By on June 20, 2013

??????????????????????????????????????????

Car salesmen call buyers like me, “squirrels.” It seems like whenever I buy a new car, I pull a handbrake 180 turn at the last moment and purchase a completely different vehicle than originally planned. Last week I was so close to buying a new Mustang GT with the Track Package that a friend at Ford was poised to set me up with an insider deal. The only problem was I seemed to have forgotten that this will not be my daily driver so why was I analyzing SYNC Packages, luggage space, resale value and the like?

I regrouped and asked myself two questions: which vehicle will have the soul of the two most fun cars I have ever owned, the 1994 Mazda RX-7 and the 1988 Honda CRX-Si? Why do I live in sunny San Diego and have never owned a convertible? The halogens went off in my head. As fate would have it, a dealer I know had just traded for the exact car I wanted. Say hello to my little yellow friend.

 

S2000 1

 

I am now the proud owner of a flawless 2008 Honda S2000 with only 27,000 miles on its clock. It is an unmodified “little old lady’s car” that a middle-aged Arizona couple took amazing care of before trading it in. They told the dealer that they were sad to let go of their “baby.” And, yes, Rio Yellow was my first color choice so I could be seen by the distracted-driving, left-lane-blocking blockheads that infest our freeways.

After three days of ownership I can say that I made the right decision: the S2K is an absolute hoot to drive. It has the slickest gearbox I have ever rowed and the motor pulls like a V-8 above 6,000 RPM.  In the near future, and after a few runs up Palomar Mountain, I will write a “long-term test” story on my roadster.  I promise it will be the first review of an S2000 that does not include the phrases, “It handles like a go-kart.” or “It’s a four-wheel motorcycle.”

The GT would have looked great in the garage next to my wife’s 1968 Mustang, is a tremendous value and Jack Baruth says it is the best all-around ponycar ever built, but my S2000 is an affordable, no compromise, kick-ass sports car the likes of which may never be seen again.

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

75 Comments on “Tales From The Cooler: TTAC Writer Buys A Cool Car...”


  • avatar

    Where are the pics of the “cool car”?

    Is it the Porsche up there? I heard they are number 1 in reliability now.

    • 0 avatar

      Porsches are a DIME A DOZEN here. S2000s? Not so much.

      Porsches are so cool that they dropped the stick shift option for “performance” reasons yet many cheaper cars (ariel atom?) will run circles around them — with a stick.

      Op> I’ve been dreaming/pondering an S2000 for quite some time now as a weekend car, but I prefer the higher revving ones that (I think) were only available up to 2002 or so (AP1 I think they are called).

      • 0 avatar
        Synchromesh

        AP1 was available 2000-2003. I’ve driven both AP1 and AP2 and I by far prefer the AP2. They have increased torque at the bottom and rev same 9000rpms.

        As much as I like the S2K, imho the Miata is more fun in a barrel-o’-monkeys kind of way. But Honda is a cool car nonetheless!

        • 0 avatar
          snakebit

          I’ve owned both the version one Miata and an S2000, and they’re both engineered so well, as though the product planners aimed to include all of the fun stuff from the 1960’s british roadsters, but were determined to keep out all of the factors that made the early roadsters unreliable and poorly made.
          That being said, the Miata’s are more plentiful and cost less, they’re both available with leather(standard on S2000, optional but equipped very often on Miatas).
          If you get either checked out before buying used, very hard to go wrong with either.

        • 0 avatar
          prouds2k

          AP1 owner here. AP1 is much more aggressive and fierce but is also more tail-happy. Both are sporting 50-50 weight distribution.

          One thing you’re mistaken about is the tachometer redline limit. The AP1 (2000-2003) revs to 9000 RPM’s and the AP2 (2004+) revs to only 7,800 RPM’s. It is a substantial difference between the two after passing 6,000 RPM’s.

          • 0 avatar
            chrishs2000

            The AP2 is definitely a superior car to the AP1. Every two years the platform was significantly improved; the 08-09 is the culmination of all the improvements and I would love to own one someday.

