By on December 17, 2012

If you need proof that Lincoln really is down right now, here it is: they must be down, because Edmunds is kicking them. The same blog that tossed the Volt’s salad with an enthusiasm worthy of Tom Colicchio has placed its newest MKZ tester into the stocks for a bit of the ol’ public shaming. At the crux of the issue: the disgusting fact that, when fitted with the same tires found on the BMW M5, the Lincoln MKZ outperforms it in the Edmunds slalom test.

Just kidding. There’s more to it than that. Or is there?

The article, titled “This Car Won’t Save Lincoln”, starts off with a Farago-esque broadside:

There are four things on the 2013 Lincoln MKZ that are undeniably best in class — four things that will blindside Lincoln’s rivals, and shock and awe its customers.

Those four things are its tires. The rest of the new MKZ is wanting, disappointing and generally undesirable.

Apparently, West Coast press-fleet MKZs are fitted with the Michelin Pilot Super Sport which, according to the Lincoln PR person contacted by Edmunds, is only “85 percent certain” to be offered in production. This tire, according to Edmunds, is the standard-equipment tire on the BMW M5. When equipped with that tire, the MKZ was faster through the slalom than the aforementioned M5, and one mile per hour slower than the Porsche 911.

As a racer, I respect the hell out of that. If you can beat the M5 on equal tires, when your car wasn’t engineered for those tires, that’s doing something. It speaks volumes about Ford’s ability to deliver the “European experience” for which the color rags have been screaming since time immemorial. Nice job, guys.

As a journalist, however, I’m a little concerned about the behavior displayed by both Ford and Edmunds here. Let’s start with the Blue Oval. This tire-swapping stunt isn’t even close to, say, Pontiac’s decision to drop a tuned-up 421 into the 1964 GTO tested by Car and Driver. To begin with, it was prima facie obvious — enough for the Edmunds editors to notice. I’m pretty sure the “stock” cars used by GM for all of their Burgerkingring taxpayer trackdays are a lot farther away from showroom configuration than this re-shod sedan was. With that said, the plain fact is that until the day that Lincoln customers can order their MKZs with Michelin Super Sports, they should be left off the press cars. Playing it any other way is an ethical grey area at best and customer deception at worst.

Now for Edmunds. Their review closes with this rather damning summation:

Basically, the MKZ just doesn’t feel special. And that’s the kiss of death in this hyper-competitive market, which is filled with sedans that do feel special. And make no mistake, every other manufacturer that makes an entry-luxury sedan — from Acura to Volvo — is selling a superior product.

Ford says this MKZ is the future of Lincoln. The car that will save it from suffering the same fate as Mercury, Plymouth, Oldsmobile and Pontiac. But if this is the best Ford can do, we say Mulally, Fields and Farley should just cut their losses and get the headstone ready.

Is the MKZ really inferior to the Civic-alike Volvo S60? The beaky-Accord Acura TL with its deafening interior and retro electronics? The ladies at Edmunds doth protest too much, methinks. I’m also not sure that the mass-market-sedan-based near-luxury market is “filled with sedans that do feel special.” It seems to me that whatever the MKZ’s faults in the areas of rear-seat room, four-cylinder thrust, and unethical press-car tire choices, the sheer design chutzpah of the thing makes it special. Dismissing it as an ES250 for the new millennium is a touch facile.

The problem is this: Edmunds needs the wobble. And as I’ve noted in the past:

[a particular writer] typically found his wobble the way the print guys do it nowadays: by picking on a vehicle which barely trails a close competitive set.

It’s even better if the product comes from a company which is already being privately written-off in airport hospitality lounges across the country. By blasting the MKZ, Edmunds is discharging its weapon in a safe direction. They’ll be on the right side of history; when Lincoln closes its doors, Edmunds can point to this review as evidence that they talked tough on Lincoln all the way to the grave. It makes stuff like their Acura puff piece look more credible and cements their relationship with the Acura PR people in Torrance even further.

That’s how the sausage is made. In this case, Lincoln’s providing the mystery meat in the middle. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to call my Ford PR person. Any time I see a car make good use of its tires, I don’t think hit piece; I think National Solo dark horse. MKZ, giddyap!

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110 Comments on “Edmunds is Tired of the Lincoln MKZ...”


  • avatar
    dumblikeyouTu

    Hmm, funny, I think Edmunds is spot-on.

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      Edemunds is 110% correct about the Lincoln Fusion.

      It’s a half-asses effort that relies on gimmicks (large moonroom that hampers visability, push buttons for the transmissionm, and a “short bus” slow suspension system) to make a rather bland, mediocre car seem better than it is.

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        “Yet this is the least exciting 300-hp V6 in existence. There’s no exhaust character of any kind, while the engine gathers power steadily with a corresponding increase in intake noise as you approach the 6,500-rpm redline. You’ll never remember any of it tomorrow.”

        No, Edmunds totally misses the point. How exactly did Lexus sell so many ES350s? An exciting V6?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Spot on Chicago Dude, it wasn’t an impressive powerplant. The first time I ever drove an ES it was a low mile (<20K) '02 so I decided I was going to gun it up the auction, and just wow was it sad. The '86 Cressida runner we had at the time had much more power and was five times the fun.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Jack, you’re just plain wrong about the MKZ. It’s as bad as Edmunds says it is, and it’s worse than they say considering its price.

        For what it’s worth, I agree with Edmunds on the dismal nature of the MKZ, and I just can’t see how your lining up of straw cars to knock down furthers your case FOR the MKZ (yes, there are other horrific cars at or near the MKZ’s price point, but the MKS is definitely bringing up the rear).

        Now if you really want to talk about an abysmal failure, there’s the Lincoln MKS, which even makes the MKZ look good by comparison…but I digress.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      “And make no mistake, every other manufacturer that makes an entry-luxury sedan — from Acura to Volvo — is selling a superior product.”

      Is not true, the Acura and Volvo offerings are completely mediocre. And those brands are on life support anyway.

      “Ford says this MKZ is the future of Lincoln. The car that will save it from suffering the same fate as Mercury, Plymouth, Oldsmobile and Pontiac. But if this is the best Ford can do, we say Mulally, Fields and Farley should just cut their losses and get the headstone ready.”

