By on April 2, 2014

23 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe last Continental we saw in this series was of the iconic 1961-69 generation designed by Elwood Engel. Its successor was built for the 1970-79 model years, and these cars lost the suicide doors and Lincoln-specific engines but gained even more angular styling. The Town Car option package was aimed at the real high rollers of the Malaise Era, and I’ve found a very solid, refrigerator-white example (photographed at a Northern California self-serve yard last week) that’s sure to make Sajeev Mehta weep bitter, brand-loyal tears.
21 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinAccording to the temporary registration sticker on this car, it was still street-legal less than a year before took its final tow-truck ride.
15 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIn California, 1976 is the oldest model year that requires the state’s very stringent emission test, and so it’s possible that there was no easy way to make this big, dirty 460 comply with the not-so-strict requirements for ’76 cars. Actually, it takes something on the order of a dead cylinder to fail the 1976 test, so it’s more likely that the car’s last owner tired of the single-digit fuel economy. The sad truth is that there’s not much collector value for mid-to-late-70s Lincolns.
14 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe interior is in excellent condition, there’s not a speck of rust on the car, and all the body damage could have been fixed for peanuts.
13 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinCartier clock! I thought about buying this one for my collection, but the failure rate for Malaise Era Ford mechanical clocks is exactly 100% (in my experience).
08 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIn case you’re wondering, this car has quadrophonic 8-track capability. I’d be listening to Ace Frehly’s greatest hit non-stop, were I to find myself transported back to the late 1970s with the keys to a ’76 Town Car in hand.
24 - 1976 Lincoln Town Car Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinI’m sure our European readers are clawing at their monitors in outrage, seeing this amazing car consigned to the world’s scrap-metal market like it’s just another ’91 Camry. All I can say is: come over here and ship one home!


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131 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1976 Lincoln Continental Town Car...”


  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Aw, man…couldn’t they just have sold it to someone out-of-state?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Seriously, that could easily be sold for +100 over scrap, probably much more in fact, but I find it hard to believe they even attempted to sell it before going to the scrapyard.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Add some bull horns, and you have the sweetest tow rig in the world for your race car.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I’ve often thought about this. Bag it, add a trailer brake controller and get rolling.

    • 0 avatar

      I saw one going down the road one day pulling a double axle, single horse trailer with a horse in it. Looked majestic.

      • 0 avatar
        MadHungarian

        I don’t want to think about the fuel consumption of that rig. These cars are around 9 MPG empty except for the driver.

        • 0 avatar
          TheyBeRollin

          The beauty is that they’re probably only .5 or so MPG less when towing just about anything.

          My grandfather’s F-350 Ranger with a 461 got ~8 MPG no matter what you did or attached to it. Uphill? Downhill? Faster? Slower? Towing? Always the same.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Yup the beauty of most of those big blocks was they got the same MPG loaded or empty. I knew an old Farmer who had a one ton Chevy dually with old 454 V8.

            He claimed “9 mpg, empty, loaded, trailer, no trailer, up hill, down hill…”

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      In Cody, WY, I actually saw this setup last year. I didn’t have a camera, but I can remember it very well. It was a bright white Continental Coupe (Looked like a Professional Restore paint job), pulling a long, single-horse trailer. The car was lacking the horns, but had Texas plates (That alone should count for something!)

      The thing looked surreal next to the Aleros and Tauruses in the lot.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    So it rides like a waterbed and has more body roll than a school bus.

    Never seen the rotating digits Cartier clock, though. Interesting.

    Very likely that the unsanitary, aged, SSI receiving packrat who drove this thing is missing it dearly. We are probably looking at their last car ever purchased.

    Doesn’t Kim Jong (North Korea) have one of these? Lol. Didn’t know there was such a following for the hideous machine.

    Although I have seen crazier things, including a frame off/nut and bolt restoration of a 76 Ford LTD (WHY?).

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      By the way… the clock has a wheel showing “seconds”.

      Whoa…

      • 0 avatar
        Firestorm 500

        That was to let you know it was still working. Or not.

      • 0 avatar
        redliner

        “BOOOM!”

        …that was the sound of my mind being thoroughly blown! Such uncompromising LUXURY!

