By on December 14, 2011

 

Shawn writes:

Hey Sajeev and Steve,

I recently asked the Best and Brightest for help regarding my friend’s car buying dilema, but now I’m in one of my own! I am looking to get rid of my 2006 Mazda5 GT, which has been quite problematic. I can no longer tolerate the frequent trips to the shop. Its got about 125,000km on it, and I’ve been getting offers ranging from $6000-8000 for it on trade. The cars I am considering are in the compact to mid-size class, but there are benefits to each car, and I can’t seem to make up my mind. I am seeking a car with decent fuel economy that is fairly engaging to drive. However, I DO NOT want a harsh ride. The GTA is filled with pot holed roads, and I know the stiff ride would get tiresome. Manual transmission is preferred, but not necessary. I do carry four people occasionally, so cross out any coupes. On the Mazda I’ve taken quite a hit in the residual value, so this time around, I am looking to buy something that is a couple of years old. That way, someone else takes the largest depreciation hit. Here is the list so far:
  1. 2007 or 2008 Acura CSX w/premium package and manual tranny: Essentially a Civic with a nicer front and rear end, leather, a bit more sound deadening, and the motor from the RSX. Really fun to drive, but the manuals that I’m seeing in the GTA carry a price premium… The 2008 that I test drove with 58,000km is going for $18,900. At this point, does it not make sense to just buy a brand new one for $23,000?
  2. 2008 Honda Civic EX-L w/ manual: The CSX, while it only has 15 more hp, does feel noticeably more powerful than the Civic. My main problem with the Civic is that it feels a little gutless on the highway. However, it does deliver great fuel economy. Going in the $15-17,000 range.
  3. 2007 or 2008 VW Rabbit: These are surprisingly cheap in the GTA… There are quite a few 2007 and 2008s with low mileage going in the $12-15,000 range. I don’t find this car as engaging to drive as the Acura, and the VW shifter just doesn’t compare to the Honda’s. I do love the “solid” VW feel, but I am concerned about the reliability of the Volkswagen. Fuel mileage is also disappointing. Jettas carry a price premium and I prefer the hatch.
  4. 2007 or 2008 Ford Fusion SEL: This is the lazy commuter choice. It was surprisingly good to drive, but I am not a huge fan of the looks, which I find to be a little bland and cheap looking. I would be looking at a 4 banger with auto in this case, because the manuals are just about impossible to find. Quite cheap as well, with low mileage examples going in the $13-16,000 range. Not the greatest on gas either.
  5. 2007 or 2008 Honda CR-V: In Canada, only the LX was offered with front-wheel drive. If you step up to the EX, you need to get AWD, which I am hearing is a little problematic. Apparently, there is a grinding issue in reverse? Either way, I had this car as a rental for a week when the Mazda was in the shop and found it to be quite easy to live with. The steering and brakes were just right and the car was roomy. Downsides? LOUD on the highway, and the ride is a little harsh. Fuel mileage is so-so. Holds it’s value really well, so we’re talking $18-24,000.
Lastly, 2012 Ford Focus Titanium: Ford has really outdone themselves with this one. I found that the car felt like it was worth the admittedly steep price tag. The car has a refinement to it that is not matched in the compact class, and I found the MyFordTouch to be pretty easy to use. Downsides? Rear seat legroom is a joke. Also, I am assuming that this car is not going to hold it’s value well, since most Fords do not. Probably best to wait a couple of years for a lightly used one?
Well, Best and Brightest? What to do? Am I forgetting something that I should be driving? I have intentionally left out the TSX and GTI as I do not want to purchase a vehicle that takes premium when regular is already at $1.38/L.  Help Sajeev and Steve!

Steve Answers:

I used to live in upstate New York which also has rather nasty roads. So I can appreciate your desire to couple comfort with sportiness.

Back when I lived there in the early 90′s, the car to bridge both divides was a Volvo. 240, 740, 940, etc. All those bricks were underpowered. But they offered excellent durability in a nasty climate and a feel for the road that was unique unto anything short of a Mercedes W124.