      Is true. But not because this car isn’t good. But because Lincoln is so tarnished that it needs an absolutely amazing car to reverse its course, and this isn’t it. People that don’t care about cars and want the default are going to buy a Lexus ES. The Lexus is a completely mediocre car, probably not as good as this Lincoln, but Lexus can carry a completely mediocre car. People obsessed with image are going to buy/lease an Audi A4. People that want a traditional American luxury sedan (that happens to look like a 1960s Lincoln Continental because of its slab sides and roof profile) are going to buy a Chrysler 300.

      Who does that leave for this Lincoln? Especially since Ford offers the same car, except looking like an Aston Martin, for less money.

      • 0 avatar

        I would agree, except that ES is not a mediocre car, let alone “completely” so. Camry probably is, and perhaps Malibu. It delivers what it promises, and does it better than the competition. That is not mediocre.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Who does that leave for this Lincoln? Especially since Ford offers the same car, except looking like an Aston Martin, for less money.”

        This will be one of the, if not the final nail in the coffin. I saw one when my bro was looking at used Zephyrs, it looked very nice, way to nice be a Ford. It would seem the right hand doesn’t know what the left was doing with the Fusion.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        Re: Pete Zaitcev – By completely mediocre I mean average/mediocre across the board. Good at everything, great at nothing. The ES may well be slightly above average across the board, but there is no category it shines in. That’s fine for Lexus. In fact that *is* Lexus. But that’s not good enough for Lincoln.

        One area where I have to give Lincoln a lot of credit is the MKT livery. Based on my anecdotal commute experience it is absolutely smashing the XTS on the livery plate front. I’ve only seen one livery plate XTS, but I see multiple MKTs each way. Recently many more MKTs than Escalades, the old favorite. Enough to give Lincoln a serious presence on the roads. Lincoln made a risky, but smart bet placing a low riding crossover as its livery vehicle instead of a sedan. I’m even starting to see a lot of the MKT limos.

  • avatar
    harshciygar

    Having not driven the Lincoln MKZ, it is hard for me to come to any conclusion other than “Tarted up Ford Fusion”.

    And therein lies the issue. I have no reason to WANT to drive the MKZ. It looks…OK. The engine options are adequate. The interior looks comfortable.

    But there is no history, no inspiration, no performance. Sure, keeping up with an M5 in the slalom is cool, but who is buying a MKZ for autocrossing? Nobody.

    Ford has failed to convince me, a die-hard Blue Oval fan, that the MKZ is anything other than a fancy Fusion with a much higher ticket price. Why anyone would even bother with one is beyond me, supercar tires or not.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      The Pilot Super Sports are not quite “supercar tires” — I have a set on my far-from-supercar sport sedan — but they are some of the best tires available in their class today, combining excellent grip with very good comfort and low noise. Highly recommended!

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The PSSs are the replacement for the PS2s. The Focus Titanium can be had with the PS3s which were a revision to the PS2s that improved wet traction. They are all great tires, but shouldn’t be labeled as “supercar only” tires. I’ve had all three tires, as well as similar Continental Tires, on either a GTI or a Focus.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      “Having not driven the Lincoln MKZ, it is hard for me to come to any conclusion other than “Tarted up Ford Fusion”.”

      I’m curious why you think this way when it looks nothing like a Fusion. Everything common to the Fusion is related to platform, base engines and some other mechanicals. Every single entry-level luxury car from say Acura or Lexus uses platform and engine sharing, so why is it ok for everyone else?

      • 0 avatar
        harshciygar

        Because not everyone does it.

        There is no Chevy version of the Cadillac CTS. The ATS will probably spawn Chevy or Buick versions, but in my mind it is a Cadillac first.

        Same with the Chrysler 300; yes, there is a Charger for Dodge, but the pricing is also a lot closer than in the Fusion/MKZ. The Ford Fusion starts at around $22k, the Lincoln STARTS at $35k.

        The Charger starts at $25k, the 300 starts at $30k. To me at least, that pricing makes the Charger feel more premium, and I can buy into the idea that Chrysler added $5,000 worth of standard equipment to the 300 over the Charger.

        But that is a more bitter pill to swallow for the Fusion/MKZ. And for the record, I don’t think Lexus or Honda would get away with it if they did not already have a built-in customer base that is buying what they believe to be some of the most reliable cars on the market. Lexus owners know they’re just buying a fancy Toyota…but to them it is worth it because of the history they have with the brand.

        What is Lincoln’s legacy? That is why they can’t get away with the same move as Acura/Honda or Toyota/Lexus.

    • 0 avatar

      I thought MKZ was a tarted-up DS/Flex/Taurus/Freestyle, not Fusion. Did they manage to stretch Fusion _this_ much? Pretty impressive if so.

      • 0 avatar
        harshciygar

        MKS = Taurus

        MKZ = Fusion

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        harshciygar

        Actually, …
        I guess it is time once again to remind all the MKS came before the Taurus.
        So…as mentioned above in praise of the ATS being a Caddy first….the MKS came first.
        The genius boy Mulaly, or whatever his name…decided that they had to build the Taurus should have been built instead of the Fivehundred. HE added the MKS copy.
        So just FYI…the MKS was first.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        The MKS is still just a D3 derivative, which means that the Ford Five Hundred was first. The first Taurus on the D3 platform was the 2008, so the 2009 followed it too. The current Taurus came out after the MKS, but the bones are old, like 1999 Volvo old.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    “Burgerkingring” Saved for future reference – nice.

  • avatar
    ajla

    It’s obvious that Jack really believes in the Lincoln brand and thinks the MKZ is a good car.

    And, there’s nothing wrong with liking the MKZ, but I really wonder if he expects the car to do anything for Lincoln’s sales freefall. This all seems like a Bob Lutz-style “This car is awesome, if only the media and the haters would give it a chance!”

    Plus, you’re the guy that criticized the old Pontiac 6000STE and Seville STS for touting their handling numbers against German cars. Do you really think having the MKZ’s biggest feather in its cap being a great salom number compared to the M5 is going to accomplish anything? Would a Fusion with the same tires do any worse?

