 300 hp out of these ).

  • avatar
    Derek C

    Good article guys. It’s nice to see your giving Ram the props they deserve. Couldn’t agree more with the cheap, out dated feeling fords. The new 2015 f150 should help with that, even more once the HD’s are reworked.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I’m pleased to see the typical knee-jerk reaction of “dur hur hur tiny penis compensation machines dur hur” has been kept to a minimum.

    The whole thing with trucks being so tall is due to several factors:
    1. The frame differences, as so thoroughly covered by other members of the B&B;

    2. Perception: with the Big 3 adopting freight-train front ends for their HDs and the air dams extending seemingly to the ground for that precious .5 MPG, it looks like solid vehicle for 7 feet up. Take off the bumper and see how much there really is(n’t).

    3. Apples to oranges: The average pickup 35+ years ago was (and still is) a 1/2 ton, which naturally sits lower than any comparable HD (although a few older light-duty 3/4-tons were nearly as low). But it was also 2WD, which meant you didn’t have to jack up the back to match the extra height in front (although plenty of 1-ton 2WD pickups were tall in the back so they’d ride better loaded down, but looked odd unloaded). In general: 4×4 1/2 ton=4×2 3/4 or 1 ton in overall height.

    Just type “Ford Super Duty (or other HD truck of your choice) 4×2 for sale” into Google (or other search engine of your choice) and you’ll see how sensible the height is on a pickup that knows it will never actually be required to go off-road.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      If douchebags who buy these just to go to the grocery store and never do actual work aren’t deserving of the small dick jokes, what else is there to use?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        How about just saying nothing and keeping one’s opinions to one’s self?

        There’s enough insults and negative language being hurled around anyway. Why should any of us feel compelled to add to it? We are the Best and Brightest, are we not?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @tuffjuff – So why do you care so much about my d!ck?

        If I buy more/bigger truck than I need 99% of the time, so what? If I use it to get groceries, so what? Should I keep a horse trailer permanently attached to keep you happy? And keep it filthy and banged up too?

        Remember big rigs are bought exclusively to haul heavy loads, and they’re pulling an empty trailer most of the time. Or no trailer. Where’s the small d!ck jokes for them? But all of industry buys more/bigger trucks than they need most of the time for a reason. It’s safer and keeps wear & tear manageable.

  • avatar
    tiger260

    Sorry guys, TuffJuff is right. The whole market for over-size cartoonishly styled trucks sold to guys who have LITTLE or NO practical need for a truck – is very funny.

    Sure, many sales of a truck like this will of course be to businesses or folks that actually need to tow very heavy loads and I’m sure it is a great tool for the job. There will also be plenty of buyers who use the full capcability of the truck occasionally and therefore buy one to keep it around for when it’s really needed. But at the same time, anybody with their eyes open can see that a significant portion of sales of a truck like this will be to guys who just like to dress up and pretend that they need a truck. Of course many of them will opt for the most powerful engine options and highest tow ratings even though they never tow anything or haul anything bigger than a couple of sheets of plywood from Home Depot. No doubt most will insist on 4×4 and maybe even the lift kit even though they never drive off road and don’t live in a swamp.

    I seem to remember a couple of statistics about Hummer H2 (I am recalling this from memory so I can’t swear by the accuracy of the actual numbers) something like – “87% of Hummer buyers stated that four-wheel drive off-road capability was a must-have feature in choosing a vehicle” and “4% of Hummer H2 drivers drove their vehicles off-road”.

    Hey, I can’t blame the auto manufacturers for pandering to the silliness. It’s extremely lucrative. You could probably argue that the “dress up and pretend” portion of the truck market was the difference between a company like Ford going under or not in some of the toughest times?

    It’s a free country I guess. Anybody can buy whatever they want or can afford and you could argue that it is a “victimless crime” if somebody wants to spend thousands (tens of thousands) extra of their own money to buy a whole lot of truck utility they’ll never need? – but I can’t help feeling it is a bit of a sad reflection on modern society when buying the vehicle that represents the image and lifestyle you’d like people to associate you with (even though in reality it’s just a sham) is more important than buying the vehicle that actually meets your needs? Pretending to be something you clearly are not, to try an impress people in some way, is dishonest. Though, I guess marketing of cars and trucks has ALWAYS been more about selling the dream, than practical need?