So what up today? It depends on where your comfort and sportiness intersect. Everything you mentioned would be brutal for me after 50k miles. I would opt for a midsize vehicle that can offer a nice thrust of acceleration, a healthy level of comfort, and a good feel for the road.

My choice? 2007 Honda Accord EX with Leather, V6 and a five-speed. If you can’t find a good one (and yes, that is a tough find in this market), I would just enjoy a four-cylinder version. The Acura versions are overpriced and the price for Subaru Outbacks and Foresters in the northern country makes them poor values compared to a new purchase of the same model.

If you are willing to buy new… ask Sajeev. That’s his domain.

Sajeev Answers:

I can see why you’d want the Focus Titanium, but depreciation on a top drawer compact (just about ANY of them) will be worse than a middle of the road unit. So you should steer clear of Titanium, wait a couple of years for them to show up on the used car market. A new Focus SEL is a wiser move, and you should also test drive the Hyundai Elantra and Sonata…just for funzies!

More to the point, anything can be fun with a touch of aftermarket suspension bits. Sure, the last-gen Focus is fairly hideous, but all the SVT/aftermarket goodies just bolt right up! Ditto a non-SS Chevy Cobalt with all the suspension bits from that “Hot One.”Relatively speaking, of course: none of these modifications will hurt the ride enough to upset your commute to work. Probably.

Well, that’s only food for thought. Also consider the Mazda 6, last generation. They aren’t the best on gas, but I truly enjoy driving them. You might too.

Need help with a car buying conundrum? Email your particulars to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com , and let TTAC’s collective wisdom make the decision easier… or possibly much, much harder.

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71 Comments on “New or Used: Avoid “Titanium” Grade Depreciation...”


  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I agree with the mid size sedan choice. A lightly used new generation 2011 Sonata or Elantra are solid choices with good fuel mileage potential. The 4 cylinder Fusion is a good overall car with better than expected interior and trunk space plus Ford’s excellent SYNC. An Accord or Malibu 4 cylinder is also a reliable choice just avoid the top tier models with there oversized 18″ poor in the snow tires unless you plan on snow tires every season. I have personally seen 34-35 MPG in several 4 cylinder/6 speed Malibus and from what people tell me the Accords aren’t much behind that. Also note the 10/100 Hyundai power train warranty and GM’s 5/100. Certain select certified Fusions will have a 6/75 used warranty as well. All of these choices give much better than average handling and road holding and are comfortable on long drives.

  • avatar
    vbofw

    If you can live with the small back seat, get the Titanium! You obviously love it. I don’t blame you, the packaging is really nice.

    Sure any time you’re buying a costlier vehicle, the depreciation will be steeper compared to the base model. It’s a fact of life.

    Assuming you stay on the 5 year resale cycle, the Titanium is also going to deliver you another thousand or 2 in trade-in, compared to a low-end Focus. Plus your MPGs will be great and repairs should be nil for 5 years.

  • avatar

    Hmmm, is the Focus available from the factory with all of those brown trim bits? Looks sharp.

    With the Focus, though, enthusiasts tend to agree that the one to get is the SE with manual trans and Sport Package. Much cheaper than a Titanium and the attractive yet rugged cloth will prove more comfortable in extreme hot or cold (and is available with heaters).

    I would avoid any Mazdas if you plan to keep them beyond five years of age. They start rusting about year 5.5 where the roads are salted.

    I would drive any serious contender along the roads you usually travel for as many miles as possible, paying close attention to seat comfort and ride quality. These are the key reasons, beyond reliability, that people come to hate a car they initially loved.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      That’s the Tuscan Red interior trim package in the photo. It’s available from the factory on the SE, SEL, and Titanium. You can get a SE with the SE sport package, rapidspec 203a, and the Tuscan red interior package (so you get leather) plus the winter package for the brutal cold of the Canadian winter. According to Ford Credit’s projected lease residuals a SE hacltchback retains about 4% more of it’s value compared to a Titantium hatchback.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      The Titanium may be $1,400 more, but i like the keyless entry, push button start, and upgraded interior you get with it.

      Michael, i built a Focus Titanium online with heated cloth seats. That’s how i’d want one.