      • 0 avatar
        ChesterChi

        That clock looks so amazingly high-end and luxurious, I’m sure Louis Cartier himself hand-crafted it in his workshop in Paris.

      • 0 avatar
        Veee8

        That’s not a clock but a GPM or gallons per minute counter…:)

        My uncle had one of these babies and I recall a trip to northern Ontario in late spring/early summer when I was in my pre-teen years.
        I was sitting in the rear seat and as we rolled along my Dad turned back to me and asked “how fast do you think we’re going now?”…I said “about 50 miles per hour?”….well, we were doing just over 85.
        The perception of speed was masked by the sheer mass of this machine, its super quiet ride and pillowy soft suspension, like walking on a cloud.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The late 70’s Continental Town Car is among my favorites of malaise era steel. My grandfather drove one throughout the 80’s and I loved riding in that car. One of these days I’m going to follow through on Crabspirits’ suggestion and make one my main tow rig.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    That’s awesome. BMW should try that leather color instead of their baby vomit sandy one.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    So sad to see this iconic if worthless car getting scrapped when it’s in VGC .

    I bet they tried to sell it but had not one offer .

    -Nate

  • avatar

    Oh man, and ’76 might be my favorite year for that body style. I liked the coffin nose grille much better than the Rolls Royce style. Wider is better on this barge.

    Look at the driver’s seat! This was certainly a little too nice to be crushed, very saddened to see it in the yard.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      We’ll Sajeev, next time your in a poverty-stricken urban area, keep a keen eye out for dumpster divers and scavengers.

      They might lead you back to their ’70-’79 Continental and (bonus!) they might just accept a princely cash offer of a couple hundred bucks.

      Then again, they’ll need a new place to sleep so you may want to have a box handy for them.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I found a 1977 Lincoln Continental Town Coupe around here…white with white top and black interior, 460 engine, and the rare fixed glass moonroof. Guy wants $2500, which is good because that means some derby sh*theads can’t afford to destroy a perfectly good Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That sounds like an OK price, too. Is there an ad for this, I wanna see!

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Unfortunately no ad, but I did take two pictures…it was raining, so I wasn’t willing to take a ton of pictures. But hey, an original factory price sheet! It’s a little hard to read because of the rain, but it can be seen that this is a real 460 car with fixed glass moonroof option.

        http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh222/rockmanDX3/0329141343.jpg

        http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh222/rockmanDX3/0329141345.jpg

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I just…

    I need somewhere indoors to put it, and then I’d have one! But maybe the Town Coupe, since more rare.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Gorgeous.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Hoards of alcoholic Vietnam Vets are in agreeance with you.

      • 0 avatar
        friedclams

        Who would hoard alcoholic Vietnam Vets? Is that like cat hoarding? There sure are strange people in the world.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Too many people watch shows like The Walking Dead and try to use words from it improperly.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            Well, I declare!

            Polish that Grammar Police badge, there, bud.

            Give it the ole’ spit shine real good.

            You know, I bet if I too drooled over the ’70-’79 Continentals- the mere afterbirth of the truly gorgeous fourth gen Conti’s- that I wouldn’t have been ticketed so fast.

            I call foul, and I want my day in court.

            This is stereotyping!

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I used to hoard Vietnam Vets but too many of them kept dying off from liver disease. Now I tend to hoard Gulf War vets.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            28, I hear those Gulf War Vets are easy to keep, so long as they’re clutching their 1911’s.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Yes but you must always remember to give them blanks as occasionally they wake up in a cold sweat and try to shoot each other.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    These finds are a bit like having to walk past the pound every day. I can’t adopt all the cute puppys. It’s sad.

  • avatar
    EdmondOkie

    My parents bought one of these used in 1977 and still have it. Actually, it’s the Continental Town Coupe, dove gray inside and out. I think the Cartier clock finally quit working sometime in the 90s. It was my mom’s baby and stayed in the garage most of the time when I was growing up. After my dad retired around 2000, it was their primary vehicle up until just a couple of years ago.

    Back in the late 80s we made some modifications that upped the fuel economy to about 10 in town and 15 on the highway.

    It’s sitting in a garage now, but would probably still run with a new battery and a little love. And it’s in pretty great condition, considering it has close to 200K miles on it. I guess I’ll have to decide what to do with it someday …

    I used to LOVE driving that car. A bit cumbersome in town, but there’s absolutely nothing better on the road. I loved so many things about that car – the speedo, the 460 V8, the surprising responsiveness, and the fact that even at 6 feet tall, I could stretch out in the back seat.

