By on September 25, 2012

In 1873, it took Phileas Fogg and his valet Passepartout eighty days to get around the world, mostly by slow trains and steamships. 150 years later, that trip can take eight months\ when you do it by EV. One of the drawbacks when you have to stop every 60 miles to wait for yo r car to recharge.

Antonin Guy and Xavier Degon left Strasbourg, France on Feb. 11, writes Hybridcars. Their goal: To round the globe in a re-badged Mitsubishi i-MiEV, now called  Citroën C-Zéro. On September 24, they were back in Strasbourg,

Their trip led them through 17 countries and they covered  16,383 miles. To do so, they had to stop and charge their ride close to 300 times.

While some charging points were anticipated in advance, the crew’s biggest challenge has often been to convince the encountered inhabitants to lend them their outlets.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

5 Comments on “Ou est le plug? Around The World In Eight Months, In An EV...”


  • avatar
    ott

    And the reason for this epic adventure was…

  • avatar
    Mud

    … no real jobs.

  • avatar
    AKM

    Looks like I really put Strasbourg on the TTAC map :-).

    The picture is taken Place Kleber, one of the central squares in town. But it appears a Tesla has done the same thing, faster than the CZero:

    http://www.engadget.com/2012/09/07/around-the-world-tesla-roadster-tour-back-on-track/

    http://www.20minutes.fr/article/1009415/deux-baroudeurs-achevent-strasbourg-tour-monde-voiture-electrique
    the tesla is mentionned at the end of the article.

  • avatar
    niky

    Well, at least they had airconditioning. Say what you want about the iMIEV… it’s overpriced, undersized and feels rather cheap inside… but man can that AC howl when there’s this little cabin to cool off.

  • avatar
    Robert Gordon

    Point of order.

    The events of Jules Verne’s ‘Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours’ were set in 1872 not 1873. The book was published in 1873 which is perhaps where your error arose.

    Secondly, Phileas Fogg did the journey in under 80 days (otherwise he wouldn’t have won the bet) – actually it would have been under 79 days had Fogg gone straight to the Reform club instead of moping around his Savile Row home for a day thinking he’d lost the bet.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India