By on March 22, 2013

Here in Colorado, retired members of the Land Rover family are lined up in large numbers in every self-service wrecking yard. Range Rovers and Discoveries were (and are) extremely popular here, most likely as a form of rebellion against the Subaru Outback-driving hordes whose maintenance expenses (even with all the blown head gaskets and nuked center diffs) come to a boring 0.004% of the total per-vehicle annual cost of Range Rover ownership. I’ve been ignoring these trucks when I see them in junkyards, but today we’re going to look at a typical example, chosen at random.
The most interesting thing about these trucks, from a junkyard-scavenger perspective, is the fact that most of them have the 4.2 liter Rover V8 engine, which means that a homemade MGB-GT V8, or even— shudder— a TR7-to-TR8 conversion— is an easy, low-budget proposition. You’ll want to ditch the Lucas fuel-injection system, of course, but that sort of goes without saying.
These things are very comfortable for those willing to keep them running; this one made it to a pretty respectable 164,774 miles during its 18 years of service.
Of course, there are some Land Rovers around here that are safe from the cold steel jaws of The Crusher!

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87 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1995 Range Rover...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Its always sunny…

  • avatar
    Defender90

    What a waste. If you depend on the stealership then yeas L-Rs are uneconomic to repair.
    I assume there’s some customs reason you don’t just google cheap parts off the net.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Love the random analog clock on the far right of the center console. I’m sure it was put there so all passengers could see it, but it looks so out of place.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    Because they are without a doubt by the widest of margins the worst vehicle on the market. Top gear was testing a brand new 2013 range rover supercharged with all options. It was leaking rainwater through the dome light just driving down the road, then the air suspension malfunctioned and the front end got stuck in road mode with the ass end in off road. Completely and totally unacceptable in any year let alone 2013

    • 0 avatar
      jz78817

      I remember seeing the ’90s Range Rovers at the Detroit auto show when they were the then-current models. I clearly remember how, er, approximate the build quality was on them. 1/4″ variance in panel gaps, orange peel paint, suspension that creaked as you got in.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        jz, the fit on these vehicle was so bad that you could read the tire inflation sticker on the drivers door with the door CLOSED. Our neighbor had one of these and he was the ultimate import car snob…I was amazed at how many defects in assembly he was blind to…

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      When did they do this? This was not on television on a regular episode.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        It was on TG USA. Tanner was driving it.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Oh well then it was probably set up. I don’t trust that show (not that I’m implying RR has good build quality, it doesn’t.) Top Gear USA is crap.

          • 0 avatar
            ranwhenparked

            Right, because Top Gear UK is totally above cheap set-ups. Doors on Rover SD1 3500s just spontaneously fall off all the time.

          • 0 avatar
            jz78817

            so where’s the backlash from Rover?

          • 0 avatar
            gearhead77

            Top Gear USA is crap. Unless someone can find some way to get the budget from the UK show, get rid of Rutledge, Ferrara and maybe Faust (though he does have skills) then maybe the show might be good.

            I at least enjoy seeing some cars I know on the US show, but I’ve gotten to know some of the stuff on UK roads from TG UK and Wheeler Dealers.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Not much backlash to be had, because essentially Rover does not exist anymore.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            I’ve never seen the US Top Gear, but the British show, while very entertaining, is hardly an unbiased program. Everything American is “rubbush”, yet when the steering wheel cover on a UK built car flops in the breeze nothing is said. The bias does get a bit tiring…it would not kill them to give credit where it is due.

    • 0 avatar
      Defender90

      2013 R-R is a completely different vehicle to the one here, no similarities at all. Not that I’m saying the older R-Rs were super well built or anything but they are always fixable and modifiable.

