By on March 7, 2014

40 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe 1961-1969 Lincoln Continental, with its suicide doors and slab sides, is recognized by most as the styling pinnacle of the Lincoln brand in the postwar era. Very nice early examples are worth pretty decent money, but a ’67 in beyond-basket-case condition is worth whatever scrap cars are fetching per ton. Here’s a thoroughly used-up ’67 that I found recently in a Denver wrecking yard.
44 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThis car appears to have spent many years bleaching in the High Plains sun; there’s not much Michigan-style rust, but the interior is completely baked. It’s hard to imagine that Richard Nixon’s plush limousine was also a ’67 Continental.
35 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinYes, the upholstery is dry as Moon soil.
15 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinLikewise, the vinyl top.
41 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIt has a great big 462-cubic-inch MEL engine.
32 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinHey, some sort of primitive cruise control!
29 - 1967 Lincoln Continental Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThermostat-controlled HVAC systems were super-high-tech in 1967.


Watching the wind rustle a torn plastic-bag “window” in a once-proud luxury car while The Crusher clanks ominously in the background… well, it tends to remind you of your own mortality.

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108 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1967 Lincoln Continental...”


  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Wish I had an Oliver Wendell Douglas edition.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    This is the type of Lincoln I could aspire to owning (restored), forget the MSG Campbell soup names. This car screams high class and forces you to notice it.

    There’s a redish-burgundy 70s caddy that’s been running around lately, rust bubbles and all, it could fit a piece of plywood in the trunk and ask for more.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      A couple months ago, I saw, on a nice day a 63ish black/black Seventy-Five with big whitewalls. Just casually driving around. It was majestic.

      http://www.cadillacforums.com/cadillac-performance/limo/63limo.jpg

      You’d need a barn to park it in.

    • 0 avatar
      kmoney

      When I used to work at a transmission shop just after high-school we had an older customer who would bring in his 63 convertible continental: original owner, ~50,000 miles, original paint and interior.

      That thing still stands out as one of the most commanding cars ever made. I still remember standing beside it and watching with a smile the mechanical ballet that goes on when you open/close the roof, with the worm drives and hydraulic cylinders/actuators doing their thing. I would say these and the W140 S-class are probably the best examples of understated luxury and presence in a car.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    This just punched a hole in my day. If I only had the means to give life to this car.

    • 0 avatar
      Neb

      I know the feeling, but this one looks like it reached the “do not resuscitate” point in the late 80s. I’d like to know the last year it was on the road…

      Though the 462 is apparently really hard to get parts for by old American engine standards. At some point they got replaced with Ford’s standard 460(?) and those are much cheaper/easier.

      • 0 avatar
        dtremit

        My understanding is they’re hard to upgrade, but reasonably easy to repair.

        Sadly the 460 swap didn’t happen until ’68, after the convertibles went out of production.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    In the original Matrix when they pick up Neo – was it a Continental like this, or were they in an Imperial of similar vintage?

    I’m leaning toward Imperial.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Very this. Second photo, second row.

      http://imcdb.org/movie_133093-The-Matrix.html

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Oh, beauty.

        I shouldn’t have doubted my initial instincts and memory! I brought it up because I remember the interior light had a timeout fade when the door was closed, which I found very unusual for such an old car.

        And then I saw the photo above of the rear seat area, and the little detail surrounding the C-pillar interior light looked familiar.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          While I consider the Continental to be the uber-Goddess, any American luxus barge from that era shows America at its peak.

          And having grown-up a peon, I’m constantly astonished nowadays to learn just how advanced and predictive was the tech in the oldies of this class.

          • 0 avatar
            jim brewer

            Its interesting you would call it “uber-Goddess” It was certainly a feminine kind of car for some reason, the American Counterpart to the Citroen DS in every way.

            Now who was the American counterpart to Catherine Deneuve?

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            ” It was certainly a feminine kind of car for some reason”

            Completely agree. And I’ve always recoiled from the misogynist genderizing of vehicles = vessel = vagina = woman = my property and I can beat it if I want to.

            But these Continentals make me want to plight my troth.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Very cool!

    • 0 avatar
      Joe McKinney

      The 1961-69 Continental and 1964-66 Imperial were both designed under the direction of Elwood Engel. It’s no coincidence they look similar.

      • 0 avatar
        koshchei

        The Imperial was a massively over-engineered masterpiece of a car. While a shame to see one sacrificed, I remember seeing a 1964 in a demolition derby give a mid-70′s round-back an airplane ride. The 6′ long leaf springs were also used to great effect in spearing the radiators of other cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Neb

      Dennis Hopper also used a trashed Continental to drive around his oil tanker in Waterworld.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Its funny how some car’s appearances never go out of style.