    And it could haul – One of my fondest/most terrifying memories was when I was about 14 driving between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. We were running late for something important, and I knew my Mom had the cruise control set pretty fast. I glanced over and noticed speedo was reading 115, and it tended to read lower than actual speed. We would have died gruesome deaths had we crashed, but the speed was effortless.

    • 0 avatar
      friedclams

      You got 15 on the highway with the 460? What were the mods you made?

      The tow truck I drove in my youth had the same engine. It was a beast of a motor and rarely cracked 8 mpg (admittedly, it was a much heavier and taller vehicle).

      • 0 avatar
        EdmondOkie

        We took the internals out of the catalytic converters and reattached the empty shells, for a start. Oklahoma’s “emission testing” consisted of a visual inspection to make sure they were there.

        As for the rest, it’s been so long I can remember generally what we did, but not the particulars. We reworked the exhaust somehow to recirculate exhaust gasses through the air intake. Kind of a jury-rigged turbo, without the fans. That let us tweak the air/fuel mix to use a little less gasoline. Before that, it tended to get about 10 on the highway and 7 or 8 in town. Somehow, it never exploded.

      • 0 avatar
        Searcher

        It’s not terrifically difficult to do. Basically all you’re doing is reyurning the engine to a 60’s state of tune by advancing the cam 6-8 degrees, re-curving the distributor, doing something about those first-gen cats and actually shortening the final drive a bit to bring the highway revs back into the efficiency range.

        Now truck engines are another thing entirely and trying the same things you would do on a passenger car engine will result in a pile of molten slag under the hood during a long pull.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Living my dreams.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    I’m seeing two mob baboons chasing Starsky & Hutch

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      Wouldn’t Huggy Bear drive one of these, too? Or would he prefer a Mark IV?

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        Huggy Bear got the new model one year before release, ‘cuz he gots connections.

        As an added bonus, the door map pocket is so large that one can fit their whole pimp cane in the slot.

        • 0 avatar
          bomberpete

          “That’s right Starsky. It’s a ’76 Bill Blass edition Continental Town Car. Doesn’t come out for another year. But I know somebody who knows somebody who stole it for me.”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            What other special ed’s were available from Lincoln around this time period? I’m only familiar with 1990+ really.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            Lincoln offered “designer” (Bill Blass, Cartier, Gucci, etc.) editions of the Mark IV and V.

            There was a “Williamsburg” edition of the Continental sedan, but it didn’t appear until 1978. It was followed by a “Collector’s Edition” in 1979 to mark the final year of the REALLY big ones.

          • 0 avatar
            bomberpete

            Corey DL – In the Seventies and Eighties, they were named after the designers Blass, Gucci, Cartier and the Signature Series.

            Wikipedia confirms what I remember, that in 1979 a particularly rare “Collector’s Series” option package that commemorated the last year of the large Lincolns: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Continental#Williamsburg_Town_Car

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Continental#Williamsburg_Town_Car

            The few extra-cost options were power moonroof, 40-channel CB radio, “Sure-Track” brake system, and the special plush Kashmir Velour interior. There were only four colors available: dark blue, white and limited-issue medium blue (197 built) and light silver (125 built) with a dark-blue vinyl top.

            It was also available on the Continental Mark V. Try finding on of those.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            Don’t forget about the “Feigning For A Fix Edition”.

            This is noted by the cracked vinyl top, various junkyard steel wheels, and a “good God what color is that” shade of gray.

            This seems to be a very common package. One was recently spotted here outside of a local homeless shelter/outreach center.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I was aware of the Gucci Sevilles, but have never seen any on Lincoln product. Are you sure?

            Never heard of the Williamsburg but I’d certainly like to see one.

            The Collector’s Edition was a very nice navy blue. It had integrated garage door opener and auto headlamps at night, as well as, I believe, rain sensing wipers. All very advanced stuff for 79.