            The AP1 is of course much more ‘raw’ than the AP2, which can make it much more amusing but also much more scary due to the knife edge balance. That said, I’ve never spun mine on a public road and I’ve swung the tail around plenty of corners – I go through rear tires every 7k miles! I think a lot of the bad reputation comes from inexperienced owners and auto journalists that try to drive like an idiot without properly learning the car.

            I own an AP1 because I like the ‘rawness’ of the original, the 9k redline, and the value equation is just incredible on those cars.

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            I’ve owned both AP1 and AP@. I prefer my current AP2, if just for the back that I feel like it is trying to kill me less when I give it gas too early in a corner. There is so much more rear grip.

            Though TBH I’d prefer to have a everywhere else AP2 to a US-spec AP2. I loved the 3000RPM VTEC window and winding up to 9000 in the AP1, and the rest of the world kept the F20C in the new chassis if I recall correctly.

  • avatar
    JoelW

    As someone who works at a Honda dealership, I can say one thing about S2000s… they typically come in one of two varieties:

    1) Completely clapped-out, trashed

    -or-

    2) Pristine

    There is a little, but not much, middle ground between those two extremes…

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Neat choice. I owned an 04 and regretting selling it almost immediately after doing it. But kids and activities did not work well with the S2000.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    And how does she do in braking?

    http://m.autoblog.com/2013/06/14/honda-s2000-acura-rsx-recalled-over-brake-boosters/

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    I have a 2006 as my daily driver/commuter/weekend/whatever car. Bought it used with ~30K miles back in ’08, now have 110K miles w/o a hickup.

    Brilliant, brilliant car. Its quite civilized (if your previous primary commuter was a motorcycle). If something happened to it, I don’t know what I’d replace it with.

    It is also nicely tail happy if you turn off the computer, responding to ham-footed throttle with attempts to kill the driver. I recommend you try it. Its fun.

    • 0 avatar
      Nicholas Weaver

      Oh, and you should upgrade the stereo head unit. Its a basic DIN unit, easy to get to, and the Modifry wired dash control interface works like a charm, so you can get a nice iPod hookup etc, and still keep the external control buttons. There is even space to route a back-panel USB out into the passenger footwell area.

      Its a 1 hour job even if you have never done it before, following the instructions from Crutchfield.

      That, Pilot Sport All Seasons, and when the rotors needed replacing at 100K miles, I got fancier front rotors, are the only modifications I’ve bothered with on mine.

      • 0 avatar
        Virgil Hilts

        Thanks, Nicholas, the radio is my first teeny nit to pick with the car. Of course, I am still in the “who needs a radio when I can listen to the engine?” mode…

        • 0 avatar
          Nicholas Weaver

          I didn’t bother replacing the door & seat speakers (probably will replace the door speakers eventually), but the factory head unit is really a piece of cake to remove and replace.

          Use the Modifry wired interface rather than wireless (its vendor specific, BUT its a much cleaner install), and just order from Crutchfield for the head unit itself.

          Go for one with a rear USB with a pigtail rather than front, and/or Bluetooth A2DP (bluetooth stereo audio), so you can keep the door to the stereo closed, you can route the USB line through the passenger footwell area (there is a gap it fits though).

          • 0 avatar
            SoCalMikester

            i imagine you could probably route it into the glovebox, and use a USB thumbdrive? or no? my factory pioneer supports it

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Why would you downgrade to all season tires on a S2000?

        • 0 avatar
          Nicholas Weaver

          See: daily driver and tail happy.

          The thing is squirly in the wet, even with good all season performance tires. You can easily overwhelm the computer with deliberately bad throttle application on a wet surface.

          So I got all season tires which, amongst other application notes are “wet track autocross”.

          Its the same reason why my motorcycle wears Pilot Road IIs (soon to be Pilot Road IIIs) rather than Pilot Sports. I’m willing to give up a little traction in the dry for a lot better traction in the wet.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Sorry but Max and ultra high performance summer tires are designed to stick in the wet and in general do better in the wet than All-season tires that do nothing that all that well. Before you buy another set look at testing at tirerack and you’ll see in most cases the Summer tire has higher wet cornering G’s quicker lap times and a shorter stopping distance compared to the all season tires from the same brand and usually do better in the dry too.

