By on February 11, 2013

Good news, Aussie car fans. The Commodore lives. But the evidence keeps piling up that the next one will be a front-drive car bearing little to no resemblance to the current RWD muscle car.

The Australian, reporting on the VF Commodore launch event, says that we’ve got about three more years to enjoy the current rear-drive car.

After the speech, Devereux told the frazzled media scrum: “This [Commodore] will run through to the end of 2016. After that time we are going to be putting two global architectures into the [Adelaide] plant, one of them will underpin the next Commodore.”

To make sure he wasn’t misunderstood, Devereux repeated: “There is another Commodore coming after this one. We’re going to build it in Adelaide on a [global] architecture.”

The Australian reports that the next Commodore will be a Toyota Camry sized vehicle that will be sold as a Buick in other markets. That jibes with previous reports of a global, front-drive architecture coming to replace the rear-drive one. At best, we may see some kind of Alpha platform vehicle utilized in the future, but the front-drive Commodore is going to happen. Australia’s automotive tastes have turned upside down over the past five years, and the Commodore’s popularity with the buying public isn’t nearly what it used to be.

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74 Comments on “Holden Boss Spills The Beans On New Commodore...”


  • avatar
    Muttley Alfa Barker

    The Aussie market’s new car market has f***ed itself due to the recession (which means less RWD sedans sold per MY). Sigh.

    • 0 avatar
      Ooshley

      The Aussie economy is healthy by world standards, not that the competition is all that fierce atm, and non-luxury large car sales began their free-fall long before the GFC hit.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      Australia never technically went into recession, they’ve basically sat out the whole global financial crisis comparatively unscathed. What’s hurting them are an opening up of the car market to imports, a high cost of business that makes domestic manufacturing expensive, and high fuel prices that are driving people to smaller cars.

      That, plus weak exports; caused, in combination, by lack of sufficient overseas demand, high costs, smallish production capacity, and a high dollar.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @ranwhenparked
        “That, plus weak exports; caused, in combination, by lack of sufficient overseas demand, high costs, smallish production capacity, and a HIGH DOLLAR.”

        All problems very much magnified by the High Dollar. Dutch Elm disease as it has been called elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        grinchsmate

        Rob
        Just Dutch disease mate.
        Dutch elm disease is a fungal infection which as the name suggests affects elm trees, not economies.

        Also settle down a bit this isn’t a youtube comments section.

  • avatar
    ...m...

    …couldn’t the next-generation commodore share platforms with the camaro?..

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The Australian and the news.com.au websites are related. (They’re both owned by News Corporation, aka Murdoch.) For what it’s worth, I glanced quickly at one of the Fairfax websites (Murdoch’s main print media rival in Australia) and didn’t see any confirmation.

    Some sort of change does make sense, though. Nobody’s buying these things anymore. The alternative to turning it into a low-volume global BMW fighter is to use it to keep the mission as an Aussie family car. And FWD makes a lot more sense for that application.

    • 0 avatar

      PCH, what do you think of the odds of a premium Holden product based off of Alpha just to keep the rwd die-hards happy?

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        I can’t comment on what motivates GM internal politics and how those may be driving their decision making. But I do know that:

        -GM is attempting to create more world cars (this is a significant departure in strategy from the old GM)

        -It makes no sense whatsoever to export large numbers of cars from Australia

        -There is still a market in Australia for family cars…

        -…but the Commodore is no longer suitable for that purpose.

        Perhaps they’ll start building the Holden version of the Malibu there. And if they do, then you know what that means…

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        @PCH and others…Holden Malibu is scheduled to debut Q2 of this year in Australia…spreading the Malibu into another of its supposed 100 markets.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “premium Holden product based off of Alpha just to keep the rwd die-hards happy”

        I was thinking the same thing since it appears the number of vehicles sharing the Alpha structure will be expanding. There’s still a market for these types of cars, just not in the volume there once was.

        Aussification costs should be minimal as there are RHD Alpha vehicles in the works for other markets. Perhaps this is a “global” platform being considered.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      How much do you imagine it takes to build an automotive platform from the ground up?

      The reason I ask is it sounds like GM/Holden is going to be investing quite a bit into developing a new front drive platform, axing an existing one in three years which could stay re-purposed for export, while the Holden brand seems to slowly become irrelevant in Australia. Seems like a case of good money after bad, can the Holden brand even survive till the next decade?