      Surprised that folks in the US don’t drop quality US V8s into L-R products – long time ago there was an article I read about putting Ford Mustang units into R-Rs, apparently they fit beautifully.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      When Top Gear UK tested the new Range Rover (against that unmanned military truck), you could catch glimpses of the dash during the segment. They were trying to get a cool shot of the tach sweeping upwards, but if you paid attention, the dash was a lit up christmas tree! Check engine, as well as warning lights from the car (suspension or something else?). I thought it was hilarious. The bottom of the car got torn up pretty good as well, the plastic splash shield on the bottom of the engine was dragging on the ground by the end of the segment.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    It amazes that the Buick 215 aluminum V8 had a longer production at Solihull than it did at GM.

    I know why the original owners bought these. – exclusivity – but I often wander far, far away from the nearest Interstate. Who stocks parts and services these beasts outside of large metropolitan areas?

    It’s a LR wasteland when headed East from I-25 towards Kansas, the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. I’d rather be in a Tahoe when in the hinterlands of the South Plains – where lots of folks understand a SBC 350.

    • 0 avatar
      Defender90

      IS there some sort of difficulty with ordering parts off the internet from UK to USA then?

      And yes it is funny that the “Rover V8″ nee Buick went on for so long. Not only it was a favourite custom car motor over here for a long time, it went into in 3 generations of Rover saloons but also the MGBGTV8, TRs, TVRs and I don’t know what else.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      And it’s still being built (in limited quantities) by MCT Group in Weston-super-Mare. The Rover-Buick V8 has quite an interesting family tree – it also spawned the Buick 300/340 small block V8s and the legendary 3800 V6 that survived through 2008.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      One of GM’s dumbest moves ever was dumping the Buick 215 aluminum V8. The Olds turbo version put out 215hp from 215ci. Think of all of the GM compact and mid-sized cars that could have been fitted with this motor well into the 70’s or 80’s with fine performance and meeting CAFE.

      I always thought a 215 into a Vega or Monza would be a neat swap.

  • avatar

    I have the intake manifold from one of these out on the shelf in the garage (actually, the earlier 3.9 version). I sorta have in mind to use it as the basis for a custom, big plenum manifold for a Ford 2.3T.

    What’s neat is that inside these manifolds are 8 steel inlet “trumpets” that are just pressed in place and pull out rather easily. It’s a wonder they don’t pop out on their own, but I guess nobody actually goes off-road with these things. I actually don’t plan to use them on the custom manifold – trying to come up with some alternate use for them though. :)

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’ll never forget when I saw Dumb & Dumber for the first time, and on the street in Aspen (in the scene where he’s on the payphone) was a RR limousine. I was amazed!

    These models are just so stately. I’d love to have one in pristine condition. I’d park it next to my ideal blue/tan woody Grand Wagoneer.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe McKinney

      Agreed. When I think of Range Rover, this is the one that comes to mind. A few years ago I saw one for sale that was an early U.S. import with the exposed front door hinges. I wouldn’t touch a high mileage 1980’s RR with a ten foot pole, but it is fun to imagine having one of these first-generation models.

    • 0 avatar

      In Aspen, Range Rovers are like Camrys. It sounds cliche but here’s my supporting evidence: the Land Rover dealer that services Aspen is located down the road in nearby Glenwood Springs, which has a population of 9,600. Meanwhile, three dealers service the entirety of the Denver/Boulder metro area, which have a combined population of 3 million.

      It is not possible to walk down a street in Aspen and not see at least one Range Rover.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Sounds like a bougie place.

      • 0 avatar
        Windy

        Another place where these are common is the Island of Nantucket.
        My Late mother bought a 1989 silver RR to be her last car when she moved there to live out her days.

        She drove it about 6,000 miles a year and I would guess that about 4000 of those were in low range on the very soft sand roads and beaches of the great point reserve( She did depend on the the help of the rangers to air down and refill her tires at their entry post for the last 4 or 5 years) but she used it as it was intended to be used and frequently would help clueless folks with rental 4X4s who were stuck.