            For example the Exalto PE2 posts .95g in the wet while the Pilot Sport A/S Plus can only do .88g in the wet.

          • 0 avatar
            chrishs2000

            +1 Scoutdude. My AP1 came with very expensive Michelin all seaons when purchased. Upgraded to one of the cheapest max performance tires on the market (Hankook Ventus V12 EVO) and the difference was night and day.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            +1 on the Ventus V12, but don’t be fooled, they are the extremely rare exception to the rule on cheap tires. And they are not that cheap anymore, having just shopped for tires the price on the V12s has risen quite a bit since last year, but it is still the cheapest “good” UHP tire out there. If @Nicholas compared some other cheap UHP to his Pilot A/S tires then they would probably be much better since the Pilots are very good even in A/S form. But the Hankook V12s were incredibly good and for the price cannot be beat IMO. Considering how fast you guys say you go through tires then less expensive is a good thing! My MR2 tires last forever.

          • 0 avatar
            campocaceres

            I agree about the car being finicky in the rain. I was definitely being careless, but I spun the car off the highway going around 70+mph when I hit a puddle and hydroplaned. These were on summer Potenza’s. Again, I was very distracted and ignored warning signs, but I would encourage caution nonetheless. The S2000 is definitely less stable in the wet than any other car I’ve had (which includes a Toyota MR2 Spyder).

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Yep, a summer tire typically has better grip on a wet surface with little to no standing water. Thus, Formula1 intermediate tires look like shaved summer tires. But there’s a reason that they bring out full wet tires that look like all-seasons when the rain gets heavier. You’re unlikely to crash simply because your tire can only deliver .88g instead of .95g. More likely, you’ll crash when the back end of the car suddenly has 0g of cornering capability. Besides, the fun is in getting the car to move around underneath you in a predictable and controllable manner. It is for me, anyway. I have the most fun on snowy/icy days on my studs, which are entirely predictable but have extremely poor traction on ice compared to the grip of a summer tire on warm pavement. I’m not actually racing anyone on the street, so I’ll take the extra tread life, hydroplane resistance, and sand/gravel forgiveness of a good all-season in summer.

            30k miles on my Pilot all-seasons, with about 7/32″ remaining.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Good summer tires actually have better hydroplane resistance than most all season tires. All season tires typically have more restrictive paths to evacuate water since the goal is to provide many edges to get a little grip in snow. The BFG KDW’s on my cars do not hydroplane as easily as the all seasons that came on the cars despite being up to 1″ wider depending on which car. The Continental Extreme Contact DW that is my current favorite tire also is very resistant to hydroplaning. Yes there are some dedicated dry Max performance tires that don’t do well with hydroplaning but there are more that are very hydroplaning resistant, you’ve just got to do your reasearch.

            Speaking of gravel I have a gravel driveway and one of the things I really hate about the Michelin AS tires that are on my wife’s car is the fact that they love to pickup gravel and then fling it out as it gets up to speed. You can usually hear a couple fly out driving through the neighborhood, a couple more as we get to the mid speed roads and the last couple when getting on the freeway. My cars with BFG KDWs or Conti Extreme Contact DWs do not do that. For that reason and the fact that you can feel them start to ride up on the water when going through puddles I’ll be replacing them next spring, with Extreme Contact DWs when the X-ice come off, despite the fact that they will have about 6/32″ of tread at the end of this summer.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I agree that most all-seasons – especially the OE style – do have poor hydroplane resistance. I don’t even consider those sorts of tires when I’m looking. Most summer tires wouldn’t clear water like a Pilot Sport A/S or General G-Max AS-03, but those KDW2s sure look like they would. I guess you’re primarily just gaining treadwear at the expense of grip with all-seasons. There’s also the convenience of not having to install the winter tires for a day or two of light wet snow in late spring or early fall when the ground is too warm for ice. I’ve used my Pilots in those conditions many times, though they’re basically like summer tires now in terms of tread and probably wouldn’t do terribly well in those conditions anymore. But that’s irrelevant for a second summer vehicle anyway.