      • 0 avatar

        Zeta will be a decade old at least by then, and the new platform will probably be another Epsilon variant

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Thanks for the input, Derek. I will never quite understand the obsession with platform replacement, feels very much like planned obsolescence. Sure when the sales dry up it doesn’t make sense to run a line at a loss, but there is (or at least used to be) a market for high quality long lasting cars

        The Volvo 200 series ran from 1974-1993 and is considered by some to be one of the most reliable and finest built automobiles of all time.

        Sure both were/are tired and dated, but Panther/W-body love may not be widespread but it exists for a reason. New is not always better.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Yes the Commodore was the best selling vehicle in Australia 2-3 yrs ago. The High Australian dollar makes Asian sourced cars very cheap indeed. Instead of taking up small Asian/Euro sourced Minicars. Australians are buying enormous numbers of SUV’s followed by Pickups. SUV’s now make over 30% of the market.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Sounds like the US about ten years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      Pch101,

      I was at the press launch and don’t believe he said exactly what was written by ‘The Australian’ journalist.

      What he said in his flamboyant style as the very last line in his speech was:

      I can confirm that we’ve started work on the Commodore coming after this one. Which is going to built in Adelaide.

      That may be splitting hairs but importantly he didn’t mention what would be the basis of it. The first paragraph I don’t remember at all but, that may have come from the break-out interviews afterwards.

      For what it is worth I think it will be based on the FWD platform, but Devereaux was quite measured in what he said and certainly didn’t confirm it.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        FWD in larger sedans is a dead loss in Australia. One of the problems of the Camry and it’s cousin the Aurion, was Australians do not like FWD midsizers, they would rather by SUV’s or Pickups. FWD in Minicars is OK though.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “I was at the press launch and don’t believe he said exactly what was written by ‘The Australian’ journalist.”

        News Corp isn’t claiming that Devereaux announced that the next Commodore will be FWD. Rather, they’re claiming that they have an unnamed source or sources who are making that claim. From The Australian article:
        ___________

        Devereux’s comments were likely designed to reverse the perception that the 2013 Commodore is the last – after he told journalists in Detroit the Commodore would be phased out in 2016.

        But the reality is that what Devereux has called “the next Commodore” will not be a Commodore as Australians have grown to know it over the past 35 years, 15 of them as the nation’s top-seller.

        News Limited understands the second vehicle to be built alongside the Cruze will be a front-drive car, similar in size to the Toyota Camry and to be sold in other countries as a Buick.
        ___________

        Reading between the lines, that makes it sound as if the next Commodore might be a variant of the Buick Regal, which itself is derived from the Opel Insignia. All of these use the same platform as the Malibu, which will also be sold in Australia.

        Perhaps they could build the Holden versions of the Cruze and Malibu, plus the Commodore, in Australia and make it viable. Two platforms, three cars, designed to use global platforms.

  • avatar
    Dirk Stigler

    What’s most interesting to me about this car is the redesign of an existing model (compare the greenhouse and hood cutlines to the G8) with an all-new interior and updated front/rear bodywork, following the strategy of the last-generation Ford Focus and Fusion. It’s the clearest sign that the rear-drive Commodore is on its way out – this product is meant to keep the existing car competitive in showrooms until the next iteration of the Impala/XTS platform comes along to replace all three models.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      @Dirk

      The green house is the same. The doors, handles (shape/style – they are modified), glass and roof line are identical from the VE on the VF. So sayeth GM.

      As a matter of fact, the only thing carried over from the VE is basically the greenhouse!

      http://www.caradvice.com.au/212818/holden-vf-commodore-exterior-design-overview/

      …The only common parts the VF Commodore shares with the outgoing VE are the door skins, roof and window glass, although Ferlazzo adds that “we did need to modify the doors with new passive-entry door handles, but the form shape is the same…”

  • avatar
    Jim Fekete

    Don’t you find it hard to believe that GM’s last remaining RWD sedan platform will not find its way out of North America?

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    *SOB*

    The spiritual successor of the VXR8, the HSV, the G8 GXP, Lumina SS, and Caprice SS (depending on market) is going to be a Buick badged FWD Camry wanna be?!?

