By on May 16, 2012

Clint writes:

It seems odd to me that some old Japanese cars are becoming collectible. Some cars are understandable like Toyota 2000gt, 240z, RX3, etc. It seems that rarity plays a huge role in what people consider collectible. A good example is a Toyota Cressida Wagon. Its not a sports car, its not attractive but it some how has some pizazz. I do not foresee many American Classics from the mid 70′s becoming collectible. There will be a few but it seems like people love Datsun, Toyota and Mazda’s from that era. Even low mile Subaru’s are become collectible. Has the world gone mad?

Sajeev answers:

Heavens no, the world is just right!  Many people are programmed to collect, either by sheer desire or chemical imbalance. Everything is collectible, if presented in a historically relevant condition.

This is the way its been, and the way it should be!  Austin 7s, Hudson Hornets, Nash Metropolitans, Lincoln Zephyrs (the original), BMW Isettas, SAAB Sonnetts, Datsun 510s…hell, according to the Internet, even the Hindustan Contessa turned into a cult classic Muscle Car in my mother land! If you think a Toyota Cressida Wagon has pizazz but “is not attractive”, you need some Vellum Venom. Most, if not all, Cressidas are clean, well proportioned (for their eras, esp. compared to other Toyotas in the lineup) and are well crafted designs that stand the test of time.  And with modifications, they look more than a little eye-catching. It’s a classic design that deserves more than a little credit.

People can and should pay good money for well-preserved old Japanese iron. That is how the collector car biz works.

More to the point, the problem is with you, my friend. When you say, “I do not foresee many American Classics from the mid 70′s becoming collectible. There will be a few but it seems like people love Datsun, Toyota and Mazda’s from that era” I counter with:

 

The Ford Gran Torino. It was a fantastic sales success, and super clean examples fetch decent money for younger collectors interested in re-visiting their past.  The same is true for any other American iron from that era that disco-dancin’ children fell in love with. More to the point, this particular model inspired the likes of Robert Bechtle (thanks Murilee!) and starred in one of the best TV shows that I was too young to see outside of syndication. So awesome, in fact, the car was the star for the recent (and horrible) movie remake of this amazing show.

The car was the only good part of that movie. And when they jumped/crashed them, I cursed the producers for wasting perfectly good Disco Street Muscle when they coulda given it to me! I mean, come on son!

Big Bumper’d disco iron is absolutely fuckin’ awesome! You can find many, many more proper cuts of disco Iron on flickr.com. So shut up and do it. Right now.  ALL OF YOU.

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry.

 

 

 

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80 Comments on “Piston Slap: Has The World Gone Mad?...”


  • avatar

    I like 80′s Japanese cars. ALOT. In fact, maybe that should be my next vehicular conquest. Also, Sajeev you should seriously have countered with the 70′s BIIIIIIIIG body Cadillac Eldorado. I’m sure those are beyond collectable now.

  • avatar
    raph

    @ Sajeev – or less famous bet still pretty cool cars like the mid 70′s Chevelle Lagunas or other mid 70′s A-body performance (for thier time) cars.

    • 0 avatar

      Exactly. This is what I want to hear from the B&B!!!

    • 0 avatar

      I’m a firm believer that any car 40 years old or older is interesting or even collectible, but I have a hard time believing that anyone could fall in love with a battering ram bumper era car. All of those cars, the Lagunas and Gran Torinos, were just terrible looking when compared to the cars of the late ’60s or early ’70s.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheeljack

        Ronnie, the ’73 Gran Torino wasn’t that bad. Thankfully it still had the smooth rear bumper from ’72, and it wore it’s clunky front bumper reasonably well compared to many other cars. I think ’73 was the last year for the fastback bodystyle as well.

        Back in the mid 1980′s a buddy of mine had a hand-me-down ’73 Gran Torino hardtop that we wanted to make look sporty. We added dual sport mirrors and some of the argent “Magnum 500″ style wheels shod with 60 series rubber. Then we painted both bumpers, the grille, the headlamp buckets and the rocker panels (below the ribbed aluminum trim) satin black. It actually looked pretty good with most of the brightwork blacked out. The car even handled surprisingly well with the 60 series tires and the gas shocks.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        The bumpers and the engines are the worst – get out the plasma torch and cut those bumpers down to something with more pleasing proportions and put a better driveline in them.

