By on August 5, 2014

2014 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD LT

This Duramax-powered 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD possesses an as-tested price that’s precisely triple the as-tested price of the 2014 Mazda 3 hatchback I drove around for a week back in late May.

The Mazda had half as many cylinders as the Silverado HD, less than one-third the engine displacement, and no turbocharger. The Silverado has 20% more seating capacity, a wheelbase that’s within eight inches of the Mazda’s overall length, 278% more cargo bed volume than the Mazda has cargo capacity behind the rear seats, and 2.6 times the weight.

The Silverado’s 6.6L turbocharged V8 diesel produces 242 more horsepower while generating more than five times the torque. Yes, it’s not quite three times as heavy as the Mazda, but the Silverado has the torque of five Mazda 3s. Mazda’s 3 operates only as a front-wheel-drive vehicle, but the Silverado can send power to all four wheels. Both utilize a 6-speed automatic transmission.

Naturally, none of this should be taken as a reflection of my opinion on the Mazda 3, which is probably the best car in its class at this moment. Take it as a prelude to my father’s concerns about my financial well-being. After all, GM Canada supplied me with the Silverado HD for a week, but the Cains supply the fuel.

See, I had told my parents that I could pick up their first-born and his wife and two of their kids and all their luggage at the airport in the Silverado HD so the patriarch and matriarch wouldn’t have to take two cars in order to manage the load. I was told that it would be quite late, and since I get quite sleepy rather early; since it’s a slightly longer drive from my house to Stanfield Airport way outside the city; since they’re anxious to see a family they haven’t seen in a year, I should just stay at home.2014 Chevrolet Silverado HD 2500 long box

The next day, however, I found out it was actually because my father didn’t think I should spend the money on fuel. Indeed, later in the week when we appeared at their place in our own car and not the Silverado HD, he once again asserted the view that it was because of fuel economy concerns, despite the fact that in long-box form, the Silverado simply didn’t fit in their parking lot. I kid you not.

But in real world terms, the diesel Silverado 2500 crew cab only consumed twice as much fuel as the Mazda. Let’s not kid ourselves, it’s certainly more than twice as capable.

Moreover, to what extent is (or should) fuel economy be a concern for buyers of a truck that costs $76,000 (before deep discounts) in Canada? That price, by the way, includes $23,040 in options on an LT-trim Silverado 2500, including the $11,115 Duramax diesel/Allison transmission combination, a combo which costs $8395 in the United States.

The Duramax isn’t installed in GM’s 2500/3500 pickups simply as a means of saving fuel. Diesels are the engines of choice in heavy duty pickup trucks because of the way in which their torque is delivered.

All of it comes on stream at 1600 rpm in the Ram Cummins, Ford PowerStroke, and this Duramax, although the Ram and F-Series diesels produce more torque, and the F-Series quite a bit more horsepower, too.2014 Chevrolet Silverado HD LT tow haul modeUnloaded and without a trailer, the Silverado HD didn’t so much feel like a torque monster as much as it felt like a very fast automobile. I can’t imagine how a full array of passengers, a fair amount of cargo, and anything less than a 6000-pound trailer would cause it to feel slow.

During its stay at our house, the Silverado didn’t max out its tow rating, I didn’t use a front end loader to throw a gigantic boulder into its bed like they used to in old Like A Rock commercials, and I didn’t transport five construction workers to a paving project on a main artery at rush hour.

This may have caused me to appreciate the Silverado’s range of abilities all the more, as its ride quality, mighty brakes, and genuinely normal handling by light-duty modern truck standards convinced me. I enjoy hushed cabins, comfortable thrones, masses of rear legroom, built-in bumper steps, and softly-sprung tailgates.

Outside of those extreme moments (of which there are surely more for the buyer of a truck like this) when the Chevrolet is pushed to its limits, this is a normal truck. And we live in an age in which normal trucks are very pleasant places in which to spend time. You won’t always tow a horse trailer. The bed will not always be loaded with lawn mowers and sod and mulch. I wanted to know if the Silverado HD was liveable, a normal vehicle to operate at times when it’s not executing abnormal job duties. It is.