        Several times a week she would drive out on the beaches and find a spot to herself and just watch and listen to the surf and birds she did this year round and in the spring through fall she would take her Garden Club friends out for picnic lunches and wild flower photography walks and the RR gave her very little trouble till she passed at 87 in 2004.

        the problems it had were 2 or 3 replacement windshields in the first winter when the temp was bellow freezing… the glass had embedded fine wires for defrosting and it would crack in the lower right corner when heated when OAT was in the 20s or less… but they were fixed under warranty .

        the other problem was in the power seat controls they failed in the late 90s and were a constant fixit item from then on. She was one how would change oil and filters every 3000 miles so spring and fall it would be done all by a local independent shop.

        She really loved her “little Elephant” as she called it and when I sold in at the start of 2005 I got almost $8000 for it which should tell you how well maintained it was… the folks that bought it still use it to tow their boat to new england lake vacations.

        I will grant you that when BMW took over and the feature bloat began with things like air suspension and the much bigger engines that they did become very expensive to maintain but the late 80s versions that began with Rover reentering the US market in 1988 were solid and quite simple work horse 4X4s that could take the harshest use.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Yes British cars are known for their electronic simplicity. ;)

          I enjoyed your story though!

          • 0 avatar
            Defender90

            Yes it’s the electrics that are the bad part. here in the UK I’d say it would be the V8 or auto gearbox that would cause problems, but I’m guessing that those two items are things US mechanics eat for breakfast.

        • 0 avatar

          I assume your mother had the requisite ACK sticker?

          • 0 avatar
            Windy

            Actually not rather than the ACK country oval she sported a set of the pass stickers for the the trustees of the nature reservation and rather than stick them on over the last years sticker she had them in a rather colorful array along the width of the bumper.

            In the 90s range rover brought the new model with the air suspension to the island for a photo shoot and she was put forward by the dealer that sold the RR as someone to show good photo spots in the reserve they got to the ranger gate and Mom did her letting the tires down to 11 to 12 lbs pressure and the RR crew were saying it was not needed with the power of the V8- and left the Photo cars at the standard 36 lbs…..

            In less than an hour she was pulling them out with her 100foot of 3/4 inch nylon snatch line….. They were very red faced but sand in that area is very soft and deep esp when you are not in others tracks in the off the beaten path photogenic areas. The standard RR tires when hard would dig the thing down to its frame rails in nothing flat.

            She got a lot of use out of that snatch line it worked like a rubber band and pulled out even larger trucks like suburbans….. Lots of folks would get stuck esp folks in rentals…. And some idiots would even try to drive cars on to the beaches having seen advertising photos of normal cars on beaches far harder than the ones on the island.

          • 0 avatar
            Power6

            The beach permit stickers are the best “OG ACK” indicator since it is too expensive for the casual traveler to purchase, though I really wanted to thrash around beaches with our Outback XT couldn’t justify the $200 worth of permits.

            I do not believe there is any brand dealer at all on the island, have to take the ferry to service the old RR? Holy crap though there is TONS of old money on that island, prime Land Rover territory.

          • 0 avatar
            Windy

            When I left the island for the last time in 04 the were down to just a Ford dealer. The Land rover dealer was a two bay gass station near the VFW hall and shut in the early 70s. In 1989 ther was a Gm Jeep VW dealer on the road to the Jetties beach but that shut in the 90s. So yes warranty work required a trip off island but ther was a very good independent repair shop out at the east end of the island that did mostly import repairs. To be fair the winter of 89/90 RR sent a man to the island for the replacement of the windshields. Which they said was aproblem with the heat treatment when they were cooled after being shaped. And the problem never came back.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      These trucks always remind me of the bad guys running around the airport in Die Hard II.

  • avatar
    StaysCrunchy

    A few years ago, we Americans were introduced to a certain British TV treasure called “Wheeler Dealers.” Sure, they make the occasional jab at “dodgy” American electronics (they’ve never heard of Lucas?) but I gotta say I still love those guys.

