By on June 23, 2014

G37x8

TTAC reader Tim Rust sends us his review of his 2010 Infiniti G37x.

Do you pass up the expensive steak house restaurant to buy your meat at Costco and grill the perfect steak at home?  Do you purchase your clothing at an outlet mall to avoid the huge mark-up employed by brand-name stores in a mall?  Is hiring a handyman/contractor a last resort when your house needs some work? If so, a gently used Infiniti G37 may be the vehicle for you.

 

As people go, I tend to fall more on the practical end of the spectrum.  When I purchase a product, I like to get good value for my dollar, but I also like high-quality products. Sports sedans have always called to me for that reason.  They are not too ostentatious or gaudy, but definitely hint that there is some performance underneath the conservative sheet metal—the E39 BMW 5-series would be my prototypical specimen.  So why not buy a used E39, you ask?  Well, I want a product that will last without numerous trips to the mechanic and intimidating repair bills.  I also require some of the creature comforts only found in newer models (decent audio system, Bluetooth, up-to-date safety features, etc.).  Looking at sports sedans circa 2010, the Infiniti G37 stands out as being both dynamic and reliable.  Consequently, last year, I purchased a 2010 Infiniti G37x sedan with about 25,000 miles on the clock.

Why might you not want to get this car?  Well, the gas mileage is poor compared to some newer models—I get 19 mpg with a majority of city driving.  The cup holders also stink.  Two soda cans fit well, but try getting two large McDonald’s cups in there during a road trip and you’re just asking for a spill.  But, these aren’t factors that should keep you away from the G37.

The ride, handling, and driving feel in a practical package are the reasons to purchase this car.  In my non-sport trim, the ride is firm, but forgiving.  Uneven road surfaces are felt, but are tolerable.  Driving on the twisty roads in the Hocking Hills of Southeastern Ohio is enjoyable, but there is some body roll, reminding you that you are not in a full -on sports car.  The G37 still employs hydraulic power steering, so steering feel is great compared to newer vehicles with electric power steering.  It feels a bit heavy while navigating parking lots at slow speeds and firms up nicely at higher speeds for confident handling.  For a daily driver, it offers a great compromise between a firm sporty suspension and a comfortable commuter.  Road noise is noticeable, but not so bad that you will hate yourself after a long road trip.  Much of the noise comes from the coarse, throaty engine note, which adds to the sporting nature of the car.

And about that engine… This was a pleasant surprise for me after owning the car for a while.  The engine note is almost more muscle car than sports sedan.  I’ve never really been attracted to muscle cars, but the sensation of all of that power is growing on me.  Acceleration in city driving is great and a blast when in sport/manual shift mode.  At highway speeds, it seems to be a little out of the torque curve and it can take some minimal effort to pass.  The automatic transmission has been a bit of a disappointment with this car.  There are seven gears, but the shifts can be a little rough, especially when coasting to a stop.  Even though my car is not a sport model, I have also read online that it should still be prewired for the shift paddles that come on the sport model.  It looks like it is a reasonably easy self-install after buying a kit and it is on my list of things to do this summer.

My prior car was a 2004 Subaru Legacy sedan and there is a noticeable difference between Subaru’s symmetrical all wheel drive and the AWD system on the G37x.  For those that don’t know, the Subaru system sends power to all four wheels all of the time.  The G37’s AWD powers only the rear wheels until they slip and then power is sent to the front as well.  This is great, in that it maintains the RWD feel of the car.  Still, compared to the Subaru, it is disconcerting to feel the back of the car start to slip before the AWD kicks in.  At low speeds, the car can be locked in AWD with the “Snow Mode” button, but this deactivates at higher speeds.  In all fairness, I only really notice problems while trying to drive on unplowed roads with more than two inches of snow on the ground.  In light snow or plowed streets, the G37’s AWD is great for winter driving.  I haven’t noticed any difference driving in simply wet conditions.

I admit, the interior of the car is starting to look a little dated.  I prefer a more classic look, so this works for me.  Infiniti’s center screen with dial and keypad below looks premium and is simple to use.  It may not be cutting edge, but it works well and minimizes distraction from driving.  The screen also works as a touchscreen in cars equipped with navigation.  The voice commands work well for making phone calls and using the navigation system.  Bluetooth audio streaming comes with models with navigation and works well 95% of the time with a few glitches.  Curiously, there is no auxiliary jack, so Bluetooth is the only connectivity option for playing music from your own device.  There is a hard drive that can rip CDs—I know, terrible outdated.  The Bose sound system is pretty decent, although I am not a hardcore audiophile and I don’t expect my subwoofer to rattle my neighbors’ windows as I cruise by.  It seems a step above the Bose system in the 2014 Mazda6.