  • avatar
    bludragon

    I just logged on to say you should look at the “SE with manual trans and Sport Package”. Michael beat me to it. As it is cheaper to start with, depreciation will be much lower than the Titanium spec. Buying a new car with all the kit is generally a bad idea for depreciation. Get one with the bare essentials and you won’t lose nearly as much. At least, that is true in the UK and US. I’ve never shopped for a car in Canada. Is the Titanium available with a manual there?

  • avatar
    zone

    Unless I’ve personally know the previous owner, I won’t buy “used.” If you’re buying preowned through a dealer and getting the warranty applied, that’s something to consider but it is factored into the price. You see how people drive? Gas/brake/gas/brake. Wonder how often the oil or fluids has been changed? Think most people ever care about rinsing off the undercarriage during winter? I’d rather buy new and take care of my new car then buy someone’s headache. Now if it’s grandma and I know exactly how she drove her STI every day since she owned it and now she’s trading it in on a Boss 302 – okay, maybe that’s the exception.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Steve, I’m still scratching my head as to how a Volvo 240 could be included in any conversation with the word “sportiness” in it without the inclusion of the word “lacking”. You got the “underpowered” part right and they were incredibly durable. I’ve never driven a W124, but my in-laws’ 240 had the same road feel as box trucks I rented from Budget. It may have been a solid workhorse, but positively the least entertaining vehicle I have ever driven.

    • 0 avatar
      stryker1

      Volvo’s are pretty reliable, until they aren’t. And then the repair costs will put you into the poor house. I have a friend who has calculated that he spend 3k to 4k a year keeping his 11 year old volvo running.

      • 0 avatar
        TEXN3

        Agreed. When our (my wife’s) 84 760 GLE started having niggling cooling system issues we replaced a few items (radiator, reservoir, hoses) and did a leakdown test to see if the thermostat was the issue. Nope, it was a leaking headgasket, which also explained why the turbocharger was getting gunked up.

        $3k in repairs, plus all the little annoying electrical issues (including not shifting into 4th when cold). Yeah, could have been a project car but I was glad to rid of it.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        I have a friend who has calculated that he spend 3k to 4k a year keeping his 11 year old volvo running.

        For that you can lease a bunch of very nice new cars. But I bet he feels like the paragon of economic virtue.

      • 0 avatar
        stryker1

        He’s not great with money in some ways (you know those $300 Dyson blade-less table fans? Yeah…). But he is planning on replacing it in the next couple months (after constant nagging by all of his closest friends).

  • avatar
    orick

    I hear you about the bad GTA roads. I am thinking of trading one of my cars in for a CUV for a more relaxed ride as well. So my vote is for the CRV based on your list, although I am a bit surprised about the high price for an used one. The CRV should be by far the most reliable of the bunch and you will appreciate the worry free drive for years to come.

    Personlly I am thinking about the RAV4 as it has an even softer ride and better visibility as well as more cargo room than the CRV. Might as well go all the way.

    Surprised about the high price of the CSX. Is that CPO from dealer? My 2008 TSX lease buy off is only $18,000.

  • avatar
    jmo

    On the Mazda I’ve taken quite a hit in the residual value, so this time around, I am looking to buy something that is a couple of years old.

    That’s not going to save you any money as high used car prices are now such that deprecation is linear in many cases. Especially with something like a 2007 Accord!

  • avatar

    I’m currently driving (wife’s car) a 2005 Mazda6 in upsate NY. With snow tires and the traction control, it’s fine in the snow. Mileage is 29 average, mixed city/highway with the 2.3L and automatic. There is rust bubbling under the paint and on the shock towers. Long distance it is relatively comfortable, but the seats are rather stiff even on short drives. The low-beam headlights are pathetic. You can drive with the high beams on and not get flashed. The brakes, especially the rear, will rust due to road salt and need to be replaced about every 15k-20k miles. The heat is uneven, your head will sweat while your toes are frozen. The automatic trans has always “surged” 500 rpm before shifting when cold. Dealer told me it’s normal. Haven’t driven the standard trans.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    I will champion the Rabbit. We had one for several years (before a woman on her cell phone totaled it). For a compact car, the interior space is extremely usable (the passenger front seat folds flat, allowing for interior transportation of 8 foot 2x4s). The front seats are firm and comfortable, and it has kind of alot of go for a compact (it’s not GTI, but its a hell of a lot faster than a civic). As far as reliability, its the only VW that consumer reports recommends as a used car. One tip though. Definitely get the 4 door version. It has the heated seats and pretty decent sound system. We still miss our rabbit.

