By on November 29, 2012

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Steve Lang just asked the question, Which Car Companies Do You Not Like… But Respect?. That brings to mind a related question, sort of an inverse on Christianity’s love the sinner, not the sin, attitude. What car companies that you don’t like make cars that you do like? I’m pretty sure that I can guess how our friend Mr. Baruth feels about Porsche the company, but the guy owns three of Zuffenhausen’s best.

His recent negative comparison of the new 911 to a classic 1970s air-cooled sports car of the same name isn’t going to make him any more friends in Stuttgart. Similarly, the UK’s Chris Harris got put on Ferrari’s fecal roll call after being honest about how Ferrari preps its ringers press fleet cars, but even after he was made persona non grata in Maranello, and banned from their test cars Harris sold his Porsche and went out and bought a 599. Why? “Because I like the cars and I miss not driving the cars”.

I can’t afford either a Porsche or a Ferrari but I share some of Jack and Chris’ distaste for those companies while I’d be happy to drive many, if not most of their cars. A fool and his money are soon parted and someone savvy enough to have made enough coin to afford a six-figure car should hopefully be wise enough to not be exploited, but many of the behaviors of Ferrari and Porsche seem quite exploitative of their well-heeled clientele. Not just exploitative, but condescending as well. It’s almost as though they are doing people favors by selling them a car – Ferrari is particularly odious in that regard. I don’t know how true it is, but I’ve read that not just anyone can walk into a Ferrari dealership, plunk down some cash and drive out in a new car. It’s said that because of Porsche’s pricing and lack of a car below the Boxster that “an entry level Porsche is a used car”. It’s been alleged that that is close to Ferrari’s actual business model and that nobody gets to buy a new Ferrari without the approval of the home office in Italy. We already know that in the case of very limited production models, like the non-street legal FXX track cars, Ferrari decides who the lucky buyers would be. Lamborghini did the same with the 20 Reventons they built.

That patronizing attitude may turn off some affluent customers who are used to buying whatever they want. I know a couple of very wealthy car enthusiasts who are not happy with that attitude, even though one owns a Reventon and the other owns an Enzo. When I asked one of them how he felt about it, he said that he preferred the way Gulfstream takes orders on a new model private jet. A lottery determines build sequence and if the company finds out that a customer tries to buy their way up the waiting list, they’ll be blackballed from ever buying a new jet from the factory.

Playing favorites with customers, charging exorbitant prices on relatively mundane options, massaging their image in the media – all those things contribute to a company’s reputation just as the cars they make affect their image in people’s minds. So what brands have you loving their cars while loathing their makers?

Ronnie Schreiber edits Cars In Depth, a realistic perspective on cars & car culture and the original 3D car site. If you found this post worthwhile, you can dig deeper at Cars In Depth. If the 3D thing freaks you out, don’t worry, all the photo and video players in use at the site have mono options. Thanks for reading – RJS

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63 Comments on “Question Of The Day: Love The Car, Hate The Company...”


  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Chevy/Caddy/GM. The Corvette is an astonishing car, and the Volt is technically impressive, but it does not matter. The management is so obtuse that they replaced the more powerful Corvette engine with the Northstar in the XLR because they thought their customers wanted an over-head-cam.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      Agreed. The Vette is an amazing car, the Volt shows great progress, and I’d absolutely love a CTS wagon in place of either our Accord or Outback. And every GMC I’ve had as a rental in the past few years have been outstanding trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        I agree completely. The GM 1500 and bigger trucks/SUVs are fantastic as well as the Corvette, CTS-V and maybe Camaro V8.

        However, the rest of the lineup is just for rental car lots at the airport.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      Agreed. GM management has been clueless for over 30 years now. It’s amazing the Corvette still manages to go from strength to strength.

    • 0 avatar
      jeffzekas

      My son owned a Vette: amazingly poor reliability for a car made with “regular, time proven” GM parts i.e. V-8 and automatic transmission.

      Far worse was my other son’s BMW 3-series: lovely car (though it breaks on a regular, expensive basis) but the dealer is even WORSE: condescending, rude, and generally unfriendly… NEVER AGAIN!

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    Too easy: Scion FR-S. Great car, stupid extension of Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      Agreed. Although I think “hate” is a strong word. I don’t really “hate” any car companies, I just don’t care for many of them. Other than the FR-S, I agree that Toyota is one of those companies I just don’t give 2 s**ts about.