I don’t like GM’s MyLink infotainment unit, because it’s slow, crawling through satellite radio stations like a snail who ingested too many of Colorado’s unique brownies. There’s quite a bit of disconnect in the steering for the first two inches or more on either side of center, though not an unexpected amount.

I’d like the HD version to be more stylistically differentiated from the 1500 trucks. The Z71 badges on the side of a bed this vast either need to disappear or grow large enough to look tough. Optional 20-inch wheels should look a lot more exciting than this quartet. If the front row’s middle occupant is going to be punished by a massive centre hump, couldn’t GM figure out a way to give them more than just a lap belt?

It’s also tough not to be tempted by the extra torque available in the GM twins’ two rivals. One might also assume that at some point, despite the goodness of their trucks, the concern analysts have over lost market share and the angst auto news writers have over recalls will cause GM’s actual buyers to rethink their own “time for a new Chevy pickup” notions.2014 Chevrolet Silverado HD LT woodsIncidentally, I did end up making it out to the airport. The neighbours and their 80-pound Husky/Border Collie didn’t want to pay to leave their car in long-term parking for nine days, and one morning they looked outside and saw an eight-foot bed attached to a four-door truck in the driveway next door. As you’d expect, the massive WestJet-approved dog crate and a load of luggage that included 50 pounds of meat for the dog didn’t test the cargo or payload capacity of the Silverado. Nor did the six pieces of eight-foot long quarter round trim I bought on the weekend.

Yet isn’t it interesting that the Duramax travelled 20.5 miles per gallon of diesel on that highway jaunt to the airport? (That’s about the same economy achieved by the Silverado 2500 HD in Winston Braithwaite’s hands.) Maybe it wouldn’t have been such a bad idea for the truck to complete the airport run earlier in the week, either, particularly considering the fuel economy of the Outback and Elantra that actually did make the trip: 23.5 and 31.4 mpg, respectively. Especially now that, in Nova Scotia’s regulated fuel market, diesel costs 23 cents less per gallon than regular gasoline.

Yes, this means instead of three Mazda 3s, you should buy one Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD Crew Cab.

In order to save money.

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78 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD...”


  • avatar
    anti121hero

    GOOD GOD this thing is hideous!

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Personally, I think the new Aluminum F-150 is hideous-er. But not by much!

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      As if the 1500 wasn’t bad enough. They gave it a massive bumper and an 8″ airdam. It still looks better than the Sierra 1500 and 2500, but I’ll have wait and see if there’s a monochrome base truck. That airdam would get ditched immediately!

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      I think it’s handsome, and completely unnecessary for at least 80% of the people who will buy it.

      • 0 avatar
        jjster6

        I disagree. People who I see with them tow fifth wheel trailers, big boats, and other heavy loads. And they plow snow in the winter. Just because they aren’t always doing that doesn’t mean the truck is unnecessary. Or perhaps you think that the hobbies of some people are unnecessary?

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “Just because they aren’t always doing that doesn’t mean the truck is unnecessary. Or perhaps you think that the hobbies of some people are unnecessary?”

          It’s not like it really matters. The haters can’t do a thing about it. Maybe that’s why it upsets them so much.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Funny, every time a full sized truck gets tested or reported on, the usual “no one will ever use its full capacity” or substitute for Viagra comments get posted………

            The same thing can be said for a Boss 302, Hellcat, Z06 Corvette or any sports/supercar that will adorn these pages.

            Who uses those vehicles to their full capacity on a daily basis?

            1/2 of pickups sold in the USA are used as work implements.

            Will 1/2 of the cars I mentioned ever get ridden hard and put away wet?

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Why doesn’t anyone judge 18-wheelers? They’re hauling around empty trailers most of the time. Or no trailer at all. And they’re bought for the sole reason of doing lots of heavy work.

          I see 18-wheeler used to round up groceries every day. I’m sure you would look past, just to judge the pickup owner. It doesn’t pay to have separate car just for running errands, when the big rig is sitting idle.

          Your utility companies all drive around 1/2 ton pickups for most daily menial tasks, that a Yaris could easily do.