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    I bought my daughter a new rabbit in 08. It has 50K on it now and has had NO issues whatsoever. Enough said

  • avatar
    PaulVincent

    Should have bought the MazdaSpeed 3. Resale was very good.

  • avatar
    Franken-Subie

    I’m not sure about price range but I’d look at a 2007 or 2008 Subaru Legacy GT Ltd with 5pd. They’re sporty enough but aren’t too punishing. The AWD might be nice up there, too. I know they hold their value well, but they outgoing Legacy was much better in many regards to a new one.

    I’d also look at a latest model Forester if you like the CRV.

    Good Luck.

    EDIT: Saw you didn’t want premium fuel, so that axes the 2.5 LTD. I think any last-gen Legacy sedan or wagon work. The Outback would decrease fun factor but increase comfort.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Plan for the long haul and get the Titanium. It obviously turns you on to the point that the other alternatives are nothing more than expressions in bookkeeping. If you can find a car you really like, the enjoyment of the automobile itself will make up for whatever spreadsheet shortcoming could occur.

    Besides, do you really want to spend the next 5+ years muttering to yourself, every time you drive it, “Just think of the resale value?” Sometimes we go overboard on the economics of automobile ownership. Or, those who do I seriously question just how much of a car enthusiast they are in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      vbofw

      Amen on sometimes we go overboard on the economics of car ownership. I am quite guilty of this.

      Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to buy that shiny new A6 I’ve been hemming and hawing about!

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        Most of the time it makes sense to buy what you want, especially if you are going to keep the car for more than five years. Particularly when you are dealing with different trim levels of the same basic car.

    • 0 avatar

      I used to have a six year-old Volvo, and now I have a new Titanium. Yes there is a depreciation cost, but modern aerodynamics and engine tech mean that I’m now refilling about half as often. That pretty much covers the depreciation, and the car is really quite cool. So go on, get the Titanium.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      +1. When I got my BMW, I asked my dad if he thought I was crazy. He said no. He said there may have been more fiscally prudent choices out there, but he knew I had done my homework, given them fair consideration, and wouldn’t have been happy with them, and that was what I needed, a car that I would be genuinely happy to own. When I was thinking about other cars, I would inevitably end up using the BMW as the standard for comparison. I also knew what I was getting into when getting it and sacrifices might have to made (less eating out for example) to afford it.

    • 0 avatar
      dastanley

      Agreed. You may as well just go for what you truly want regardless of how responsible you may feel going for the lesser model.

  • avatar
    Hildy Johnson

    The 2010 Fusion looks a lot better than the 2007 one IMO. There is a 2010 model for sale right now at autopricecanada.com that looks like a passable deal.

    (Disclaimer: no affiliation other than that I bought from them myself.)

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I would recommend the GM Epsilon bodies for a comfortable cruiser. Look for a Saturn Aura XR with the 3.6 V6/6 autobox. My daughter bought a CPO 2007 Aura in October for about $14K out the door. The car has every option on it, a 5 panel sunroof, XM, OnStar, heated leather seats, shifter paddles and some other stuff I’m sure I’m forgetting.

    67K miles, the car had new (Goodyear Eagle LS2) tires and brakes installed, and it came with the GM CPO warranty which is pretty good. I believe it’s 12/12 bumper to bumper and 5/60 on powertrain. The particular dealer sweetened it with free tires for life on the car, but I wouldn’t be too excited over the cheap-o tires they’d pony up. I do better on tires at Discount or Belle (in MI).