  • avatar
    mcg

    Love the engine, hate the cars they put it in? Pentastar V6

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      We’ve got a 2012 3.6 Pentastar V6 in my wife’s 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee, but for a vehicle of that size and heft, the purported 295-horses it cranks out are just barely adequate.

      No lo contendre in mountainous or hilly terrain, or long uphill slopes. Not enough torque. Constantly hunting for the right gear vs engine power curve. I’ve seen the tach jump from 3000 rpm to 6000 rpm when the computer downshifts TWO gears. Scares the hell out of you!

      IMO, the 5.7 (V8) is the better match for the JGC, but even a 4.6 (V8) or a 5.2 (V8) would give a better-balanced power/torque curve.

      Having driven a Chrysler 300 with a 3.6 Pentastar I believe that the Pentastar is better suited for light-duty passenger car applications. It truly excels in those applications.

      Now Fiatsler is going to put that puppy in a RAM 1500 for 2013. In the first place it is not a truck engine and in the second place a RAM 1500 weighs even more than a Grand Cherokee, and that will affect drive-ability and capacity, even with an 8-speed automatic.

      I understand that Fiatsler is between a rock and a hard place and that the Chrysler sub-division is keeping the parent alive, but IMO, a 4.8-liter (294 cubic inch) V8 based on the architecture of the Pentastar 3.6 (221 cubic inch) V6 would solve all their ills. Two extra cylinders to bring up the grunt.

      But that could be just wishing and hoping on my part. Chrysler has rarely done the right thing in the past, and that was just one of the reasons Chrysler died in 2009.

      Just because it was resurrected at taxpayers’ expense and pimped to Fiat with a hefty $1.3Billion bribe, doesn’t mean Fiatsler will suddenly do the right thing.

      • 0 avatar
        mcg

        I bet the 200 really flies with it, but a Ram not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        mcg, it does real good in a Wrangler too, especially when mated with a manual transmission. Bought one for my grandson in June 2012 and it is a lot better than the old 3.7 of the past.

        Many years ago, I converted a Wrangler I had to an old Chevy 283, and IMO that’s the only thing that outclasses and out-torques a Pentastar in a Wrangler.

  • avatar
    NMGOM

    I guess I’d have to go with the McLaren MP4-12C, although the word “hate” is a bit strong for the company. Like, where were they all these years in making production vehicles?

    ———–

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Fusion, C-Max, Escape:

    I like the direction Ford has taken with most of its cars.

    Ford:

    The b*st*rds f*cked me over but good. They’ll never see another dime of my money. Ever. Yes, it was over 15 years ago already. So what? And, compared to my wife, I’m one of Ford’s biggest fans.

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      Yep, it’s what they do. “The Ford way” if you will.

    • 0 avatar
      mmarreco

      +1 no more Fords for me in this life.

      • 0 avatar
        talkstoanimals

        I agree with Ford. They treated me like the enemy when I had problems with my Mustang, and I’ll never buy another as a result. It’s a shame, because they make a number of cars I really admire. To wit:

        New Fusion
        Focus ST
        Fiesta ST
        Mustang Boss 302 (sad to see it go for 2013)
        New Escape
        Taurus SHO
        C-Max
        Transit
        SVT Raptor

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Same here. Grew up in a Ford family, too. Got burned 3 times too many.

      OTOH, the new SHO really appeals to me for some reason…

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      But the behaviour exhibited by Ford is exactly the same as that of Chrysler and GM in the past 30 or 40 years, and I have been on the receiving end from all three since I started buying new cars over 30 years ago.

      And based on what I read on the interwebs, it’s also the same egregious behaviour displayed by your choice of: BMW, Daimler, VW, or Porsche within the previous decade, yet somehow, the domestics are held to a higher standard.

      Apparently it’s understandable that Porsche can retail a $100,000 car that eats it’s $14,000 engines within 50,000 miles (but outside of the warranty period), yet GM sells a $10,000 Cavalier that can’t go 50,000 without some major repair and GM gets crucified?

      I personally have been screwed over in the past by Ford, Chrysler and GM as well as Toyota, VW, Nissan, Mazda, AMC and BMC. Every manufacturer will, if given the opportunity without incurring a penalty, deny culpability for a substandard product and/or will deny warranty coverage for same.

