By on January 21, 2011


I moved to Denver over the summer and am now experiencing the joys of proper snow driving for the first time in the 29 years since the State of California saw fit to give me my first driver’s license. With just a ’92 Civic and a ’66 Dodge A100 in my personal motor pool, I figure it’s time for me to start shopping for something with four driven wheels. In fact, I need something that can do four-wheel burnouts on dry asphalt!
I could do what everyone else in the state— including my wife— did and just buy an Outback, but I was thinking more along the lines of a Scout… or maybe a BMW 325iX… or an AWD Justy. At the top of the list, however, sits the 15-years-before-its-time/the-fools-weren’t-ready-for-it AMC Eagle, a car that came about when the cash-strapped folks in Kenosha decided to drop a Concord body atop Jeep-based running gear. You see quite a few of them around here, but I hadn’t seen one that I needed to buy. That is, until I got tipped off about this excellent ’82 SX/4 (you can go here to see some photos, but do not attempt to install the American Greetings software that allows you to look at full-sized images. Trust me). Why, yes, a rally-ized Eagle coupe with hot-rodded 390, 4.10 gears, and manual-body Torqueflite sounds like a great idea! I’d probably have to cut out at least part of the full roll cage, since whacking one’s dome on a steel bar in a minor fender-bender isn’t my idea of fun, and I don’t feel like wearing a helmet on the street. OK, fine, it’s actually a very, very stupid idea, but still: I must have this car!

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63 Comments on “Could This Be The Ideal Colorado Winter Car?...”


  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    This is my secret shame.  I talk a lot about wanting, oh, something interesting, smallish, efficient and yet classy, in a way.  I’d like a Saab 900 SPG, or an AE86, a 318ti with an M3 engine, or even a first-generation Insight, but deep, deep inside, when the chips are down I know it’s either this (or rather, this with the faux woody look) or a Suzuki X-90.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Do it! When will you ever get a chance like that again?

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Perfect!  Rare and cool to us car “geeks” (I say that proudly) but the greasy bits will be easy to replace if need be.  AMC cool with Jeep mechanicals!  Sweet!

  • avatar
    Sam P

    I’d go for an Eagle SX with the original 258 ci boat-anchor AMC six pulled in favor of a fuel injected 4.0 liter out of an XJ Cherokee. That’d be a fun torquey ride. Especially with a stick shift and full time Selec-Trac.

  • avatar
    dswilly

    I had a ’91 iX, I should have never sold it.  Now a friend drives it in Utah for his ski car and reminds me constantly how much fun he is having with it. They are one of the best snow cars you can find, the 4wd system is very rally-car-driving-style friendly. Unfortunately they are all well used/abused and a good one is a tough find. The 4wd system is more or less bullet proof but if it does fail get ready to pay for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam P

      BMW’s de-evolution of their AWD system from the E30 iX system with mechanical center and rear limited slip differentials to the current Xdrive system (3 open differentials with brake-based traction control) was a major butt plant on their part, except for the fact that Xdrive is probably cheaper per-car to produce.
       
      At least my wife’s Subaru has center and rear mechanical LSDs with no traction control to muddle in things.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      Sounds like my Subie…one of the major benefits of having a manual transmission, besides having a manual transmission.

  • avatar
    GuernicaBill

    Looks like fun, but don’t call it a “Denver winter car.” I’d take a Civic over an Eagle for driving in Denver snow conditions any day of the week. At least the Civic will start, and it will be just fine getting where you want to be. Of course, I grew up in western NY so the Denver snow seems like nothing to me.
    The Eagle at least wouldn’t be worse than FWD on icy highways like a Scout would, though.

    • 0 avatar

      My wife grew up in Wisconsin, so she thinks the Civic is just fine for the wimpy snow we get in Denver. Being from California, ANY snow is the end of the goddamn world for me.

    • 0 avatar
      FromaBuick6

      My current winter beater is a Civic (granted, I live in Georgia at the moment).  I’ve made it through plenty of Midwestern winters in relatively lightweight front-drive cars with no ABS and cheap all-seasons.  And if the wife has an Outback, there’s no need for another AWD.
      But notice I said need, Murilee.  Because the AMC Eagle is awesome, especially in SX/4 form.  I’d totally rock one.  But, thing is, I’d probably never drive it in the snow in fear of ruining it.