          • 0 avatar
            EdmondOkie

            We had some friends who had a ’73 or ’74 Mark (I think – I was little) that had rain sensors and even a remote starter. Don’t know whether they were factory options, but I remember they’d open the sun roof and windows, then sprinkle water on the windshield and everything would close.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            You’re right…Lincoln offered the PUCCI designer edition, not the Gucci designer edition.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think most of these died off after the Mark VI, Bill Blass surviving until at least 1990 or the end of Mark VII production in 1992.

            EDIT: I seem to remember a Givency and Valentino editions on 80s Fox Contis, but not on the Mark VIIs. Cartier continued on Town Car till 2003.

            “For the 1976 model year, Lincoln introduced the Designer Series; special edition Mark IVs with color, trim and interior choices by famous fashion designers. All carried the designer’s signature on the opera windows, and had a 22 karat (92%) gold plated plaque on the instrument panel which could be engraved with the original owner’s name. The concept was successful, and future Lincolns would continue to offer designer editions.

            For 1976, four designer editions were offered:

            The Bill Blass Edition was in dark blue with cream accents. The external finish was dark blue metallic paint, with a cream “Normande Grain” landau vinyl roof, cream and gold pinstriping, and cream or dark blue bodyside moldings. Inside, a blue cloth or leather interior used cream accent straps and buttons.

            The Cartier Edition[3] was in dove grey. The external finish was dove grey paint, with a dove grey “Valino Grain” landau vinyl roof, red and white pinstriping, and dove grey bodyside moldings. The interior was in dove grey cloth or leather.

            The Givenchy Edition was in aqua blue. The external finish was aqua blue “Diamond Fire” paint, with a white “Normande Grain” landau vinyl roof, black and white pinstriping, and white or aqua blue bodyside moldings. The interior was in aqua blue cloth or leather, and the instrument panel was in a special, lighter shade of simulated woodgrain. The Givenchy color was aqua blue in 1976, dark jade green in 1977 and 78, and crystal blue in 1979.

            The Pucci Edition was in red and silver. The external finish was dark red “Moondust Finish” paint with a silver “Normande Grain” landau vinyl roof, silver and lipstick red pinstriping and red or silver bodyside moldings. The interior was in dark red “Majestic” cloth.”

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Continental_Mark_IV

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            SANJEEV has a Valentino Conti (or was it a Versailles), IIRC?

            I didn’t know about the Pucci, and I had forgot about the Givenchy. I’d prefer that to the Bill Blass ones, which were often navy/white.

            I’ve seen a couple Diamond Jubilee ones on Ebay. They seemed out of place, celebrating such a British event on an American car.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          Don’t forget the Diamond Jubilee Edition, offered in 1978!

          (copied over from Wikipedia)

          “Ford Motor Company had its 75th anniversary in 1978. To commemorate this Ford produced two automobiles as limited editions. The 1978 Continental Mark V was one, the 1978 Ford Thunderbird was the other. Only 5,159 Diamond Jubilee Editions were produced.
          The Diamond Jubilee was available in only two colors: Diamond Blue and Jubilee Gold. Whichever color was chosen, it was repeated throughout the car. In addition to the special clearcoat paint, the vinyl-insert bodyside moldings, vertical bars on the grille, bumper guards and rub strips, turbine-style cast aluminum wheel vanes, and padded vinyl deck lid kickup with matching vinyl-insert lock cover were all coordinated. Additionally, the operational exhaust vents on the front fenders held chrome beading.
          Also matching the exterior color scheme, the interior featured front bucket seats with a padded center console. The console provided extra storage, and came equipped with an umbrella built into the underside of the padded armrest. The seats were upholstered in luxury cloth with a unique sew style.
          Other distinctions included padded leather in high wear areas of the interior, as well as ebony wood-tone inserts on the instrument panel, door trim panels, front seat backs, and console – even the ignition and door keys held a matching ebony wood-tone insert. All Diamond Jubilee Marks were supplied with a leather bound owner’s manual and tool kit. The outside edges of the opera windows were also beveled, and featured Diamond Jubilee Script and a simulated diamond chip laminated between the glass. The unique hood ornament featured crystal-like inserts within the Lincoln “star” emblem. After delivery, the customer could choose to have his or her initials monogrammed on the doors, interrupting the bodyside stripes. Most Mark V optional features were standard on this car, including the new digital LED “Miles-To-Empty” fuel gauge that calculated approximately how far the car could be driven with the remaining fuel in the tank, based on fuel level, driving speed, and fuel consumption rate.[15]
          Every new owner was given the special car keys and could request a Ford created cookbook entitled “Ford Diamond Jubilee Recipe Collection”.[16]
          The 1978 Continental Mark V Diamond Jubilee Edition carries another distinction as it was, per the 1978 Lincoln brochure, the most expensive American standard-production automobile available in 1978. After the package price was added to the base Mark V, the final sticker price was approximately $22,000. Some of the select few extra-cost options available were 7.5 L 460 V8 engine, dual exhausts, power moonroof, and 40-channel CB radio.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah the Diamond Jubilee edition. Mark VIII has some sort of similar edition I believe in MY96.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The blue on that DJ Edition was EXTRA ugly and watery.