I prefer lighter vehicle interiors rather than an expanse of black plastic and leather and went with the Stone interior and aluminum trim.  It’s a little different than a typical beige car interior and may strike some as too bland.  Aluminum also helps to make the interior look a little more contemporary compared to the optional wood trim.  The non-sport front seats are very comfortable and tend to be on the firm side.  No problems after a seven-hour road trip.  They do allow some room for sliding around during hard cornering, though.  The seat heaters are excellent and the climate control is very quick to heat or cool.

The rear seat room is another plus of this car.  Compared to a 2010 BMW 3 series, Audi A4, or Lexus IS there is considerably more room for two adults to comfortably sit in the back.  I am six feet tall and can sit comfortably behind my drivers seat position.  The center armrest is chunky and padded, adding to the comfort and coziness of the back seat.  I have not tested this personally, but several online reviews show that rear-facing infant and child seats can also fit in the backseat without ruining the front seat legroom.  This was a big factor in the practical nature of this car, as it truly can be a family vehicle.

Visibility is quite good and a back-up camera is standard even though it’s really not necessary.  There are also rear backup radar sensors to help with parking and pulling out of parking spots.  The trunk is so-so.  The opening is probably too small, but there is room for several roller bags for airport runs and the like—approximately 13.5 cubic feet.  The rear seats do not fold down, though, so you’ll have to take your SUV when making hardware store runs for longer objects.  There is a small pass-through for skis.  Overall, I found this interior more comfortable, practical, and better looking than the comparable BMW.

Infiniti’s exterior styling seems to be pretty polarizing.  Compared to other models, they showed some more restraint with the G37.  The front end is beautiful with the swooping sleek HID headlights and aggressive fender flairs.  These are the best headlights I have experienced in a car—very bright with a large area of coverage.  Of note, there are no daytime running lights.  The back end of the car does not work as well.  The G sedan has had the same basic taillight design for a while now and it looks old.  It is unique, though, in an age where many cars seem to have the same basic rear end design.  The rear end just looks frumpy compared to the curvaceous front end.  And I am not a fan of the chrome trim on the spoiler either.

The excellent reliability record according to Consumer Reports and True Delta along with the reasonable price, driving dynamics, and interior amenities made this purchase a no brainer.  You can get more for more money with a newer model, but this value is hard to beat.  BMW—and with recent models, maybe now Cadillac—may be the Ultimate Driving Machine, but the Infiniti G37 is the Ultimate Used Sports Sedan.  If you are a practical guy or gal on a budget looking for a sophisticated, fun ride, definitely check one out.

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92 Comments on “Reader Review: Infiniti G37x...”


  • avatar
    duffman13

    Great review, the G37 is definitely a car I’ve considered as a CPO at some point, especially how their post-lease pricing tends to be compared to the German competition.

    Have you had any issues with the paint? I know that’s been a sore spot to most a long-term Nissan owners that I know, and I’ve heard at least a few complaints about it from Infiniti folks as well.

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      True on the paint. You see a lot of faded infiniti’s in Florida. Poor engineering on the paint for Nissan.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      The paint is quite soft. I regret not getting the 3M hood cover at purchase time.

      There was one year (2009?) where the EX37 – aka the G37 wagon – had self-healing paint. Did that work as well as it sounded?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        My 09M has self-healing paint. It doesn’t have any hazing type scratches, so maybe it works?

        I’ve seen some photo evidence that it does work slightly.

    • 0 avatar
      timcc23

      The front of the car has a few small paint chips. I may end up getting a clear 3M hood cover just to protect from further damage. I haven’t noticed anything new in my year of ownership. It think this model also has the self-healing paint.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatist

      Faded pant -+the bargain hunter’s friend. Cuts the price with no impact on performance or reliability.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I guess it’s always interesting to hear other viewpoints and that’s the great part, we all like cars for different reasons. I’ve rented a couple of these and I’ve owned a BMW 3 series, just for full disclosure. Both are truely great cars and they are two of the closest competitors there is in this class. I did notice the poor gas milage on the G37 just as you have. I thought I remembered the 3 series having more rear space than the G37, but maybe I’m mistaken? While I enjoyed the G37′s engine, I struggled with the transmission and I think that was the weak point of the car. I alwasy felt that it was making some odd shifts (as in in the apex, or exit of a corner for example). Downshifts were very off too (and rough). As for reliability, my 3 series was stellar as has been every BMW I’ve owned (and own). Either way, both very recommended used cars.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      I’ve notced quite a range of difference in what is ostensibly te same transmision in G37 models. I’ve driven base model (non-sport) service loaners with transmissions that are hatefully slow and indecisive versus sport models that are simply brillant. Does anyone know if they are suppose to be the same, or does the sport model just have different tuning?

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    There are precious few sedans that I can even stand to look at, and this is one of them for sure. Absolutely beautiful curvaceous design. I have no doubts that Mazda’s Kodo design was inspired by Infiniti.