    • 0 avatar
      neevers1

      AWD or 4WD is totally unnecessary and often dangerous in the Denver/Colorado springs area, why dangerous? It gives people who don’t know how to drive in the light snow we get a false sense that they have more control than they do, 2wd cars are still 4 wheel stop, like all cars. I’ve never had a issue getting going, but stopping, yes on ice a car with 4 wheel stop, will not stop the way you want. I’ve lived in Colorado for 27 years now, and have never owned a 4wd car, ever, and I’ve NEVER gotten in a crash on snow, my fault or otherwise, I have however avoided 4 AWD cars THIS YEAR alone that couldn’t stop and almost took me out, somehow I missed them in a 2wd car, with lame all season tires, the horror, not by stopping but maneuvering around them. Driving a stick is the single most effective thing you can have to drive safely on snow or ice, it modulates your speed, allowing far more actual control over a car vs the false sense of security 4wd gives people. If I could I would ban the sale of AWD cars on the front range of Colorado, you don’t need them, not one bit.
       

    • 0 avatar
      GuernicaBill

      I’m glad you admit you have a snow problem. ;-) I’d get the Eagle, but for goodness sake don’t drive it in the snow, some dude from California in a 4Runner will just plow into you!

  • avatar
    twotone

    I’ve lived in Colorado for 34 years and will take my RWD BMW with four real winter tires over AWD/4WD any day. Part of the vehicle choice depends upon where you live and how you drive. If you are here in Denver any RWD vehicle and the right tires are all you need. We get a killer blizzard once every five years or so. Just wait a day or two for our solar snow removal to do its job.
    If you live in Steamboat Springs and need to get to work at 5:00 AM every day, then a 4WD SUV is probably a better choice.
     

  • avatar

    murilee – an eagle sx/4 is an excellent choice. this one has been a little to heavily modded for my taste. there’s just not enough keonsha left in it. the price isn’t exactly a bargain either… hold out until the impossible eagle shows up and then pounce!

    • 0 avatar
      Porsche986

      exactly… not enough Kenosha indeed.  Well, they’ve all rusted away to nothing around here.  Just be sure to always clean out the wheel wells… those front fenders will rust away in a matter of seconds… even in non-salty conditions…

  • avatar

    I love the old Eagles. Came within a weekend road trip to central California to snag one for under a grand in fine running condition a couple years back. In the end, I decided to stick with what I knew and bought a second Mitsubishi Galant VR4.
     
    Sure, you could pick up a retired rally car and attempt to civilize it, but know it’s lived a hard life and, given how long its been since I’ve seen anyone even mention an Eagle in the North American rally community online, probably spent some time parked. As much as I love the old Eagles – and rally – I would respectfully suggest you consider a Galant VR4.
     
    There are a number of GVR4 owners in and around Denver and, while you might find one on Ebay/Autotrader/Craigslist once in a blue moon, there’s generally a good 20-30 of them listed for sale well below what they should be selling for in the cars for sale section on GalantVR4.org (which is apparently experiencing database issues as I post this).
     
    Think of it this way. The Galant VR4 was designed to haul ass on loose surfaces. They were born rare in this hemisphere, with only 3,009 ever sold in North America, and there is an almost endless supply of disposable DSM twins out there from which to source replacement parts to keep your Galant on the road for a good, long time.
     
    They are four door sleepers, oft mistaken for early 90s Maximas and generally invisible to Johnny Law and undersirables bent on helping themselves to your stereo. They come with 190hp, AWD, 4WS, ABS, and leather right out of the box, and can be truly sinister weapons in the right hands. They’ve proven themselves in rally, they’ve gone 200mph+ at Bonneville, and there’s still plenty available for under $5,000.
     
    Juuuuuuust throwing it out there.

  • avatar

    I’ve had a secret love for these cars for 20 years or more. Unfortunately AMC reliability tended to be worst in class, even when new, so I worry that a vintage AMC could be more trouble than it’s worth.

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    Get it!