    You just wrote an editoral about how Lincoln should NOT be chasing BMW and should instead build a moonshot $100K luxury car. I’d say that your proposed car is something that “feels special”. Really, I don’t believe that you and Edmunds feel that differently about what Lincoln should do.

    If I were a big Lincoln fan I’d be concerned that brand has fallen far enough that they are now safe victims for the “wobble”.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    “I’m pretty sure the “stock” cars used by GM for all of their Burgerkingring taxpayer trackdays are a lot farther away from showroom configuration than this re-shod sedan was.”

    You’re “pretty sure” because you have “proof”, right?

    If you’re going to cavalierly accuse another automaker of doing what Lincoln Motore Care Atelier Incorporated did, I’d like to hear some details!

    Details like this: Lincoln PR said the Michelin Super Sports on Edmunds’ tester MAY not be available on the stock car, and Michelin Super Sports are nowhere to be found on the MKZ online configurator.

    If you know of specific sneaky mods made to the ATS or other GM press-fleet cars, I beseech thee to haul them into the sunlight.

  • avatar
    kjb911

    I Rather Like The MKZ…In All Honesty I Think People Are To Stuck In The Past To Allow Anything New Too Succeed For Lincoln. One Must Only Look To Chrysler To See Badge Engineering Between Cars That Doesn’t Get As Much Slack As Ford Does. I Hope Lincoln Succeeds Sure They Need To Do Something Better With Their Lineup But You Have To Start Somewhere And That Somewhere Is The MKZ

  • avatar
    cwallace

    I thought it was kind of funny to see Edmunds so put out over the tires, since they value bench-racer data so highly. Every time I read “0-60 in XX seconds (or XX-minus-too-little-to-care with one foot of rollout like on a drag strip)” I want to scream.

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Yes, why are cars judged on 0-whatever and dragtimes, 99.99% of car buyers doesn’t buy cars to dragrace, they buy them to get to such exotic locations as work, home and the much coveted grocery store. If the car handles well and is comfortable should be a hell of a lot more important for the car buying public then misguided performance ambitions.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        I would argue once we’re past handling and general feel on the road 0-60 is the next most important issue because that’s essentially merging from an on-ramp speed, it’s why we use it today. Admitting you’re probably doing between 30-45 to start on the on-ramp but in principle it allows you to get up to highway speed.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        Xeranar this must truly be an american problem. Not having driven in America i can’t comment on the validity of the claim regarding the US, I can however comment from experience in driving in many a European country with many different combinations of speed and on-ramp, sometimes in one of the worst cars ever built from a performance standpoint (SAAB 9000 sans turbo but with an automatic) and I have never felt that more grunt would have made for a safer merger. This includes many a mile on autostradas and the autobahn. Might it be a problem that is related to a reluctance to let the engine work or being a country of AT drivers? Frankly I’ve never driven a car that I felt where inadequate at highway speeds (The Accord was strange thou, requiring high revs).

  • avatar
    Dan

    Laughing at writing off the TL as a “beaky Accord” while praising the MKZ for “design chutzpah” three lines later.

  • avatar
    Steve-O

    Whether or not it “feels special” is really up to the individual. I can’t imagine it feeling any less or more ‘special’ than the other cars in this class –they are all mass-market vehicles, after all. (I love them, but how ‘special’ does a 3 Series feel when you see one on every corner?)

    The differentiators for me are styling and features. To my eyes it has a pretty cool look that you won’t mistake for anything else right now. Add that enormous Targa/glass roof and the pushbutton transmission and now its got something going for it in my eyes: Its Different. Whether that is enough to make it ‘feel special’ depends on you.
    We can debate subjective things like styling all day, but not being another cookie-cutter entry in a sea of near-luxury cars definitely counts for something.

  • avatar
    ABankThatMakesCars

    The Obama admin threatened Edmunds. Edmunds was told to bash the MKZ so that Cadillac CTS sales were not lost to the MKZ.

    • 0 avatar
      moedaman

      The plant that makes the Cadillac CTS would have to burn down first to allow the MKZ to steal any sales from it.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Since when has the Catera been a sales leader? Half of Cadillac brand’s sales in 2011 were the SRX. I think CTS sold something like 30-40,000 units. Zephyr could beat Catera (sedan), in theory.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        I’m not exactly a GM fan, but I have a hard time imagining this car stealing sales from the CTS, let alone the new ATS.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        From the hype it sounds as if ATS will actually steal sales from CTS.

        The problem between CTS/ATS and Zephyr is they are really two different kinds of cars, one is a faux BMW and the other a Camryesque family sedan, and I don’t think they can really directly compete. But it seems higher volume sales go to wrong wheel drive snooze-mobiles vs enthusiast cars. If CTS/ATS break 60000 units combined, the MkFusion and MkTaurus could best them, assuming buyers take well to the new styling.

  • avatar
    SupaMan

    Sorry Jack but I disagree.

    The MKZ is the poster child for what is really wrong at Ford. They claim that the MKZ is all over far differentiated from the Fusion which forms its roots but it does beg the question. When I can option up a Fusion for over $36k, why would I spend another $10k on the MKZ? Edmunds points out that the interior isn’t worth the premium price and the 300hp V6 doesn’t sound terribly special. Maybe I’m missing something, but why would Lincoln send them a car on sport tires that aren’t even optional on production spec cars? From my understanding, that’s a big no-no and Edmunds called them out on it.

    I think Ford products are getting to the point where they’re eating Lincoln’s slice of the luxury market pie.

    Why buy a MKX when I can have an Edge for cheaper?

    Why buy a MKS when there’s a Taurus SHO with similar power and interior features?

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      Why buy an Acura TL when the Accord is cheaper?
      Why buy a Lexus ES when an Avalon is cheaper?

      It’s all about the brand. Some people care about those things. I don’t, but i understand some do.

      • 0 avatar
        james2k

        Why buy a TL when the Accord is cheaper? Not sure. Not many do. Why buy an ES when the Avalon is cheaper? Dealership experience, for one. I’m not sure about the difference in content but there’s only a 5k difference between the base price for the Avalon and the ES.

        Personally, I couldn’t see myself spending the extra coin on a Lincoln because of the styling. The Fords seem much more handsome to me and it’s not clear what you’re getting in the Lincoln that you can’t get in the Ford.

