By on September 25, 2013

Claim your Mazda Summer Sales

The new 2014 Mazda3 is getting rave reviews for its improved looks to go along with Mazda’s typical best-of-class driving dynamics. Last month, Mazda had its best August sales ever in the United States, with slightly over 28,000 units sold.

 

However, those August sales were up 6.8%, barely keeping up with overall growth of the U.S. market and for the year to date, Mazda sales were actually down 26.4% from 2012. According to Jeremy Barnes, director of marketing and communications for Mazda in North America, the reason is that the company is having trouble delivering enough product. The Mazda6, whose August sales were up an astounding 167% from 2012 on the strength of an all-new model, is said to be in short supply with 60% of inventory turning over every month. The CX-5 small crossover had its best month ever in August and Barnes said that supply is down to 40 days.

Mazda’s SkyActiv Technology, based on light weight and fuel efficient powertrains seems to be catching on. Models available with SkyActiv made up three quarters of all Mazda sales in August, prompting the company to increase production plans for the Skyactiv engines and transmissions. Introduction of the diesel powered Mazda6 in North America has been delayed for emissions calibration and testing, according to Mazda.

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39 Comments on “Short Supply Issues Hamper Mazda Sales Growth...”


  • avatar
    snakebit

    Good for Mazda. I’m glad folks are shopping them when they’re considering Escape, Civic, and Accord-class cars. Let’s hope they can fix their supply problem without affecting quality.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Supply issues are also hampering sales of Wonder bread and Twinkies.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Heres my question: are they actually making $ on these cars? I recall that one of Mazda’s problems in the past has been the yen/$ exchange rate not favoring them. I know the new 3 is being made in Mexico so this should help, but I assume the 6 and CX-5 are still made in Japan. Has that exchange rate changed significantly enough to help Mazda actually make serious $ on the cars they sell?

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      I’ve got one local dealer that I hear some bad stories about, and one dealer that’s somewhat close that seems to treat people very well. I’ve also got some really scummy Toyota and Honda dealers nearby…

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Mazdas have higher average transaction prices right now, and they’ve said that they will avoid the rebate/discount approach to meet their sales goals, so I have to assume the new models are profitable. Their plant in Hiroshima was identified as the fastest plant. Part of the SkyActiv scope is simplify/common-ify manufacture processes to improve flexability, speed, and cost. And now that the yen is back where it should have been the last few years, I think it’s safe to say they are making money on each of these cars considering how much their profit has risen in the last year or so.

  • avatar

    As much as I love Mazda, they’ve got to get their dealers under control, as they simply lack the class of the Toyota stores. the big guys all figured out that good dealers helped move cars, and Mazda, based on my recent SF Bay area purchase, is not there yet. it’s a shame as every car they build is excellent!

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Exactly this. We bought a CX-5 a month ago, and the difference between Toyota dealers (we cross-shopped the RAV4, obvs.) and Mazda dealers was embarrassing. We went to two different Mazda dealers, both of which were low-slung buildings straight out of the 70′s with sad balloons and flags that wouldn’t have been out of place in a buy-here-pay-here lot. The Toyota dealership looked like a New England version of the BMW Zentrum. If I hadn’t known what I wanted to test drive already, I doubt we would have even stopped at the Mazda dealership (though I do love the car).

      • 0 avatar
        jeffredo

        Yeah, building architecture and decor are at the top of my list as well when scoping out a dealership. :/

        • 0 avatar
          mike978

          Agreed – the dealerships here in central North Carolina are not spacious or good looking. Also the sales tactics (radio ads etc) are not in keeping with where Mazda should want to be.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          You’re interested in cars. So am I. Plenty of people don’t plan out in advance what they want to test drive, and go into dealerships (or stores, or open houses, or restaurants) based on curb appeal.

          And for what it’s worth, the general feeling of old-timey car dealer (not meant to be a compliment) didn’t stop with the physical surroundings.

      • 0 avatar
        Volt 230

        yet Toyota customer satisfaction surveys almost place them at the bottom of the list, and yet their cars are perceived as quality and good value, so the dealers themselves are not doing their job. I bought a new Scion last year and never heard back from the dealer at all, no survey, no coupons no nothing. As if I had never purchased there at all.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Which is especially odd given I’ve never seen a standalone Scion dealer, its always Toyota/Scion. Assuming the dealers cover this for Toyota, its almost as if they don’t care enough to contact Scion owners.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      It depends on where you go. The Mazda dealer closest to me has as a facility that is competitive with any non premium brand here in Orlando. The sales people there are also very friendly, and the chain that operates it is a no haggle low pressure place so it makes for an easy buying experience.