    This is clearly one of those.

    Timeless.

    It probably sat in the old man’s (original owner’s) trashed yard for the past 47 years until he died and the grandkids had to call The Junk Squad.

    In turn, this car was likely well loved.

    And yes, I’m sure it stopped on a dime and handled like it was on rails.

    Nevertheless- Godspeed, ’67.

  • avatar
    Joe McKinney

    These cars lost a lot of their elegance with the 1965 facelift. The front facia is too much like contemporary Mercuries.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Totally atrocious as actual cars, but pretty… oh, so pretty.

    I don’t usually like ’50s and ’60s styling, but these were just perfect.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    You left the Continental stars?

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Why Ford? Why do we not have a Lincoln has the 60s Continental styling? What the heck is your problem?

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      They have the Flex, boxy, but nice

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I’m talking sedan. Ford does a better job of hiding the Volvo platform’s cubbiness in CUVs than sedans. The refreshed Flex is sweet, no doubt.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          The Tauras/MKsomething is pretty fat and useless

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            They have wasted potential and exist because the Explorer pays their bills. The D3/4 CUVs are just nicer places to sit and drive than their sedan cousins.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Not true, they make very mediocre police cars with 12mpg to boot.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Explorer is a better police car too. The city I live in just replaced they’re CVs with Explorers. It seems to be a common trend.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            Three things

            1. 2010+ Taurus is crampt without any police equipment added into it.
            2. Taurus’ center console interferes with gun belts.
            3. Your 10 year+ cops have trouble fitting into Taurus because they are too large or overweight.

            Explorer alleviates 1 and 3, I haven’t seen the inside of one yet to tell you if the console still interferes.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Explorer center console also fixes #2. It is not as giant as the Taurus console. Plus the seats aren’t, like the dearly departed Layne Staley once sung, down in hole. I don’t think the Taurus can be saved, as a police car.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You were right the first time. Keep MKTaurus going cuz why the hell not, but I say drop Taurus altogether if they can’t/won’t fix it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I agree with you 28. Everything is going to the CD4 platform anyway. If the Taurus/MKS continue, which they probably will, they’ll just be stretched, and possibly widened, Fusions. Its not that simple, but the only way they get better is when the new models come out.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Why does Lincoln not have the love that Cadillac does? Because Ford only woke up a few years ago to the fact that they can’t sell mega profit Town Cars and Navigators to 70 year olds forever. Lincoln has none of what makes a Cadillac interesting now. The only mildly interesting vehicle to me is the MKT, everything else is just another Taurus or Fusion. The 3/4 rear shot of the MKS is nice, everything else is blah.

      The LS of the early 00′s might not have been a great car, but they had something there.

      Now they sell mega profit Navigators, while everything else is a rebadged Ford of some variety. They’re moving, but at a glacial pace and to the continued detriment of the brand that this car represented.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I own a ridiculous MKT. It is the vehicle with the biggest departure from it’s Ford platform buddy. I wish that translated into more sales for Lincoln, but I think it and the Flex will die soon. :(

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        What makes Cadillac interesting to you?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Hahahahahahaha

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m being half sarcastic half serious. Cadillac hasn’t been interesting for over twenty years. In 1992, Cadillac had 2.61% of the market and offered a full size coupe and sedan (Deville), effectively an extra trim model on the full size sedan (Fleetwood FWD), two mid size (for the period) “sport” coupe and sedan models (Eldo/Seville), a big boat (Brougham/Fleetwood Brougham) and an oddball little roadster convertible (Allante). Now we’ve got three, no four Chevrolet variants (SRX, Escalade/ESC, XTS), one barely midsize sedan/coupe (CTS), and one tiny sedan (ATS) with a coupe compliment coming out to replace the former’s coupe offering (I’m not even going to acknowledge the Electric Cimmaron). Last I checked I believe for 2013 Cadillac had 1.1% of the market and over 50% of those sales were the Mexican built SRX. What is interesting about this brand again? Oh yeah the awesome concept cars they never build.

            http://www.100megsfree4.com/cadillac/cad1990/cad92.htm

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      They do a concept every 15 years or so. Be patient, the next one is due in about 3-4 years.

  • avatar

    It’s a pity this breathtaking 2002 concept went nowhere:

    http://www.conceptcaronline.com/concept-cars/concept-car-52.php

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    I like the font used on the controls, it looks much more modern than the era.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Love suicide door Lincolns.

    Cadillac was FLASHY, Lincoln was CLASSY.

  • avatar
    ArBee

    Sad, very sad. I always feel a twinge of regret when one of these Lincolns dies. No matter their dynamic shortcomings, they were just so damned elegant, and so evocative of an era. The 1964-66 Imperials affect me the same way.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Ah, yes- 64-66 Imperials… were these the deals with the record player in it?