            I suppose the current Pirelli F1 wets aren’t quite as all-seasony as the Michelins or Generals I mentioned, nor quite as summery as the KDW2s. Older Bridgestone full wets had patterns with smaller and tighter blocks than the current ones.

            http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ftjs046.html

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Something most people don’t realize is that an A/S tire isn’t really good for snow once it has worn to about 7/32″ of tread. The Continential Extreme Contact DWS (A/S) and DW (Summer) have built in indicators to tell you the conditions the tire at it’s current wear level is suitable. Imprinted in the outer tread blocks are D, W, and in the case of the DWS S in them. When you cant read the S anymore, which occurs around 7/32″ then their snow traction is greatly diminished and they are no longer recommended for that. Then when the W goes away around 4/32″ their hydroplane resistance is diminished to the point they are only recommended for dry conditions.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        I have an 04, and have done everything you said. Actually, all of Modifry’s stuff is worth buying, I love the glovebox organizer and the phone/GPS dash bracket.

        It was easy to route a mic for my bluetooth head unit to the top of the steering column as well

  • avatar
    thanh_n

    Welcome to the S2000 family.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    Virgil,
    I know the CRX SI and ’94 RX7 were somewhat fun, but you’re about to experience fun, as in all capital letters.

    Any downside?. Well, Rio Yellow is also called Radar Yellow in S2000 circles. And, whoever gets to ride shotgun may complain your ear off, especially a spouse, who will hate the go kart ride.

    But, IT’S NOT THEIR CAR. I enjoyed every day of the two years I owned mine
    (in Silverstone Gray), and would buy another one in a New York minute if I was back in Los Angeles. The biggest favor Honda did for us was bring this toy to the States. Good for you, Virgil.

    • 0 avatar
      Nicholas Weaver

      Hey, if you look at the controls and vents (2 vents vs 1, climate control location, stereo control location) its clear that the S2000 designers included a passenger seat purely to maintain left/right weight balance. Otherwise, the passenger is intended to be about as significant as a 150lb bag of potatoes.

      So treat a passenger’s griping about the same as you would gripes coming from a sack of spuds: ignore them.

      • 0 avatar
        chrishs2000

        Exactly. The passenger seat of my AP1 is probably the most miserable place in the world. My wife hates the car and doesn’t understand why I own it – because she’s never driven it.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          Wait, so you guys are saying that there are people who, as passengers, don’t want the driver to treat public roads like a race track? I can’t relate. Being a passenger to an overly cautious driver makes me want to beat my head on the dash until the ride’s over.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          In late for this one, but funny comment.

          My wife recently went out for an afternoon of girl stuff in our friend’s VW Beetle convertible. When she came back, she said, “I liked her convertible way more than your S2000. It just felt so much more civilized.”

          All of us here know why and could explain ad nauseum, but at the time, the only reply that came to mind for me was “Because Racecar.’

  • avatar
    racebeer

    I understand where you are coming from, Virgil. In my family we often do the same thing at a dealership when buying …. Changing our mind at the last moment and absolutely flustering the sales guy. It’s usually my wife who initiates it when she runs across something different she really likes. So, same thing happened a few years ago when we decided to look for another car for “me”. Hardtop, convertible, 2-door, 4-door, AWD, FWD —– you get the deal. Something practical. Well, that all changed when I almost got run over inside a convenience store when an idiot came crashing through the front wall and wound up where I had been standing not 30 seconds before. That little incident made us rethink the car purchase, and it turned into a “I’m looking for what I want, practicability be damned” purchase.

    Well, we sat down and laid out a pretty specific set of parameters. 4th generation Trans Am, 1998 or newer, red, convertible, 6-speed, taupe interior. You guys who know these cars are aware that this combination is fairly rare (approximately 190 built in 2001), with the 6-speed / taupe interior being the major issue. Plus, living in Minnesota, I was prepared to look at other points south and west for this purchase. It must have been my lucky day, because three days after I started looking in earnest, I ran across this exact combination not more than 9 miles from my house! Red, 6-speed, taupe interior, convertible, 2001, and only 45,000 miles. The guy selling it was looking to purchase a 60’s MOPAR muscle car (Roadrunner, GTX, Super Bee) and needed to sell the T/A to finance the deal. The moment we met, I knew this car would wind up in my possession. He was happy I wasn’t some young kid that would abuse his pride and joy, and since he was looking for an older MOPAR we had a lot in common (see my avatar…..). When he fired it up in his garage with the Magnaflow cat-back barking, my wife turned to me and said “You are going to buy this, RIGHT???”