      • 0 avatar
        kezeka

        The problem is that Lincoln is not a brand people are eager to buy into like Lexus. Acura is a bit tougher to justify the price difference for in recent years but they certainly have a difference driving experience than their respective hondas in the past.

        I just don’t see this horrible looking car saving the brand when the new Fusion is so excellently designed. It is competing against itself essentially.

      • 0 avatar
        moedaman

        Sure, there are some Acuras that are tarted up Hondas and there are some Lexus’s that are tarted up Toyotas. But both those divisions also make cars that are unavailable from their lower cost siblings. Nothing Lincoln offers is exclusive to that division compared to Ford. So having an Acura and Lexus makes sense in the first place for Honda and Toyota. The re-skins help to fill out the line-up for those two brands. Re-skins for Lincoln would be great, if they only comprised half the models available from the brand. As of right now, nothing about Lincoln makes much sense, for the consumer anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        Sinistermisterman

        @N8iveVA “It’s all about the brand. Some people care about those things. I don’t, but i understand some do.”

        And therein lies the rub. Why buy an Acura over a Honda or a Lexus over a Toyota? Because they are brands that have ‘equity’ (as so many people put it), and people are willing to pay over the odds for the brand.
        Lincoln on the other hand has practically no brand equity other than with some folk over the age of 75 and car enthusiasts who appreciated the indestructibility of the Town Car, which makes it a much, much harder sell.
        Add to this that the perception of the Ford brand is heading upmarket, and the ‘luxury gap’ between the Ford and Lincoln brands has become almost negligible.

      • 0 avatar
        chrishs2000

        Huge difference between both sets. Just because it’s based on the same platform does not make it the same car. Sit in both before you make comments like it’s an 80′s GM badge job.

        Can you get an Accord with the ELS sound system, higher spec leather, SH-AWD, 3.7L 305HP V6, etc etc etc? The interiors and exteriors are both completely different in materials, features and function, for better or worse.

    • 0 avatar
      Spartan

      The SHO and the MKS are too similiar.
      The Fusion Titanium and the MKZ are very different.

      I’d choose the MKZ over the Fusion because frankly, the MKZ looks a helluva lot better, but I wouldn’t (and didn’t) choose the MKS over the SHO.

      • 0 avatar
        james2k

        You really think the MKZ looks better than the Fusion? I love that. It’s hard for me to imagine anyone thinking the Lincoln is a nice looking car. I’d like to see Lincoln do well so I’m really glad there are people out there that like it. I’d be very happy to be in the minority on this one.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      If Lincoln actually offered something prestigious, I would buy one over the Ford equivalent but well… they don’t. I respect the performance figures immensely put out by the 2010+ Taurus but both cars are an epic fail to me in the styling, comfort, and value-for-the-money depts. I liked the 2011 MKZ I drove quite a bit but I didn’t love it. The last Fusion I was in was a 2007 and I meh’d it at the time, although the 2013 looks dead sexy I’ll test drive it the next time I go car shopping.

      • 0 avatar
        jrasero23

        While I do agree a Lincoln on price a lone is a tough sell, I think Lincoln is too commonly used as a bunching bag. The new MKZ is a good looking car in my opinion and style and design wise a step above my 2011 MKZ which looked way too Fusion esque but like many have said the MKZ has a premium car price and tries to compete with a premium Japanese car maker when really Lincoln is a near luxury or entry luxury car company and you know what there is nothing wrong with that, but stop charging premium prices and go the Buick root. I think people would consider the MKZ more if the car didn’t price close to $50k fully loaded. Give it to me for $40k-ish fully loaded and the MKZ doesn’t become a laughing after thought.

        I think lincoln has the right formula but has priced it out wrong. A lot of people have been saying what makes Lexus special is the service which I agree and I think this is an area that has constantly impressed me about Lincoln especially at my dealer. I used to be an Honda Acura guy and why they were good cars the service was leagues behind Lexus and way behind Lincoln. This brings me to my question of why isn’t Acura ragged on more. After the ILX I gave up on the company. Talk about rebadging a car and charging crazy prices. Yeah the car started sub $27k but when it was released the base model didn’t have leather, heated seats, and came with the same Civic motor. Then you had the TL which I does have a sportier feel but border lines being too harsh and costs $6k more than an Accord EX-L V6. IMO I would take a Accord Coupe EX-L V6 HPF any day over a TL unless you need awd. I guess Acura felt the same and that’s why they are disc the TSX and TL but the TLX doesn’t look impressive at all. The only vehicles I think are worth the Acura premium are the crossovers in the RDX and MDX because that’s because the Pilot has fallen from grace and the CR-V is way too under powered for my likes. Point being we all like to rag on Lincoln some other brands are no better or even worse.

        Talking to some dealers there is two theories. One, Lincoln doesn’t need performance based cars because they don’t need to compete with Caddilac and that features and comfort will sell cars. Then there is the group that says Lincoln needs a halo car like the MKR to compete. At first I believed a halo car was the logical choice but after owning a Lincoln and seeing who and what sells cars I believe going the comfort and feature cars will serve Lincoln well. One evidence of this is Ford which has constantly used features to get new buyers or convert buyers. Lincoln has been doing this with discover luxury ads but my big problem with the ads are the fact that they compare the Lincoln to the Lexus es, that’s not to say the es is a bad car but the people who used to buy Lincoln now by the es and that’s the demographic Lincoln is trying to move away from. Secondly the biggest growth sector in car sales is crossovers. And like it or not Ford sells a ton of them. Crossovers are known for there performance but rather comfort and features. Revamping the MKx, navigator, and creating the mkc isn’t revolutionary and might not get your middle age male looking to buy a 3 series but it will get women, younger women.

  • avatar
    prndlol

    I read the review about an hour ago and I’m not buying it.
    (the review or the car)

  • avatar
    dan1malk

    I wish TTAC would test and review cars again…

    This garbage from Jack is embarrassing.

    I have a strange idea! How about you act like a professional in you industry for once and just review the damn car yourself instead of trash-talking those more informed than you?