      I just don’t understand – personally, I will consider any product from just about any manufacturer if it meets my criteria and is considered a good buy by either True Delta or Consumer Reports.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      I totally agree. I like the Fusion, C-Max and new Fiesta ST. Ford is putting out some compelling products. But at the same time I still haven’t forgiven Ford for the hell they’ve put me through with my Aerostar, E150 van and Ranger.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        Well not to seem sour-grapes, but I love Ford. I’ve owned my ’95 Cobra Hardtop Convertible for 10 years now and the local Ford dealer never fails to treat me like a big shot every time I lay down some more simoleans for a scheduled servicing. Owned several new Fords to include a ’98 Contour SVT and F-250 SLT with a great experience from the sales department getting what I wanted and they needed.

        Hyundai on the other hand….

      • 0 avatar
        NMGOM

        dolorean….

        I agree with you. And more. Truth be known: I have had Chevy’s, Fords, Dodges, Ramblers, VW’s, Isuzu’s, Nissan’s, and BMW’s. (And an old beaten up Porsche 356B in 1968 that I won’t count.)

        And, shocker of all shockers: I have had good experiences with EACH of their dealers during these past 50 years. And that includes the service departments.

        So, when people complain about dealer-relationship problems, I really can’t relate. Maybe it depends on how you treat the people at the other end, and not consider them an enemy, nor approach them angrily, nor accuse them of wrong-doing. They are only doing their job.

        Frankly, if I were a service advisor or manager, I would probably have pulled out all of my remaining hair by now, from the stories THEY tell me!

        ———–

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Honda Ridgeline…Hate is too strong…Dislike their design direction is closer to accurate (esp with Acura product line)…

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    911, Porsche. I’ve only driven one once, and ridden in several others of various vintages, but they are fantastic cars compared to the mundane dross I’ve driven around in all my life.
    Not sure I can stand the company though. I can’t put my finger on whether it’s the fault of the company by pushing their products into the ‘veblen good’ category (see, I learn new words on TTAC!), that overpriced Volkswagen (the Cayenne), or a large number of their clientele with the delusions of grandeur and snobbery.

    • 0 avatar
      sobamaflyer

      Drive a Porsche for a little while….. you will find you are the subject to more “reverse snobbery” than I’ve ever seen exhibited by us “a$$-hat” P-car owners. I’ve never been the subject of random cut-offs, fingers and dirty looks while driving my [insert the Asian family car of the moment here]. Sports car [driver] hate is a propagated myth that we are all rich douch-bags, my Porsches cost far far less than most of the Pick-em-up trucks running around.

      • 0 avatar
        Nostrathomas

        “my Porsches cost far far less than most of the Pick-em-up trucks running around.”

        That’s one thing I feel like I have to explain to people as well, over and over. I paid less for my used Cayman then most people do for their new minivan, SUV, family car, or pickup. Yet because I chose to put my money into a Porsche, the constant flow of “things must be going well” or “a Porsche on a teachers salary huh?”.

        As for the question at hand….Porsche the company does seem to be out of touch with core Porsche values these days (small Boxster would hurt it’s image, yet a CUV is a-ok). But i still love the cars. Which is probably why I’ve spent the last 2 hours playing around with the new Cayman configurator…..even if I’ll only be able to get it if someone sells it to me in 5 years.

  • avatar
    juicy sushi

    Old Ferraris. I really like the old 250GTs and the like, but I just cannot stand the company’s attitude.

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    Taurus SHO – Not the fat pig we have now, but the proper 1989-1995 SHOs. The cars themselves were not all that good (typical Ford) but that engine made up for all of the shortcomings and then some.

    And I don’t hate Ford, far from it, but ever since about 2005, their products have been on a downward spiral and leave A LOT to be desired.

    But that SHO…..I’d one one in a heartbeat.

    • 0 avatar
      rnc

      Sure you don’t hate ford, and I’m sure the average concentration camp guard had nothing against jews (maybe even liked one or two), I mean come on, bash, bash, bash, throw in little disclaimer to make it seem as though its not bashing, bash some more.

      • 0 avatar
        86SN2001

        Wow, I don’t think the Nazi comparison was justified, but whatever.

        Until you show me where I have said that I hate Ford, you are lying.

        As I have said before, I own a Ford powered vehicle and it’s my favorite vehicle to drive. It’s absolutely perfect. Pretty high praise from someone who supposedly “hates” Ford. I hate Ford so much, I went out and spent my own hard earned money to buy a vehicle with a 100% Ford engine!