            Haven’t seen a gold one.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I feel like the last Mark was the “Special Gold Edition” or something. I’ve seen one in red pearl for sale.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            $22,000 in 1978 dollars for an American car still amazes me…plugging into an inflation calculator, $22,000 in 1978 dollars equals $79,220.58 dollars in 2014 dollars! I don’t think you can even buy an $80,000 dollar American car today, aside from a ZR1 Corvette or a Viper.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “$22,000 in 1978 dollars for an American car still amazes me…plugging into an inflation calculator, $22,000 in 1978 dollars equals $79,220.58 dollars in 2014 dollars!”

            Think of it as a 70’s version of an Escalade (up to $92,000).

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    My least favorite of the Malaise era full sizers. I would much rather have the much sharper looking Mark series coupes in this time era.

  • avatar
    Pebble

    Damn, do I love these Seventies Town Cars. At last, a proper full-size sedan. Long may they roll. It saddens me to see this one in the junkyard.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    Looks like someone pulled out the rear seat cushion looking for loose change.

    Look how the fuel gauge is below the driver’s field of vision so that he wouldn’t notice how fast it was dropping.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Buddy, if you’re worried about fuel economy, you’re in the wrong automobile!

      Don’t worry though, these have a big red idiot light to tell you when you’re low.

      Mine has a loose ground so it tends to come on when it’s about half a tank. It’s kind of a big old exclamation point on the whole matter.

  • avatar
    mypoint02

    I’m always astounded to see just how large these 60s and 70s Lincolns are. No way this thing fits in your average garage, so it’s amazing to see one in this good a condition 37 years later.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Depends on your definition of “average”, these measured in at 19.5 feet at their peak so you’d need at minimum a 14×22 garage to get a snug fit.

      It’s all relative I suppose; many crew cab trucks with the traditional short box (6.5 feet) come in about the same lengthwise.

      I was one of the lucky ones to find a survivor (caveat of a newer paint job) last summer.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      They tend to be low, too. I pulled up alongside a 70’s Caddy awhile back and found myself to be looking down at it. That was most surprising considering I was in a Focus.

      My garage is 18 feet wall to door, there are lots of cars from that era that wouldn’t fit.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @FormerFF, most all 60s and 70s cars are low compared to today’s rides. I wager that a 20 year old who sat in my 1967 Mustang (provided they had never been in a 60s or 70s car) would be opening the door and looking to see if the rivets in their jeans were scraping the pavement.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I actually have a working Cartier “digital” clock out of a ’77 which I acquired in 2001. I’m sure if I used it more, it would die a slow death.

  • avatar
    tobiasfunkemd

    My Grandpa had a 1979 Continental, silver exterior and a classy bordello maroon interior. To this day, the finest California freeway cruiser I’ve ever driven. This one is a dead ringer, down to the 8-track and the Cartier clock. That car might be the reason I die a little inside whenever I see the piles of steaming crap FoMoCo is slapping Lincoln badges on nowadays. This car, for better or worse, made a statement about the driver; the only statement new Lincolns make is: “I wonder why they didn’t buy a Lexus?” The new Continental concept would go a long way in re-establishing a brand identity for Lincoln.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    My family had the 1978 Town Car from this Lincoln period – BRIEFLY! Everyone of us HATED that car. It wallowed worse than any car I ever drove and the seats were terrible. 200 miles and your back was killing you. It got traded for a 1978 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham de’Elegance. It was the “downsized full-size” Cadillac. Amazing, the Lincoln beat it in gas mileage by a couple of miles per gallon. Also in 1978, my mother got a new car. Mom picked out a Bonneville Brougham Landau (loving all these l-o-n-g) names. The Bonneville was the best car of the three.