    The week after she got the car we drove it to Cleveland for a wedding, in early October the Lake Erie shoreline can be a bit tricky, as we drove through rain and snow. The car ate up the miles like a champ. The only bad thing is, my daughter is kind of short (5’2″), she apparently can’t see when reversing. She’s already damaged the rear bumper cover twice in the two months with the car. I only point this out if you’re not real tall, you may want to open a door before backing. I thought she bought well, and the car has presented no issues at this point in time.

  • avatar
    ajla

    How much does a used Regal go for in Canada these days?

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    How about a 2009 Nissan Altima? Depreciation hit should have taken hold, especailly since they promoted the heck out of them. They handle well, have great brakes, and are fun to drive. They even ride well. CVT is a negative, but can you get a manual with the 4? If you want to modify the suspension, all sorts of goodies are available…

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Depreciation hit should have taken hold

      Just had a buddy try to buy one – no such luck. He bought new as the used were totally not a deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      A friend has a 2010 Altima with the CVT and he swears he’ll never get another one. 2008 was the last year for the 6-speed manual with the 2.5 four, and there weren’t many sold. Otherwise, that would have been a good choice.

  • avatar
    BigOldChryslers

    More to the point, anything can be fun with a touch of aftermarket suspension bits.

    Beware: Ontario insurance companies frown strongly on any vehicle mods, and will decline to insure a vehicle for even slight suspension mods or an aftermarket “cold air” intake. If you make changes and don’t inform your insurer, they may deem this as lying by omission, in which case you’ll be without insurance if you get in an accident.

  • avatar

    Want something reliable and fun, with a good suspension setup?

    Two choices: used Acura TSX 6-speed, or Honda Accord EX 5-speed. Both have great transmissions, and an absolutely bulletproof engine. The beauty of both of these cars is that handling is sharp and accurate, the ride is well controlled and fairly sporty, yet it is never harsh. The Accord especially succeeds at this where others (Camry) fail. And don’t underestimate the 2.4l as well, it sounds great, has nice pull for its numbers, and is quite efficient.

    Go out, find one of these two, and give them a go. We’ve had our 03 Accord since it was a year old, and it has been, far and away, the most reliable and livable car we’ve ever had. It now has 285,000kms, with no suspension or powertrain issues to report, and many more kms to go. And this is in Canadian climes as well. Can’t go wrong.

    As with all things Ford, I’d stay away from a first year Focus. Ford does good things, but usually needs a year or so to sort out brand new models.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      The Accord especially succeeds at this where others (Camry) fail.

      In terms of being loud and flimsy feeling maybe….

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        Can’t buy it. Flimsy is not a word I would use to describe the Accord. Light but strong comes to mind, from personal experience.

      • 0 avatar

        Yeah, I’m going to go with geeber on this. No part of the Accord is “flimsy.” The doors still make the best sound of any car I’ve owned, including a VW. The interior is solid, the car rides solidly…

        The Camry is soft, but somehow immature compared to the Accord. Yes, it bounces over big bumps nicely, but its more perturbed by ice heaves in the road (frequent in Canada) than the Accord is. Loudness? Yeah, not that quiet. But the Camry Hybrid I drove recently wasn’t a saint in this department either.

        My point is not that the Accord is the God of cars, but rather that it is a good balance considering the OPs needs and desires.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        It isn’t just your experience geeber. There is no shortage of people who are perfectly willing to expose their lack of integrity to the millions of people who’ve been in Accords and Camrys in the past decade. Having ridden in my neighbor’s 128K mile, 2004 Accord EX-L V6 6-speed coupe just last week, I can say that flimsy doesn’t describe anything about it. Loud didn’t come to mind either, although she commented that when she got it new the noise of the shifter clicking into gears stood out to her compared to the 270K mile Accord that it replaced. There are plenty of cars that are nothing more than beaters when they reach 128K miles and 7 years of age, particularly on San Diego’s improbably bad roads. The Accord isn’t one of them.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      TSX requires premium gas which is on the Do Not Want List.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        You’d really not buy a car you really liked because gas might end up costing an extra $3.60 a week?

      • 0 avatar

        If you research it, most people say the TSX doesn’t need Premium…you can take a less than 5% performance hit and stick regular in (the engine adjusts for this).