    What I always find curious is how it seems like every other episode they’re making over yet another Land Rover. I guess they must be viewed in a totally different light over there, because over here people practically give them away on Craigslist. Any day of the week I could have my pick of a dozen clean, late-model Land Rovers for about the price of a used Ford Focus. I’ve even thought about picking one up just because Mike and Edd love them so much, but I figure there must be a reason there’s always so many of them for sale and for so cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      photog02

      As an auto enthusiast, watching Wheeler Dealers gives me a sense of what watching Breaking Bad is like for meth enthusiasts. That being said, I don’t think it is too unusual to find cheap LRs/RRs in either the UK or the US. They are a bit rare in some areas, but they all seem to depreciate in free-fall mode (in contrast to higher quality vehicles like the Toyota Land Cruiser).

      • 0 avatar
        markholli

        “As an auto enthusiast, watching Wheeler Dealers gives me a sense of what watching Breaking Bad is like for meth enthusiasts.”

        +1000

        That show almost brings me to tears sometimes. It’s inspirational to see a these machines yanked back from the gates of automotive hell and given a new life.

        They make me fall in love with every car they have ever done…well almost (Saab 9-3 Convertible: no thanks). I invariably go online after watching and look for clean examples of the cars they restore.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Having had several friends who have owned early Range Rovers and Discoveries, as long as you are into DIY they are really not THAT bad to own. They need a LOT of maintenance, and the parts are not cheap, but they are not difficult to work on at all. But much as I like them, the problem is they are no better on the road than a 10yo Jeep Grand Cherokee, and any difference in off-road prowess is moot to me. And the Jeep is just as cheap to buy, and a fraction of the cost to maintain, while in I6 form getting MUCH better gas mileage. So I have an ’02 Jeep as a beater.

      But there is a possibility I will break down and buy a Land Rover someday, they really are just plain cool, as opposed to my ’02 Jeep which is just plain a Soccer Mom Wetdream. Will have to be old enough to be pre-air suspension if a Rangie, and if a Disco one of the rare 5spds.

      For certain though, the secret to Land Rover ownership at this point is don’t even THINK of buying just any example, you want one that has been loved, cherished, and has a stack of invoices with it.

      • 0 avatar
        corntrollio

        “Having had several friends who have owned early Range Rovers and Discoveries, as long as you are into DIY they are really not THAT bad to own. They need a LOT of maintenance, and the parts are not cheap, but they are not difficult to work on at all.”

        That’s my understanding too. Also, if you aren’t a DIYer, at least go to an indy instead of the stealership. When I looked at the price of OEM lower control arms online in Doug’s E63 thread, it was comparable to other European cars, and it was within $15 of a Honda Accord OEM lower control arm.

        The problem is that people who have no business buying them buy them and then complain afterwards. If you rarely change your oil, it’s not for you. If you can’t absorb a random $500 repair because you strained your budget to buy the car, it’s not for you.

        I see it as being like the ih8mud people who have Land Cruisers at 300K or the Volvo guys with their 240s. You have to do a little bit of work and spend a little bit more to keep it going, but they’ll keep running if you’re dedicated.

        In addition, a lot of people complaining about the reliability of Rovers are the same people who would dump a car after spending 4-figures repairing it while it’s underwater, so they roll their trade-in into the next loan, losing tons of money in the process. Probably cheaper for the dedicated Rover guy to keep the Rover than to do that crap.

        “For certain though, the secret to Land Rover ownership at this point is don’t even THINK of buying just any example, you want one that has been loved, cherished, and has a stack of invoices with it.”

        Agreed. I don’t own one, but if I did, you’re describing the one I’d buy.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Bingo on all points. And really, this is the issue with pretty much everyone who buys deeply depreciated luxury vehicles, no matter what the brand. Just because you paid $10K for a car that cost $75K new, doesn’t mean it will have the running costs of a $10K car that cost $20K new. If you can’t afford to fix it, you can’t afford it. And this idea that luxury cars should somehow be more reliable because they cost more new is simply laughable. What isn’t there can’t break, so a car that has everything an engineer can dream up and then some is going to have some issues in the long run. Even the much-vaunted Lexus LS has a laundry list of expensive dilemmas as they get old.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            The positive of people being scared off of used luxury vehicles is that it means better cars for me without buying them new.