    It’s been a couple of years now, and just like you we have not regretted the purchase. With the top down and the music of the exhaust filtering up, we both just love touring in this rig. I did make one modification by adding subframe connectors to get the wobbly cowl shake out of it, and even my better half could immediately tell the difference in ride and handling with that addition. Just goes to show that if you get what you really want and it makes you happy, all is right with the world – even if everyone else thinks you are nuts for buying it.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Great story, and I have always loved those Trans Ams! I remember when they came out with the newer WS6 package with the giant nostrils on the hood, the car looked like it was going to eat anything in its path. I think they even had a commercial that had the car doing that. Its funny too, I prefer the black interior but most all of the ones I saw back when they were new were taupe. I test drove a bunch of them, almost pulled the trigger a few times but for usual reasons I never did. Glad you are enjoying it, and I think its more fun to own cars that make people think you are crazy for buying them!

      • 0 avatar
        racebeer

        Thanks for the comments!!!! When you are having fun, it really doesn’t matter if folks think you are crazy ’cause you probably are ;-) BTW, it is a WS6 with the “giant nostrils”, and here is a link to the ad you referenced:

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pB83RunYDuU

        Hey … the youtube link won’t post … what gives????

        EDIT: Whoops … now it’s there!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Lordbeezel

      That’s freaky, I had the exact same color / 6 speed parameters for the 2000 Z28 Convertible I purchased in 2005 and still have, also put subframe connectors and a Magnaflow cat-back in it. I recommend a strut tower brace as well and Bilstein HD shocks, utterly transformed the car from ” I can see the fenders move up and down independently before I feel the bump” to nearly as or as rigid as the coupe, and the shocks made an unbelievable difference in ride and handling.

  • avatar
    ash78

    Virgil’s “The Aeneid for Aspeid”

    Got nothing. Great car, every time I see a nice one around town, I feel compelled to leave a note saying “If you ever decide to sell…”

    I’m still leaning towards a cheaper, simpler Miata, but sometimes I get the urge.

  • avatar
    Cubista

    You chose…WISELY.

  • avatar
    niky

    Fake-out. I was reading the teaser, and the first car that came to mind was “Miata”. But that would be too cliched.

    That’s an absolutely beautiful S2K, though. I’m jealous.

  • avatar
    windnsea00

    I live in LA now but when I was in SD Palomar Mountain was always a blast! Another favorite was Montezuma Valley Road (S22) climbing out of Borrego Springs.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I used to go on Palomar drives with my friend’s S2000 club, but the bikes made it sort of risky. Even early on Saturday and Sunday mornings, there were bicyclists hiding in the shadows just past apexes, and motorcyclists getting ambulanced out after bad looking accidents. I think we had some cop issues on our last adventure there too.

      Getting an S2000 was a great decision though. Driving one changed my mind about Hondas about a decade ago. They’re good track cars too, since they’re fast enough to mix it up with the PCA guys while being light enough not to eat brakes and tires. Hopefully there will still be a few unmolested ones if I ever get around to buying one.

  • avatar
    Numbers_Matching

    I would give the ‘emotional’ choice a little more credit in the attributes category – especially in engineering, technology, build quality and overall performance. I don’t know of a car that I would be emotional about that wouldn’t have those features – unless you get all emotional over a ’67 Dart.

  • avatar
    jco

    it IS a four-wheel motorcycle

    out of the nearly 20 different cars I’ve owned so far, the s2000 is the only one of those that can be related to an actual drug addiction.

    i will own another one, i never should have traded mine in

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      I know several folks who are on their 2nd, 3rd, or even 4th S2000, usually with an Impreza of some sort in between.

      • 0 avatar
        jco

        i traded in a WRX (which was always broken) for the S2000. didn’t really look back on that one.