    *SOB* *SOB* *SOB* *SOB* *SOB* *SOB* *SOB*

    Will there be a UTE Maloo version too? ;-)~

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @28 Cars Later said
    “Sounds like the US about ten years ago.”
    Very much so and there is not sign of it slowing down.A record number of vehicles were sold this year.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      What do you attribute it toward? The western Australian mining boom?

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @28-Cars-Later
        “What do you attribute it toward? The western Australian mining boom?”

        Nothing to do with any Mining Boom. Australian have found that Asian sourced Pickups are more civilized and capable than they ever were. SUV’s have the same “safety” image they do in the US, although they are more unstable going around corners. Car/utes do not have 4X4 but can be more useful than a Asian sourced Pickup in Cities and some country areas Many Tradesmen I have talked too would like Ford to re-introduce the RTV version of the Falcon ute. It has the higher safety value of the Falcon handles and rides like a car, but has a 2,700lb payload and with a locked diff and raised body is no slouch off road.. There is no equivalent of the Maloo with Pickups.
        The MAIN ADVANTAGE of ASIAN SOURCED PICKUPS? They are a whole lot cheaper than the Falcon/ Commodore Utes.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        As recently as 1987, the Australian import tariff on cars was 57.5%. It was gradually decreased from 45% to 25% between 1988 and 1996.

        But in 2000, the tariff was lowered to 15%, then was cut again to 10%, and since 2010 has been 5%. And vehicles sourced from Thailand, such as the Toyota Hilux, have no tariff due to the FTA.

        Removing the barriers has had a tremendous impact on Australian car buying. Prices are still fairly high, but the market has become far more competitive for imported vehicles than it was not long ago. Of course, this comes at a price to Holden and Ford, which had based their business models on the continued existence of what was a defacto government-sponsored duopoly. The Falcon and Commodore could succeed when there wasn’t much else to buy.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        Worth noting too that Australia has a free-trade agreement with Thailand which is where the majority of the pick-ups come from. However pick-ups are not necessarily cheap.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Pch101
    “. Of course, this comes at a price to Holden and Ford, which had based their business models on the continued existence of what was a defacto government-sponsored duopoly. The Falcon and Commodore could succeed when there wasn’t much else to buy”

    Not really at all. There have been more models available than you can get in the US, BEFORE tariffs of any sort were dropped.

    I would like to see the US market as free as the Australian one. It would be very INTERESTING indeed if that was to happen but not likely.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “I would like to see the US market as free as the Australian one”

      You display a consistent inability to process factual information that is somewhat disconcerting.

      Still, I’m somewhat curious to know exactly what it is that you don’t like about the US car market. Is it our lower tariff (yes, 2.5% is lower than 5%, really it is), or is it the substantially lower prices that we get to pay?

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Psch101
    “You display a consistent inability to process factual information that is somewhat disconcerting.”

    Well you beat me to it. I was going to say the same about you. I hope you can read and understand posts. I said there are MORE MODELS and Makes available in Australia than in the US. I wish the US market was as free as far as lack of market restrictions as Australia. Instead of being a rather restricted market.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Argh. The US market is not particularly restrictive. But it is extremely price competitive.

      The reality is the opposite of what you believe it to be. Doing business in the US is so attractive to automakers that they’ll engage in substantial price competition for the privilege of being here. (Note how VW and Hyundai are falling all over themselves to expand here.) A large market such as this one demands and rewards scale.

      But that means that the marginal players and many of the low-volume niche import models don’t come here, since they can’t sell at prices that are high enough to turn a profit. In Australia, everyone gets a fair shot at overcharging the Australian consumer.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        It’s an attractive and price-competitive market but still restrictive due to a multitude of US-specific regulations and certification requirements.

        Those three terms are not mutually exclusive.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Everyone else is free to copy US restrictions if they wish. The US certainly isn’t stopping them.

        Every nation in the developed world has restrictions. The US is not unique in having regulations, so there is no reason to particularly single out the US as if it’s unusual to have laws.

