By on February 13, 2014

2014-Nissan-Micra-62

 

At the Canadian International Auto Show, Nissan announced that the new Micra, slated for Canada only, would slot in just under $10,000, making it the cheapest new car on sale in Canada. Compared to world markets, the Micra has some Canadian-only features, like an upgraded HVAC system and split-folding rear seat (to carry hockey bags and other large parcels).

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44 Comments on “Nissan Micra To Cost $9998 In Canada...”


  • avatar

    The $10,000 barrier…

    Can anyone cross it and yet have AWD???

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The plate at the front says March! :P

    I think I like the original 80s one better. Looked very honest.

    http://dev.hatchheaven.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/nissan_march_collet_83.jpg

  • avatar
    seat safety switch

    I don’t want to be working at Mitsubishi right now after all the hoopla about how the Mirage was supposed to bolster sales in Canada.

    Probably not going to be a lot of us Canadians lining up to pay $12.5k for a 3-cylinder Mirage when we can pay $9998 for a 4-cylinder Micra or $14k for a 3-cylinder turbo Fiesta.

    • 0 avatar
      Atum

      Mitsubishi always seems to have bad luck. Right as they thought they were starting a new market with the Mirage, a more popular company came in with a better and cheaper alternative.

  • avatar
    daver277

    If one of Renault’s sweet little diesels were available for another $2,000, I would get one.
    It would be would be nudging 100 MPIG under Canada’s bogus fuel economy standards.

  • avatar

    These are going to be everywhere in Québec in about 12 minutes.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Don’t forget to add the $1500 shipping charge usually imposed in Canada.

  • avatar
    FuzzyPlushroom

    ‘Split-folding rear seat’ as opposed to a one-piece folding seatback? I mean, it’s a hatchback – it would be completely useless without a folding rear seat of some variety.

    I don’t even understand why some non-hybrid sedans lack that critical feature. Why wouldn’t a new car have something you could get in a ’90s Escort sedan?

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      I think the reason they stress “split folding” as opposed to “one piece” is so that one can carry both a kid AND his hockey bag in the back, with parents up front.

    • 0 avatar
      spreadsheet monkey

      BMW (and others) used to cite torsional rigidity as a reason for not fitting a folding rear seat.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        This is very true. I used to have two identical 325i. One with folding rear seat. The one without was noticeably quieter, more solid. I have sold the one with folding seat and have only bought BMWs without this feature since then.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    What’s the base price of a Versa in Canada?

    Also, expect the CVT transmission to be a $2,500 option.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    I have to say, thats WAY better looking than the Spark.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      That’s not hard. The Spark looks like a startled squirrel on meth, but this thing just looks like an honest little car.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        I guess I should say, I think this is a genuinely good looking small car, which, based on its competition, is apparently really hard to design.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          A basic, simple design isn’t hard, but it’s difficult to differentiate from other simple, basic designs. The competition had to impose its corporate design philosophy onto its small car models to make them look different, and left the simple, basic design open for Nissan. Either that or the designers are smoking something.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            It seems hard to get the proportions right in this segment.

            Theres also a good chance I am just loving the parallel beltline, large area of glass, and apparent prismatic cross sectional shape of the pillars.

            All of which are design elements I lament the lack of in modern car design.

  • avatar
    Onus

    I still don’t get why they wont be selling this in the us. They already had to make it meet Canadian vehicle standards which are identical minus two things.

    DRLs, and some instrumentation differences for the brake light which should be an ISO brake symbol instead of BRAKE. Most us cars have both in the light. My truck does. Also metric primary speedometer.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    And, of course, 99% of Micras sold will be a $12,000 version with A/C and a radio, which actually reflects the cost of production. The $9998 price is a loss leader and a cheap publicity stunt.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      You’re probably right. And the Mirage still comes with standard bluetooth and dual climate control, so expect the “tech package” on this car to drive the price even higher.

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        You mean we can still buy a new car without a “tech package”? I hope it comes with manual windows and locks as well. I will need something to replace my strippo Ranger “S” in a few years. I’d be interested in a Micra for my astounding 5000-6000 kilometers yearly mileage.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          If you want a stripper, you might not want to wait too long. The way the economics work for the manufacturer, the few strippers still made now are probably not going to be worth the trouble to make in a few years, due to fewer and fewer guys like you willing to roll up their own windows, manually set their side mirrors, etc. It’s cheaper to include all the stuff most people expect to get in a car as standard equipment.

    • 0 avatar
      AlfaRomasochist

      $9998 model is the Quebec special.

      • 0 avatar
        Atum

        The SR model shown in the photos on Nissan Canada’s website is probably 15 grand. Nice advertising stunt, Nissan.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Come on, it the “loss leader”. The dealer will have ONE, in an ugly color that will never be sold. He’ll show it to customers first and they’ll gladly look at the higher priced models with more standard equipment.

          As AlfaRomasochist points out, they’ll only be stocked and sold in any numbers in Quebec. Otherwise Nissan could send each dealer a single poorly fitted prototype to steer customers toward the profitable models.

  • avatar
    wolfinator

    I have absolutely no idea why, but this car seems really appealing to me. It’s probably my cheapskate side talking.

    I know a lot of people would prefer to buy a used car at this price point. But I’ve had bad experiences doing that – I much prefer to buy new and keep for the long haul. I can do all the maintenance correctly and keep it looking good inside and out.

    This car looks perfect as a short range commuter or about town runabout. Or a second or third family car. The exterior design is appealing, it has all the features I “need”, and the price is great.

    Even at $12k or whatever they’re going to charge to add on some A/C and possibly cruise, I’d be interested.

    C’mon Nissan, bring it to the US! Us Gen-Yer’s need a cheap car to go with our depressing paychecks!

  • avatar
    Joss

    Add a/c & auto & tech pkg won’t be much diff monthly Sentra lease. Especially if Micra hot and Sentra not. I’m gunning on some cute-me-up dealer add-ons to help Micra drive away.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Savings are in the transmissions, late twentieth 5-spud or 4-slush. Rear drums not found on the Accent. Video looks like Sherbourne Common waterpark round the back of the filtration beside Corus/George Brown.

    I’d hold off for CVT trans. It’ll be along sooner if Micra takes off. The 4-speed is obviously the early producion gamble. Remember it was available early on the Versa. Can’t think production will be around much longer? I’d like to see a rear disc option on the SR.

  • avatar
    PuckDrop

    Love the fact that it comes with the instrument cluster in front of the driver and not offset like the Yaris. I see for this year Toyota is finally seeing straight (as it were) on that matter. I think this car could work here in Canada for sure. Might be a winner for Nissan.


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