        Edit: Of note, some levels of the aforementioned CSX also require premium fuel…so the OP doesn’t seem that worked up about it.

  • avatar
    calsonicgtr

    I’m pro Titanium. I bought one and I love the thing. I was looking at that, the Cruze, and the Elantra (a much different spectrum that you have listed) and I found that it was the best to me. I’m not worried about depreciation since I plan on keeping it for more than 5 years. Might as well buy something that you’ll enjoy during that time

  • avatar
    jogrd

    I’m all for the great Canadian tradition of the winter beater. The freaking streets and roads around here are so rough that I drive my truck all winter and put the car away only partly because of traction, but mainly because of the nasty holes, constant window and paint chips and the misery of 30 below mornings. I ‘m hoping that the increased gas bill will be worth it at resale time when the car is still in one piece.

  • avatar
    slance66

    Nobody mentions the current generation Kia Optima? Bigger than the Focus (and cheaper in some cases), good mileage and the same HP as a TSX in 4 Cyl trim. Ride – handling balance more to ride than some others. A used Altima could work, but my friend had one where the floorboards rusted through. Might be dicey up north.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Just pony up a little more money and buy a 2012 Outback. It gets great mpg, is good to drive and has ample power.

  • avatar

    There’s a cheap manual Fusion out in Ajax right now in your price range.

  • avatar
    SV

    I’m a big fan of the Focus, so of course I think you should go for that.

    However, MyFordTouch would make the Titanium a no-go for me. It’s a great idea, but I’ve seen too many horror stories on the forums about indexing, crashing, etc. It’s just a mess right now. The best alternative then would be the SEL; I would personally go for an SE manual, but the SE’s interior doesn’t have all of the nice touches of the SEL/Ti (less soft plastics on the doors, fewer chrome bits). The PowerShift isn’t much of a concern any more; a recent software update appears to have fixed much of the glitchy shifting owners have been reporting, and it was more ironed-out than in the Fiesta to begin with.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Just hope some of them Titanium spec parts aren’t Cooper Works priced…

    If I wanted a comfy ride I’d be staying away from anything sport-tuned suspension.

    Be careful with your portfolio Canadian RE hasn’t taken a dive yet. Point in case Boston Mansions/century homes less 100K similar homes in Toronto sell for 1-2 million.

  • avatar
    MrIncognito

    Have you looked at the new Civic Si? I know the reviews aren’t that excited about the new civics, but there are two important things to consider:

    1. The new civics have more sound insulation than the previous models.

    2. The new Si is very peppy. It now has essentially the same drive-train as the Acure TSX, but is substantially lighter and cheaper.

  • avatar
    Andy D

    Almost makes me glad to be a 99%er

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    how difficult is it to import a car into canada from the u.s.?

  • avatar
    changsta

    Hey all, original poster here. I asked this question a while ago, all the way back in April! I’ve been driving a 2007 Acura CSX Premium 5MT since May and loving it! The car was a babied lease return with only 42,000km on it. Silver, black leather, 6-disc, sunroof, HIDs, auto climate, no-nav. Exactly as I would have ordered it if it was new. It looks and drives like it’s brand new, and I was able to swing a pretty good deal on it. $17,000 out the door!

    I ended up choosing it because it had the best combination of sporty, efficient, luxury for me. To make sure I was making the right decision, I was actually able to rent a 2012 Ford Focus Titanium for a week from Enterprise. The Focus ended up being a much more difficult car to live with than I had anticipated. My Ford Touch continually crashed, the transmission had many erratic moments that left me feeling worried about it’s durability (this was before the reflash was offered), and I did not find the driver’s seat comfortable for long periods of time as the head rest juts out pretty far forward and forced me to crane my neck. Most annoyingly, the electric steering required numerous corrections to keep it in a straight line on the highway. I walked away from a week with the Focus feeling like it was the hot date that gradually starts to show their little peculiarities which ruin the package.