          But it’s just stupid to judge pickup owners that aren’t loaded to the hilt or used commercially every minute of their existence.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            That’s a silly question – without 18 wheelers, the shelves at the supermarket are going to be bare indeed.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Nothing wrong with delivering groceries, but 18-wheelers are empty most of the time. Just like pickups. Less so, but shockingly, civilian pickups wear lots of hats. If a family with 2 or 3 cars has to downsize to just one car, the pickup is the one to keep. They can do most things a car can, but not the other way around

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            That must be a US thing, they tend to have maximum loads here, usually two trailers

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Denver – 18 wheelers run empty most of the time?
            Stop making sh^t up.

            Freight companies go out of their way to minimize running empty.

            Some cargo is only one way i.e. logging trucks.

            I’m sure you see all sorts of interesting things outside the Asylum window.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yes the Semi’s that deliver to the grocery store run relatively empty back to the warehouse but those are typically short hauls. Since they typically deliver to multiple stores they run light less than half the time. The OTR trucks on the other hand will sit for the next load rather than run empty. Companies like Frito Lay actually advertize their back haul services on the back of their semis. They’ll undercut the dedicated trucking firms to cover the cost of fuel of going back to the plant.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            In a perfect world, 18-wheelers would be loaded both ways, near 100% of the time and at full capacity. But when they do pickup a load or partial load on the way back to say Los Angeles from Arizona, it may be from Utah to San Fran. Commerce usually flows in one direction more than the other. Like from ports/borders inward. And you see an enclosed trailer or refer and assume it’s loaded. Or fully load.

            Point is there’s always hater’s remarks about pickups they see hauling air and assume they never haul/pull anything. And if they rarely perform a lick of work, who cares? Or in showroom condition, at 10 years old, why whine? What’s with all the sniveling? What’s the percentage of time sedans spend loaded with 4 or more passengers? 2%?

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      Yeah, that nose… if the chrome trim piece at the hood and the grill was sized about the same as the one at the bottom of the grill above the bumper, it would look so much better to me.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    From Andrew Collins (who tested Ford, Chevy, and Ram HD trucks) at Jalopnik’s “Truck Yeah!” Blog…

    “I liked the Ford’s powerplant, the way the Chevrolet managed its own speed, and the comfort of the Ram. I have a favorite based on what’s important to me, but I think an argument could be made for any of these trucks.”

    …and a very level-headed commenter “Klurejr” (emphasis all mine):

    “You pick the one YOU think looks the best inside and out, and is most comfortable for YOUR body type. Other than that they are all pretty much the same and always have been. I grew up in a Chevy Household, and as a kid felt the Chevy had to be better than ford or dodge because that is what my dad bought. Then I grew up and realized that all have their ups and downs, but they are ALL good trucks. DRIVE WHAT YOU LIKE.”

    I couldn’t put it better myself, and I also grew up in a Chevy Household…which gradually converted to Hondaism.

  • avatar
    86er

    Tim’s review succinctly sums up why trucks are so popular.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    Are you sure that isn’t a 2015 model?

  • avatar
    daviel

    Way cool truck. “But in real world terms, the diesel Silverado 2500 crew cab only consumed twice as much fuel as the Mazda. Let’s not kid ourselves, it’s certainly more than twice as capable.” Isn’t that an odd remark about capability when the two vehicles are built for different purposes? Otherwise good article.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    “Outside of those extreme moments (of which there are surely more for the buyer of a truck like this) when the Chevrolet is pushed to its limits”

    Actually, I wouldn’t be surprised if most of the buyer of a truck like this have LESS extreme moments than you did during this test.

    Just because these truck CAN do certain things, doesn’t mean they ever WILL. A lot of people buy them simply because they’re big and showy.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      Since the “1/2 ton” “1500″-series versions of these trucks are available in the same exterior dimensions, I rather doubt that people are buying these larger weight capacity trucks just for the fun of it. More likely, their owners tow something fairly heavy, like a horse trailer or a travel trailer or a car trailer or some modest-sized piece of construction equipment. Otherwise, the diesel versions aren’t worth the price premium, and the gasoline-powered versions offer less performance than their 1/2 ton cousins, which weigh 1,000 – 1,700 lbs. less.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “A lot of people buy them simply because they’re big and showy.”