    • 0 avatar
      james2k

      I really enjoyed this piece from Jack. I don’t know why you think it’s embarrassing. He brings up an insightful point about “stock” test cars and the MKZ’s really surprising slalom test results compared to the M5 and 911.

      You seem to like this site and want to help. I have normal idea. Let’s refrain from name calling and stick with constructive criticism. “How about you act like a professional in you[r] industry for once,” “Garbage,” “damn,” “more informed that you,” don’t really move the conversation forward in a helpful manner.

      • 0 avatar
        dan1malk

        I guess I’d just like more of Jack’s opinion and review of the car rather than Jack’s opinion of reviewers of the car.

        That would be a more honest/professional approach and less finger-pointy/name calling.

      • 0 avatar
        MK

        I’m sorry but the call for the high-road is somewhat tempered in discussing a post where the author states that another party is performing analingus for the Volt pr campaign.

        Just sayin’.

        To my 40-something proclivities the Lincolns are not attractively designed. Subjective but there it is.

        Also agree that the “we here at ttac are outsiders dontcha know..here look at out creds!!!!” Schtick is getting a little old.

        Again just sayin’.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      TTAC is more or less a filter for media. He’s trying to meta-filter not cars but the industry. While I enjoy some reviews and a great deal of Murliee’s articles I agree, his back room shenanigan talk is pathetic in ways that are a shame because he is actually a rather good wordsmith with some interesting takes on vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      This kind of article is why I come to TTAC multiple times per day and why Jack is the best automotive writer at this time.

      Jack is calling bullshit on Lincoln for putting non-stock rubber on their test cars in order to get better test numbers and reviews from the media.

      He is also calling bullshit on Edmunds for exaggerating the weaknesses of the MKFusion . Is it as good as The Lincoln Motor Company is touting it? No. After all it is essentially a rebadged mass market car, not a real luxury car. But a lot of companies do this and make a lot of money this way without the grief: Exhibit A: Camry/ES 350.

      Is it as bad as Edmunds is calling it? Probably not. There just isn’t the difference between “good” and “bad” cars like there used to be.

      But if it actually can pull off the numbers that they are claiming with just a tire swap then there must be some inherent goodness in the car after all.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    I like the new MKZ. I love the look and it looks more unique than anything else in its class.

    I don’t understand the hate for the MKZ, though. What’s wrong with enthusiasts (who won’t buy one even if it were RWD with a EB V6) and the ragazines is that they keep expecting something that isn’t feasible. A RWD 6MT Ecoboost V6 sedan with 50/50 weight distribution, 400 HP, full leather seating, leather stitched headliner priced under $50k, or something equally unreasonable.

    Lincoln isn’t going to invest “BILLIONS” of dollars to develop a platform that may or may not recoup the costs it would take to create. They’ll bury the brand first. The sooner we all realize this, the sooner we can evaluate Lincoln in a fair light.

    I really hate that we don’t give Lincoln a fair shake. I know we’re a global economy and all, but I swear Americans bet against the home team so much, it’s saddening.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Lincoln has had the platforms and designs to have better product. One can look at the entire Jaguar lineup and wonder why Lincoln doesn’t have cars like that. There is no reason why there shouldn’t be a Lincoln Continental, or whatever heritage name you want, with similar underpinnings as the XJ and a Coyote V8. Lincoln fans are mad because the LS and Town Car weren’t updated, and were replaced by the MKZ and nothing/MKT.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “I really hate that we don’t give Lincoln a fair shake. I know we’re a global economy and all, but I swear Americans bet against the home team so much, it’s saddening”

      How is calling for the end of Lincoln a “bet against the home team”?

      I think Ford is the greatest automotive brand in the entire world. I think the Ford brand can successfully sell $40K+ cars. I certainly couldn’t say that about non-V8 Chevrolets or just about any Dodge.

      Years ago the Ford Motor Company made the choice to sacrifice Lincoln in order to strengthen the Ford brand. It worked very well, and I think it was the right thing to do.

      At this point, I believe any money spent on Lincoln is a lost cause and would be better spent on the Ford brand.

      At what point does the business case for keeping Lincoln around fall apart? Should the Ford brand suffer because a few executives in Dearborn are so hung up on their nostaglia and pride that they won’t let their luxury brand go?

      • 0 avatar
        Spartan

        Because people are bashing the new MKZ without stating exactly why or they’re rehashing talking points they’ve heard on the internet.

        We all know it rides on the Fusion platform. Got it, roger, check. HOWEVER, it’s not the same car and IMO, it’s a better car. Better interior, design, drivetrain.

        It’s not going to win any races on the ‘ring, but neither is the A4 or TL for that matter.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      To be honest I can’t tell an MKZ from a Camry.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      So to evaluate Lincoln in a “fair light”, we need to lower our expectations of them building great cars and just be happy with reskinned Fords with $15k price premiums???

      And why is that so-called dream car so unfeasible? Dodge makes a big RWD platform. Ford has them already, they have some of the best engines available, they have manual transmissions already that are designed to support the power as well. No one here has ever asked for leather stitched headliners or full leather seating, actually if anything everyone thinks Lincoln has nailed the premium interior quality thing, the complaint is that that alone is not worth a $15k price increase over it’s Ford fraternal twin. We just expect at least one actual unique, impressive, premium product to associate the Lincoln brand with.

      Someone above responded to another one of your comments talking about Lexus and Acura reskinning their cars. The TL doesn’t look like an Accord with a different grill, the ES looks nothing like the Camry, the interiors are completely unique, and as was pointed out… each makes flagship cars that are not shared with the lower-priced brand, which increased the perceived brand value and status of the lower priced models. If Lincoln doesn’t want to make any investment to make a product people would aspire to own, then where do they get off charging such a premium price for the reskins? Even Hyundai made the investment to bring us the Genesis, but Ford can’t be bothered to at least rebadge an Australian Commodore or something??

      • 0 avatar
        Spartan

        Will you buy a RWD Lincoln if they built one? I’ll wait…

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        No, but I am not going to buy any of it’s competitors either; whether or not I would buy one is irrelevant. It is even more irrelevant if you bought one of the current models, because then you would have proven yourself to be a buyer that sees value in their current product line. What Lincoln needs are conquest buyers, and not enough people are wandering into the showrooms. It’s not even enough to offer a competitive product, they need to go above an beyond the competition or new buyers are not going to bother.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        “Will you buy a RWD Lincoln if they built one?”