    The 3-pedal variants that I’ve seen listed on cars.com seem to be creeping ever closer to the magical $20k barrier, which bodes well for me, if I go that route. I love the coupe even more, but the mail-slot trunk, midget sized back seats and “higher price for fewer doors” really combine to turn me off. If I get a coupe, it’ll be an Accord.

  • avatar
    jmo

    How much did you end up paying? I ask because I’m under the impression that these are a great deal on the used market, as demand for them is realtively low compared with a Lexus, BMW or Audi.

  • avatar
    gasser

    There are still new 2013s for sale at substantial discounts. I am not sure if they are still building this model as a lower cost alternative to the Q50. The factory warranty on these is a reassuring 48 months/ 50K miles. To me, the engine note was always too loud. I once thought the size a bit small, but since the kids grew up and left home, it’s just right.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      They went back and forth over whether to “Q” it beneath the Q50 or leave it as a G. There was no ’14 model and I recall Jack calling Infniti out for hitting the residual values on G37′s by continuing to build / offer lower spec G’s.

  • avatar

    Thanks for the review, Tim! I was seriously debating a CPO G37 when I started my car search. One thing that turned me off was the configuration options – I couldn’t get a manual with AWD. Either way, the looks and power of this car and enticing. Enjoy it!

  • avatar
    SomeGuy

    I’ll jump in here too. I have a 2008 G37S coupe. So it has the big akebono brakes, mechanical LSD, sport seats, etc. The noise this car makes is just truly my #1 favorite thing about it. I put on an axle back exhuast so I could hear it a little more.

    The manual transmission is really good. It isn’t Honda good, but it is better than my old 2001 330Ci which felt like shifting a rubber band in 1-2 (even with the BMW SSK). Don’t expect to powershift like you own a Fox Body Mustang.

    The software in this system is dead nuts reliable: fast and it never freezes, but my god is sorting through iPod music a disaster. Unless another G37 owner can clear the air, good luck finding your favorite Van Halen or Metallica song when you have to scroll down, and down, and down to get it.

    Maintenance wise this car has been a joy. I got mine with 29k two years ago for $24,500. It has about 58k on it right now and I have only done oil change and air filters.

    Drawbacks? All the big power is up high. Real high. I equate it to a 4-cylinder car below 2,500 – 3,000 RPM. By the time you wind it out to 7,500 (!!) RPM in second you are breaking every speeding law outside of Texas. I also agree with the OP that the interior is looking dated, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that is bad. I don’t know about his car, but mine has the aluminum trim pieces and I just love to look at them against the black interior.

    If you are into modding cars, don’t expect any power gains without spending big bucks. Just don’t bother. Focus on improving your skills.

    Also, gas mileage is poor. 24 MPG if you stay out of it, and it only gets worse from there. Fillups can be painful if you are “living above you means” to own this car ($75+ here in Kentucky on premium only).

    I would say clean examples of manual coupes are hard to find, because when I searched, most were wrecked or had a bad Carfax. I flew to Chicago from Louisville to get my car.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Either it’s got a bigger tank than the 19 I’m thinking, or your gas down there is VERY expensive.

    • 0 avatar
      cirats

      Here’s a tip on using your iPod I found somewhere when I got frustrated with the same thing on my G35:

      Go into iTunes on your computer and change the Genre for all of your songs to the first letter of the name of the artist. For example, create Genre “V” for Van Halen, Van Morrison, Vanilla Ice, etc. It takes a little while but you should be able to do them in big batches. Don’t use any Genres other than these single letters and you’ll have no more than 26 Genres. Then, when you are in your car and want to search for a song by artist, go to the Genre tab and just scroll down to the letter. When you hit “enter” on the letter, the next page will list the artists whose names start with that letter. Still not the best system in the world (and of course you can’t use Genres for their normal purpose any more) but actually works pretty well and is way way better than the scroll forever method.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      “Drawbacks? All the big power is up high. Real high. I equate it to a 4-cylinder car below 2,500 – 3,000 RPM.”

      Maybe you had a V8 before? Because I find this engine has plenty of torque down low. The weight certain does not help the mileage but I think 24 out of this package is pretty good. People are shocked I get that much out of my Z which is basically the same car minus the rear seats with an even cheaper interior.

      Agree these cars are downright awesome as CPO purchases. You really can’t beat their performance-to-price ratio. And as a bonus they look fantastic styling wise. However if you looking at getting the manual (and you should be) then avoid the pre 2006 models because the synchros suck. My Z has already eaten one transmission (original CD001) and the second one (CD009) grinds 3rd and 5th when cold.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        This girl with a 370Z parked next to me one time, and said – “Hey, we’re cousins!”

        She just assumed that I knew that I basically had a 4-door Z.

