By on February 26, 2014

steve-king

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) took to the House floor last night to speak on behalf of her recently-introduced resolution, House Resolution 488, a resolution “supporting the people of Venezuela as they protest peacefully for democratic change and calling to end the violence”.

Following her was Representative Steve King, a Republican from Iowa. In his monologue to democracy the congressman brought up a (legal) trip he took to Cuba where he got to ride in one of Cuba’s finest taxis – a 1954 Chevrolet powered by “a Russian diesel engine”, the driver of which who also happend to be a doctor. Such communism. Very Russian. Much oppressed. Below is a clip from his speech compliments of CSPAN’s awesome Create Clip Option.

Curious if any taxi drivers in The Free World of the United States of America also hold degrees in medicine.

The congressman went on to describe the almost laughable state of the automobile in Cuba. He said it was like a “rolling repair shop” where people would run out into the street to repair cars as you sat in them as their mechanical demise was inevitable.

He then went on to talk about Cubans using oxen as a “beast of burden” likely highlighting the island’s lack of F-150s, America’s “beast of burden.” Although, give the people of Cuba credit – if things get real bad, like Walking Dead bad, you can always eat your ox and not an F-150.

 

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48 Comments on “Congressman Tells Of His Ride Through Havana In A Russian-Powered 1954 Chevy...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Much doge reference. Many applaud. Wow.

    • 0 avatar
      ellomdian

      “It’s just part of traveling to stop and repair the vehicle that you are in.”

      So, it’s effectively America in the 60′s? Stop the presses!

      Thanks Steve King – I know you are contractually obliged to say dumb shit to fill time and get sound bites about how American you are, but this is retarded.

  • avatar
    Slawek

    Doctor is a limited profession in the USA. Last time I checked the limit was 20600 new doctors a year. The way it works is you can study medicine all you want, but when you want to get MD license, you have to go through residency program and it is nationally limited. There are around 200,000 MD degree holders not practicing medicine.

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    Take a moment to read Marco Rubio’s response to Tom Harkin regarding Cuba. Here is one place you can find it:

    http://hotair.com/archives/2014/02/25/video-rubio-rips-cuba-venezuela-and-tom-harkin/

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      Cuba is once again benefiting from oil subsidies. This time it’s Venezuelan oil. Even though the oil is marked down $32 a barrel – other than sending doctors, some teachers, police and military trainers – the Cuban government can’t pay its oil bill. They owe Venezuela at least $8 Billion US.

      So, a warning to any farm state congressman and senators, unless the US wants to prop up the Socialist Model with a subsidized loans, the Cubans don’t have much foreign exchange to pay us for food exports. Even the Chinese are wise to Cuba’s deadbeat status.

      Bottom line: without subsidies from other countries, the Socialist Model doesn’t work very well.

      • 0 avatar
        charly

        Cuba’s natural strength is to be America’s tropical garden patch. Lift the embargo and all the tomato’s and banana’s in New York City would be Cuban, especially around this time of year. Lift the embargo and they could pay for grain.

        ps. Cuba is more capitalistic than America at the moment.

  • avatar
    50merc

    Taxi drivers with degrees in medicine? No, here our taxi drivers have PhD’s in gender studies.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    So did he propose easing the sanctions to help the people of Cuba out or is he still pissed off at Castro?

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    Given all the local engineering that has been done out of necessity, I suspect that many of these vehicles are death traps.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I never understood our Cuba policy. It’s OK to trade with China but not with Cuba? The policy also hasn’t worked for 50 years, yet many insist that change would somehow show weakness or make us less secure. But then again, sticking to rigid dogma in the face of an avalanche of facts to the contrary is one of Steve Kings specialties.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    I’ve heard of doctors driving cabs in the US as well. They usually hold medical degrees from their respective originating countries where they got their degrees and experience, but the residency requirements are usually very difficult for those people despite passing board exams and such.

  • avatar
    Synchromesh

    I’m pretty sure Russians didn’t make any diesel engines for cars in the 60s-80s when most Ladas and Moskvitches were imported to Cuba. The only passenger car available with a diesel was Volga 24. They were pretty rare and some were station wagons. That diesel was actually not Russian but made by Indenor. According to wiki the weren’t made for the domestic market but I remember seeing some in the old country so perhaps they were reimported.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      While you are correct in general, it could have been a tractor engine. Other than tank diesels, Russians have never been fond of diesels, even in trucks. T-34 diesel worked out pretty well though…

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    No country for old men (or new vehicles)

  • avatar

    Just ran this today: http://www.mystarcollectorcar.com/2-features/editorials/2227-cars-in-cuba-a-trip-back-to-the-land-that-automotive-time-forgot.html

  • avatar

    I recall somewhere that much of the ability to keep these cars running was because the Soviet Bloc wholesale stole our engine and trans designs in the same era as the cars, only changing them to metric fittings, so it was actually easier than you’d think to keep things going as “sorta close” parts were fresh from Russia. Also, the fact that there was never a “throw away” option kept things on the road. Given how simple most of these car are/were, a good mechanic circa 1955 could make just about any part in house. There was a great PBS special a few years ago on the cars, and it profiled a few mechanics, who could probably make a Model T out of lego parts.