  • avatar
    Sundowner

    I’ve always had a soft spot for classic Datsun Z cars. The idea of owning a 240z done up JDM style with a factory “G” fiberglass nose, fender mirrors and wheel flares makes me all giddy.

  • avatar
    moedaman

    The biggest reason Japanese cars from the 70′s are very collectable is the fact that they rusted away so fast, that there aren’t many of them left.

    And watch “Chasing Classic Cars” on Velocity and then tell me that American cars from the 70′s aren’t collectable. I saw a Hemi Challenger sell for over $100,000 in an auction on that show last week.

    • 0 avatar

      I hope that CCC never, ever covers mid-late 70s American cars. Media coverage will ruin disco iron for me.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      The Challenger was a desirable car when it was new and old. The Toyota grocery getter with updated wheels, suspension and driveline fetching collector money is what’s odd. I’m glad they are getting attention. I can only look at so many Corvettes, Mustangs, Camaros, ’57 Chevies, and so forth at the car shows. Bring on the variety.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Cars from the 70′s? Nothing foreign, that’s for sure, especially Japanese…well, except a 1976 Corolla SR-5 hatchback, but that’s all.

    On the American side, all mid-size hardtop coupes 1970-72 and the 1973 Satellite Sebring and all surviving pillarless hardtops where the rear glass wasn’t fixed.

    All others? Maybe a few of the mid-sized Colonnades like the Pontiac Grand Am and the mid-70′s Cutlass Supreme. AMC Gremlin must be in there, too, solely for the reason I owned one and loved it.

    I’m true-to-form here, aren’t I?

  • avatar
    jco

    well.. it’s a new era. the kids my age who grew up in the 80s certainly didn’t mind the muscle cars our dads liked, but these crazy Japanese cars with the turbo badges everywhere.. they were OUR exotics. we liked the ferarris and the porsches, too, but the 300zx, supras, celicas (the proper RWD ones), they were attainable. although modern 2JZ supra prices certainly question that ‘attainable’ part.

    the 70s for American cars were most definitely not the same smog-choked 70s for the Japanese cars. in the 70s and 80s I think the Japanese were coming into their own in terms of engineering, durability, and even performance. and we were being sold, for the most part, undiluted Japanese market goodness. yes there are definitely special home-market engines we didn’t get, but that’s all the rage now to find and install the JDM engines in your classic or semi-classic Toyota or Nissan. L20 powered 240. blacktop 5-valve 4AGE in your AE86. while our massive 4-ton steel barges were limping along with 190hp V8s, these little cars were quick, with their light weight and often well-made 4 cylinder engines.

    they had pop-up headlights. they had talking computers like my grandma’s 1985 Maxima (sadly, I haven’t seen an example of one of these in YEARS. since it was FWD I doubt they’ll be saved). turbos, digital dashes, RWD, light weight.. the american makers tried to mimic these things when the fuel crises forced them to ‘like’ small cars but they never seemed to do it as well. the Japanese HAD to like small cars. that’s what happens when your nation is a densely populated small island.

    and now with the ability to ship almost anything anywhere, they’re mostly restorable. what you can’t find here, you sort of have a chance to find in Japan (if you know the right people). and with the 25 year rule still in effect, there will be some massively desirable early 90s cars becoming available for import. R32 skylines, I’m looking at you..

    if the late 60s were the golden age for American cars, the age they still reference in modern design (oh hai, mustang, camaro, challenger), then I’d argue that the 70s and 80s were the golden age for the Japanese cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I argue that its 80′s to 90′s with the Japanese were making some fine cars, Supras, Rx-7s, Lancers, Imps, NSX, Z cars, all of them were great sports cars. Except for the 3000gt, that belonged in 70′s America.

      After that, about every company killed their sports car lines for hybrids.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        Nah- I think the sportscar lines have whithered away all by themselves. Folks buying grocery getters b/c that is all they could afford. The hybrid line was borne out of the “greenie” movement. The idea that the sky is falling unless we all buy hybrids. The shear amount of human consumption of everything is a bigger problem than our cars’ fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      Jellodyne

      American small cars were produced grudgingly, for cheap people who couldn’t afford a real car. Japanese small cars were the main event.