  • avatar
    cfclark

    I lived in Madison, WI for almost ten years, after growing up in the Southeast, so snow driving was something I had to learn as an adult, having been raised to believe that the first snowflake was the signal to buy all the bread and milk you could find and prepare for Armageddon, or at least a few days home from school eating all that surplus bread and milk. The best snow car I had while living in Madison was my ’87 Caprice wagon. Not because it had superior traction, but because the extra ground clearance and massive front bumper allowed it to bull through and over plowed and drifting snow better than the FWD Saturn we had, which would drive right up to a snowdrift with its better grip and then just get stuck. Not to mention, despite the Saturn’s plastic side panels, which would seem to be the better choice for snow driving, by the time I’d spent two winters in Madison, the Caprice was dinged in a few places and had contracted rust cancer (oxidoma?), and I just didn’t care anymore. I was safely ensconced in a massive tank, sliding around town with a couple hundred pounds of cat litter in the wayback, and no one would dare pull out in front of me.
     
    My point being, don’t get hung up on what looks on paper to be superior traction, which can often get you in trouble; think of mass and ground clearance (which an Eagle will have anyway) and just don’t do anything fast. Learn to work with the skid, not against it, and you’ll be fine. Oh, and live in a municipality with a healthy snow-removal budget.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      There is something midwesterners tend to forget, the inclines are much steeper in the mountain west. AWD helps a bit at times when in the backcountry. With that said, a 90 Integra and Artic Alpins got me through 7 Utah wintersm(high up in the Wasatch and Uintas), and I was quite happy. But the “confidence” in my Outback is there as well as the ability to have a wagon and not a ute.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      I had a ’79 Impala wagon for 11 years, during which time it was used mainly on logging roads, many of which were not maintained, and often in the winter.  My Impala had positraction and inflatable rear air shocks, so it had both amazing traction and could carry a lot of weight without losing clearance.  It did almost as good as a 4×4 in snow, but was stopped by sharp ditches.  With snow chains, it was as good as a 4×4 without.  As you said, rust was a constant problem with them.  Combination of limousine and pickup truck.

  • avatar

    Most of me wants to say “what could go wrong?” and urge you to plunk down the cash. But the 1% of rationality that hasn’t yet succumbed to LeMons Disease (or is a Syndrome?) says that you just can’t really tame a wild animal, and that’s what this rally car is — a wild animal. Sure, you may think that you’ve domesticated it when it rolls over and lets you rub its belly, but deep in the reptile part of its brain, it’s really just waiting for that moment when you’ve gotten all trusting and are vulnerable and you move just the wrong way, and then it will pounce on you like a kept puma on a beefy hunk of gamekeeper. And then you get what you deserve for trying to take the wild animal out of its natural habitat. In the case of this Eagle, it will probably wait until you trust it just enough to take it into the backcountry during a blizzard, then it will do something unthinkable like throwing a valve or barfing a rod out the side of the block. The kind of thing that even your trusty glovebox sized container of JBWeld can’t fix. And there you are, stranded (or worse, stranded and also responsible for your wife being stranded with you), cold, in the wilderness, where your cell phone doesn’t work. That’s when you’ll think “I wish I would have paid more attention to those parts of Jon Krakauer books where the protagonist survives a surefire wintry death by no more than his wits and a time-worn Swiss army knife,” right before you succumb. The wild animal always wins the game. The only way you can win is to not play. But what’s the fun in that?

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      I think Krakauer’s subject thought he was going to survive wintry death with wits and a Swiss Army knife, but he ate the wrong wild berry and died not all that far from help, if I remember the book correctly. My point being, I agree with you, hubris in winter can lead to death in a way that will lead people to think “what an idiot”, if you’re not careful.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve65

      “hubris in winter can lead to death in a way that will lead people to think “what an idiot”, if you’re not careful.”
       
      Or near death if you’re really lucky. the name “Stolpa” springs immediately to mind.

  • avatar
    pgcooldad

    Wouldn’t it make a whole lot more sense to get a hardtop Jeep Wrangler instead and throw in a couple of good seats instead?