      Considering that it’s an HD truck and a diesel I’d guess that whoever bought it had a need. But let’s say someone did buy it because its big and showy, it’s their money to do with as they please and its not like noone ever purchased a car for less than “altruistic” reasons right?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @philadlj – there will always be image buyers of any vehicle. The guys into “big and showy” are easy to spot. 20 inch lift kits, monster tires, big winch bumpers, stacks straight up.

      It also depends on where you live. 80,000 dollar fully optioned pickups are a dime a dozen in Northern BC where I live and in the oil patch.
      It is hard to go for big and showy when everyone has a similar truck.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Mazda 3 vs. BIG truck? Just toss the car in the bed and you’ve got the best of both worlds.

    I find it fascinating that by comparison, our old bought-new 1980 Dodge 225 slant 6 4 speed ultra-stripper long bed pickup only got 18.5 mpg on the highway! Trucks nowadays do pretty well with all the bells & whistles. Maybe that’s why so many drivers of these things race along at 80-85 mph.

    My Impala only gets between 27-30 mpg back-and-forth to work, mostly highway at slightly less than 65 mph.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Can anyone ever review the base truck? Normal V8, no Nav, no sunroof, no leather dash? Just the truck us mortals would get that don’t need the $70,000 write off.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Let’s review the chassis-cab version!

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        No, but base trucks are a tremendous value and actually look better without chrome everywhere. And you don’t really want carpet in a truck. Serves no purpose. Center console? Why not but a coffee table in there?

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Plus you don’t need a tugboat to get the thing in and out of a parking space at the grocery store.

          I actually wouldn’t mind having a regular cab, regular bed 4wd pickup for fun…but one of these $70,000 jobs? LOL…

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Implying it’s not already used as a coffee table.

          But truly, had I any full-size truck (pickup or BOF SUV), I would not tolerate a center console that didn’t also flip up to become a seat. I don’t care if I never actually use that seat for a person; if the vehicle is wide enough to put three adults across in the back, it’s wide enough to put three adults across in the front, dammit!

          I wouldn’t count full-size CUVs because those are so space-inefficient that you can’t fit three adults across anywhere in the vehicle

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Hell, I’d read it. Might be fun to go to one of those work/fleet specialty dealers, too.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I have a few 2013 Silverado WTs with long beds, 2WD, and the 4.3L V6. The refridgerator white work truck just doesn’t get the press, or the ladies.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The ladies love a man in a base truck! The $70,000 jacked up trucks just brings out the little boys…

        But why does it have to be one or the other? The baseline should be an extended cab, 6.5′ bed, 4X4, V8 with vinyl, rubber and black/matte finish everywhere!

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I sometimes wish someone would review my dream truck: SuperCab/8′ Bed F-150 XLT, 5.0, HD Payload Package. And then put a camper in the back and see how it does.

          But then I remember that a review would be irrelevant, because I’d buy it anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      dts187

      I bought just the truck you’re describing about a year ago. ’13 Ram Express regular cab 4×4.
      I should do a reader ride review. . . .

  • avatar
    hazmat

    Big trucks have come a long way in comfort and economy and they provide a driving experience that some really enjoy (i.e. high & smooth).

    However, most lives (perrennial haulers excepted) are better off with a car by day and an older truck for the weekend warrior work. I LOVE old trucks BECAUSE they drive sloppy and smell bad and never quit (’97 Ranger). I love cars b/c you can get a reasonable purchase price, a great drive, good economy and easy parking without any substantive sacrifice.

    So, the question isn’t 3 Mazda 3′s vs. 1 Chevy 2500HD. The question is 1 Mazda 3 + a 10yr old 2500 + a stack of $ vs. 1 Chevy 2500HD.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      +1 for spending not as much as a small house in the midwest on a truck you’ll only genuinely *need* a few weekends a year.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        There’s more to it than just *needing* a truck. And sometimes you don’t know when you’re going to need it, until it’s too late. Better to have one and not need it, than…

        It does open your eyes to things not possible in a car. But not often mentioned is trucks are overbuilt, just in case they ever are put to hard work. They can last forever and sell for 2 or 3X more than a passenger car of the same vintage/care, decades down the road.