      As an aside I saw what appeared to be a cherry 1980 or so Honda Quaalude driving around the other day. Those of you who live in Areas the Rust Forgot may not think that remarkable, but here in Minnesota I haven’t seen one of those in years. I’d forgotten how much I liked the looks of those, but too bad they didn’t have a semi-competent engine to match the looks.

  • avatar
    Banger

    Score another win for Brown Car Appreciation Society in the featured photo before the jump.

    Also, score another win for Sajeev. 1970s iron, be it American, Japanese, or otherwise, is pretty awesome stuff, stylistically speaking. I dare anyone to look at an Isuzu 117 and tell me it’s not sexy. Same with a ’70s Bloatstang. Yeah, either car is kinda underwhelming from a HP/weight ratio, but the design cues are going to be the next big thing in auctions once all the ’60s muscle car guys die out and their cars go through a couple decades of heir ownership before hitting the block again. Mark my words.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Any car that is over two decades old, has a clean body, good paint and drives is collectible in my book. I get a combination of odd looks and appreciation when I compliment owners of such rides.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Collectiblity is in the eye of the beholder.

    You want to collect 70s Mazdas? Fine by me.

    You want to try to use Great Grandpa’s 1977 Lincoln Town Car as a daily driver? Fine by me.

    You want to find the world’s cleanest, most rust free, remaining 1985 Chrysler New Yorker and drop a 4brl off of a Diplomat cop car onto the 318V8? Fine with me.

    Life is short. Have some fun.

  • avatar
    Philosophil

    There can be all kinds of reasons for seeing something as collectible, and while rarity is one of them, being rare is not necessary for being collectible.

    I think the Monte Carlo from the early 1970′s would make a great collectible, as would a Satellite Sebring, Valiant, or an AMC Pacer from the same period.

  • avatar
    noxioux

    Oh, Sajeev, you speak to me today.

    The most fun you can have is jump on the classifieds and look at everything from 1968 to 1978. There are some real gems out there. Cougars and Montes and MKVII’s, oh my!

  • avatar
    replica

    I want a 1979 RX7 really bad. The way my drunken self wants a burrito.

    That bad.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Sounds remarkably similar to my lust for a big block equipped luxury car from the 70s (the earlier in the decade the better). I don’t care if it has a 440V8, 460V8, or a 500 cubic inch Cadillac monster. I think about it daily. Seriously. I fantasize/plan/dream about ways to incrementally improve the fuel economy to make it more practical as a daily driver.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        There was a red 79′ RX7 in front of me this morning. I never get tired of seeing them. Every line in the body has a purpose. All the glass. The buzzy rotary under load as it struggles to merge on the freeway with the shadow of my Mustang matching its pace onto the road with little effort. It just looks so honest. My new Mustang could CRUSH that car at every measure of performance, but it’ll never be as charismatic.

        If I had a garage, I’d already be restoring one. There are quite a few decent looking 79-84′s on craigslist in the PNW area for less than $3k. A good looking 240z or 280z also overwhelms my desire for “old worthless cars that have no point other than to be detailed and driven twice a month but couldn’t be happier about it.”

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “If I had a garage, I’d already be restoring one”

      Are you saying home ownership may have one advantage over apartment life?

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I figured that the Japanese sports cars of the 70′s and 80′s were collectable, as well as a few sedans, but I never knew that Subbies and economy cars were gathering any value.

    Can’t blame them though, keep the rust out and they’ll just keep going and going. Thats why I brought Japanese.

  • avatar
    fincar1

    A couple of times at a local cruise I’ve seen a right-hand-drive Nissan Skyline 4-door sedan, bright red with the white top, mirrors way up front on the fenders, and all. It’s a navy town so I suspect the guy brought it back from Yokosuka. Talk about having the only one in town, it may be the only one in the state.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    “Turning Japanese…
    Oh, yes, I’m turning Japanese
    I really think so!”