      Swanky….

      No, no- that’s MY56. I stand corrected.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I couldn’t hear you over all the MOBILE COMMAND.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I want a car with built in MOBILE COMMAND. I bet it would come in handy when the POLAR VORTEX comes calling.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            There was a dandy on ebay the other day. Very rare Imperial Coupe with Mobile Director. Can’t believe I called it command.

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chrysler-Imperial-NO-RESERVE-1967-CHRYSLER-IMPERIAL-MOBILE-DIRECTOR-INCREDIBLE-TIME-CAPSULE-NO-/141193409951?forcerrptr=true&hash=item20dfc8759f&item=141193409951&pt=US_Cars_Trucks

            Beauty.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    People are lame that kill these.

    I see nothing but blank canvas. I would want all new material inside anyway, and I bet you can get the glass and missing bits pretty easily either new aftermarket or swap meet.

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Lincolns of that period were great big pieces of ****.
    Proof that Detroit couldn’t make cars that required engineering and build.
    Engineering was defined as 5000 lb simulated trucks, gas hog engines, inadequate brakes and suspensions, Texas whore house interiors.
    They still aren’t over it.

    • 0 avatar
      koshchei

      Anachronism much?

    • 0 avatar
      Shawnski

      And the envy of the civilized world.

    • 0 avatar
      jim brewer

      In fact: up to 19 mpg highway. Brown leather interior. excellent brakes. Comfortable, yet connected suspension. It could easily pass (from the driver’s seat) as the 1967 predecessor of my old BMW 7.

      A Lincoln was NOT a Cadillac, let alone a stereotyped Cadillac.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        19 mpg: maybe while falling off a cliff.

        Excellent brakes? Brakes didn’t even get “excellent” until at least the 1980s. Today a good ordinary car stops from 60 in 125 feet or less. In 1967 you would have been lucky to stop in twice that distance.

        • 0 avatar
          jim brewer

          Pre-smogged, cars fairly uniformly got mileage somewhere in the teens. Single digit mpg for a passenger car. was unheard of in 1967. At least 20 mpg around town was sort of the informal cut off for what constituted an economy car back then.

          I remember getting about 17 mpg out of a 1967 chevy wagon I drove for a summer job. It would have been the oldest car in the fleet by then. It was probably a 327. (It was quite zippy) But that would have been around town, and I recall, with a manual transmission.

          As to brakes, I really have no idea where the bad brakes canard comes from. Motortrend said the 1969 Lincoln Continental averaged 110 feet 60-0. the Lincoln was considerably better than the Cadillac, and a little better than the Imperial. That’s about as good as a 5,000 pound vehicle could do given the technology of the day. In no way would a modern driver find the brakes of a 1967 Lincoln scary. http://forums.motortrend.com/70/54886/motor-trend-classic/1969-lincoln-60-0-mph-in-1099-feet/page2.html

          Note also that in 1969 the Lincoln could still do 0-60 in 9 seconds. I’m guessing our 1967 would have done it in a little over 8 seconds in her prime.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            The 1967 and 1969 Continental had front disc brakes and 11.9″ rear drums with 15″ wheels. The original ’61 Continental had 11″ drums on 14″ wheels, while my ’65 Imperial had 12″ drums on 15″ wheels. Front disc brakes on a car with a massive V8 up front would make a huge difference. Just ask Murilee how those drums worked on his ’65 art car when he first got it. He slapped front discs on it not long after replacing the engine.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Agreed, not all cars back then were terrifying to stop.

            My 1963 Thunderbird, essentially a 2 door version of the suicide door Continental stops quite well from highway speed with it’s massive drums on all 4 wheels. Repeat panic stops will cause pedal fade, but even then they’ll get the car down to speed.

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          Lincoln went to standard front disc brakes for 1965, and reviewers of the time uniformly praised the car’s brakes.

          The 1965 Ford Thunderbird, which was built in the same plant as this car, also featured standard front disc brakes.

  • avatar
    old fart

    “Naw I don’t want to sell it , I’m gonna fix er up someday”

  • avatar
    cargogh

    “Moon soil”–that’s dry.
    Murilee, these are some great pictures. Something about them reminded me of the final visit to the nursing home to see my once beautiful and dignified grandmother who was gone with dementia. Some of the elegance is still there, but it couldn’t be revived.