        Too many advantages to owning a truck, especially if you buy it new, but without the bling’n it out to “small house in the midwest” pricing.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Let’s be honest here, Mike…how many people actually use these the way God intended them to be used, particularly here in Denver? The most “hauling” I see being done with about 95.2% of these duded-up diesel pickups is one moderately-paunchy middle manager backside between Parker, Starbucks, and DTC.

          As far as the “we need ‘em for snow” thing is concerned, during the last real big snowstorm (2006), my next door neighbor managed to get his 4wd pickup (It was a Chevy four door of some kind) stuck on his front lawn…after he bragged to me how he was going to be Snow Warrior and I wasn’t going anywhere in my silly little Focus ST. Turns out we were both just as stuck…but I felt no need to stay sober, and he had to. Focus 1, 4wd pickup 0.

          Unless you had a jacked up pickup or Jeep, or a Hummer Alpha (not the wimpy H2), you weren’t going anywhere.

          Ah well. It’s their money.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What’s with all the judging? If you really want to know why, just ask. You might be surprised. Or not. Check for a 5th wheel hitch. Do they run food staples and clothes to the poor, deep in the woods and reservation?

            And can’t we just own what we want just because we like it? Too many reasons to own a truck other than hauling things all day. But once you’ve owned a truck, you never go back to normal cars, if you can help it. You’d probably be hooked too. So don’t try it!

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            FYI, I feel pretty much the same way about Priuses – they’re an awfully expensive way to eke out a few extra MPG.

            Ditto for all the folks tooling around on $5,000 bikes in the Tour De France getup.

            Like I said…it’s their money. Just pointing out the silliness.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I beg your pardon my H2s can do 85%+ what my (non alpha) H1s can do. Certainly more stock than a stock jeep of any kind.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @FreedMike – you ever consider the fact that your neighbour is an idiot?

            I’m sure your Focus St would be able to follow me in my stock height F150 Supercrew 4×4. Oh, I was being sarcastic.

            I have yet to get my F150 stuck. Came close once.
            You ever spend an afternoon plowing through 18 inches of snow? I did that last winter to make sure I new exactly where my son’s boy scout troop was going to spend a weekend winter camping. I used 4×4 a few times out of 80km of back country.

            In the name of full disclosure I did have a set of new winter rated General Grabber AT2′s on the truck that are the stock size but 10 ply.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        “+1 for spending not as much as a small house in the midwest on a truck you’ll only genuinely *need* a few weekends a year.”

        That depends on how you define “need.” If you have an RV that weighs 12k pounds and you buy a 3/4 ton truck tow it a few weekends a year you do NEED it, even it it is only occasionally. Nobody is going to rent or loan out a $60k truck for you pull your Airstream. Same with towing a large boat or a trailer with a skid steer loader used by a hobby farmer.

        If you need that capacity occasionally, and a fair number of Americans do, these trucks make sense. Even if it is only 5% of your driving there is no substitute for this capability.

        If you don’t like or need one, don’t buy one. Otherwise how people spend their automotive dollars is their own business.

        • 0 avatar
          Fred

          Still I see folks trying to maneuver these things in parking lots and I wonder if it’s really worth it for the 5% of the time you actually do.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          According to the “needs” argument, no one needs an Airstream or a boat either.

          Don’t worry, I get it. I need my truck to pull various race cars.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Toad – exactly. My part of the world is based on heavy industry like logging and mining. During peak reforestation, construction, and fire control season most rental trucks are impossible to find as every company around has them all rented.

          The “borrow your buddies” truck logic makes sense for a city slicker but you’ll get a f^ck off” if you want to borrow a guys truck during hunting season or almost any other time of the year where I live.

          The “help me out for a few cases of beer” approach is the best way to go.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        And since when does every car have to be the absolute most logical choice? Should ANYONE drive anything other than a Yaris?