            I could buy (or lease) new, but I’d rather buy a well-maintained, checked out by my guy, gently-used model and save the massive early depreciation and keep it for the longer term.

            In the extreme case (and I’m not this extreme), I knew a guy who bought an early 2000s mint S-class for under 6 grand in 2008 when car prices crashed due to lower auto-buying.

            At that price, he didn’t care if he had 3 grand in repairs the first year because he had the means to buy a new car if he wanted to and the car was such a steal. Hell, a 6 grand car would go on my credit card and be paid off in full at the end of the month, so I can get the points :p

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I agree, it is a great thing as long as you go in with eyes wide open as to the repair and maintenance costs. And LOL – sad thing is I have done exactly that on my CC to get the Frequent Flier miles.

            As I said on the Pope thread, if I had ANY need of a huge 4dr there would be a Phaeton in my garage. They are so crazy cheap who cares what the running costs are, it’s a plain-wrapper Bentley for the price of a Camry!

        • 0 avatar
          Defender90

          I concur wholeheartedly.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Matthew was an enthusiast.

    Matthew slogged through the slushy parking lot, dodging thick areas so as not to scoop up any into his nice shoes. The job interview had been more of the same. “We’ll definitely get back to you! Thanks!” Yeah right. He hopped up into his green sled. The suspension groaned while taking on his 150lb mass. Times were indeed rough. The job wasn’t even an attractive position, yet it prompted him to don the full suit and tie garb and make himself presentable and smiley. But his situation had grown desperate a long time ago. There would be no picking nits. He had seen the writing on the wall at his last job at the mortgage servicer last year, and started looking then. He sat there in the quiet cabin and felt small. He watched out the side as a man put in a half-hearted effort to clear the ice off his Camry’s windshield. Matthew fired up the Rover V8, smiled, and said to himself “sucker!”. At least there was something he could feel fortunate for. That thing was the windshield heater, now being called to duty. In moments, the meltwater was flowing…down the passenger side only. “Well that’s just great.”
    He got out and asked the nice Camry guy if he could borrow his scraper.

    “Range Rovers are good trucks!”, he would tell the naysayers. People appeared in pretty much every situation, bringing the reliability of the UK’s finest off-roader into question upon learning that Matt drove one. “I heard those are expensive to keep running.”, said Jessica. “Isn’t that getting hard to find parts for?”, said Mike. He was constantly defending the faith from the annoying horde, usually saying something like “If you’re the type of person who doesn’t know you are supposed to perform maintenance on your water heater, then you’re going to have a bad time with them.” It was one of his favorite lines. The person he was talking to would inevitably turn concerned at the realization that they were not aware that water heaters required frequent draining to stave off corrosion. Matthew was correct, Land Rovers were not for them, they were for godly individuals with foresight and smarts. They usually kept their mouths shut after that one.

    That’s not to say the green beast didn’t challenge Matthew’s mettle. A transmission here, 5 brake jobs there, as well as a spectacular alternator failure made it hardly a ride for the novice. It never left him stranded, but it sure was expensive. Those days of farting out cash were gone now though. Matt had turned into THAT GUY.

    He arrived early for his appointment, and powered the seat back to try to relax for the interview. Fifteen minutes of relaxing smooth jazz through the stereo, and it was time. He hit the switch to bring the seat back up, and the command was refused. Then Matt tried the standard switch fixing solution of working the control back and forth. This only resulted in the seat reclining further into the ghetto setting. “Fantastic!!”

    Matt entered the King Soopers, and gave the most frustrated interview performance of his job applying career. Though he didn’t know it, it helped his chances. The manager had seen a slew of grinning, hollow candidates. Matt stood out as a serious go-getter, someone good for the company.

    The door of the Range was violently slammed as an enraged Matt hopped into the disabled seat after a vain attempt to use his key fob. He drove home, eager to toss back some Coors Lights and put an end to this day. There were lights of a different sort on his mind as well, however. One was the forever illuminated ABS, now accompanied by the one signalling hunger for premium. He wanted to spit his gum out the window, but remembered the regulator had bit the dust long ago. This truck was dying a death of a thousand cuts. He was done.