  • avatar
    Yoss

    I don’t think it’s so odd. People get nostalgic or just want something different for the sake of having something different. Just last weekend sitting at a stoplight I caught myself looking at a well-maintained powder blue ’77 Ford LTD and thinking it had nice lines. Blue pinstripes and a white vinyl top. Nice package. Immediately after that I was thinking “What’s wrong with me?” That’s the kind of car I’d have mocked mercilessly in high school. Jump forward 15 years and surround that same LTD with a bunch of characterless modern cars and it makes me smile — in a non-mocking way.

    Perhaps I should be worried. Lately I’ve been having unnatural feelings toward 90s Roadmaster wood-paneled station wagons.

  • avatar

    The only thing wrong with 70s and 80s Japanese cars is that when they conked at 200,000 miles, people junked them, believing that they would cost more to repair than they were worth. In a pure dollars and cents context, that’s true, but a fresh engine in an 80s Celica or Prelude would probably have been way less than whatever their fickle owners bought next.

    The upside for the people collecting now is that almost any 70s-80s Japanese car is truly rare…and there’s a financial upside to keeping them running and making repairs and (some) restorations.

  • avatar
    George B

    I want a late 80s Mitsubishi Starion or Dodge Conquest. RWD, light weight, made in Japan, turbocharged, and affordable. Can’t buy that combination today.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Starion

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    When too many of a particular popular model end up at the crusher, like the Datsun 210s, you get that “oh yeah, I remember those… Plus RWD, light weight, smog exempt… How cool!” when you do see one. They where really unloved in the ’80s and why they’re so rare today, but will never be extremely valuable. More of a niche thing.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I had a ’76 280z that my sister gave me to use when I totaled my Mustang as an “in-between cars” car back in ’88.

    The engine fell out when the crossmember rusted. I christened it the “Rotsun” and later, my Infiniti was “son of Rotsun.”

  • avatar
    mikey

    For me, give me a 78 Caprice 2 door. I know where there is a 77 Impala 2 door with a 350,numbers matching. The guy will NOT part with it.

    Several people I know, have tried to pry it out of the dude. Not a chance.

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      My wife would kill me but a ’77-79 Impala/Caprice coupe (with the ‘aero’ rear window) would be right up my alley. (She is open to the idea of a Panther variant, though…Mercury Marauder maybe?)

      • 0 avatar
        Lightspeed

        Those were nice cars. I like the ’78s grille the best. with F41 suspension these things handled beautifully. A crate moter, good shocks and some poly bushings would turn one of these into a real Q-ship.

  • avatar
    cfclark

    No mention of the Gran Torino movie itself?

    Every odd interest under the sun now has an internet group that supports it, so if you like Renault Fuegos, there’s probably a place for you…now I’m looking for a clean Hindustan Contessa. (I should head down to Artesia, I guess.)

  • avatar

    Well, if I can’t get a Mazda Roadpacer, Isuzu Statesman Deville, or ZIL-4104, then I’ll take the Oleg Cassini Edition AMC Matador.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    Perhaps it’s because I was around when the cars were current, but the ’72-’79 FoMoCo intermediates and their derivatives (Cougar, Elite, ’77+ T-bird) were horrible machines. I’ve driven them and I know whereof I speak. Overweight, overstyled, terribly thirsty even with the small engines yet painfully gutless with a 460, poor interior and trunk room despite the size, zero handling, zero feel, and utterly uninspiring to drive. Ford’s attitude in the 1970s was very cynical with triumphs of marketing and gingerbread over substance and the intermediate cars were the most cynical of all.

    • 0 avatar
      CobraJet

      I bought a new 74 Gran Torino 2dr. It was the same color as the blue one pictured with the same wheel covers and fender skirts. You are correct it was huge on the outside and very heavy, but small inside. We kept it 6 years and dealt with an infant in and out of the cramped back seat.

      This one had a 351 Cleveland and C6 Auto. It was not very economical and did not have much power.