        • 0 avatar
          tuffjuff

          I find it offensively socially irresponsible to purchase a vehicle that you will never use the capabilities of; there’s a gentlemen of high position in my office, and his daily driver is a Ram 2500. I know for a fact he doesn’t tow more than a few thousand pounds, and even then only sparely. Which begs the question, why a truck? Why not one of the many capable, more fuel efficient crossovers? If you need a truck, somehow, why not a 1500?

          I make no illusion that I am (or should be) in charge of how other people spend their money. I guess ignorance for those using a truck as a car and nothing more just fascinates and annoys me.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “I find it offensively socially irresponsible to purchase a vehicle that you will never use the capabilities of”

            That’s hilarious. I can only imagine how bent out of shape you get watching people exercise their freedom to choose how to live in various other aspects of life.

            Honestly, how can people care this much about what other’s drive?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I get the gist of your argument against waste (I share the concern), but on the same token why buy a sedan if you never haul passengers? Why buy 4×4 if you never off-road? The gentlemen with the RAM would probably have been well served by a traditional American coupe or sedan for his towing purposes, and use the same or less gas to boot vs the 2500. Those were eliminated. The alternative is some kind of gigantic truck or the CUV. Between higher resale and actual capability, I know which one I’m choosing.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            If you’re annoyed and offended by my truck, awesome! Where do you live?

            But a “few 1000 lbs” can be too much for a 1/2 ton. I depends on the situation, but generally you wan’t to say well under a trucks max rating. Even sparingly. Although a 2500 may weigh much less than a “few 1000 lbs”.

          • 0 avatar
            Cavendel

            What percentage of people actually use the capabilities of the car/truck that they buy? 1% .5%? I imagine it is pretty small. I have a Mazda 3 that is easily capable of relieving me of my license without breaking a sweat. As DenverMike said, a Yaris is all any of us need.

            I used to be offended by people using “Begs the question” incorrectly. I’ve gotten over it, and I just let people use it as they like.

          • 0 avatar
            Toad

            I guess all any of us “need” is a bicycle and a Mao jacket. How bourgeois to desire anything else.

            I am amused by the Porsche that never leaves city streets, the jacked up 4×4 that never leaves pavement, the Prius with a dozen bumper stickers for various progressive causes, the tiny women driving full size SUV’s, the Honda Civic tuned within an inch of it’s life, the GM B body with 24″ rims and rubber band tires, Norms Buick SUV that gets 50+ mpg, etc…

            Life is too short to be annoyed by the people that make automotive choices that I would not make.

          • 0 avatar
            mcarr

            Whoooo!!! It’s not a party until someone get’s offended by offensively social irresponsibility!!

  • avatar
    Vetteman

    I use my Diesel pickups to tow and that is the only reason to spend the money for the higher cost of the truck and the higher cost of maintenance and repairs. That said I have enjoyed and had great service from my 2004 2500 Silverado Duramax but last week based on a lot of research and comparisons I bought a 2014 Ram crew cab short bed to assume the towing dutys in our family . The ram IMHO is the best diesel pickup on the market at this time . What really tipped the scale for me in favor of the Ram is the recall issue and the admission that they assemble cars and trucks with parts that they accept into the plant that do not even meet their own engineers minimum design specs. At issue now is the ignition switch because it is now a high visibility failure that has caused deaths and injuries but think about all the other parts and components that go into those vehicles that may have latent defects or substandard build specs . I don’t want to spend my money with that company. Mary Barra can get on TV and say the recalls have not affected sales but I voted against GM with my money Last week and I was predisposed to buy GM again. The new GM is still the Old GM for me Building crappy cars and trucks and charging a premium for them . ” Yesterdays cars and trucks at Tomorrows prices “

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      Good to hear that you voted against GM. I wish more people made the kind of informed research and decision that you did, when making a vehicle purchase.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    For $70000 they could at least throw in one Obama-hater bumper sticker.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    How the fvck is this both the most conservative commentariat and the most truck hating commentariat in the automotive intarwebz? Oy. I cannot brain today. I haz the confuz. I drive a farking Prius and I don’t hate trucks like you all do.