    Glad to see you’re back in California, Murilee, at least for a while. You’ve found another rare Lincoln from this period without the opera windows. You had a picture of a 1972 Mark IV in the background of a shot once that was the only Mark IV in the wild I’d ever seen without opera windows. They were technically optional at the beginning of 1972, but hardly any cars were sold without them. Same with cornering lamps on the ’72 Mark IV.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I actually have opera windows and the rare “un-federalized” grille off of an ’72 Conti MKIV.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I’ve never heard of that before, what makes the “un-federalized” grille different?

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The US Federal gov’t came out with I believe 5mph bumper mandates for 1973. The 1972 Continental Mark IV’s bumper (and subsequent grille) did not meet this mandate. It was hastily redesigned for 1973 and onward. These were referred to as “federal” bumpers.

          See the difference? The ’72 is longer and more elegant (along with the bumper), and ’73 is less so.

          MY72

          http://automotivemileposts.com/files/mark41972darkblue.jpg

          MY73

          http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/1972-1976-lincoln-continental-mark-iv-7.jpg

          Oh my, such good Conti porn:

          http://www.americandreamcars.com/collectorcarphotos/1a/1972markiv1a.html

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Ah hey, that is quite different…

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The parts I have came from two different cars. The grille was purchased already removed for $100 which was steep but I knew how rare the ’72 grill had become.

            I also knew I would probably never have another opportunity to snag one.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The 72 bears quite a resemblance from that front angle (to my eyes) of the 66-67 Toronado.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m not seeing it.

            http://www.classiccarart.us/carsMCOlds66Tornado8-5-06d.JPG

            http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/01/junkyard-find-1972-lincoln-continental-mark-iv/

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Wrong angle – I meant from this view, the overall shape and the way the bumpers are – obviously grille has to be exempted from the comparison here. Character lines similar. Apply a landau with your mind if you like.

            http://totallythatstupid.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/1966-toronado-1.jpg

  • avatar
    thunderjet

    I don’t know if I’d like to own one of these beasts but driving one would be fun. They are just so massive and lumbering. I would love to take one on a road trip however.

    I’m surprised the 460 is still in the engine bay. When 80’s-90’s F series trucks with 460s end up in the local junkyard the engines get snatched pretty quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I remember this phenomenon but I suspect $4 gas has curtailed it.

    • 0 avatar
      redmondjp

      Our family had a 1977 model of this car with the 460 for ten years. It was a nice highway cruiser, but very low on power, economy, and it always ran hot.

      I now own a 1990 F350 with the port-injected version of the 460. It is orders of magnitude better than the 1977 version in just about every way.

      That, I belive, explains why the later versions of the 460 are more popular (and are still in wide use in 1990s F-series pickups still on the road).

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I wonder if one could convert the 70s 460 to multiport FI or at the very least some kind of TBI.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          Probably, I’m fairly sure carbureted Chevy 305s and 350s can be converted to TBI with the intake manifold and injector setup off a TBI engine…but that’s assuming the TBI setups had their own stand-alone computer that doesn’t have to be wired into the rest of the car.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Just tear all the crap off and put something like an MSD Atomic EFI 4 brl substitute on there.

            One of these days when I’ve got the money, I’ll swap a 4 brl intake manifold on the 289 in the old Mustang and add EFI.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yup you just need the intake from a EFI 460 out of a late 80’s early 90’s F/E series and the attendant wiring and fuel pump. There are actually only about 4 wires to hook up to the vehicle not including the fuel pump wiring.

          @Dan, that is about the worst way to go. Cost is huge and the benefit does not make up for it. Either keep the 2bbl manifold and put a GM TBI system on it or a CFI controlled by a Megasquirt. Or just get the intake and attendant wiring from an non-HO port injected 5.0.

  • avatar
    AlienProbe

    Like a helpless beached whale…

  • avatar
    doug-g

    @CoreyDL and 28-cars-later

    I can now totally see the Toronado in the Mark IV – I’m seeing more the ’68 and ’69 though. Good eye!!!