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Well, the rally Eagle is a whole ‘nother animal.
    But permit me to address the topic of newbie snow drivers and 4x4s, AWDs, etc.  If you watched one of the televison networks in the past few days, you may have caught a video of a driver in– prolly — Atlanta attempting to seduce the New Jersey barrier on the left side of an ice-and-snow covered highway.  Unfortunately, the camera’s field of view wasn’t wide enough to capture the beginning of this driver’s troubles, but by the time he/she comes into view, his/her car looks like its attempting to have carnal relations with the New Jersey barrier.  Unfortunately, the camera does capture the New Jersey barrier’s response to the vehicle’s amorous advances: it flips the car.
    The vehicle: a Jeep Wrangler with big fat tires on all for wheels.
    Story #2: for ten years my family owned a house in the highest part of West Virginia, which has its own micro-climate and receives something like 150 inches of snow a year.  During our trips back and forth in the winter, we would see an average of one vehicle per trip that had left the road and was stuck somewhere out in a field — usually right side up, but not always.
    Every one of those vehicles was an SUV of some sort.  Please understand that the State of West Virginia does a very good job of snow removal on its highways, so lots of people go up to that area (which has two downhill mountains and a big cross-country ski area) in 2wd cars.  In fact, I made the trip a number of times in my Taurus SHO with all-seasons on the wheels while the rest of the family — who could stay longer — made the trip in our Blizzak-equipped AWD Previa.
    The point being that its easy to overestimate the benefits of 4WD/AWD in driving on slippery stuff.  When it comes to stopping and turning, those benefits are just about zero.
    My late uncle lived in Kremmling — several hundred miles west of Denver on US 40, at about 7500 feet elevation.  For him, the family car was a big Chevy station wagon, equipped with snows and some extra weight in the back.   Eventually, he got a WW2 surplus Jeep CJ . . . but that was just to take him to remote fly-fishing spots in the summer.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      I keep saying this, but it never seems to sink in.  I believe the reason so many suv’s lose control in the winter is that people think: “it’s slippery, locking the transfer case is for more traction, right.”  The trouble is, that for the same reason you shouldn’t lock the transfer case on dry pavement because it puts stress on the drivetrain, you shouldn’t lock the transfer case for highway driving because on slippery surfaces the system will break traction on some of the tires on the first corner.  That’s why you see so many capsized suv’s “on the first corner”.
       
      (Suv’s also have a weight shift on corners that’s greater because of their higher center of gravity, and happens faster because they have stiffer suspension.  This more dramatic weight shift exacerbates the loss of tire friction resulting from the locked drivetrain.)
      Rather than explain this, the manufacturers have been adding stability control systems.
       
      And rather than think they can drive faster around slippery corners than people with cars, SUV owners should be driving SLOWER around corners.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      The trouble is, that for the same reason you shouldn’t lock the transfer case on dry pavement because it puts stress on the drivetrain, you shouldn’t lock the transfer case for highway driving because on slippery surfaces the system will break traction on some of the tires on the first corner.
       
      I disagree.  I always lock it in 4WD when I’m driving a 4X4 on a slippery highway.  I’ve never noticed the phenomenon you speak of, and I first starting driving a 4X4 that way sixteen years ago.  Tires regularly lose traction during winter driving regardless of drive setup, and you simply apply the appropriate steering or throttle input to compensate.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    33 years at 9000ft in the Colorado snow belt here, and this is my take on winter driving gear. I would have good winter tires on a RWD over all-seasons on a 4WD/AWD. Then drive train consideration come into play.  FWD is much, much better than RWD, and 4WD/AWD is better than FWD.
    The 4wd wagon version of the Eagle, 4wd Subies were all popular up here in 70′s & 80′s before the great SUV craze.
     

  • avatar
    itsgotvtakyo

    Don’t be a coward, do it and DD the hell out of it.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    Hopped up AMC 390 with a manual valve body torqueflite? BUY IT!

  • avatar
    M. Ellis

    I grew up in Denver and spent a lot of time driving in the mountains growing up, summer and winter. We had a lot of AMC Eagles around town, and they all got replaced by SUVs or Subarus once AMC was no longer a going concern. My mother, who is old enough to be on Social Security, has a Legacy AWD Wagon, and every year she has the snow tires put on and drives all over the mountains in weather up to and including whiteout conditions.