    Attempts to sell or trade the Rover on Craigslist failed. It seemed there was little market for a completely serviceable Range Rover with 500 annoying problems at a price point just above what the junkyard would pay. He passed a small used car lot. The glint of a jade Outback Sport caught his eye. A u-turn was performed. He sat there in the grey, plasticky interior and admired the luxury of working windows and the like. After signing some papers, he stopped at the bay door and paid his respects while a displeased mechanic crawled under the dash.

    “It’s been real, old friend.”, he thought as he began to answer his phone.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Considering the age of these things, you’d think if you found a maintained one, that all the bugs would’ve been worked out in 18+ years (since 95 was the last year for this model), but no! They just manage to be an endless money pit.

    Most of this gen that I’ve seen have a crooked dash as well.

  • avatar
    korvetkeith

    I hate myself enough to think about making one of these my second British vehicle. I saw one at the offroad park on 35″ super swampers that was freaking sweet.

    • 0 avatar
      Defender90

      That’ll bust the axle shafts… probably will make the propeller shafts go in doubble quick time too.
      If it’s a proper suspension lift with all that entails ($$$!) then I’m wrong but even over here in the UK you see halfwits who just wack a set of huge mud tyres, springs and dampers on ‘em then wonder complain it drives shite and breaks all the time. “Nah those things are crap mate. I know” And i just raise my eyebrows and think “No you don’t window licker”.
      BFG A/T 235 and a 2″ lift is as large as l’ve gone.

  • avatar

    This one looks to have a new alternator – I can’t imagine that stayed there very long given how easy it looks to come out.

  • avatar
    gasser

    These trucks are supposedly so rugged that in other trims they are used in the wilds of Africa. I spent 3 weeks in Botswana and South Africa on photographic safari a few years back. I did not see a single Range Rover or Land Rover.
    Not one!! Plenty of Toyota Land Cruisers and some diesel Hyundais not sold here. To me the greatest luxury of a luxury car is that it runs.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      Land Rover Discoveries are definitely used on safari in Kenya or at least were a few years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      An ex-colleague of mine was actually born in the Congo in the mid-80s when his religious family was there as part of doctors without borders (or something to this effect). He explained car wise Toyota was pretty much king in Africa, not only because of perceived reliability/toughness etc but more so it because it was the “standard” brand and thus everyone always carried sufficient parts supplies from the cities to out in bush country.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    I’ve seen several Top Gear UK shows where they praised the new Range Rovers, and they’re not usually handing out praise unless it’s a super car that costs more than I’ll make in 10 years. So maybe the new ones are better. I’ve never had any luck buying any car used so I’ll take your word for it that the old ones were money pits.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Top Gear UK praises by rote anything British-made, except for obscure cottage industry makes that no one has ever heard of. Then they go to town.

  • avatar
    MarkP

    Yeah, the British car guys at Top Gear and Wheeler Dealers are cute when they start talking about how wonderful European cars are compared to American cars, assuming they include Britain in Europe. I, too, have heard snide comments about how dodgy American electronics are. I nearly spit my liver out on that one. I had no idea the British could be so ironic with a straight face. And, of course, all the classic British makes are now owned by other-than-British companies.

    But Wheeler Dealers did a TR-6 that I would have loved to have. Yes. Loved.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Nice looking vehicle but not for me. I had a British Raleigh Sportsman Bicycle in college that I had to constantly tinker with just to be able to ride it. Adjust the gears, tune the spokes, bent tire rims, and etc. The leather seat was hard as a rock and the Wentworth wrench and tire pump that came with the bicycle were well used. Finally junked the bike and now have an aluminum framed mountain bike made in China. My brother had a Norton Commander motorcyle in the 70s and loved it but it required constant maintenance. My brother-in-law use to collect MGs and Triumphs and restored many but before he retired he sold them because he got tired of tinkering with them every time he wanted to drive it.