        If it is a 4-door sedan, priced like a CTS, and comes with the Coyote V-8 or 3.5 Ecoboost, then yes.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    While the new MKZCamry-copy doesn’t really interest me, I don’t really see how “the MKZ just doesn’t feel special.” compared to all of the other FWD4WD sedans on the market, its like that same vague meaningless “It has no soul” criticism thats often passed onto Japanese sedans.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    The real Edmunds story today is the discontinuation of Inside Line – the only part of the empire that made some attempt to provide decent automotive journalism. Apparently resulting from the swift and immediate backlash of gear heads who don’t want to read about how the Camry has .3 cu.ft. more trunk space than an Accord may have worked – the current IL site took down the letter and all content is from 2008 or so.

    http://www.insideline.com/features/a-letter-from-scott-oldham-vice-president-of-editorial-edmunds-com-inc.html

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Does this mean no more comments or cool series like “Suspension Walk-Around”?

      • 0 avatar
        harshciygar

        Probably; Edmunds killed its “Green Car Advisor” section about a year ago, and they had some cool in-depth articles about MPGs and alt-fuels that have not been replaced.

        Sad.

    • 0 avatar
      Prado

      +100 What a shame. Insideline was one of the best overall enthusiasts sites out there. I don’t care if all the same content is still there on Edmunds, because it is now formatted and presented so poorly that I will not be visiting.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    As you can tell they also made it so you cant write or comment on their reviews anymore. I really wanted to say a few words about the review. He states that the interior is underwhelming but does state how. I have had the pleasure of setting in one and I dont agree. As a matter of fact I would bet that more than a few commentators on this site have “reviewed” more car s than these guys do. I used to like Edmunds and look forward to their reviews…no not so much due to the fact that there has been several recent reviews that have left me shaking my head. There seems to be a pattern for them now of making comments but not giving facts with examples.

  • avatar

    It’s ugly. The face is awful.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “They’ll be on the right side of history; when Lincoln closes its doors, Edmunds can point to this review as evidence that they talked tough on Lincoln all the way to the grave. It makes stuff like their Acura puff piece look more credible and cements their relationship with the Acura PR people in Torrance even further.”

    This the sort of thing that makes me hate MSM, the politics are simply inescapable. So despite the merits or drawbacks of the Zephyr, you’ll knock it to play nice with the other generic blob builders, thus insuring your kickbacks, freebies, and overall gravy train can continue. I can’t say it isn’t smart b/c it is, but it really doesn’t follow the tenets of journalism and is in general being despicable.

    Edmunds, whatcha think of the Acura Cimmaron boys? Wait hold on let me help you off off your knees…

    If there is any brand out there which should be nuked from orbit just to be sure, for being uninspired, pointless, and bland its Acura!

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      If, by “Acura Cimarron” you are referring to the ILX, the differences between that car and the Lincoln MKZ are that the ILX isn’t being heralded as the first step in the marque’s rebirth, and the car itself actually fits a slot once occupied by the old Integra.

      The Integras were nice cars, but they weren’t particularly luxurious. And they were based on the Civic platform.

      Whether there is a place for such a car in 2013 is certainly worthy of debate. But it’s not as though the ILX is taking the Acura brand to a market segment where it has never been before.

      The MKZ, on the other hand, seems as though it would make a great Mercury.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “The Integras were nice cars, but they weren’t particularly luxurious. And they were based on the Civic platform.”

        In addition to that, the Canadian market had the Acura EL and CSX, which were quite obviously badge engineered Civic sedans. The ILX is a direct replacement for that series of cars.

        The Cimmarron comparisons seem to be popular here, but they are woefully misguided. For Cadillac, the Cimarron was indicative of a brand positioning freefall, whereas Acura has tried to occupy this slot between mainstream and luxury from the start. It’s not exactly a great strategy, but the ILX doesn’t damage the existing brand, either (although it fails to elevate it.)

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That’s true Geeber, ILX is not meant to harken of things too come, its just the true Integra replacement. But its still more or less a Civic Xerox as MKZ is a Fusion one.

        “The MKZ, on the other hand, seems as though it would make a great Mercury.”

        Actually, its funny you say that scroll down a few posts.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    Just can’t trust anybody these days, looks like we’ll all have to actually go out and test drive for ourselves.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    The Lincoln MKZ is a very nice car and would be great except for one problem:

    The Ford Fusion exists.

    A Fusion Titanium 2.0T AWD can go head to head with an A4 in terms of size and features (radar cruise, nav, etc). It is not worth the cost difference to upgrade to a Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Whether or not it’s worth it will be a personal call for each buyer. I’ve driven both, and I think the MKZ is worth the difference in price for the better interior alone (I do like the styling more on the MKZ as well).

      The Fusion isn’t on my short list for my next vehicle, the MKZ is.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Given how good the new Fusion looks I’d be hard pressed to choose between a loaded Fusion and an MKZ. Does the MKZ get any unique engine choices at least?

    • 0 avatar
      Steve-O

      Yes, the MKZ can have the 300hp 3.7L V6, not available on the Fusion.

      Then there’s the huge sliding glass roof, also exclusive to the MKZ…

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The electrically controlled suspension is supposed to be Lincoln-exclusive too.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        The V6 and the active suspension are the big mechanical differentiators, but the biggest reason to go to the MKZ over the Fusion is the difference in interior trim IMO.

        The Fusion is nice inside, especially in SE Luxury Package or Titanium trim, but the MKZ takes it to a whole new level. The seats are far more comfortable, the various trim pieces are covered in more leather and nicer feeling materials, and the quality of available leather on the seats is higher. There are some extra luxury touches available inside too – massaging seats, air conditioned seats, power rear sunshade, and of course the huge glass roof.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I once read Mercury’s existence beyond the 70s was to serve two purposes: (1) Fords to be built as Mercs to maximize Ford’s manufacturing capacity at a given time and (2) give the Lincoln dealers higher volume/lower margin models to sell without turning them into cart blanche Ford dealers (and thus pissing off existing Ford dealers).