      • 0 avatar
        SomeGuy

        Well my other car is a turbo 4 banger, so the torque is nearly 100% at 2k. I’m not saying it is bad, just the character of the car. Gives me a reason to shift at 3k+ RPM :)

        I agree that the cars have aged really well on looks too. This will be the first car in a long time I’m going to struggle to get rid of. I really like it.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Aluminum also helps to make the interior look a little more contemporary compared to the optional wood trim.”

    Isn’t the wood the standard one, and the alumium an option? At least on the M, you couldn’t get the aluminum trim unless you had an S.

    I agree with you on the dated interior. The curves and squished up nature makes it look more dated than it needs to. If it had fewer panels and more continuity, it would be aging better.

    I’ve also always thought that this particular model G, with the “soft” front lamps and more gentle bulges didn’t age as well as ones with more straight lines. Another similar example is something like a 95 Taurus vs. a 99 Taurus. It’s less noticeable in darker colors.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think wood was optional.

    • 0 avatar
      timcc23

      For this model G, I’m pretty sure that aluminum was standard and the wood was extra. Either way, this is definitely not a sport model and it does have the aluminum.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        If I remember this correctly, on the “S” model you couldn’t even get wood – aluminium only.

        That’s one of the drawbacks of Infiniti or Acura versus BMW – the latter allows you a pretty wide choice of interior trims and colors, but the Japanese brands hold costs down by limiting those choices. Lexus does better, but then again, Lexus interiors have always been so nicely finished that the lack of color choices isn’t as big a drawback.

  • avatar
    brenschluss

    Just last night I bought some prime boneless ribeye from Costco. F*ck me running, some of the best I’ve ever had.

    I have a latent interest in used G37s, but I don’t think you can get AWD + manual transmission, and that’s kinda what I’m after.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Costco is the go-to place for decent, inexpensive beef. I’m a huge fan of the horribly-named, but-oh-so-great-for-grilling flap meat. It’s related to brisket or flank steak, so you have to cut it across the grain, but it’s zero waste and has decent flavor.

      I *hated* the throttle tip-in on the G37 I rented a few years back. I owned a few Maximas, so I was a fan of the VQ engine. Despite that, the G37 left me cold. It’s funny how a single characteristic can ruin an experience.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        One nice thing about DBW cars is that you can remap the throttle-pedal curve to your heart’s content.

      • 0 avatar
        Eiriksmal

        I wonder if it’s the difference in pedal position? The accelerator pedal hangs down from the firewall in the Maximas* whereas it’s mounted to the floor in the Gs.

        @Bumpy: Unfortunately, Nissan/Infiniti lacks much of the aftermarket support that Honda/Subaru/Mazda boast. I know the silly SprintBooster widget will make the pedal more sensitive, but that may not be what Bunkie was looking for.

        *Well, it did from 1995 – 2008, at least.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    For a four year old car the g37 has become so outdated in such a short period of time. Even the new q50 seems to be on the bland side. Just this morning I was in the break room and an infiniti commercial came on the TV. One of my employees said “when is Infiniti going to update that car?”. I said that is an updated Infiniti, that’s the new q50. I think she didn’t believe me.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think the last-gen design (like this example) was introduced in 2007 or 2008, so no wonder it looks a bit dated now, particularly inside.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      The Q50 is a good looking, understated design unlike the new IS. I really like the dual screen setup in the former as well, though the way they are utilized is less than ideal. Ultimately, I think that the Q50 will age better than many of its peers, styling-wise.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    Make sure get the manual because I heard the automatic has some intermittent shifting issue where it would momentarily engage neutral while driving, feels like someone just rear ended you. My friend kept taking it to the dealer and they just kept resetting the computer, had a firmware update too but no dice. Apparently there’s no definite fix.

    Otherwise it’s a very nice car.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    One issue to watch for with these cars is the rubbery trim used around the controls on the steering wheel, which will peel off. As far as I’m aware the wood/aluminum trim doesn’t fall off the doors as it does on the M and FX though.

    I’ve driven one of these, I thought it was nice but wasn’t particularly enamored with it. I didn’t notice any particularly issues with the autobox, but the engine note got tiresome pretty fast. The steering wheel is also oddly shaped and uses a leather that’s not very nice in the hand. Panel gaps, especially in the lower center stack are pretty bad.

    It does cost less than the equivalent German car, but you can see why. That said, if I had to bet on a 10 year old G vs. a 10 year old BMW 3 series, it would be the G, hands down. Infinitis may not have the best paint or interior trim quality, but the electrics and the engine will outlast anything from Munich.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      “Cost less” is a bit understated. These days, you can pick up a fully loaded G37 for about $30-$32k – at most $35k for nav, moonroof, weather package, the works. The same fully-loaded 328i will be close to $48k?