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      I’ve got one local dealer that I hear some bad stories about, and one dealer that’s somewhat close that seems to treat people very well. I’ve also got some really scummy Toyota and Honda dealers nearby…

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      That’s a tough thing to generalize. In my area, there are at least two Mazda dealers that are top-notch and one that is scraping the bottom, while there is at least one Toyota dealership that’s as slimy as a catfish-turned-lawyer. I don’t know about the other dealers because I haven’t visited them.

      But enforcing more consistency and uniformly high standards across the brand certainly couldn’t hurt.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      That’s funny you say that while I have never perused a Mazda dealer I have Toyota dealers and I found the experience to be wholly obnoxious. I didn’t make a purchase or use the service dept so perhaps those experiences would be better.

    • 0 avatar
      George Herbert

      As another SF Bay person – One of the Mazda dealers, I no longer trust to change my oil, and sadly this is the one between me and work; another one, I trust at least for basic maintenance (Redwood City); another one, I drive the extra 12 miles (opposite direction from work) for anything major, and would go there to buy a new one (Oakland).

      Sadly, the one I don’t trust to change my oil is the big one alongside a freeway, with relatively new open buildings.

    • 0 avatar
      jbreuckm

      Alas, I’ve had a Mazda for 11 years and I’ve had less than stellar experiences at three different Mazda dealers. The physical plant ranged from awful to cutting edge at the dealers, but the real problem is the indifferent customer service I’ve received at all three.

      Standard disclaimer for small sample size and all that.

  • avatar
    afflo

    This explains the delay in the Mazda3 2.5L/6MT, as well as any MazdaSpeed3. Get the beige version out on the lots ASAP, and then backfill.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    The need to ramp up Skyactiv engine doesn’t bode well for me as I am waiting to buy a Mazda5 (mini minivan) with the Skyactiv engine. As it’s sales volume is small, in a small market segment for Mazda, this may mean it has low priority to get the short-of-supply Skyactiv engine. Other models that are more popular like the 6 sedan and CX5 (higher profit margin) and the 3 (high volume) will get priority on the Skyactiv engine. If anyone has any tip on the Mazda5 getting Skyactiv, do let me know.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I would have thought they would wait to give the 5 the skyactive engine and other goodies until it is completely redesigned. I know they prefer to do a holistic approach if possible. The 5 is due for a complete redesign in the next few years isn`t it since it has had an MCE recently.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Bad news. An upgraded 5 is not in the works.

      http://rumors.automobilemag.com/mazda-refreshing-cx-5-6-launching-new-2-next-year-242405.html#axzz2fwUTsF2z

      “5: The small minivan hasn’t been very successful in the U.S. market, where customers tend to favor full-size vans like the Honda Odyssey instead, but Mazda will probably continue to sell the current 5 here for some time. According to AN, profits from sales in the U.S. help support selling the struggling Mazda 5 in other countries. No significant upgrades are planned, meaning the minivan will not switch to a SkyActiv platform or chassis.”

      • 0 avatar
        nguyenvuminh

        redav and mike978 – not what I wanted to hear but thank you for your insight. I was afraid of that. I just love that concept so much, too bad these mini minivans are well liked in Europe and Asia but not here in the States.

        • 0 avatar
          technivore

          I just bought a Mazda5 about a month ago and love it dearly. Don’t let the lack of skyactiv keep you from buying it. It’s still the most fun you’ll ever have driving a minivan (I got the “Sport” trim with the 6MT).

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    (opens window overlooking factory floor) WORK FASTER, YOU #@$+@&)$!!!!!

  • avatar
    brenschluss

    Friend of mine bought a new 6 last week on my recommendation. Perfectly nice car, good looking and seems like a hell of a deal. He drove it and loved it, after driving a Fusion which “sucked [his] ass,” and a Focus Ti which was just a bit small for his taste.

    I drove it, but carefully as it was not broken in. I’m very interested to try a manual version, would be very attractive to me if it can provide the antisocial acceleration I’m looking for. If they make a speed6 with too much power, AWD, MT or 2 out of the 3, Ideally for not much more than 30k, by gosh I’ll be flipping over the couch cushions for change.

    I’m glad to see Mazda doing well as I like how they prioritize. I would like to see rust protection move up a couple spots, but the jury is out on the 2014 models. I told my buddy to keep his as clean as he can.