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        @rnc, Yeah! Not cool… Completely uncalled for.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m a General Motors fan–it’s in my blood, don’t criticize–but I actually like the Ford products a lot, especially anything with the 3.5L EcoBoost engine (like the Taurus SHO). But they need to do something with the Lincoln brand before it’s lost forever…

  • avatar
    carguy

    GT-R and Nissan. Between below average quality and a boring product lineup, Nissan has nothing i could possibly want – with the exception of this insane track weapon that is the GT-R.

  • avatar
    KalapanaBlack

    I’ve driven quite a few of the new VW Jetta and Passat (they are heavily dumping into rental fleets). I know the cost-cutting that’s gone into them, and they are both technically inferior to the products they replaced, but they are both much more lovable and practical cars. They drive and ride quite well, get good fuel economy, and despite cutting many of the special touches the driver won’t see, many of them (height-adjustable passenger seats and auto up/down on all four windows even on the cheapest Jetta) continue.

    I think of VW as more of a faceless corporate overlord than most other carmakers, and I also wouldn’t even begin to consider any of their products as a long-term ownership prospect, but I really enjoy driving the cars.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      At the other end of the spectrum, I’m really rooting for Ford. Their apparent quality (switchgear, dashboards) and technology (MFT/MLT, reconfigurable gauges) have gone through the roof. The styling is much less boring – although I think the Fiesta and Focus are unattractive. The driving dynamics and fuel economy are leagues better than before. But the cars leave me completely cold.

      They are cars developed by the numbers.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Jeep. I like the Grand Cherokee and the Wrangler, I can see their purposes, even if I have never had one. However, the rest of the lineup is just rebadged trash.

    Also Mitsubishi. The EVO is cool, the rest of the line is outdated and the brand seems disorganized and half-hearted.

  • avatar
    200k-min

    I have never, and will never, be a Chrysler fan. I’ve simply never thought they’ve been par with GM or Ford, let alone the imports. That said, I thought they had something in the 90′s with the LH cars. I was driving a Taurus at the time and while Ford was well ahead in reliability, on style, oh those Intrepids looked good. Never have like the RWD LX platform that Chrysler replaced the LH cars with. Also, I admire JEEP but can’t stand that “trail rated” bull$hit. 99.99999% of Jeeps are lucky to see a dirt road, let alone a trail.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Our 2012 Grand Cherokee saw a lot of off-road action this past winter when we delivered Meals-on-Wheels in axle-deep snow in the Sacramento Mountain communities.

      I have never been a Chrysler fan and if my wife had not loved the styling of the new Grand Cherokee, she would be driving a 2012 Sequoia now. But the Grand Cherokee has proven problem-free, just like our 2008 Highlander, which we still own today.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Oddly enough Jeeps make fine urban assault vehicles. Think tire eating potholes, frost joints, railroad tracks, and driving over curbs rated. 4WD for semi-plowed streets and short wheelbase for parking. Also an index card that says: It has the cheapest radio I could buy. Bonus points for being able to haul nurses back and forth from the hospital.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Yeah, and they’re babe-magnets, too!

        Bought my grandson at Camp Pendleton a 2012 Dozer Yellow Jeep Wrangler Hardtop with the V6 and the manual tranny, and that boy is laying pipe all the time to those California girls.

        Since he looks a great deal like me, it’s gotta be the Jeep!

  • avatar
    ajla

    I really like AMGs, but don’t care about anything else Mercedes has built since about 1999.

  • avatar
    talkstoanimals

    Mini. I find their culitvation of the twee image and their attempts to expand the line-up with weird niche models enitrely too cynical and at odds with what a Mini should be (i.e., small, affordable, economical, suprisingly practical, and fun to drive). But whenever I experience one their cars I come away thinking, “at least they still nail the fun to drive category.” Consequently, I grudgingly respect the cars and don’t fault anyone who buys one for doing so.

  • avatar
    gourami74

    Have and love EVO IX. One of my favorite car and is currently a daily driver/get around car. Mitsubishi as a company is FUBAR. Fully expect a downward spiral similar to Suzuki.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    Hyundai Genesis. Lovely car, in saloon and coupe forms, all around, almost as if they never came from the Hermit Kingdom. However, Hyundai’s sales service at the two dealerships I dealt with made me feel like I was negotiating with a CA$H 4 GOLD PawnShop, they were so pushy. Their other cars seem to me to steal most if not all styling cues from it’s Japanese and European betters. Mainly, its the subtle, cheapy feeling that just exudes from the cars themselves. Hard to explain but its definitely there.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I suppose if I have to have a love/hate thing, it’s gotta be…Jeep.