        We do have stricter emissions regulations than the EU, and I, for one, am thankful that we do, since I breathe the air here.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      @Robert Ryan

      “I said there are MORE MODELS and Makes available in Australia than in the US. ”

      I have heard that stat from a few different sources and it didn’t ring true to me. I have since investigated it and found that the US market actually has more brands available than Australia – the UK market has many more again, and I would hazard a guess that it is the world’s most open.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Robert.Gordon said:
        “I have heard that stat from a few different sources and it didn’t ring true to me. I have since investigated it and found that the US market actually has more brands available than Australia – the UK market has many more again, and I would hazard a guess that it is the world’s most open”

        Slight problem here did you mean the UK Market is the most open? or the US? The UK is part of the EU and can import EU and global brands like we can.. Robert can you site your source for US brands and makes and what website did you look at to see what Australia had?.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        @Robert Ryan

        UK certainly has more brands available than the US – no question about it. I meant it as a counterpoint to the unsubstantiated statistic that Australia purportedly has the most brands.

        In terms of sources for US vehicles I used a car sales site Edmunds for my initial list – I then searched a list of Automotive brands of the US which yielded some more – cross checking of course that they were actually extant and selling cars. I used Autocar for the UK market and a cross check of a list of UK manufacturers. I then searched to see if any of the UK brands sold car in Australia.

        Admittedly this did throw up some quite obscure makes, but I took the obscure brands for all markets. I didn’t include trucks.

        For the Aussie market I have access to detailed sales data from Polk and Glass’ as part of my job so I am fairly confident with that. Perhaps the best thing is for me to list them and see if you disagree?

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        USA (64 Brands)

        AC Propulsion, Acura, Alfa Romeo, Aston Martin, Audi, Bentley, BMW, Bugatti, Buick, Cadillac, Callaway, Carroll Shelby International, Caterham, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Coda, Dodge, Ferrari, Fiat, Fisker, Ford, Global Electric Motorcars, GMC, Honda, Hyundai, Infiniti, International, Jaguar, Jeep, Kia, Lamborghini, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Lotus, Maserati, McLaren, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mini, Mitsubishi, Morgan, Mosler, Nissan, Panoz, Porsche, Ram, Range Rover, Rolls Royce, Saab, Saleen, Scion, smart, Spyker, SRT, SSC, Subaru, Suzuki, Tesla, Toyota, Volkswagen, Volvo, Westfield, Zimmer.

        Australia (58 Brands)

        Abarth, Alfa Romeo, Aston Martin, Audi, Bentley, Blade, BMW, Caterham, Chery, Chrysler, Citroen, Dodge, Elfin, Ferrari, Fiat, Ford, FPV, Great Wall, HDT, Holden, Honda, HSV, Hyundai, Infiniti, Isuzu Ute, Jaguar, Jeep, Kia, Lamborghini, Land Rover, Lexus, Lotus, Mahindra, Maserati, Mazda, McLaren, Mercedes-Benz, MINI, Mitsubishi, Morgan, Nissan, Opel, Peugeot, Porsche, Proton, Range Rover, Renault, Rolls-Royce, Skoda, Smart, Ssangyong, Subaru, Suzuki, Tesla, Toyota, Volkswagen, Volvo Car, Westfield

        UK (80 Brands)

        Abarth, AC, Alfa Romeo, Alpina, Ariel, Ascari, Aston Martin, Audi, BAC, Bentley, BMW, Bristol, Brooke, Bugatti, Caddy, Caparo, Caterham, Chevy, Chrysler, Citroen, Connaught, Dacia, Daihatsu, Ferrari, Fiat, Fisker, Ford, Ginetta, Great Wall, Grinnall, Gumpert, Honda, Hyundai, Infiniti, Invicta, Isuzu, Jaguar, Jeep, Kia, Konnigssegg, KTM, Lamborghini, Land Rover, Lexus, Locost, Lotus, Maserati, Mazda, McLaren, Mercedes-Benz, MG, MINI, Mitsubishi, MK Sportscars, Morgan, Nissan, Noble, Pagani, Peel, Perodua, Peugeot, Porsche, Proton, Radical, Range Rover, Renault, Rolls-Royce, Seat, Skoda, Smart, Ssangyong, Subaru, Suzuki, Tesla, Toyota, Ultima, Vauxhall, Volkswagen, Volvo Car, Westfield.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Pch101
    “Argh. The US market is not particularly restrictive. But it is extremely price competitive.”

    Strange ,Australia has many more entries into the market setting up distribution networks and becoming quickly competitive.