      • 0 avatar
        VA Terrapin

        Sounds like the S2000s were daily drivers for them. They loved how much fun it was to drive, but missed the practicality of a more normal car enough to switch to cars like an Impreza, then missed out on how much more fun it was to drive an S2000, and switched back.

        I understand that cycle, and I almost bought a used S2000 myself, but insurance, tire replacement costs and practicality made me choose a new GTI instead.

        • 0 avatar
          Nicholas Weaver

          I guess the key is “go from a motorcycle TO an S2000″. That way, rather than seeming small, cramped, and harsh, it seems big, roomy, and smooth.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    I love how that engine revs.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Great choice. My test drive of an AP2 S2000 changed my viewpoint on the role that peak torque plays in a sports car. In short, it shouldn’t matter at all. If you are driving a sports car and complain about torque at low RPM, you are driving it wrong. Downshift and let it sing. There just aren’t many cars that sing like an S2000.

  • avatar
    ICARFAN

    LOL, done the 180 myself at a dealership, went in looking at a 94 Probe, drove it and just did not like it, drove a 94 Escort wagon and thought it was way better than the Probe, then spotted a 94 Ford Ranger Splash and after a test drive ended up with that.

    Congrats on the S2, I own a new Mustang and it is great, but for a weekend car I think you made the right choice.

  • avatar
    ChiefPontiaxe

    I owned a ’00 from 1999-2005- it was a great car- sold it (for a very good price with only 20,000 miles) when we were expecting our first child. Now all my vehicles have to have at least 4 seats.
    I wish I could say I missed it- my only regret is that I never took it to the track.
    A bit of trivia- the ’00 S2000’s had no clock- not even in the radio.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      Not every drive has to be a family affair. I’ll take the kids for a little drive one at a time in my Elan. They seem to enjoy it and so do I. It also doesn’t have a clock, nor a radio for that matter.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    Very nice purchase. I steered a female co-worker towards one of these back in 2006. The funny thing is, that co-worker, an Ivy League graduate who was doing very well for herself, was about 27 at the time. We walked into a Honda dealership and the salesman immediately started talking to me (instead of her), despite my assuring him that she was making the purchase. He started condescending her, talking really slowly, “This is a. sports. car.” We politely thanked him after he still didn’t take us seriously, pulled out of the dealership, called another Honda dealership and negotiated the price of $150 over invoice over the phone (end of the month and all that). As a reward for spending the day shopping around with her, she let me be the first one to drive her new baby off the lot (something that’s inconceivable to a car guy!) The S2000 handled like go-kart (not in a bad way). Simply Beautiful car.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That is so disrespectful. I tell women to be informed about what they’re purchasing (that goes for anyone, really), and that they don’t need to bring men to the dealership just to get the time of day. If the salesman can’t speak to her like a normal person, he doesn’t deserve her business.

      Anyway, I hope your friend enjoys her S2000; it’s a real peach of a car.

  • avatar
    mvoss

    I might be the only one with this opinion, but I was thinking of getting an S2K a little while back. I liked that it was RWD, Convertible, had HIDs, and MT. Went out to test drive a car… boy was I underwhelmed. For something that’s going to be my daily driver, I’m not sure if I was going to enjoy putting it in 6th above 45 mph and sitting at 4500 RPM at 70 mph. The engine noise is ridiculous. It was also more cramped than I expected. Since I was going to get a good deal with my company on a new car lease, I decided to lease a Z4. Never looked back.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    Excellent choice, I have always loved the S2000, my dad had a 2006 and it was spectacular. We have an MR2 Spyder now and I am always trying to talk my wife into trading it on an S2K but she loves her car too much. I personally have a sweet spot for a muscle car and since we already have a sports car I don’t want two of them in the family, so the MR2 fills that role for now.

    And honestly, since your wife already has a 68 Mustang you already have a great muscle car. I can see the appeal of “matching” cars but it is nice to have both. I am trying to decide myself if I would rather have a classic Mustang or a new one.