  • avatar
    mypoint02

    Just think of the pride a guy must have had while driving this car off the lot in 1967 – and look at her now. Sad really…

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I feel that way about most cars, but especially high-end cars. I passed a downsized Fleetwood(E-body? Don’t know if that’s right, but it was that size, not the RWD or later longer FWD cars) from the mid-80′s this morning on the turnpike. The whole front end was being held on(up?) by multiple bungee cords and the suspension sagged in a way that only a used up cars can.

      But you know, someone was really excited to drive that home from the dealer one day. To show it off at the country club or Elks. That awful creamy Malaise yellow shining, wire hubcaps still attached.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        It’s been stated on here several times..despite how bad even a Vega or 1980 Citation might have been, unless it was a fleet car, SOMEONE first drove it off the lot, someone first showed it off to the neighbors! It was somebody’s BABY once!

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Learned to drive (in part) on that car. It was one of Dad’s better choices. Dad found out that you could buy a lightly used one for $2500. Still, I was pretty embarrassed by the ostentation of it for a couple of years.

    Definitely had that LBJ vibe to it. You get an almost uncontrollable urge to chase deer behind the wheel of a 67 Lincoln. It was an absolutely wonderful highway car. You could load up a family of six, all their luggage and then drive it all day at 90 mph on the newly opened I-10 in West Texas. It would return its best gas mileage at that speed. Then the top-of-the line Sears (really Michelin) radials would blow out. They weren’t used to making tires suitable for driving seven hundred miles a day in 105-113 degree heat in a fully loaded barge.

    Still a very nice looking car.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “at 90 mph on the newly opened I-10 in West Texas. It would return its best gas mileage at that speed.”

      Rubbish.

      • 0 avatar
        jim brewer

        Probably an exaggeration, but that’s what Dad told me. My recollection is he said it got 19 mpg in West Texas, which is plausible. It was definitely geared for the highway. Remember, 1967 was right before the emissions began to bite–its 4XX ci engine really was like a 7 liter engine.

        I don’t know why people pan its handling. Obviously it wasn’t what you would call tossable, but it certainly felt solid, had steering that felt like it was connected to something, which was not the norm for large cars in those days. The suspension was much less floaty than a Cadillac and would be preferrable on a sweeping highway curve which is all anyone would expect of it.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          It might not be too much of an exaggeration. Those big engines just loafed at highways speeds, and in the flat endless terrain of West Texas, there was nothing to break it out of low rpms.

          There was also much better gas available. I remember 98 octane premium that under R+M/2 would be 93-94 today without the octane boost and lower mileage of 10% ethanol. The cost though was outrageous: 34-35 cents/gallon, vs. 29 cents for regular.

          • 0 avatar
            jim brewer

            Certainly. Plus, let’s be realistic: the 19 mpg would probably have been a “best-tank” number. But this engine consuming between 4 and 5 gallons an hour at highway speed? About right.

  • avatar
    davew833

    My stepdad had two cars that he loved– a gold 1981 Cadillac Coupe De Ville D’Elegance edition with that “great” L62 V8-6-4 engine, and a baby blue ’67 Lincoln Continental like this one. When I entered college in 1990, he offered me the Lincoln which had been sitting in his yard for a number of years. I turned my nose up at it in favor of a rusty Subaru hatchback. I wish I’d had more wisdom then!

  • avatar
    skor

    Lincoln Mark IX concept.

    http://www.roadandtrack.com/cm/roadandtrack/images/Zz/LincolnMK9_HR-lg.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Madroc

      Rumors persist that the new S550 Mustang platform will give rise to one or more Lincolns. As one who just moved from an Acura TSX to a current-gen Mustang GT I might be very interested in 6 years or so.

      Not sure how I feel about that styling, though. Very classic but I’m not sure it does it for me. That said, if they build it with a Coyote and a stick it would probably do.

  • avatar
    bill mcgee

    This era of Lincoln still makes me feel guilty as my first automotive mishap involved a 1968 Lincoln sedan . I was an unlicensed 15 year old , my parents had left town and my younger sister , always a bad influence, convinced me to ” borrow ” the parents’ 1968 Pontiac Tempest , and give her a ride to a nearby mall . I promptly backed into the across-the-street neighbor’s Lincoln , and worse , drove off . ( In my defense , the neighbor didn’t usually park there ). Later , we snuck back into the parents garage , the Tempest ‘s large back bumper totally undamaged . The Lincoln took the worst of it as I hit both doors .Worse , ( guilt,guilt ) the neighbor came home , seemingly drunk and apparently not noticing the dent til then , and sister and I heard him talking to his wife and blaming the valet at the restaurant they’d been at for denting the car .

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    To think this car once looked like this:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Lincoln_Continental_Heck.jpg/800px-Lincoln_Continental_Heck.jpg

    (except better, since it had the white interior)

  • avatar
    MRBEAN813

    Nice highway car


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