    I can’t say I miss the Eagles much.  Among the people I grew up with, the summer ‘mountain car to have’ was a tubo Saab.  For winter, it was the Jeep Grand Wagnoneer (this was back when an ‘SUV’ was a Bronco II, and you don’t ever want to be in a spin in one of those). These days it’s a Volvo Cross Country (though that seems to be in danger with the sale of Volvo), Subarus, and SUVs.  Regardless, once you hit the brakes, your fancy 4WD/AWD vehicle is basically identical to any other car if you don’t have the right tires on it, something a lot of people seem to forget. I had a 1993 Ford Probe GT, and between the V6, the manual gearbox, and a full set of Mud & Snows, it was ridiculously fun in the mountains in winter.

    Now that I’m living in a place with weather again, I’m seriously considering getting a Subaru for myself. Just need to convince my wife that she can actually live with a wagon if she doesn’t have to drive it as her primary vehicle. She hates them. I find them extremely practical. Of course she’s also one of only two women I know who hate SUVs because they don’t like sitting up high.

  • avatar

    Murilee, there’s a house not far from here that has 3 or 4 Eagles & Spirts. I’ll try to get a snapshot for you.

  • avatar
    relton

    Actually those aren’t Jeep underpinnings, they’re Chrysler. Chrysler developed the 4wd system, but chickened out when it came to making a car with it. So they sold the parts to AMC. The trasfer case, front diff and axles were all made in the New Process plant in western New York.Chrysler made the tranmission, too, for most AMC cars back then. But the case they had developed to use with this transfer case is unique to these cars, and not the same as a Jeep, or a 4wd Dodge truck.I had a couple of friends who were infatuated with these things for years. They seemed to spend an inordinate amount of time fixing things in other cars that never broke, like gas tanks, front engine cover castings, seat frames, and window regulators.AMC cars are an acquired taste.Bob

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Where did you hear that bunch of phooey, that wasn’t designed for a Chrysler. You can easily swap in a 2sp transfer case from a CJ I have a friend who did it to his it’s a bolt in deal. The CV joints are shared with the Eldorado and S10 even if the shaft between the 2 joints are different lengths. The front diff is a Dana 30 sharing the guts in the center section with CJ’s, Scouts and many other vehicles.

    • 0 avatar

      He didn’t say designed for a Chysler, he’s right. American Motors and Jeep used a variety of transfer cases designed by New Process Gear, a Chrysler subsidiary.
      Here’s a link about the Eagle/Spirit transfer case being made, ultimately, by Chrysler.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Ronnie, He did say Chrysler designed it but then chickened out and didn’t put it in a car. Yes it was designed by New Process who at the time was Chrysler division but it was specifically designed for AMC and is just a version of the Quadratrac systems offered in the Wagoneer/Cherokee.

  • avatar
    DeadEd

    Could it be the ideal Colorado winter car?  I don’t know, but I’ve had the same thought.  I do know a bit about AMC powertrains from the era.  The high compression 390 was a hot number, with plenty of torque on tap.  The fuel economy sucks.  My brother has 72 AMX with a 401, with some headwork and a cam.  It will go.  It is durable, and easy to work on.  His car has 3.54 (or 3.55?) gears.  That’s more than plenty.  The 4.10′s in the subject car are, IMO, too low for daily driving.  If you buy it (and please at least look at it…it’s just too cool), you’ll want to change the gears.  Another buddy had a manual valve body 727 in his Demon.  A great transmission, but the full-manual, all-the-time, became a chore.  Of course finding a replacement 727 isn’t hard.
    All that said, I love to see some pictures of you hooning around in it during a heavy snow!
     

  • avatar
    WRohrl

    Murilee, you need the Civic wagon with “Realtime 4WD”.  Available ’85 – ’92 I think…

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Murilee, do you see any Jeepster Commandos out there anymore? The AMCs were unique, but fragile.

  • avatar
    mazder3

    For all of you who think 4wd/awd is invincible in the snow check this out.
    http://www.thebostonchannel.com/slideshow/weather/26528890/detail.html
    Ever seen a Subie Impreza high centered on a jersey barrier? You have now.
    Murilee, you only live once. Buy this thing and hoon the living daylights out of it!