  • avatar
    2012JKU

    No doubt it had a catastrophically expensive repair and the last owner opted to send it to the junk yard rather than fix it. Generally SUVs go the distance when they get older more so than a car but not a Land Rover. The depreciation on them is huge and out of warranty they are a definite no-no. A 1980s Hyundai Excel would probably be just about as reliable and equally worthless.

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    I’m surprised to see the radio is still there!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If this were an old Toyota Landcruiser it would probably still be on the road. My brother-in-law has a 1987 Toyota Landcruiser that he has had since new with very few issues. It has a straight 6 with a manual transmission. I would much rather have Asian than European and the US vehicles are much more reliable than the British. Lucas electrics, need I say anymore.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Like a siren, cursed entity British Leyland beckons your wallet from the grave…

  • avatar
    Ron B.

    lots of haters on here but not too many former owners I think. Range rovers in their first iteration are fantastic cars. It was only when they discovered that the hooray henrys et al found them to be fashionable that the overblown interiors and so on were added,then copied by other 4×4 manufacturers . Compare an early range rover with a jeep of the same era. …
    Toyota might be popular but they are not without their faults either and I live in a country which is one their biggest 4×4 customers so I have heard all the complaints about excessive gouging on parts prices and vehicles crapping out in the bush dues to design faults. With any vehicle it’s all about how you look after it. No maintenance becomes expensive after a while which is what kills a lot of Luxury vehicles after they change hands from the lease company to the 2nd,3rd or 4th owner.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Dad had a 75, bought used somewhere in the 80’s. I remember some of its faults:

      1) Overheating, solved with new radiator core and aux fan. Never again.
      2) Points. Those bloody points. Sorted with a swap to Motorcraft ignition. 3rd world improvisation FTW
      3) Noisy central shock absorber, too expensive to fix and not screwing safety. Don’t fix what ain’t really broke.
      4) Door locks, inherited non working from previous owners. All the inner rods in the doors needed replacement. Never again.

      Other than that and a Lucas gauge (they were cool) that went bad and was replaced, I don’t remember anything else. His commute was around 200 kms and IIRC he used the truck for 3 years for that. Even back then, being stranded wasn’t much of an option in Vzla.

      Car had great suspension for being a 4×4. Either Jeep or Toyota back then would have crushed your kidneys and back with their leaf spring suspensions.

      The Rangie was also very comfortable and had great visibility. And looked great with those hood mounted mirrors.

      I can’t see the hate either.

      • 0 avatar
        Defender90

        I had one of those, that 2 door design was great although that miitary 4 speed gear box was… well, suitable for British soldiers. Very tough though. But an excellent vehicle if you had forearms like Popeye.

        Mine unfortunately had a Ford straight six diesel transplant, anmd it was the worst diesel in engine (cue Clarkson voice) IN THE WORLD. No really it was f*cking awful, it was like it had been designed by Russion communists. Just thinking of it still reduces me to tears.

  • avatar
    Robert Gordon

    “You’ll want to ditch the Lucas fuel-injection system, of course, but that sort of goes without saying.”

    The Fuel injection on a Rangie, is Bosch L-Jetronic.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Range Rover in 1970 was the new gem for the British snotty-ho horsy crowd. Who wanted more comfort & class to hitch a horse box than an army or farmers Land Rover. Today Range Rover is Michael Jackson’s fashion glove up & down the States.

    • 0 avatar
      Defender90

      Many horsey types would have liked a R-R back then but:
      a) They were expensive to buy.
      b) They drank petrol at a huge rate in the middle of a fuel crisis.
      c) You could pull a two horse double axle Rice trailer with a 1.8 litre front wheel drive and spend the savings on more horses! So they did.

  • avatar
    aeberhar

    Even if you hate Subarus (the stated alternative here), I’ll never understand why people buy these cars. Murphy Brown said it best: why don’t you just buy a Ford Explorer and strap $30k to the hood?

  • avatar
    downforce

    Hi – which breakers yard is this ?

    I need some of those bits for my classic range rover !


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