      I was very envious of my in-laws when they bought a new 78 Pontiac Bonnieville that was smaller outside, but much roomier inside. The Pontiac got better gas milage also.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Japanese? Why? There was so much more fun stuff available back in the day…

    Opel Mantas, Mercury (Euro-Ford) Capris, Fiat X-1/9s, MG Midgets, BMW 318i’s…

    I was in Munich in the late 70′s at an ADAC rally, when I saw my first Irmscher Opel Manta (A) with bulging fender flares, and I thought: why don’t we have these things in the States?

    I still don’t have an answer to that one…

    • 0 avatar
      tonyola

      Why no Opels in the late ’70s? Because the mark had grown so strong against the dollar that German cars became very expensive in the US. Opel left the US market after 1975 and the German-built Capri was soon to go. This also was the incentive for VW to build a plant in Pennsylvania.

      The MG Midget was a sad and gutless relic by the mid-’70s and hindsight shows us that the X1/9 was not a wise buy. Japanese cars like the Datsun Z and Toyota Celica offered fun along with reliability and good build quality.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      British Leyland completely ruined the MGB and the Midget by tacking on hideous, black rubber bumpers in the mid-1970s and jacking up the ride height to meet bumper-crash standards. The cars looked awful, and the change in ride height ruined the handling.

  • avatar
    DearS

    I like progress, but of course the M3/M5/M8 need no review. The E 2.3 Benz either, etc etc.Love the 84 Celica. I prefer the 2000 E39 to 1970-90 whips though except perhaps the E30.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Bought my wife a 90 Cressida. It’s funny how this car feels very old-school, despite having most of the ‘luxury’ features of newer cars. Bland? maybe, but it somehow has far more character than most newer compact sedans. I think the most collectable Japanese cars will always be RWD though. Around here we have tons of JDMs running around. A Skyline or a Crown I can understand, but I’ve actually seen 1990s JDM Camrys. What’s with that?

  • avatar
    John R

    You gotta love this – http://www.speedhunters.com/2012/05/te72-corolla-with-a-3sge-heart/

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Mid-70s iron isn’t collectible? Pull-eeze.

    If it ain’t Brougham, send it home.

    -Enjoys his 455 LeSabre hardtop.

  • avatar
    replica

    I’d drive the crap out of a mid 70′s Trans Am. It’ll go well with my gold chain, trimmed mustache and hairy chest.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Cressida Wagon? They’ve been reading The One And Only a few too many times.

  • avatar
    Sylvilagus Aquaticus

    My first new car was a ’76 Ford Elite. Frigidare White with a maroon velour interior and a 351M complete with two-bbl and single exhaust. Best ET in the quarter was 18.28 (yeah, the 2.79 rear gear didn’t help at any speed). I think the best mileage I ever saw was maybe 16 mpg on the highway. Second new car was a ’79 RX-7 GS with every option but cruise wasn’t available. I stuffed it with parts from Racing Beat and TMC, short stiff springs and Konis. Unfortunately, it died a vainglorious death in late ’83 into the side of a LeSabre that didn’t see my (RED!) car and tried to cross the highway in front of me.

    That RX7 wasn’t the fastest thing on the road but it’d take a corner like nobody’s business. Wish I still had it.

  • avatar
    Styles79

    As an owner of a tidy, low mileage ’92 Celica XX (JDM Celica Supra) I hope that values do go up. That said I bought for sentimental reasons, not as an investment. I have the intention of keeping it as long as I can, perhaps forever… of course it is a “Sunday” car, which lives in the garage and is taken out on fine days, simply for the pleasure of driving it.

    • 0 avatar
      Broo

      I’m in the same boat as you are. During my childhood and teenage years I fantasized about the Celica Supra. I didn’t know anything about the engine, driveability, value, etc… I just thought this car was gorgeous. Time goes by and in my early ’30s, I decide to buy an old car. While looking through online ads, not really knowing what I was looking for, I see a red 1984 Celica Supra, in awesome shape and I just fall in love. I really don’t care about its value, that’s the car I wanted, and I now have and enjoy it. I am lucky this car currently is average in value, but it tends to go up. Many owners of these swap engines for the next generation’s engine which produced at least 40 more HP and could be turbocharged, but I’m trying to keep mine as true to the original as possible.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        Did your red ’84 Supra come from TN? I drove a red ’84 Supra that the owner kept forever. She also had a Volvo P1800 that drove once. NICE cars. She’s beyond driving now I think.