    ” Doing business in the US is so attractive to automakers that they’ll engage in substantial price competition for the privilege of being here. ”

    Contradiction in terms. It is so attractive they do not bother entering the market but enter the much smaller Australian one and are happy? Something does not add up.If what you said was correct you WOULD have many entering the US market.

    ” In Australia, everyone gets a fair shot at overcharging the Australian consumer”
    US manufacturers are charging a fortune for new Pickups knowing they will be making handsome profits?

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “It is so attractive they do not bother entering the market but enter the much smaller Australian one and are happy?”

      I’ve already explained it to you, more than once. Since you don’t understand the explanation and seem to be incapable of understanding it, there’s no point in explaining it again.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Pch101
        “I’ve already explained it to you, more than once. Since you don’t understand the explanation and seem to be incapable of understanding it, there’s no point in explaining it again.”

        Your price sensitive excuse defies logic.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        It really should be obvious that it’s becomes easier for a company to turn a profit if it is able to get away with selling the same goods for more money. Is that concept so difficult to understand?

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @th009 said:It’s an attractive and price-competitive market but still restrictive due to a multitude of US-specific regulations and certification requirements.

    Those three terms are not mutually exclusive.”

    Thankyou for that. Yes those are the sort of restrictions I have been referring too not simply a price sensitive entry into the market.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Pach101
    “Everyone else is free to copy US restrictions if they wish. The US certainly isn’t stopping them”

    Well it appears a lot of Nations are dropping those restrictions except the US.

    “We do have stricter emissions regulations than the EU, and I, for one, am thankful that we do, since I breathe the air here.”

    You certainly do not . The most polluted Cities in the World are in the US. “Fresh Air” No.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “The most polluted Cities in the World are in the US.”

      This is very strange. It’s as if you’re committed to making at least one factual error in every post.

      http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2013/01/daily-chart-11

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      “The most polluted Cities(sic) in the World are in the US.” That’s hilarious. Have you heard of China? Russia? India? Africa? Zero of the ten most polluted cities in the world are in North America, let alone the USA.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @CJinSD said
    “Zero of the ten most polluted cities in the world are in North America, let alone the USA.”

    13th is Bakersfield. From what I can gather and having been to Bakersfield, best know for a known defunct dragstrip. it is in California which just happens to be in the USA.Montreal in Canada is up there as well.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      You stated that the most polluted cities in the world are in the US. Most people would read this statement and conclude that the most polluted city is in the US and a number of the next few are there as well. Having number 13 on the list does not define the US as having the most polluted cities in the world for anyone concerned with telling the truth. That you think, or at least thought, the most polluted cities in the world reveals that you’re willing to make sweeping statements based on knowledge you don’t possess.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Pch101
    “This is very strange. It’s as if you’re committed to making at least one factual error in every post.”

    Correct and that is what you have done with that graph. Los Anglese or more specifically the sub city of Bakersfield is 13th.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Okay.. Robert Ryan, the troll contest was last week. It’s a rare moment I agree with CJinSD. Montreal polluted? California? these places have some of the toughest air pollution laws in the world.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @mikey
    Have a look at the Graph of the most polluted cities in the world posted by@Pch 101.It shows Bakersfield 13th and Montreal up there as well. He posted the graph not me.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @mikey,
    This is the graph posted by @Pch101
    http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2013/01/daily-chart-11

    Bakersfield is 13th, Montreal 14th.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @ RobertRyan…I’ve been a reader here for a long time. Sunridge,pch, CJ are folks I don’t always agree with. However I don’t question thier credibility.

    In keeping with the rules here at TTAC,I’m going to leave it at that.

    Have a nice day.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @mikey not questioning their credibility, but information they @Pch101 posted in the graph.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Pch101
    In Response too:
    ” Have you heard of China? Russia? India? Africa? Zero of the ten most polluted cities in the world are in North America, let alone the USA.”
    yes there are heavily polluted cities in NA , now back to the topic of the Commodore that is produced in Australia.

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    I guess a lot of this depends on how popular the Chevrolet SS and Caprice prove in the US. If GM wants to keep on selling, say, the Camaro, they’re going to need to keep a low cost RWD platform in the mix somewhere, and if the Caprice is a hit with law enforcement and the SS does well with consumers, there could wind up being enough American demand alone to justify keeping the RWD sedans around.