    • 0 avatar

      Please note this took place in Massachusetts. Legendary for some of the worst driving in the USA. If you’re in the East, passing someone while doing ’bout 15 over and someone flies up behind you flashing their lights…check the plate when they fly by. Compared to Boston, the Major Deegan in NYC is a tiptoe thru the tulips…although the Capital Beltway in DC is also a place where you’d probably see an AWD in the Jersey barrier.
       
      Driven sensibly, AWD/4WD offers a huge advantage in inclement weather.
       
       

  • avatar
    MrFixit1599

    Buddy of mine had one of these in high school, never could get it to run right.  Swapped it for an old econline ford van with his uncle.  Turned out there was a butterfly valve of some sort in the exhaust that wasn’t opening.  After his uncle found that he drove it for MANY more years.

  • avatar
    banjopanther

    You need a lifted Suzuki SX4 with a turbo kit.
    http://www.rocky-road.com/sx4sus.html

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Scout II, Scout II, Scout II, that is what you need, no it won’t do 4 wheel burnouts on dry pavement but with the 345, 4sp, 3.73s, and a track-lock you can do 3 wheel burnouts. OK so not a big smoky burn out. If you want to do that in stock form you need a Cyclone/Typhoon, or Lincoln Aviator.
    But seriously since you left your good snow vehicle in CA, the CV, a Scout II is the way to go. They are relatively cheap to buy and despite what people will tell you most parts are cheap and available. International made very little of the components on the vehicle, GM or more correctly GM divisions made more than IH. Most of the electrical is GM, including the starter and alternator depending on what distributor you have the cap and rotor is from GM, Ford, or Chrysler. The IH SV engine is the most durable push-rod V8 ever made. I know many people with 300K and a few with 500K on them w/o any major engine work.

  • avatar
    grzydj

    If you live in Denver proper, then you don’t need a 4WD vehicle to get by. Thanks to all the sun that you get, and the decent temps, it’s not like you have the stuff hanging around very long in the city. Go to North Dakota if you want to see what it’s like to have snow hang around literally the entire winter.
     
    Put some General Altimax Arctic tires on your Civic for winter if you want more traction and be done with it, you’ll do just fine.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    The Subaru ads claiming the Outback was the first sport utility wagon always pi**ed me off.  The Eagles, with their three limited slip differentials, were much better than most of the 4×4 junk that followed later. But they were relatively small inside compared to how large overall they were.

    I never owned one of these, but drove a 4-door sedan model up a busy, snowy, narrow mountain road. It breezed past the numerous other stuck cars and trucks.  This was funny because unless you were one of the few people who knew what it was, it looked like a normal car.

    It’s nice to see the few remaining examples that people have kept in nice shape.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    Safe as milk, what do you mean that there’s not enough kenosha left in it? There’s a 390 AMC mill under the hood. You can’t get any more kenosha than that!  The engine alone would be worth big bucks, AMC 390 and 401 engines are rare, and over the past few years AMC’s have been becoming cool with the musclecar crowd. Prices for 390 and 401 mills have been steep due to the rarity, last year they covered an AMC swap meet in either hot rod or car craft magazine, and a 401 block with a cracked cylinder went for 400 bucks!  The days of people giving away AMC parts just to get them out of the way are just about gone.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    http://carcraft.com/techarticles/116_0503_amc_brute_engines/index.html

  • avatar
    Matthew Sullivan

    Evo X  +  Blizzaks  =  Win

  • avatar
    AJ

    Back when I lived in Colorado in the 90s, I always noticed that Outbacks were popular with lesbians. At the time my sister-in-law (also living in Colorado) bought an Outback for driving to the mountains to ski. I laughed and pointed out my observation, and she realized this too and sold the car. (lol)

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    AJ…..LOL.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    Milk, remember tho, interior parts from a gremlin, hornet, spirit or concord will fit the eagles, since they used the same body.
    Back in the day before I could afford a new truck I had several AMC’s for winter beaters. They make for a fun beater, and are cheap and easy to keep running as long as you have an AMC powered one. I wouldn’t want one of the later spirits or gremlins with the audi 4 banger.


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