    Thanks for the advice Best and Brightest. I think you guys down south would really like the CSX if it was offered down there… but then again, I don’t mind badge engineering as long as I can see the value in the price premium. In this case, nicer materials, nicer front and rear end, more powerful engine, same great reliability and economy.

    • 0 avatar
      orick

      $17,000 tax in? That is a really good deal. Is the suspension the right balance between sporty and comfort.

      Enjoy your new ride and snow free winter so far this year.

      • 0 avatar
        changsta

        Yes, taxes in! If you’re looking for a fair price on a used Acura, go see Anthony Pratt at Acura on Brant in Burlington. A little bit of a drive from the GTA, but there just weren’t many manual CSXs to be found in the heart of the GTA.

    • 0 avatar
      dasko

      Any reason you did not go for the CSX Type S?

      • 0 avatar
        changsta

        The reason I did not go for Type S was that I did not want to spring for premium gas. Also, the Type S has red interior lighting which I did not like… i much prefer the blue in the regular CSXs.

    • 0 avatar

      I can guess at plenty of reasons to not go for the Type-S, dasko:
      1. Not as many available used
      2. Requires premium
      3. Harsher ride (something he definitely didn’t want)
      4. Would have been much more expensive used

      Heck, I would go for a Type-Speed either…wants the point?

      Congrats on the purchase OP. I also ran far far away from my Mazda.

      • 0 avatar
        changsta

        Interesting! Which Mazda were you driving? I actually had a little blog going that chronicled all of the problems I had with my Mazda, and was starting to get a small following reporting all of the same problems. Mazda Canada was a nightmare to deal with: rude, arrogant, and placed all of the blame on me. Never again.

      • 0 avatar

        I had a2005 Mazda 3 Sport GT. Suspension issues aplenty in that it tore through rubber a ridiculous rates, consistant trouble with brakes (squeaking, sticking, etc) and of course rust…which Mazda Canada screwed over my local dealership on. Numerous other little things and I gave up on it. I’d be interested to see your blog.

      • 0 avatar
        changsta

        http://www.mymazda5lemon.blogspot.com/

        I stopped updating it after a while. Rusting spread to trunk and hood area, as well as around the sunroof. Definitely not adequately designed for the Canadian market. Final straw was that the transmission started to shift roughly and seemed like it was on it’s way out. I also forgot to note on the blog that around 40,000 km, Mazda finally released an updated software for the tranny since it would slam into second from first when it was cold. Maybe that had something to do with the transmission giving up the ghost so early.

        Also, front struts were becoming worn, and the front brakes were about to go again. I do not think Mazda took into account the additional weight of the 5 vs 3 when designing the car, so the parts simply could not handle the additional weight.

      • 0 avatar
        dasko

        I agree on the lighting, congrats on your new car!

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Nice choice! When I was shopping for a car in 2007, I wouldn’t have minded the option of the CSX’s 2 liter 155-160 hp engine instead of the 1.8 fuel economy special or the 8,000 rpm premium fuel engine in the Civic Si sedan I bought. I drove a 2005 Civic Si hatchback with the 160 hp 2 liter, and I thought it was just right for a compact commuter. Acura grade interiors are nice too, particularly if you have seat heaters.

  • avatar
    CalgaryGuy

    Congratulations on the Acura, changsta.

    For anyone working on the same shopping list. Be careful about those “City Golf” and “City Jetta’s” from that time period (07-10) as sold in Canada. They were the old Mk4 model, which I don’t think was very reliable or nice. The Mk4 had been obsoleted in Europe for years, and discontinued in the US as well.

    But the regular (Mk5) Golf/Rabbit — much nicer car.

  • avatar
    mshenzi

    If you look at used VW, consider going TDi– the equipment level steps well up from base, the suspension set-up funtionally splits the difference between standard Rabbit/Golf/Jetta and GTI/GLI, the engine is entertaining, and the fuel mileage is great.

    The Golf TDi is costly new, but depreciation could be your pal when you look used. Manual available, though you may have to hunt to find one. TDi Jettas are much more common than TDi Rabbits/Golfs, (US TDi Jettas were built in Mexico until recently, but the TDi Golfs came over from Germany and in pretty limited #s).


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