By on January 13, 2010

my what protruberances you've sprouted!

Contrasts and extremes; it’s what keeps things (and this gig) from getting dull.  Today I give you the ultimate contrast to yesterday’s Porsche 356A. Both were built at the same time, and were the pride and joy of their respective countries. A reasonably affluent buyer could afford either of these, although even the 60 hp “Normal” 356 cost somewhat more than the 315 hp Super 88 in 1959. Either way, their respective owners would have enjoyed the prestige and envy of their neighbors when they drove them home new. But look at these two cars forty years later, and what do we see? Contrasts; and lots of them. They’re about as different as two cars can get. But thanks to a bi-continental childhood and a little help from my friends, I can still find love for both of them. 

the ant-porsche

I’m not going to launch into the hackneyed “fall from glory yank tank” rag here. Yes, America’s self-confidence and exuberance of the late fifties and early sixties was soon proven to be a bit misplaced. And this ’59 Oldsmobile is a mighty painful reminder of that. In my book, it’s the weakest of the wild GM sisters of that peak year of irrational auto-exuberance. If there’s an ounce of true inspiration in this design, it long went up in a puff of smoke.

dynamic, but just not aerodynamic

It’s as if the blank, unadorned corporate 1959 body shell, which for the first time ever was shared by all the divisions, was passed around one at a time, and Oldsmobile got it last. You can just image the Olds studio frantically sketching various wild fin/tail light combos deep into the night that somehow would look different from the other four: Chevy’s batwing, Caddy’s ultra-fin, Buick’s fairly clean in-between Caddy and Chevy fin, and Pontiac’s...oops, maybe Pontiac and Olds both got the dregs in that corporate design bottom-fishing exercise. Oh well.

guys, I've got a brilliant idea for the taillight

The Oldsmobile rear end still looks somewhat less cohesive than the Pontiac’s, although that’s not saying a lot. It just looks so damned contrived, whereas the Caddy, Chevy and Buick tails are expressive; whatever was being passed around to stimulate the creative juices, those three got the good stuff. But then there’s that front end. Never mind; I’m not even going to bother trying to compare them all. Any way you look at this car, it just isn’t going to come up as a winner.

my best side

Under the hood was another story; this Super 88 had the new 394 cubic inch (6.5 liter)  Rocket V8 that belted out a hefty 315 (gross) horsepower. I bet the kids of the original owner had some fun with this sled back in the day. And those wide seats were good for more than just feeling the push of the Rocket against your back.

super-dooper 88

Another study in contrasts is to the 1951 Olds Super 88 we reviewed here a while back. As fun as these late fifties cars are to look at and stimulate our memories of the good old days, the reality is that they were anything but an improvement of the cars being made ten years earlier, except in certain technical aspects. But the basic package of the ’49 – ’55 era cars was substantially better; more compact yet much more comfortable to sit in with their tall seats and superb leg room. As I’ve pointed out before, the tallish boxy car makes a much more practical one, as today’s better CUVs/MPVs make all-too clear if you’re looking for maximum personal space. If Detroit had invested in the continual refinement of its 1949 models, by 1959 they would have had the…big sedan version of a Porsche. Oh well…

psychedelic steering wheel

The highlight of this Olds in my book is that steering wheel. My brother’s friend drove a 1960 Olds two-door hardtop, and it had that same cool wheel. We’d go wallowing off in that spacey ride and drop acid; what a perfect combination. I just couldn’t get enough of that steering wheel and…’nuff already. Let’s just say that in 1969, a hand-me-down Olds like this and hallucinogens turned this Olds into a Righteous Rocket Ride , but probably safer and certainly more visually stimulating than the Porsche. I knew if I kept at it long enough, I would find something good to say about this Jetsons-mobile. Better leave it at that, before my blood-sugar drops any further and colors my mood.

psychedelic paint job too

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74 Comments on “Curbside Classic: 1959 Oldsmobile Super 88...”


  • avatar
    holydonut

    Well, at least post a picture of a Olds 88 that isn’t rusted out and junked… I mean it’s not as if all of the 88s were unloved hunks of poop.  Fifty years later we see some are still in good condition because somebody with a different value system of classic cars still likes their whip.
     
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3206/2887781699_3d76f35d23.jpg
     
     

  • avatar
    86er

    What was wrong with the ’59 Pontiac?  Wide-track, a clean design, as far as 1959 designs went, split grille, and tri-power if so desired!

  • avatar
    Andy D

    Heh heh, we hallucinated in a buddie’s mother’s 66 Olds  Vista cruiser.  Oh  misspent youth!

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Is that cross-hatch pattern on the upholstery and door panels stock?

  • avatar
    Jeffer

    I just can’t look at these old timers in the same way after the IIHS crash test of the ’59 BelAir. I used to get a wave of nostalgia, now I can only think of how unsafe they really were.

    • 0 avatar
      DweezilSFV

      Only in a contrived demolition derby type of crash “test” by an insurance industry lobbying group. Done for sensationalism’s sake and not for any credible information. And all with the money made from denying accident claims. Gotta love em.

      Millions of people drove billions of miles in those old 59s alone, unbelted un airbagged un-federalized un-sensored and OMG: lived.