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    I can see this as another ‘get rid of the late relative’s old car’. “Eww, honey we don’t want that in our driveway. Your grandpa meant well, but…”

    Especially in N. Cali, where this car would be ‘sacrilegious’ gas hog that “should be scrapped”.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Malaise yachts like these are some of the few cars I don’t mind seeing put to rest, mainly due to their poor use of space. I had the chance to sit in a 70’s era Country Squire or something of the sort…so little space in that thing for the size.

    If this Conti were a coupe it’d be in the hands of a restore-erpimp or something by now, 4-doors turn off classic car buffs like garlic turns away vampires.

  • avatar
    Ron B.

    You don’t get much more Malaise than a escalade . I can see why Americans get all nostalgic when they see Cars like this…a truck is always a truck no matter how much bling they slap on.

  • avatar
    luvmyv8

    DAMMIT!

    I’ve always wanted one of these in black or dark blue with the 460, 4 wheel disc brakes and if black; with a blue or red leather interior or if blue, blue leather……. GRRRRR!!!!!!

  • avatar
    ReSa

    There’s one of these here in Holland in more scrap-worthy condition parked in the same garage as I park my ’87 Alfa Spider in. I once parked mine next to this behemoth. A perfect contrast :)

    The thing doesn’t fit the parking spaces though, so it’s always a hassle to park next to it…

  • avatar
    Panther Platform

    I am one of the few who loves the 70’s barges: long hood, short deck, and big engine. To me the greatest car of this era was the Lincoln Mark V. When I see a pristine one now it literally takes my breath away. Of course admiring them is a different propostion than actually owning one. I looked at and drove a Mark V and a 78 Town Car, but couldn’t pull the trigger. The sheer size of these cars is incredible. Especially with the TC you are almost totally removed from the road as if you are floating on clouds. I jokingly asked the TC owner what kind of mileage he got with it (mileage is totally irrelevant with these cars. You know its some gradient of horrible). He said “It always gets 10 MPG, whether I drive it in in town or on the highway!” Of course the engine has relatively little power, but its still a big lazy V-8. The car happily and quietly just purrs along. After I drove the TC I went home in my 03 Grand Marquis. It seemed as if I was driving a compact! As I near retirement I am going to get one. Not necessarily a Lincoln (a 70s LTD, Thunderbird, or GM would be a close approximation). I’m not going to keep it indefinitely, a couple of years would be good enough.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    This is one of those better articles where the replies truly show why they call you all ‘ The B & B ‘ .

    Great comments here IMO .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    This car is in WAY too nice shape to die!

  • avatar
    hawox

    that’s a dinosaur on wheels! in 1976 a mercedes was considered a big car in europe, imagine that thing!
    let’s buy some of those beast and ship them here, with an lpg conversion they could be hired as wedding cars or stuff like that.

  • avatar
    boogieman99

    Front and rear disc brakes… Impressive

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Actually took my driver’s road test in a ’74 Town Car (sedan not coupe). Black with the red velour interior. Loved that car. Seat belt laws had not yet come in (Ontario). Used to put 3 of us in the front and 8 in the back seat on a Saturday night when my father let me have the car.

    He traded it in for the Pucci edition Mark IV. My all time favourite vehicle. Hope to one day be able to buy and restore one. Although I believe that Top Gear recently declared these to be one of their all time ‘worst cars’.

    He then went to an Eldorado which really did not compare, we were both underwhelmed by it in comparison with the Lincoln’s over the top kitschy elegance.

    It was so quiet inside that as per their commercials you could actually hear the clock (a Cartier analogue/dial model) ticking away at highway speeds.

    These were far better vehicles than any Rolls Royce of that era. And they helped Lincoln take over for much of that decade as the top ‘luxury’ car brand in North America. Had some friends/relatives/neighbours whose families drove Audis, BMW’s, Volvos and Saabs (and one with a Mercedes) and we used to laugh at how small they were, how Spartan their interiors were and how little their engines were.

    Yes the ‘malaise’ era was really not a good one for cars. But these were the ‘best of the best’ of that era.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      What store did you order your rose tinted glasses from?