    The sole purpose of this “MKZ” and perhaps the other Lincolns was to continue to fulfill the first criteria. Ford had plenty of concepts to drawn on and other lower volume platforms to develop against (see below), and they chose the Xerox machine.

    Picture a Mustang derived 3.5 EB’d Continental Mark X… no V8 option to play up the BS technology/green angle and so not to cannibalize V8 Mustang sales… Mustang sales in 2011 were 70,000 units, I doubt many would have been lost if anything you may have gained new sales from people with deeper pockets and a loath for “NASCAR” type rides or who puke at the sight of the CTS Coupe. Mustang a no go? How about doing something with LS again? Revive the Jaguar X308 platform you probably still own the rights too with a working engine this time? Why not cookie cutter an S80, drop in a V6 and call it a Lincoln? You owned the company for a decade and I believe still own some of the patents. I just think if they’re going to do ctrl-c and ctrl-v with Lincoln why not copy something that isn’t a mass market Ford, unless of course Lincoln = Mercury the sequel.

    • 0 avatar

      You’re definitely on to something. Ever since the discontinuation of Mercury, Lincoln quietly slid into its new role of the “new” Mercury. You can just see it in the current lineup – every vehicle is simply a slightly restyled variant of an existing Ford product.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    But I saw the new Lincoln commercial as a movie preview this weekend. Ironically, it was at Hyde Park on the Hudson and the majority of the audience was likely alive (and can remember) when the events depicted in the movie happened. Cool commercial and visuals – not sure what any of them have to do with the new Lincoln as the cars show were iconic whereas the new MKZ is a Lexus ES wanna be. Made me want a 1960s era Continental though…

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    So should Lincoln go the way of the Imperial and build one car and make it the best they can make it? Will they come though? And whom do you target at this point? Lincoln is trying to reinvent itself but has to do it based on the distant past and the closer recent past. Both of which are not in the forefront of the buying public’s mind.

    I ask anyone here, what memories of Lincoln do you have that would make you seriously consider this or any other vehicle in their line up?
    Critiques aside, a big part of this car is about the Lincoln we KNEW. What do you think of when someone mentions Lincoln? Land barges, coach roofs, AARP? And does this car light your fire in any way?

    Sure, my uncle had the ’61 with the suicide doors but it wasn’t glamorous! It broke down often and rusted out like a tin can. He then picked up a 1980 Versailles which was.. I’ll just stop there. My other memory of Lincoln was when I was a parts delivery boy and on one of my stops I overheard mechanics gathered around what was then a 2 year old Town Car. The frame was rotting badly right under the driver’s door..
    I remember hearing “it had to come from the factory like that.” I was horrified.

    That said, I like the MKS and MKZ badge engineered or not. They are good looking cars and seem to be a deal on the used market (the few that I looked at, anyway). But do they offer anything Ford can’t do on it’s own? I don’t think so. So, what images/feelings does Lincoln (or should I say The Lincoln Motor Company) evoke?

  • avatar
    wmba

    How many articles has there been on Lincoln on this site over the past few weeks? Over the past year? At least 7 and 10. I googled and counted.

    Too darn many! The brand is irrelevant, the cars are irrelevant, and yet another blog post is irrelevant, particularly since it is merely a further article attacking other organizations who dare publish views contra Mr. Baruth. Personally, I couldn’t care less what one car site thinks of another. I’m quite capable of making that judgement myself, thanks all the same. It’s boorish, verging on loutism.

    The fix for Lincoln is simple and has been pointed out by commenters time and time again. Instead of spending a billion dollars making vulgar modern gothic Fords, spend a million and give the cars real names instead of this MK b…s…. I blame Mullaly.

    As for Edmunds, I have it on good authority that the woman tester shuffle-steered her way through the slalom cones. Nothing could be more calculated to upset the 9 and 3 at all costs driving instructor. Hence the vitriol.

  • avatar
    SV

    It’s a disappointing review. While I can understand concerns that the MKZ isn’t different enough from the Fusion, the tone seems overly harsh (though getting a test car with tires that won’t even be available from the factory is rather underhanded on Ford’s part). Really the worst that can be said about the MKZ is that it doesn’t justify its price premium over the Fusion, something that has more to do, in my opinion, with how good the Fusion is than any problems on the MKZ’s part.

    The Car & Driver MKZ review, while not exactly glowing, is rather better balanced I think.

    More concerning is the discontinuation of InsideLine. It’s mystifying, since it was one of my favorite car sites besides TTAC. The main Edmunds site isn’t as well-designed and feels rather outdated – hopefully a redesign is coming or I feel like they’re going to see a drop in page views.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    I take it as retaliation against providing “cheater” tires that haven’t been confirmed on the production version. Understandable, imo.

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    Hello, people, the article points out exactly what is “special” about the MKZ.

    You’re telling me that I can spend $940 on tires at Tire Rack + shipping, and my car will corner better than an M5, and almost as well as a 911? Ricer-bois spend that much for *each* blingy wheel, and it usually doesn’t increase performance worth a damn.

    Lincoln should be shouting it from the rooftops and using the PSS as standard fitment for highline versions or maybe for a new edition. You can’t call it M-Sport, but MK-Sport might work. MKZ SVO is too many letters.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    It’s not 1978 anymore. The luxury and near luxury markets have morphed into a glorious mess. Buyers tastes have changed. A FWD Lexus is considered luxury. Mercedes is making a C Klasse that I rather doubt feel like it was machined from a steel billet. Lets get a review done on the thing and see how it compares to it’s rivals.

  • avatar
    KitaIkki

    Does this mean that a Ford Fusion with the same tires will out-slalom a BMW M5? Imagine what a Fusion “ST” with 3.5L EcoBoost V6 can do …

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    What a bunch of angry hate mongers are on this sight nowadays.
    Hail to Jack for speaking some truth.
    Just give me some truth!
    And the hate on Ford and Lincoln here is as old as the women’s 8 am tennis club at Palm Beach Racquet club…and just as smelly.
    Look…are there so many ugly things happening in your lives that such a need to knee jerk out at others is sooo important?
    JesusHChrist!
    Give it a rest.
    The entire Edmunds Straightline site is dead.
    They can’t post anything new or important or relative so instead just hate.
    To bitch about the MKS yet offer drooling praise on the Avalon and other equally over priced cars is just whoring and begging for press.