  • avatar
    kimnkk

    Excellent choice! Love my S2000 especially when driving along rolling hills, coastal roads or in a rainforest.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    Congrats- the color is fantastic. Black, grey, white: blah. Any cougar can drive a red car. But yellow on a gamine little roadster just sings.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    When it comes to cars, there are good yellows and bad yellows.

    Your car is most assuredly one of the beautiful ones. Enjoy it to death.

  • avatar
    chrishs2000

    Excellent choice. I have owned my AP1 for 3 years and am having a baby in the next month, so my wife is on my case to sell it – not a chance! As a previous commenter noted, passengers just don’t ‘get it’. I am also fortunate enough to be able to afford two cars, which is the only reason I purchased the S2K – it’s the worst car I’ve ever driven in the rain or on the highway, but the best car I’ve ever driven on a curvy secondary road. The reliability and serviceability of these cars is incredible compared to the Boxster and Z4.

    Enjoy the car and try not to get bit by the mod bug. I talk myself into resisting the temptation only because my color combination is extremely rare (only ~700 AP1 GPW/Tan in the US, probably more than half of them have been trashed by mods or accidents) and I want this car to be as pristine as possible. Just make sure you keep an eye on the oil level – some F20/F22’s in VTEC constantly eat through oil like a rotary engine, and the only way to kill this engine is to starve it of oil in a corner.

  • avatar
    campocaceres

    Congratulations on your purchase! The Honda S2000 has always been up there in customer satisfaction ratings, and, having one myself, I now understand why.

    Mine’s a daily driver, traded in my BMW 3-Series for it. Similar to yours, it was an ’06 in Suzuka Blue that was a garage queen with 13k miles. Just way too good an opportunity to pass up. I’m still young enough that I am more than willing to sacrifice a harsh ride for pure fun, and there’s just no replacing a manual transmission roadster. I feel bad when I have to cart along a passenger, but other than that, no regrets.

    Definitely change out the radio if you like tunes to go with your drive, the stock radios were meant to be replaced. I ended up with a Pioneer unit that only plays MP3’s through USB (there’s no CD). Very convenient for me as CD’s are dead to me and I didn’t have to run any USB cables anywhere.

    Anyway, enjoy the car. I can’t wait to read your long-term opinions about the ownership experience.

    • 0 avatar
      copanacional

      This goes out to Virgil or any other owner of an S2000. How the f*** do you get around the insane dealer inflation of an AP2 S2000? It seems all the Edmunds & KBB numbers are nowhere near the listing prices from these dealers.

      I’m seriously in the market for one but can’t find anything reasonably priced.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        If by AP2, you mean a late model S2000, some would-be buyers are willing to go out of state for the right car. I was in a Cambridge, MA Honda dealership around the first of the year, looking for a Civic for a relative. A blue S2000 was in the showroom, looked brand new. My salesman said it was a 2009, and a chap was coming all the way from Kentucky to take delivery. If you’re not already considering it, look outside your immediate area via the internet. Also keep in mind, this is the beginning of S2000 season, when prices in snowbelt areas are highest.

        • 0 avatar
          copanacional

          Thanks for the quick response guys! Yeah, I’ve been looking out of state but it seems any 2nd gen S2000 is marked up at least $5k-$8k over the edmunds or kbb private party value.

      • 0 avatar
        Virgil Hilts

        If the car is nice, you can forget book price. My dealer traded for around $2000 over wholesale book and the car lasted 4 days before I bought it.

        Check out Garcia Infiniti in Albuquerque who has a red 2008 with 18,000 miles for $26,000.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    I don’t know what is so ‘emotional’ about it. It was on my list. Why?

    Sports cars are about the only kind of used cars with a decent depreciation profile (i.e. high initial depreciation) in a strongly recessionary economy.

    However, long term, depreciation is limited past the initial hit. Depreciation is a hugely important consideration. For we low mileage drivers, its our biggest expense.

    Low operating costs. Its a Honda.

    I couldn’t find a good S2000 on short notice, so I settled for a new F-150 XL. Nothing ‘squirrely’ about it, though. Just dollars and cents.

    P.S. Kinda wonder what an S2000 would be like with a 3.7L 302 hp engine…..


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States