    Big trucks are some of the most awesome things in existence. They are spacious, comfortable, smooth, they handle well for what they are, and their headlights and tail lights are nice and bright. They are often the cheapest way to get a V8, RWD, or both a V8 and RWD, and still have some utility. They go further off road than most cars do. And you can see over people.

    Oh and that whole towing thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I don’t know if this is exactly the most conservative group of people, but I agree haha.
      Me, I ENJOY reading how much people hate the things I love while calling “the truck love phenomena” a problem traced back to ones insecurities.

  • avatar
    patman

    Did you ever convince your dad that one trip at 20mpg is better than two trips at 23 and 34? He must not have seen the film of the school bus vs. the diesel Rabbit they showed in school.

    • 0 avatar
      xflowgolf

      Haha. Came to post this as well. 23 + 31 mpg vehicles driven together effectively was equivalent to one getting roughly 13.5mpg.

      • 0 avatar
        balreadysaid

        i would have figured you just divide by as many cars as your measuring. 2 vehicles that both equally burn one gallon in 20 miles is 10 mpg. somehow i am wrong im sure but what i just wrote made more sense to my dumb ass! lol

        • 0 avatar
          patman

          It’s not quite as simple with our real world numbers.

          we’ll say the distance to the airport and back is 100 miles (doesn’t really matter)…

          the truck gets 20mpg so divide 100 by 20 and it would have used 5 gallons of fuel for our theoretical trip.

          100 mi / 20 MPG = 5 gal

          At 23.5 MPG the Outback uses 4.25 gallons

          100 / 23.5 = 4.25

          and at 31.4 MPG the Elantra uses 3.18 gallons

          100 / 31.4 = 3.18

          add the number of gallons used by the two cars up and you get 7.43 gallons for the trip. Divide that into 100 miles and that gives you the MPG of the combined trips.

          100 / 7.43 = 13.45 MPG

          Like I said, the miles don’t really matter since they cancel out so you can solve it with the following formula

          1/(car a mpg) + 1/(car b mpg) = 1/(combined mpg)

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Being a former teacher in economics, he could do the math. Thing is, early in the week he was operating under the belief that this truck perhaps shared more similarities with his old ’84 2500 GMC crew cab long box pickup than it actually does. With real world numbers in hand, there was no denying the math was in my favour. How quickly parents need to see their first-born when he arrives from overseas, however, may have meant the math didn’t really matter.

  • avatar
    wmba

    These darn wimpy little trucks just bore me. Once I had a ride in a Newell coach, I knew what I’d have after I won the lottery.

  • avatar
    Rich Fitzwell

    Several years ago GM was given a clean balance sheet, tons of tax incentives, had bad dealers ditched for them, and got union concessions- since then GM has lost 5 points in market share.

    These trucks wont help.

    GM is done.

    GM will be broken up and sold off in parts when the next financial collapse arrives.

    • 0 avatar
      Vetteman

      Rich you are exactly right . If you look at a long term graph of GM’s market share it goes from upper left to lower right . This company has been in a continuous downward spiral since the high water mark in the fiftys and 60′s . In 1990 it was 36 percent . Now it is half that . I remember going to dealer meetings in 1998 when it had dropped below 30 to 29 and they were giveing out lapel pins to all attendees that had 29 on them . This was the line in the sand or so they hoped . We have to turn it around and hold 29 percent .we were told in a failed attempt to rally the troops I still have that pin and once in a while when I see it I feel sad for what was once the greatest industrial company in the world and the Icon of American capitalism and manufacturing prowess. I agree with your conclusion that GM is still dieing a lingering death and my guess is the bones will be purchased by chinese companies somewhere in the future They are neglecting the only strong competitive products they have Their full size trucks and this will kill them as customers shop elsewhere.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I drove my brothers ’07 GMC with the Dmax with his 36′ enclosed triple axle race trailer hooked behind it. That Dmax didn’t even know that trailer was back there. The diesel really makes towing a heavy load a lot less stressful. You pull something really heavy, shaped like a billboard in the front and gas motors just don’t make any sense. I run the 6.0 gasser in my ’04 HD Sierra and everytime I pull my boat I wish I had the oil burner under the hood. That gas engine works a lot harder to pull that boat down the interstate than I ever thought it would.


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