      • 0 avatar
        Davekaybsc

        They are discounting quite a bit, but that’s also because they have decontented the car. Aside from the extremely limited paint and interior choices, the sport package is gone, and lumbar is manual only. It’s still a fairly good deal, but a Regal GS is similar money, has more equipment, and feels more modern on the inside. Much better steering wheel too.

    • 0 avatar
      SomeGuy

      Yes. It was a problem in the first few years. The “newer” ones don’t have the steering wheel issue.

      My S actually doesn’t have leather on the wheel. I’m okay with it, but I know some people would find that a deal breaker.

      It may only be 90% of a German car, but it will outlast one with a lot less “preventative” maintenance.

      • 0 avatar
        cpthaddock

        Switch perspective and there are just as many, if not more, ways that German cars are only 90% of these.

        OP put this review in the context of value and practicality, but the side by side comparison make me less forgiving of shortcomings in equivalent cars that demand a significant premium. .

        As evidence, I offer BMW and their 3 / 4 series cup holder design tantrums. Thank the good lord that they’ve finally ditched those dashboard knee impalers and airbag missile mounts, but to do so by copying Honda’s early 90′s Integra design? In 2014 we spend tens of thousands of dollar to choose between drinks or using center stack controls?

        Audi MMC … I have honestly not seen controls less well thought out or laid out since Citroen’s decision to locate the GS / GSA radio between the front seats.

        Things like this are entirely avoidable. When the $$$ premium goes towards these unforgiveable design elements I have trouble justifying the premium price.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I never understood those why brought G3537 coupes over their sportier, cheaper Nissan counter-parts. I do understand why you’d buy a G37 sedan over a Nissan coupe though if you need 4-doors.

    At least with this you get Nissans “stick into everything” VQ at a decent hp rating.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Quite a lot of editing there, which got rid of the things I was about to yell at you for.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Yea I changed my opinion on the whole “prestige” thing.

        I was talking about how the G37 sharing a platform with Infinitis CUV and other bits with so many pedestrian Nissans killed whatever “prestige” that the G37 could muster.

        But then I remembered how little “prestige” matters to me, plus its not like the G37 uses a platform from the Nissan Altima or anything (thats a light poke on Audis-Golf derived TT).

        Funny thing is, I’m seeing more “Infinti” in BMWs recent cars, obviously Nissans doing a decent job contending with them if BMW feels the need to borrow styling cues.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Because the Nissan counter part, the 350Z/370Z, don’t have rear seats. With the Infiniti G-coupe you get rear seats, even if they are suitable only for children or adults as occasional use.

      I like coupes and have never bought a 4-door car in my life. However, I do like having at least occasional-use jump seats.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        You’d think the Z would have jump seats as an option, wouldn’t the hatch allow for a little more headroom in the back?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          IIRC the Z has a big bulk head thing (for stabilization?) where any rear passengers’ heads would go.

          • 0 avatar
            Eiriksmal

            The 350Z is shorter overall and has a massive rear strut tower brace eating the entire, limited cargo area.

            Edit: And the 370Z is just tiny.

            Too bad you can’t get a Le Mans Sunset Orange G3X coupe–then you could nearly have the best of both worlds: Sports car looks, performance, and practicality.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            From my research that head thing is just there for decoration, its just a plastic bit that pops off.

  • avatar
    diaclone

    “Curiously, there is no auxiliary jack, so Bluetooth is the only connectivity option for playing music from your own device. ”

    Have an 08 G35 so I imagine the interior is very similar if not the same. Your center console should have an RCA hook up, so all you need is an RCA to 3.5mm to hook up a music device.
    The big gripe I have on the G sedans is the fixed headrest. Makes installing a front facing carseat awkward. My prior car happened to be a Legacy as well.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    Pretty happy with our 2012 G37. We bought the only non-AWD model on the lot, which led to some pretty nice discounting. It was either this or a 2008 335 w/ 30k miles that cost $5k more. The G37 seems to do at least 85% of what the 335 does, so no question there. Though the BMW sports seats definitely do reign supreme.

    I consistently get 20 city / 30 hwy, so they could definitely improve the city mileage. Seats and ergonomics are good. I really like the turn-off-your-brain back-up parking guide. I can scoot back into a spot perfectly every time in 2 seconds.

    We tried to get a CPO one (or at least a 3-4 year old one) and they tend to keep their value fairly well for the first 3-4 years, so it wasn’t that much more to get a new one. They come with a 6 yr / 70k mile powertrain warranty, which is almost Hyundai-like.

    One comment about the Subaru Legacy comparison – isn’t the full time AWD only on the manual models? I believe on the auto models, it’s a FWD bias setup under non-skid conditions.

    • 0 avatar
      brenschluss

      Correct on Subaru’s AWD, this is often overlooked. The automatic, with 90/10 under normal circumstances, is perfect for earnest forward traction in snow but not ideal for sideways fun.