    Given unlimited time, an intact car body, and no alternates, you could power these things with anything from a lawnmower engine to a Zil motor….it’s not like there were emissions or safety inspections.

    • 0 avatar
      Garak

      Many of the early Soviet cars and engines were US designs, and most of them were actually licensed products. GAZ built Ford A and AAs with V8s, and later bought a 1920s Chrysler flathead design, which was used for decades afterwards in both flathead and OHV forms – possibly even today in some UAZ vehicles. So yeah, at least older Chrysler engines could be fitted with Soviet parts pretty much directly from the bin.

      • 0 avatar
        Synchromesh

        That’s incorrect. But the time these Soviet cars were imported to Cuba in the 70s-80s their engine design had nothing to do with US. The Ladas used modified Fiat engines, while Moskvitch used something derived from old BMWs and reworked many times over. I believe the Volga engine is an original Russian design with no specific influence. Not to mention that US wasn’t good making 4 cylinder engines up until the last decade. It would only make sense to copy Europeans or Asians.

        • 0 avatar
          Garak

          Soviet cars perhaps were free from US influence, but many GAZ trucks and military offroaders used versions of the Chrysler sidevalve engine, both in 6 cylinder form and cut down to 4, up until the 1970s.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    We are posting videos of Steve “The Size of Cantaloupes” King why?

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    The Castro brothers are not my cup of con leche and the embargo is a classic example of the definition of insanity, doing the same thing over and over again and getting the same results. Let us go there and check out their vintage autos as well as no so vintage Lada’s. We could even sell them parts. Even during the Cold War there were plenty of people to people cultural exchanges. Zappa and Lou Reed influencing Prague Spring. Satchmo and Brubeck toured the Soviet Union in the 50′s as well as limited business contacts.

    But Ros-Lehtinen is very supportive of terrorists responsible for numerous incidents in S. Florida and Cuba including the worst airline related terror attack pre-9/11. She even helped to get a presidential pardon from GHW Bush for one of the perpetrators. If it was anyone else they would be in Gitmo or Supermax.

    http://www.salon.com/2008/01/14/cuba_2/

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    The Castros will join their psychopath tool Che in hell soon enough. Then maybe we can ease embargo and see what their successors do in return.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The thing about these socialist paradises is, there’s always another strongman in the wings. Fidel stayed in power so long because he was pro-active: he trumped up charges on all potential rivals and the courts and firing squads did the rest. His periodic releases of groups of thousands also removed potential troublemakers from the system.

      Unwinding a socialist system hasn’t had much success in the past, and even in the case of Germany, there were wrenching dislocations. Without an outside sponsor, Cuba will dissolve into anarchy first, and then possibly follow the Russian model of a criminal element taking over, with former security elements controlling the army above them, running state functions.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Yep. Next up, Venezuela. American leftists will find a way to blame American policy for that socialist nightmare as well.

        • 0 avatar
          charly

          Venezuela is well run … for an oil state. Every oil state is a disaster

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Norway

          • 0 avatar
            Ubermensch

            Hey, don’t you mean that “socialist nightmare” Norway.

            http://blog.peerform.com/top-ten-most-socialist-countries-in-the-world/

            Notice that Cuba and Venezuela aren’t even on the list.

            Obvious troll is obvious.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Oh good, a blog list.

          • 0 avatar
            Les

            @Ubermensch

            I think he was posting Norway as an example of a non-disaster oil state, since Norway has all that oil out in the north sea.

          • 0 avatar
            charly

            Norway is the best run oil state by far but is not well run at all and its policy is to invest it in a trust. I don’t know how it will end but by bet is it will end like that pacific guano state. Trust will be stolen by Wall street. Also don’t forget that Norway is an EU vassal state which tempers the trouble of oil. It also has hydro state which is just another word for unending small oil state.

            Name the second best run oil state. (i will help you as it is obvious Russia)
            Third place is or Iran or Dubai or Venezuela. They are all disaster areas

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            Where do you put Canada?

          • 0 avatar
            Les

            @charly

            Norway actually is the only Scandinavian country that declined EU membership.

          • 0 avatar
            charly

            If you have to pay but have no say than you are obvious a vassal. Norway is one of those EFTA vassal states. But as fishing is one of the most important economy sector understandable.

            Iceland is also a Scandinavian country and Greenland and Spitsbergen are not part of the EEA

          • 0 avatar
            charly

            Is Canada a net oil exporter? IIRC they import about as much oil as they export.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Canada exports most of its petroleum production. It produces about 2.8 million barrels/day and exports 1.8 million.

  • avatar
    ExPatBrit

    Mr King has those “batshit crazy eyes” like Michelle Bachmann.

  • avatar
    Bluto

    “For everyone who’s a valedictorian, there’s another 100 out there that weigh 130 pounds, they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’re hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert” – Steve King

    STEVE KING IS (not a nice guy)

    Edited by JB. You can’t use that phrase here.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Interesting to see all of the juvenile attacks on Steve King by the leftists while the freedom-crushing Castro murder and poverty machine is hardly even mentioned, if at all. What a morally bankrupt group of pathetic burnouts you all are.


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