      You laughed at a smaller Euro car which was supposed to be smaller. Brilliant. The other day I found it hilarious how much smaller the Corolla is than the LS460.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        To each their own ~

        I think my stupid little avatar car is better to drive them my Mercedes wit AC & fancy radio…..

        Whatever floats yer boat , I see some folks even like Kias .

        -Nate

  • avatar
    Allan850glt

    This car breaks my heart. Growing up, my best friend’s mom rocked a ’76 Continental Town Coupe. Mind you it was in the ’90s and it was pretty out of style but it was the absolute bomb. White over the red crushed velour and those awesome oval opera windows! That thing was smooth as silk and a much cooler replacement for the ratty ’81 Audi 4000 they previously utilized as their family rotbox.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Whenever given the choice between the Lincoln Town Car (or later the Pucci Mark IV) or our cousins Mercedes, or the Audi or BMW that my neighbours had, it was no choice, the Lincoln won every time.

    It had ‘panache’ in a 70’s way that the others could not match. The interior was like a New Orleans bordello, which is why I always preferred the velour to the available leather interior. It truly made a statement when arriving, huge trunk, giant chrome grill, coach lights and opera windows and a horn that sounded like it was taken from a locomotive. Massive Interior room, with amenities and comfort levels that were far superior to the available in North America Europeans. Power everything (including antenna) 4 ashtrays each with their own cigar lighters.

    The quadrophonic stereo was superb, probably the best of its era. They came with a demo 8 track with Elvis singing the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

    As for driving dynamics? Well you could hear the clock at highway speeds, steered with one finger and had zero road noise or feel. The ultimate luxo boat, something that is now sadly out of style. In that era a Rolls was more comparable to a big Buick in its capabilities and driving qualities than it was to the Lincoln or top of the line Cadillac.

    The young ladies just loved the decadence of the Lincolns! Nothing better for travelling to the disco or going to the drive in.

  • avatar
    threeer

    There are two of these land yachts parked alongside the main interstate here in Riyadh. Of course, they are covered in decade’s worth of dust, but they do tend to stick out somewhat, even simply parked together. I’ve not seen them move in the 8 months I’ve been here, but I can imagine some prince or royal family member piloting those beasts at one point.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I have questions!

      Is there no towing service to get parked cars off the interstate?
      No vandalism for things which are clearly abandoned?
      Are old American cars common -at all- in such a place?

  • avatar
    william442

    My friend’s father had one of these in blue. The rear seat was a complete cocktail lounge. He was a litigator.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    According to Top Gear and other sources there are a considerable number of abandoned cars in Saudi and other Arabic oil nation states, including exotic and super cars.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      And there is no way to re-title these after they’re considered abandoned? They might fall under some sort of Islamic law. I watched a House Hunters in Morocco where there was Islamic law on some homes, but not others. It made the title/deed process nearly impossible for an outsider or non-Muslim to purchase.

  • avatar
    PunksloveTrumpys

    Well I know it’s been said far too many times on this thread already, and the poor Lincoln has probably been crushed many weeks ago now….

    …and I was really really trying hard to put this horror behind me and get on with life…

    …but tonight I came across an auction on Trademe.co.nz which brought the pain/memories of this Junkyard Find flooding back…

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/specialist-cars/hot-rods/auction-726246433.htm

    Yes, ’tis true. In the Land of the Long White Cloud a car like this is worth much, much more than scrap value. More than that, you could pay to ship a doomed ’76 Town Car to my neck of the world, comply and register it (which over here is insanely expensive) and drive it yourself for probably 2-3 years before selling it on and even then you’ll still have made a profit.

    Alack, in lieu of this knowledge and inducement, economics 101 prevails.

    -Jarrod

  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    “I’m sure our European readers are clawing at their monitors in outrage, seeing this amazing car consigned to the world’s scrap-metal market like it’s just another ’91 Camry. All I can say is: come over here and ship one home!”

    No outrage here. The market dictates a car’s worth. If it’s not an economically viable prospect in a land of wide interstates and $4 gas, it definitely isn’t viable in a continent where the roads are half as wide and the gas is more than twice as expensive.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    Agree. Little nostalgia here. This ain’t no Elwood Engel Continental. It was a dumb car for a dumber, simpler time when Gerald R. Ford was President. Or to paraphrase Freud, sometimes a junkyard dog is just a junkyard dog.


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