    • 0 avatar
      timcc23

      I’m not a mechanic or a Subaru expert, but I am pretty sure that Subaru’s symmetrical all wheel drive always powers all four wheels. There is always at least a small amount of power going to the rear wheels. That is what makes it different than most of the AWD setups. It is FWD biased, so it doesn’t drive like a RWD car, but it’s also not completely FWD either. Maybe someone with more specialized knowledge can weigh in.

      • 0 avatar
        brenschluss

        You’re right that all four wheels are always powered, but only the “Symmetrical AWD” system does permanent 50/50 and I believe “Symmetrical AWD” is only a feature of the manual-equipped cars. This was at least the case with my automatic 2002 Outback which had the 90/10 split until slip is detected. I only recall seeing the “Symmetrical AWD” sticker on manual Imprezas as well, but hey I could be wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          onyxtape

          My 08 auto Outback says “symmetrical AWD” too. But the knowledgeable folks at SubaruOutback.org says that it’s 60/40 front-rear for auto (during non-skid conditions) and 50/50 for manual.

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            Shows what I know! This link says I’m full of sh*t but also that clear info is hard to come by:

            http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/61-general-discussions/45751-official-subaru-torque-split-information.html

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          Symmetrical refers to the system being symmetric left and right. Power goes from the engine, straight back to the tranny, straight back to the center diff where it is split straight forward (rather than the side like BMW, Lexus, Merc) and backward to the front and rear diffs. The front and rear diffs are in line with the center diff instead of offset. The torque split at the center diff depends on the car. The STI has a controllable center diff that can do 35 front, 65 rear in non slip conditions, for example.

          • 0 avatar
            onyxtape

            Oh yeah, now I remember. There was some Subaru propaganda animation / video on their website that showed that the Boxer orientation allowed them to have balanced weight distribution between left and right, unlike their non-Boxer-oriented competition.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Yeah, they had something similar at a car show I went to. Of course, there was a little creativity in how they showed the engine placement in their comparison. On Subaru (and Audi) AWD systems, the engine has no choice but to be hanging off the nose of the car. The RWD biased systems that Infiniti, BMW, Merc, and Lexus use allow you to place the engine and diff where you please relative to one another. Subaru’s display did not show that advantage to the “non-symmetric” RWD biased system. They instead put the front diff against the transmission bell housing on the RWD biased AWD mockup to make it look like the engine was hanging off the nose. They also used an I6 to make it look even worse. Definitely a bit on the dishonest side.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    This car always struck me as very underrated – I drove a G37 back to back with a BMW 335 back in ’09 or so, and was struck how close Infiniti had gotten to the 3-series benchmark. The only things that really let the Infiniti down were the interior, which was acceptable but noticeably downscale compared to the BMW (the orange instruments, in particular, didn’t seem worthy of the car’s pricetag), and the engine. The six in the Infiniti was certainly powerful, but it was not nearly as refined as the BMW’s engine, which was simply magnificent.

    Overall, the G is a great driver’s car, and probably a very good CPO buy, and I’d bet it’s probably a lot less troublesome than a BMW.

    And apparently the new G (or Q, or S, or whatever the hell they call it now) has dumbed-down steering, which is a shame.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      Just like white sugar, the BMW 6 cylinder engines have become so refined thy’ve lost most of their character, which is what a lot of people want. As has been observed here previouly, BMW’s pursuit of Lexus has costs.

      The VQ takes an atitude and gives it out in spades without forced induction or direct injection while still running at the front of the pack. Kudos. Maye not so refined, but goddam it I loved it when BMW offered that too.

      As for the x28′ 4 cylinder turbo … have you heard that? There are diesel’s that sound less like diesels than that does. Which is fine and I like dieels, but just don’t call it refined!

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @cpthadck

        I agree with you – the n52 in my ’11 328i was too quiet. I couldn’t hear it at all much below 4500 rpm, and over it was just a distant six cylinder howl. So I installed the OEM BMW Performance Intake and Exhaust system. Now it sings Wagner! Not quite as amazing as my old Alfa GTV-6, but very close. Very quiet when cruising, but winding it out sounds ridiculously good. From the outside it just sounds mean, even at around town speeds.

        I get upgraded to G37x’s by Hertz fairly regularly. I’ll just say that every time I am in one I am immediately reminded why they are so much cheaper than a BMW. You get what you pay for.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Anyone in the mood to buy and hold an oddball collectible should pick up a G25x (yes, 2.5L).

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    Debating about picking up one of these, but the main alternative is the Genesis which has the longer warranty and is cheaper. I could care less about badges, so definitely something I am thinking about.

  • avatar
    Cole Trickle

    Nice review! We’ve had an 08 G35 since late 07. Auto, rwd, with nav. I think it is the Journey package which comes with wood. Couple of things on this year’s model at least:

    It has a CD changer that cuts down on the trunk opening big time. Trunk is pretty useless because of that.