  • avatar

    early ’90s civic coupes. late ’80s and early ’90s Mazda 323s. Late ’80s Camry wagon. A lot of Japanese from the ’70s and ’80s.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    I still think there is nothing but garbage produced between ’75 to ’82. Call it the drought years.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I’m still looking for a ’79 Chrysler R body New Yorker. Trade the detuned, lean-burn 318 for a current hemi, and you’ve got a freeway cruiser whose stately grille announces your arrival a couple yards of sheet metal ahead of you.

  • avatar
    Pinzgauer

    I would LOVE to own a Black/Gold 1987 Subaru Brat w/ T-Tops, MT and dual range transfer case. If I saw a nice one for sale I’d buy it in a second.

  • avatar
    86er

    Clint the OP writes: “I do not foresee many American Classics from the mid 70′s becoming collectible.”

    Not too many, but I think we’re on the cusp of the 75 Imperial/76 New Yorker, and the Continentals of that time rising in value.

    For the time-being, I still see dirt-cheap examples pop up. Certainly, few vehicles are good “investments”, but now with the demise of the Town Car and anything that even remotely resembles the classic post-war era of American motoring, these barges will gain more appreciation, even if for the crushed velvet seats that you sink into.

    Even the most decked out half-tons don’t have seats to compare, and are so bolstered now that they don’t encourage the classic spread-eagle, right arm over top of seat stance you used to see.

  • avatar
    Mrb00st

    Classic Japanese iron just has a different appeal. It’s sad that they pretty much stopped making anything interesting by 2000, but here’s a few from the late 70′s up that would be worth coveting.

    FA/SA22C RX-7: the classic sports car formula: light weight, engine in front, well tuned lived axle… but with a creamy smooth rotary hooked to a five speed. Like a Triumph TR7, if Triumph did it right.
    Mitsubishi Starion: especially the flared-fender intercooled models. Just SO cool. Big torquey 4-cylinder with balance shafts, funky fuel injection and ABS systems, boooost, turbo badges everywhere.
    Honda Civic EF Wagonvan RealTime 4WD: you can’t tell me these aren’t cool.
    Anything Toyota Made With The Yamaha 4A-GE: AE86 Corolla GT-S hatch/coupe. AE90 Corolla FX-16/GT-S. AW11 MR2.
    MkII Toyota Celica/Supra: big throaty straight six, five speed, folded origami styling, pop ups, yes.
    early 80′s Starlet: sub 2000lb rwd 3-door hatchback. Done.

    so many more…

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    I still say the late 70′s Dodge Magnum with the glass headlamp covers and relatively smooth bumper treatments was one of the best looking 70′s cars made after ’72.

  • avatar
    kayoteq

    Out of all the cars in Cannonball Run I ended up with the Subaru.
    Night vision and rocket boost still in design phase.

    Tips:
    buying: original radio hubcaps and owners manual. Past that evaluate with normal technical and aesthetic technique. But if those three items are present you’ve got potential.

    Bought: keep your original radio hubcaps and manual. Work around the limitations.

  • avatar
    luvmyv8

    If it’s a malaise era car that I wouldn’t mind having, it’d be a 70′s era Dodge Monaco/ Royal Monaco…. the catch being it’s a legit police ‘A38′ package with the 440. That or a Lincoln Continental Town Car, the last of the truely gigantic cars, with a 460 of course.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    Trans Ams from 73-79 kept the performance flame going, and introduced roadability too, not just 0-60. And are collectible.

  • avatar
    Commando

    The single most important factor in “collectabiliy” is that that the car has rear wheel drive. If it has RWD, you’ll always find a group of officianados attracted to it, no matter how plain-jain or vanilla it was in its day.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Any 70′s F-body Trans Am or Formula in nice original low mileage condition is very collectible and selling for far more than they sold new(as much as 3 times in some cases). Just check out any low mileage clean 10th silver anniversary pace car with a 400 stick to see what they are commanding these days. I wouldn’t give 2 cents for any 70′s Japanese car myself unless my goal was to sell it to someone else who liked them.


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