    I love the vehicle in the abstract sense, but they are maintenance nightmares and gas-hogs. Once supply houses get ahold of your e-mail and/or address, you are constantly bombarded with catalogs that contain enough Jeep-related “lifestyle” and modification goodies that would make a Harley owner blush and would bankrupt you if you fell for the Jeep “life”.

    I owned a 1992 YJ for two years in 2008-2010.

    I no longer like Chrysler, either.

  • avatar

    I have a problem with Volkswagen Group as a whole. Aside from Bentley and Bugatti, all of VW Group’s automotive brands seem to have a nickel-and-dime, hold-out approach to their configurations whereby undesirable-looking parts are put on base-models or industry-standard features are obviously missing from a car unless you upgrade two or three packages. For instance, Porsche should not exclude a power tilt-telescoping steering column on an $80K SUV. A lower-priced Land Rover, Lexus, Infiniti or even BMW would have it…

  • avatar
    TW4

    I basically hate all car companies, yet I am fascinated by the complexity and reliability of most of the vehicles they build. I’m also fascinated by their manufacturing operations, and the level of coordination required to build vehicles in a global marketplace.

    Car companies in general come across as intellectually incurious Luddite empires. Their marketing and advertising departments are generally horrible. Their connection with consumers is laughable, particularly the desperate flailing attempts to attract Gen Y. They showcase technology in halo cars to attract enthusiasts, then they refuse to build the successful concepts, which angers enthusiasts. They scapegoat government when convenient. The internal combustion engine has made almost no substantial efficiency gains until very recently.

    Yet, the car continues to intrigue mankind, as consumers perpetually posit the utility of having personalized transportation.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    I’d have to say BMW. Love many of the products, but can’t stand that they are given a free pass on reliability and quality issues when a Ford would be hung out to dry. Also, the fact that BMW electronically locks out non dealer service means none of the newest models will ever be in my driveway. I am not beholden to the “men in the blue vans” when it comes to fixing my house; I’ll never be in the same position with my car. Having to go to a dealer for a battery and shelling out $400 plus for what should be $90 and twenty minutes in my driveway is an insult. So, it will always be older Bimmers for me. Screw corporate greed!

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    Impala or Buick Regal. I’ve had a chance to ride in and drive fairly new versions of each. Both were great cars. Unfortunately both were also GMs. Three of my biggest vehicular fiscal black holes were GM cars. If I owned either of those the panic of an emptied savings account or maxed credit card would set in every time it made a new noise.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    My own ’96 Buick Roadmaster wagon illustrates perfectly the love/hate relationship I have with GM. Being the last BOF station wagon it has the sort of cushy easy chair on wheels feel that makes the highway miles melt away along with the ability to add a frame distributed hitch to give it the sort of haul-anything ability the big pickup trucks boast while maintaining a much lower center of gravity and corresponding stability under load. Its climate control is second to none, and the LT1 is a staunch workhorse of an engine which doesn’t penalize me too badly when I refill the tank.

    That said, I loathe the low buck plastiwood fittings in the cabin for all the rattles they generate once they inevitably begin to separate from the door panels, usually because the low grade plastics they use embrittle and snap after their first decade, and the one-way “permanent” barbed fittings ensure you’ll need to snap a bunch more of them in order to remove and reapply with adhesive strips or contact cement. The plastichrome plating is of much lower quality than found on 70s Revell model kits, and invariably ends up cracking, splitting and leaving rough and jagged edges right where fingers meet the contact surfaces. I am fortunate to have the all-black plastic wiper/lights/cruise control stalk, as I’m certain the plated version would have sliced my fingers into hamburger by now. The mounting bosses on the door panels are far too thin and fracture easily, while the pot metal hinges used on the rear glass hatch have deformed after 17 years of steady downward pressure from the lift support cartridges, which has introduced a deep gouge in the latch loop as it rubs against the striker plate upon closing. And those damned polymer sliders in the window tracks have a nasty tendency to become brittle and snap, rendering the window useless. GM’s official repair method for those? Replace the entire window regulator assembly, and be careful when you drill out the rivets holding the glass into the channel, as replacing that along with the assembly doubles the already ridiculous cost. I miss the days when window regulators used the same ball bearing rollers found in pocket and sliding doors – and cost about as much to replace.