    The nav/stereo system is absolutely lightning fast. I’ve rented both JGC’s, Explorers, and Tahoes in the past 18 months and none of their systems work as fast. Not a hiccup out of mine since I’ve owned it.

    The front passenger seat is a torture chamber. The seat cushion is too short. Absolutely no way to get comfortable in it.

    It is impossible to call up a particular song on your ipod without scrolling forever. I just leave mine on shuffle permanently.

    I’m getting a lot of pealing on the inside door where you grab it to close it on all the doors that are regularly used. Other than and some wear on the driver’s seat (my first time with leather; should have been treating it more often) the interior is still 9/10. Of course I get in and out of mine sometimes 5 times a day so it takes a lot of abuse.

    The exhaust note is not to be confused with the coupe. The coupe is much lowder.

    Low end torque isn’t quite there. You have to wring it out a bit to get to the power band it seems.

    My paint (red) is perfect. I still get compliments on it. It has, however, been in a garage all its life.

    The handling is much improved by better tires. I drove one with some sport tires and it leaned much less. I opted for cushy ones when I replaced mine because I don’t drive aggressively any more with a 4 year old in the back and wanted the ride/wet weather performance over the cornering. It does get a little tail happy in the wet sometimes.

    Reliability wise, knock on wood, it has been great. I can’t think of anything of consequence I’ve had to do to it.

    Gas mileage sucks sucks sucks compared to more modern cars. I think you can get the same performance out of the 4 banger 3 series and get 20 mpg more in the city, and like most cars in this class it drinks premium.

    I’m beginning to notice more cars like mine with rimzzz and tints lately. Guess the price has dropped enough to get it in to 20 year old territory.

    I’ve never experienced any issues with the transmission.

    Why oh why there isn’t an aux jack I don’t know. It is cool to be able to rip a cd with the push of a button. If it was 2003 still. But the blue tooth works great and it has push button start and it still makes me smile when I wash and wax it and shine up the tires.

    • 0 avatar
      cirats

      I too have an ’08 G35, though mine’s an “S”. Agree with most of your comments – a few follow-ups for you:

      - There is a G35 forum (http://g35driver.com/forums/g35-sedan-v36-2007-08-217/) where you can find tips on some things. It’s a bit dominated by the tuner crowd if you ask me, but I’ve found some helpful stuff there.

      - I too have the problem with the paint coming off the interior door handle trim, and it’s also starting to come off the steering wheel bezel. I found DIYs to repair both on the forum above. See here: http://g35driver.com/forums/v36-diy/211911-diy-2007-sedan-door-panel-removal.html and here: http://g35driver.com/forums/g35-sedan-v36-2007-08/430605-diy-replacing-steering-wheel-bezel-v36.html. Of course, I haven’t gotten around to doing either.

      - Agree mileage isn’t very good and it doesn’t help that the car asks for premium. That said, I put midgrade in it about every other tank and have never noticed any difference at all.

      - See my post further above for a suggestion on how to reconfigure your iTunes to make it easier to find artists/songs.

      - Surprised you don’t have an aux jack – do you not have RCA jacks in the center console next to your iPod jack? If you do, just get an adapter to go from RCA to 1/8″.

      - Funny comment about ripping CDs. Agree it is pretty useless. And what about the memory card slot thing?? I don’t even know what kind of card that would be or how you would get stuff on it.

      Happy driving! The G35 is not going to go down in history as my favorite car I’ve ever had (that would be my prior car – an E36 M3, with my first car – an ’87 Prelude si – probably second), but it’s very satisfying and a great value proposition, aside from the bad mileage, especially considering how low maintenance it has been.

      • 0 avatar
        Cole Trickle

        Good tip on the replacement of the door handle trim. My steering wheel is peeling too but it isn’t nearly as noticeable. I’m thinking when I am ready to get rid of it in another year or two it will be to a private party rather than a trade and replacing that trim would make a difference.

        I have the rca’s in the arm rest but what a terrible place to try to plug my phone in to. If we road tripped this car I’d probably do it and just leave pandora I suppose. Still silly. I remember at the time we bought it that basically every dodge down to the base model avenger had an aux port in the dash.

        The memory card slot is a mystery. I’ve never tried to use it.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Thanks for the review. I looked at CPO G35′s about 5 years ago and the rear seating with a rear facing child seat quickly eliminated it. An extra 1.1″ seems to have gone a long way, maybe they changed the shape of the front seats back panel? It was just … squarely in the way before. I love the engine sound and cammy power delivery these have. According to a friend who’s had a few they chip up really nicely if you don’t mind buying more fuel.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    A quick craigslist search shows that $18-$25 is the ballpark for one of these at a used car dealer, not bad for what you get.