    • 0 avatar
      texasspeed

      I have an 06 Speed6 that I’ve owned since new. Not sure I’ll buy another Mazda when the time comes to replace it. Fragile and expensive to fix suspension, and a bunch of little niggling issues that have turned me off from the brand. I like the car, don’t get me wrong, but they haven’t won me as a repeat buyer.

      • 0 avatar
        brenschluss

        That is good to know. On paper, your car sounds nearly perfect to me, but I keep hearing about a darker side of Speed6 ownership.

        Here’s hoping they’ve turned a new leaf as far as issues like these (and rust) are concerned. The new cars look and feel so different from their predecessors that it feels as though they may have done, but I’ll admit to being a sucker for a pretty face.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        Speed6′s are known to be fragile, but Mazda as a brand has gotten better. I had a ’10 Speed3 until recently and the only problem I experienced with it was a sticky rear brake caliper, which was replaced under warranty.

        • 0 avatar
          texasspeed

          I’m glad you had a good experience with your Speed3, and I’ll agree that maybe the Speed6 was produced in too low of a volume to have the kinks worked out.

          But some of my issues are common to all the 2.3 motors, turbo or not. Do a search on how many Mazda owners got stuck with a $450 bill to replace thermostats that stick open.

  • avatar
    morbo

    Yea, they got none in DC metro. Helped a friend buy a ’13 Accord recently. The short list was Accord, 6, Fusion; Toyota’s and Chevy’s suck (per both our biased opinions), no faith in the Altima CVT (coupled with horror stories from known bad cases), Subaru is for Vermont and the LLBean crowd, and MOPAR doesn’t offer a competitive mid-sizer.

    Axing the Fusion because the front end looks like Monica Lewinsky during a government shutdown, we test drove 6 and Accord in metro DC (Rockville area). The Mazda dealer had TWO on their lot. Not two of a color or trim level, two total Mazda 6 automocars.

    The Honda dealer up and down the road had dozens, maybe hundreds on the lot.

    Ultimately the Accord won with a better tech package (blind spot camera’s displaying in real time is awesome). But the Six was definitely the better handling and driving car. If I needed a FWD mid-sizer right now, it would win easily. I just hope they get their tech package (NAV, voice commands, ACC, cameras, etc.) up to snuff.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      Have to agree. We’ve owned the first generation 3 and a CX-9. The interior on the first gen wasn’t bad except for the famous “Cylon” dash radio. Seemed very 80′s boombox, but otherwise a great car. We bought the 9 to have a 3-row that is still fun and stylish, and it’s been nothing but reliable for 50k miles. The leather is nice, the charcoal interior is gorgeous (I’m weird, I like the cave effect). But, the dash radio and backup camera (I didn’t pay the extra thousands for NAV) is pretty lacking compared to others. Still, I wouldn’t change my decision. The Kodo CX-9 looks even better, tho I will admit it’s pretty dated compared to the higher-tech SUV’s in the same range. Something else from the Edge parts bin might have helped, but that ship just sailed.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    Have to agree about poor dealerships. In my area Queens, NY the dealers are very bad. I have owned 2 Mazda’s over the years and currently own a 1991 Miata BRG with 70,000 miles as a play toy. Mazda parts purchased from the dealers are way overpriced. Last weekend i needed a fan sensor switch for my Miata and the dealer list is $77.00. I purchased it from Moss Motors $12.95. I know many people in the trade that will not purchase a Mazda because of the price of parts. Mazda knows this and cut their parts prices to be more in line with the rest of the trade back in 1990/1992 but the dealers never cut their profit back to agree.I own 2 VW’s which everyone claims their parts are very high. Trust me i pay 1/2 the price for parts that Mazda wants when purchasing VW parts.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I hope this doesn’t have the glitch I’ve been encountering lateley with my posts on TTAC. If any TTAC staff read this please fix the problem. Your Contact Us doesn’t work as well!!!! So how can you receive help if you can be contacted.

    ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

    Mazda in Australia is performing better than in the US and the Mazda 3 has been the largest selling car.

    The SkyActive diesel has had issues for a while. I have read that the engine is having problems running on the US diesel (lower quality).

    The article stated that Mazda was hopeful that they can produce a SkyActive diesel to run on the US grade of fuel.

  • avatar
    April

    If I could afford a new car I’d probably go with the Mazda2. I would think it is totally lots of fun with a stick.


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