    I forget where I read it, but ~20 years ago I came across an article which detailed the cost difference between using the low buck fasteners and interior materials commonly found on domestic vehicles of the time and their higher quality counterparts from Europe and Asia. It came down to less than $20 extra to use the good stuff, and the price differential on the showroom floor was measured in thousands. It’s that sort of nickel-and-dime approach which has me howling at GM’s strategy, which for decades has been to provide an outstanding powertrain in its big cars while reminding drivers that every expense was spared on the interior bits.

    • 0 avatar
      Marko

      The most extreme example of that kind of Big-3 penny-pinching was the cracking/disintegrating dashboard on early 2000s Dodge Rams – the top of the dashboard would literally crumble into pieces if it was exposed to the smallest amount of sun! Fortunately, there are easy aftermarket solutions.

  • avatar
    tedward

    Ferrari and BMW.
    Ferrari: Love to death the F430 and 599 especially. OTOH, I believe their public statements scorning the manual transmission really are where the brand is going. So now, they make the world’s nicest hairdresser cars. I could throw numerous others under the bus here (McLaren cough) but they have zero product history and zero financial wherewithal to offer drivetrain choices so I understand. I can’t say enough how their scorn has made me hate them back. No respect given.

    BMW: I own an old one, I love everything about their history, purpose and past products. The 1-series especially is a riot driven well. But as mentioned above the lack of serviceability makes me hate the corporate philosophy that now moves them. In short, no dipstick….F___K you. I see it as a craven pandering to their dealer network at the total expense (quite literally) of all their future customers.

  • avatar

    I’m going to add some brands that make competent and desirable cars, but whose respective companies commit suicide by holding back:

    1. Acura
    2. Lincoln
    3. Maserati
    4. Infiniti
    5. Buick
    6. Volvo

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    There is only ONE BMW I would buy. The BMW 1 Series Coupé. I don’t hate BMW but… that 1 is pretty.

  • avatar
    daveainchina

    Mustang Boss 302

    too many horrible experiences with Ford, Ford products and Ford dealers.

    Ruined me as a customer for life most likely.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Firstly if its premiun/exotics I hate company owned stores. I only bought a BMW because I found a private dealer, the attitude at BMW owned dealership was so poor, like they were really doing me an honour to sit in the car.

    Ferrari just sucks. Twice I would have bought a car from them, but for the attitude. Lately their attitude has ameliorated, I tried a 458, beautiful looking car, but it pretty much was a total letdown to drive on the road. Its an auto, with lots of noise and no real go untill you are at beserk revs, which is not doable on the street.Nothing was linear, not the steering or the power delivery, no fun to drive below 10/10ths. The power steering is ford circa 1970 light but compensated by a very quick ratio. Probably a killer car on a trackday but not much fun to drive on the street. Plus as someone said here, the newer ferraris a brand managed hairdresser cars.

    Then there is porche, twice put a deposit on a GT3, dealer never even called back. Its a pity because I drove one and it was great. I seriously doubt the new bloated PDK only large barge GT3 will be the same. Porche brand was based on the 911 its so called DNA being put into their other products. Now that the 911 is just another big GT car
    we have 10 years to go before porche is just another pointless brand. Unless of course they put their best motor in the cayman, its not gonna happen

    Me I spent my money over at Lotus. Yes the build lacks, and the motor is not the best, but at least its a serious driving machine, and you can track it. Plus everyone smiles when you drive by, even if you just did something they might frown upon, the car is innocuous and fun/cute.

    Have to say the new Viper has appeal, and maybe if they have build quality and tactile feel the C7 vette may be the way to go. Ferrai and porche I think have lost the plot almost completly, even if their cars put down numbers. But then so does a Nissan GTR, so what does ferrari really offer, styling? Snob appeal? But yes I do admire their sucess as a company, even if I think they and porche are shooting themselvs in the foot alienating the core of actual “gentlemen” drivers who ultimatly underpin the desireability of their products.

    But then we can say similar things about BMW, who are now eclipsed by Mercedes when it comes to cars with a bit of passion and driving feel. BMW is the new Lexus which was the new Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      Boxerman

      I have this fantasy that if we all scream “hairdresser’s car!” at Ferrari for long enough they might get spooked by the embarrassment factor and do the right thing. Let’s make it very very public that if you own a modern auto Ferrari neither you nor your car have all that much to brag about.

      edit* I would like to add that I have driven 2 modern Ferrari’s myself. (same owner, same day, both autos, not impressed)


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