    Remember guys, a “real man” will still be a real man even if he’s driving a bright pink Miata. If you ain’t a “real man” to start with then you won’t change that by buying an over-sized truck.
    I’ll refrain from commenting too much on people’s anatomical deficiencies, but come on, it is pretty funny.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Damn right it’s a FREE country!!! FREE to be a judgemental A$$ apparently…

      And a “real man” as you call it, doesn’t hide behind the cloak of anonymity. I know some balless transgenders might not consider it, but when you see someone like me in a big shiny 4X4 truck that looks like it’s never done a day of hard work (or play), speak your mind already…

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Balless transgenders that you are friends with???

        Boy, I knew you were weird, but I never thought kinky. Especially with those van comments you make.

        Your millionaire lifestyle, with you constant trips to Spain and managing your trucking empire in your 10 square home must rock with all of your van driving transgender “friends”.

        Are you a hypocrite?……or a teller of untruths?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I own a pickup and there are times that it is an oversized commuter car BUT lets be honest here, how many vehicles owned by bloggers on this site are just plain “meet my needs” appliances?

      I do think that the “little wee wee” jokes are funny and do apply to some drivers.

      That is my thought when ever I see a 1 ton dually with a huge lift kit, chrome all over and straight pipes out the box ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

      BUT

      I think the exact same thing when I see a babyboomer siting in a Boss 3o2 or pretty boy in an exotic.

      Time to drop your pants boys and get out the tape measure.

      A truck guy is more likely to have one in the glove box ;)

  • avatar
    Vetteman

    As a long time Duramax owner that uses it to pull my RV Last week I tried to buy a 2015 GMC HD Duramax . The Chevy version was ruled out because of the still disapointing front end . I have had 11 years of great service with my 2004 and was predisposed to buy another GM pickup. I retired from a Chevy dealer after 32 years and had a lot of brand loyalty . I looked at a Ford Superduty and found that truck very out of date . When you really dig under the shiny paint and gigantic chrome grille you find a 1999 truck IMHO . Back to the GM trucks I found them missing so many modern features and to me are also basically under the skin a 2001 HD . Same suspension , frame , axles , Engine and trans . Sure they have been updated and new sheet metal but many features on the Ram have been left out. I ended up with a 2014 short bed Laramie Crew cab with the Cummins /Automatic combo. So far so good . Ram has in the last few years upgraded their frame , completely revised both front and rear suspensions and upgraded the interior to a level that outclasses both Ford and Gm. It has the keyless entry like the wives Lexus , Power locking tailgate , A def tank and fill that make sense not like GMs ridiculous tank hanging down behind the right front wheel and no level gauge and an awkward fill location up under the hood . GM is so clueless . They have had five years to fix that Tank and have not changed it at all. Lastly the prices on GM trucks for what you get are excessive . I ran across a quote somewhere that says it all for GM ” Yesterdays cars and trucks at Tomorrows prices ” I love that quote Anyway Gm will not get any more of my money . Money is hard earned don’t buy a mediocre product .

    • 0 avatar
      balreadysaid

      ram builds a nice truck. didnt buy a 1500 ram though just because no column shift. ram should put column shift as option for 8 speed. their market share would increase.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      Still shopping for what you have . . . and for the same purpose. I agree that model-for-model, the RAM has the nicest interior. I’m not sure I can feel the advantage of the coil springs in the rear. The big difference, frankly, is the engine. The Cummins engine sounds like what it is: a truck engine. The Duramax doesn’t sound like much at all. I kind of have the feeling that my wife isn’t going to be too happy spending hours on end listening to the “big truck” sound of the Cummins. The pre-DEF Cummins got pretty atrocious fuel economy compared to the Ford and Chevy diesels. I’m assuming that the adoption of DEF and SCR in 2013 should make the Cummins comparable to the other two. Certainly, if I were planning to drive 300,000 miles, the Cummins would be the engine of choice . . . but since I’m not planning to go that long . . . well, I don’t know.

  • avatar
    Vetteman

    Bruce the wife and another couple and I gave my 2014 Ram 2500 Laramie its first long run from Boise up north to Mccall Idaho for lunch and the girls were all commenting on how quiet the truck was . The interior at cruise is 70 DB and i have a hard time hearing the cummins. You can hear the exhaust brake and I love that My best friend had just bought the identical truck two weeks before I did and came up from the SF bay area for a visit . His is also a 2014 crew cab short bed Laramie with the cummins and automatic with 4 wheel drive . From the bay area to here in Boise and starting out with only 400 miles on the truck he got 20 mpg running 65 to 75 mph Not to shabby IMHO So far I am very impressed with this truck .


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