    Avalon review…

    http://www.insideline.com/toyota/avalon/2013/2013-toyota-avalon-first-drive.html

    Champagne Engineering
    Caviar Dreams
    Champagne and Caviar Drive

    “At the top of the line is the $40,410 Limited …”
    So what car is NOW over priced??????
    PALEEEZE…Edmunds…WHO the F#$K are YOU crapping!!??

  • avatar
    340-4

    Huh.

    So my ’13 Altima 3.5 can leave this much more expensive car in the dust, and gets better mpg’s to boot.

    Wonder how it would do with those nice sticky tires.

    I don’t know. I want to have hope for Lincoln.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    Does anyone actually read Edmunds? lol

  • avatar
    raph

    “I’m pretty sure the “stock” cars used by GM for all of their Burgerkingring taxpayer trackdays are a lot farther away from showroom configuration than this re-shod sedan was.”

    Ha! Are confirming my suspicions about the mighty ZL1 and 1LE Camaros?

    Something struck me as odd when the ZL1 was getting near ZR1 skid pad numbers despite being much heavier and with a higher center of gravity.

  • avatar
    SupaMan

    The problem is that a lot of the equipment the MKZ touts is available on the Fusion for far less (minus the fancy-pants dampers, gi-normous sunroof and V6). But the Fusion doesn’t need all of that as it is a well engineered, attractive car and the author is right about the Lincoln not feeling ‘special’ enough. I jump from an Avalon/Camry to an ES350 and the Lexus does feel more expensive, like I’d have paid my money’s worth to be snooty. Lincoln models don’t feel that way.

    The fact that Edmunds caught Lincoln trying to buy the media with non-optional tires reeks of desperation for good reviews. OMG! It handls better than BMW M5! Well yeah but is it supposed to be a performance car? Is that its reason for being?

    Do better Lincoln/Ford.

  • avatar
    npbheights

    As an owner of a ’10 MKZ, I will drop in my 2 cents on the new one. The 4 should not be offered on this car. Period. The V6 in the previous MKZ was not the same as the regular V6 option in the Fusion and could only be had in the Fusion with the fairly rare “Sport” package. Second, the air-conditioned seats have been STANDARD since it was called a Zephyr. Why are they not standard on the new car, and only available as part of an expensive options package? While I am ok with Lincoln platform sharing with Fords, Lincolns should be much better equipped in base form than the Ford.

    I do like my MKZ, the interior is much nicer than any Fusion, it is quick and quiet, has been more trouble free so far than my 2009 Toyota Corolla and and only gets 7 MPG less than it. LOVE those A/C seats too, They are in constant use down here in So. Fla. – First button I hit after starting the car.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      I agree about the AC seats – they should be standard.

      I disagree about the EcoBoost 2.0 – it’s a great engine, and I’d rather have it than the 3.7 V6. The EB 2.0 has a more accessible torque curve compared to the 3.7, which in normal day to day driving should give it an edge, plus the fuel economy is better.

      Perhaps the MKZ should have received the more highly tuned version used in the Focus ST to differentiate it from the Fusion’s top engine offering, but overall it’s still a smart choice to offer.

      • 0 avatar
        npbheights

        Ok, to be fair, I have not driven a car powered by the Ecoboost 2.0. I have never found a 4 cylinder car to be enjoyable, so I did prejudge the engine. All I can think of is the drone of a 4 cylinder engine. Droning, non stop droning.

    • 0 avatar
      jrasero23

      I agree I have a 2011 awd MKZ and having the V6 standard which was based on the top of line Fusion sport that I never seen anyone drive makes the car special. It’s what Acura should have done with the ilx making the civic si’s engine standard on the base ILX not the puny 150 hp civic engine. If the MKZ had the standard 300 hp engine I feel that is a strong selling point. Also your right you can’t take away standard features and no MKZ fully loaded should come close to $50k fully decked out because for that price a true luxury car can be bought.

      If the MKZ started at $32k and went to $40k the MKZ would be a much easier sell. for me I bought my 2011 MKZ used because with its upgrades when new of awd, sunroof, and premium paint the car originally was $40k again way too much for an MKZ new but I got it for sub $20k cpo. I am not asking Lincoln to price new mkz at $30k but make the standard features compelling like they used to and lower the price!

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    After having spent some time driving a turbo Chevy Cruze, a Hyundai Sonata turbo and various other 4 bangers, I also agree they have no place in the MKZ. I do not expect droney hair dryer economy car sounds in something that starts at over 35 larger. After having started a few Fusion AWD’s in the parking lot and revved them up in park I can’t see how they are any better than the others in the sound NVH department. The 3.5/3.7 has sounded and felt just fine in Ford/Lincoln I have driven to date. I also guarantee that a fully broken in 300 HP MKZ will blow away a Fusion with the 240 Hp Ecoboost.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Maybe Lincoln is hoping MKZ shoppers will test drive it back to back with BMW 328i, Mercedes C250 and Audi A4. If it doesn’t idle like a diesel and huff like a leaf blower then badge buyers will want to know what’s wrong. Lincoln can keep hoping though. Badge buyers aren’t going to touch a Lincoln. Their customers were a subset of the greatest generation.

  • avatar
    timmm55

    I like the Fusion a LOT. I like the MKZ a lot too. I would like a Fusion 1.6 EB with a manual transmission at $26K or so.
    I’d like a MKZ hybrid (same starting price as the standard ICE)at $36K it’s a really good deal. At $42K with the retractable roof, Navigation and a bunch of of other goodies it’s hard to beat in it’s class…..even at 40 MPGs.

    The story that was missed, and clearly hinted at by Lincoln, is what will a performance Nano V6 EB MKZ be like. Some journalist! With a tire change it’ll out handle an M series. Add some serious power and a performance 4 wheel drive system……Ford does Rally cars after all……it could be amazing.

  • avatar
    cozybeach

    How about Edmonds try to just enjoy the car and drive it and they might stop their death knell. Great Car!, I have driven the 2.0 and the 3.7. Both deliver and give so much more than a BMW, Caddy or a Fusion for the money!


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