    But then again, according to craiglist Infiniti G37s are related to Lexus SC300s, Stage 3 Toyota MR2s, BMW 328is, some Mercedes, Acura TLs…

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    Great report. I’m sure you made a great buy. Nissan makes wonderful 4-door sports sedans. The 3.7 V6 Q engine is fantastic. Regarding the paint I think Nissan Japan didn’t fully consider the drastic climate difference between here and Japan. Hope that changes quick.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      Typically, discussions about the G37 inevitably will focus on the 7-speed auto. This unit is also used on the 370Z. This transmission is sealed and cannot be (easily) serviced outside of the dealership. Has anyone gathered any good reliability data on this transmission yet? It’s been in use since 2008/2009, so I’m thinking we should hear about them now if they turned out to be total grenades.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      I think that Nissan had to change their paint formulation to meet environmental regulations and their supplier screwed the pooch. See also Hondas from 1998-2010. My Nissan from 1999 had great paint but my 2007 Infiniti scratches if you look at it funny.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    Typically, discussions about the G37 inevitably will focus on the 7-speed auto. This unit is also used on the 370Z. This transmission is sealed and cannot be (easily) serviced outside of the dealership. Has anyone gathered any good reliability data on this transmission yet? It’s been in use since 2008/2009, so I’m thinking we should hear about them now if they turned out to be total grenades.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    It’s a great car. Pretty much a Japanese BMW.

    I only wish Infiniti could have done their crossovers as well.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Not even a mention in the article or comments about the 2nd gen CTS?

    • 0 avatar
      timcc23

      That’s a really good point… The CTS is similar in performance and size and is a good value. I guess subjectively the styling doesn’t work for me, so I never really considered it. It also fits the bill, though. Based on my own prejudices, I also trust the Japanese more when it comes to reliability.

  • avatar
    Roy

    Whenever I see a G37, I think to myself how much more I like the name G35 better. Really it’s just that the number 37 is not a cool number. As for the actual car, I don’t think I could tell a newish G37 from an old G35. Did anything really change?

    • 0 avatar
      gsnfan

      I believe that the engine changed from a 3.5 to a 3.7 liter. Otherwise exterior wise I believe they are the same.

      Neighbor has a 2008 G35 – you’d think it’s a G37 just from looking at it.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      The G37 has a more refined interior, especially 2010+ models.

      Also, the 3.7 VQ is less tractor-like than the 3.5.

  • avatar
    djn

    I went G35 shopping last summer to replace my Alfa 164. The parts manager at the dealer suggested I have a look at the original Q45.

    Wow, definately a different kind of car. With purchase price and service work done, I’ve got a pristine car with all the known failure bits replaced, rear sway bar, tuned ECU, and a used set of G35 wheels for a little over 6K. Thats the way to buy a car.

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    Thanks for the review Mr. Rust.
    Anybody hearing about current discounts on new G37 sedan strippers?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Regarding your observation about rear space being greater than that of most competing products…I agree. I always felt like the G35 and G37 were compact/midsized “tweeners”…just like the 2nd-gen CTS.

    Still, I think the M37 is a little more my style, especially in terms of interior design.

  • avatar
    Bocatrip

    I had owned a G35 for over 10 years and I will honestly say that the weak leak in ownership of any Infiniti including the G37 is fit and finish. Nissan/Infiniti have consistently had the reputation of using horrible materials on interiors that literally fall apart over time. The plastics break, dye on leathers come off, dashboards crack and rubber seals disintegrate. It seems that over time Nissan/Infiniti just don’t care and continue to produce inferior interiors. Yes, the engines and drivetrains are strong, but you will not want to own these cars for the long term. No excuses. Poor workmanship.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I like the Gs and would keep an eye out for one in that market, but they are damn hard to find with a manual. Checking cars.com for ’07-’13 Gs only dug up 24 cars within 250 miles of my zip. The same search for non-M 3-series came up with 54. Include Ms and it goes up to 75.

    This is disappointing for a car that while down on refinement compared to BMW, was generally considered every bit the “driver’s car” that its 3-series competitor was.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    “The Bose sound system is pretty decent . . .”

    They must have done some serious upgrades since ’07 to earn even that level of praise! I find the one on my buddy’s ’07 Sport to be grating; hard to listen to at any sort of volume on the highway for more than a minute or two if electric guitar is involved at all. Way too much upper mid. No lows and no highs. The first step will be a speaker upgrade if he ever gets time for that.

    I really enjoy driving the car though. It’s comfortable, the suspension is well-sorted, the manual works well, the steering actually communicates, and the viscous limited slip makes it easy to wag the tail. Nannies are easily semi-permanently disabled – without complaint from the vehicle – by installing a switch to cut power to the accelerometers under the center console.

    The V6 does provide a pleasant muscle-car-ish rumble, and I agree on the back seat comfort: the best I’ve experienced.

    Even if I had unlimited funds to purchase a car collection, I’d be perfectly content to have it as my summer sedan.


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