    How well has the Buick Park Avenue been doing in China? That’s another factor to consider. The next Commodore could even be done with CKDs imported from China, that would bring the cost down.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @ranwhenparked
      “How well has the Buick Park Avenue been doing in China?” from memory they only recently stop sending kits to China from Holden. It has been a getting a bit long in the tooth and the bulk of Chinese GM car sales are divided between SAIC and the small Opels”Buick’ in China

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Camaro is already slated to go to the Alpha platform. Zeta is too big for the Camaro anyone (common complaint). The engineers cut it down to about 7/8 the size of a Commodore/G8 but some of the limitations of the chassis is why the Camaro is the way the Camaro is.

      For example, even though the Camaro is Canadian built go check where the battery is in the trunk. Yup, driver side – right where it is in Australia on their Zeta products. Too much work for a broke GM to relocate everything to put it on the proper side to counter balance the weight of the driver (as in Australia).

      If you open the engine bay of a Pontiac G8 GT and a Camaro side by side you see a TON of common pieces, plumbing, and parts.

      But for the Camaro – it’s going Alpha

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @grinchsmate said:
    “Rob
    Just Dutch disease mate.
    Dutch elm disease is a fungal infection which as the name suggests affects elm trees, not economies.

    Also settle down a bit this isn’t a youtube comments section.”

    I heard it referred too as “Economic Dutch Elm Disease ” in Australia as the high dollar strangles the rest of the economy like the fungal infection.OK “Dutch Disease” refers to the country so i will refer to it as that.
    I get on with the bulk of the people here who contribute a lot to the threads on this Blog. This one poster has annoyed not only me but Big Al from OZ who is pretty placid on the PUTC forums and Bertil from here.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Robert. Gordon said

    “UK certainly has more brands available than the US – no question about it. I meant it as a counterpoint to the unsubstantiated statistic that Australia purportedly has the most brands.”

    I find that statistic pretty amazing in itself in a good way. The UK has 55-60 million but can support 80 brands. The US has slightly over 300 million and only 64? Thanks for the diligent research.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Robert.Gordon,
      If you take standalone “tuners” out of the US Listing.Carroll Shelby International, , Coda, Global Electric Motorcars , SRT, SSC
      Callaway, Saleen, Zimmer. You get roughly 56 makers. You could add conservatively 10 “tuners” to the Australian listing making roughly 68 “makes” I would add AMG for Mercedes Australia(Tuner? Standalone?), Smart, . When expanding the listing to common commercial vehicles then the numbers explode here.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        I don’t follow that logic.

        1. Carroll Shelby International, Coda, Global Electric Motorcars , SSC
        Saleen, Zimmer are all manufacturers of sandalone models, not simply tuned stock vehicles from another manufacturer.

        2. If we’re going to remove the likes of Calloway and SRT then we have to do the same to HSV, and FPV (actually FPV are defunct, so I should delete them anyway) Abarth and HDT.

        3. AMG is more a provider of accessories than it is a tuner. Smart is most definately a standalone brand. It is to MB as MINI is to BMW.

        I do agree that for the size of market Australia has a very large choice – but that is kind of irrelevant anyway. what matters to a consumer is how many choices they as an individual are presented with.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Robert.Gordon said:
    “. Carroll Shelby International, Coda, Global Electric Motorcars , SSC
    Saleen, Zimmer are all manufacturers of sandalone models, not simply tuned stock vehicles from another manufacturer.”

    Yes You have makers of boutique cars, Electric Golf Carts, CODA an EV, SSC and Zimmer.
    Still they are far from mainstream. In that case you can add 35 Boutique makers to the Australian list plus two or three EV’s as well.

    “If we’re going to remove the likes of Calloway and SRT then we have to do the same to HSV, and FPV (actually FPV are defunct, so I should delete them anyway) Abarth and HDT.”

    Yes ,by the way FPV is not defunct but alive and well. http://fpv.com.au/

    I could have added at least 10 more similar to FPV and HSV. they are the “tuners”

    “I do agree that for the size of market Australia has a very large choice – but that is kind of irrelevant anyway. what matters to a consumer is how many choices they as an individual are presented with”

    Well the market is actually booming. The Australian car market is on another record for 2013. All sorts of cars are being bought with a huge rise so far in SUV’s and to a lesser extent Pickups. Luxury and Large SUV’s have been doing very well .Surprisingly Luxury cars as well.


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