      No need to worry about how “unsafe” anyone was. Enjoy the nostalgia.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeffer

      IIRC one or more of the GM divisions didn’t use the X-frame, I think Olds was one of them. I recall having seen old print ads for the Guard-Beam frame in Oldsmobiles of this era. Menno, if you’re still around chime in…

  • avatar
    cnyguy

    “We’d go wallowing off in that spacey ride and drop acid”
    My respect for you just hit zero.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Umm; that was a long time ago, I was sixteen, and not the driver. Do you judge everyone on what they did in their teens?

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      My vehicular acid experience was in a B210. I think that it was mushrooms in the Austin Marina.

      I guess that I’m going to hell. I’ll see you there Paul.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Juniper; and alcohol is not a drug?
      My friend; let’s revisit the cars of forty years ago with a little humor and perspective, but let’s not revisit the arguments and social norms of that time. It was long ago, and this is now. Let’s look back and laugh about it.
      And BTW, all cars are the handiwork of man, therefore they’re all as flawed but yet as lovable as humans. That’s my take, and my tale on all of them. I’d be very happy to have both this Olds and the Porsche in my driveway.

    • 0 avatar
      Cammy Corrigan

      Mr Niedermeyer,
       
      You did acid? My respect went UP for you!

    • 0 avatar
      Martin Schwoerer

      But why?

    • 0 avatar

      I think we’re missing the point here. Clearly drugs are bad because you might wake up 40 years later to find that one your offspring is your boss.

    • 0 avatar
      educatordan

      @Edward, thanks for the first belly laugh of my day.

    • 0 avatar
      another_pleb

      I believe that LSD wasn’t outlawed in the USA until the early 70s. Besides, there were probably worse things he could have been doing.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      The real question is what drugs were Chrysler stylists taking when they styled the 1960-61 lines? I wonder if we’ll see a Curbside Classic story on the 1960 Plymouth, 1961 Plymouth or 1961 Dart/Dodge? Those designs make this Olds seem positively prosaic.

      It’s one thing to do drugs in a car – it’s another to style the car while on drugs. (Let alone approve the designs for production. The Mopar executive team must have been hitting the stuff, too.)

      The Olds design team responsible for this 1959 model may have gone too far the other way. I always thought that the 1959 Olds looked best in Ninety-Eight form (longer wheelbase) in the four-door hardtop bodystyle. It best shows off the extravagance of the 1959 look. The two- and four-door sedans send out conflicting messages…they are trying to be practical when this design is anything but practical.

      This model was actually considered a huge improvement over the 1958 model at the time. The 1958 Oldsmobile sold relatively well (considering that the 1958 recession devastated sales of medium-price cars), but it was considered over-the-top even at that time. Bob Hope joked that he didn’t know whether he saw a 1958 Oldsmobile on the Hollywood Freeway, or Liberace driving a motorized piano.

      Interesting trivia bit – the front end, with its ridge over the grille and headlights, supposedly inspired the 1960 Corvair, which featured a ridge that circled the entire body. That Corvair with its ridge and miniaturized version of the greenhouse used on the 1959 four-door hardtops was HUGELY influential in Europe and Japan.

  • avatar
    wmba

    We came to Canada in 1959. One of my father’s new co-workers had one of these in burnt orange. He was not impressed, because tires lasted just 4000 miles. Those would be the 2 ply rayon balloon tires, which I remember bulging under the weight of the vehicle as it just sat there, looking out of breath at being poked into life.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, Paul, but weren’t these the last full-size GM cars to have leaf-sprung rear axles? Anyway, it wobbled down the road and had a jet-puff ride. Couldn’t wait to get out of it. The ’59 Chev was much better, but didn’t have that wowee steering wheel.

  • avatar

    I love that steering wheel, too. I think the Buick and the Caddy are both a step above the Chevy in rear styling, and the Caddy is two steps above the Chevy in front styling. That grill is a fabulous paean to glitz.
    @cnyguy: a large percentage human males are programmed evolutionarily for risky behavior in their teens and early 20s so this sort of thing is normal behavior. I wasn’t, but I don’t think my lack of having dropped acid makes me any more worthy of respect than Paul. And I really don’t think that this kind of behavior makes someone unworthy of respect. I mean, who gets hurt when someone drops acid? (besides perhaps the person themselves.) If someone was cruel to animals or to other people, that would be a different matter.
    Drugs? Many societies have drug-taking rituals. We Jews drink Manischewitz on Passover. Alcohol, nicotine, kwat, coca leaves, peyote, distance running (endorphins). It’s normal human behavior, and many animal species indulge in this sort of thing as well. The trick is to do it in such a way that others don’t get harmed, which is part of the purpose of the rituals in both western and indigenous societies.

  • avatar
    Loser

    The cars GM made in 1959 are some of the ugliest things to ever hit the road IMHO. BUT.. at the same time something about them intrigues and appeals to me. I’d love to have convertible version of the Olds, Pontiac or Chevy. The 1959 Lincoln Continental falls into the same area with me. I guess they are just so ugly I can’t help but love them.
    Now the Aztek……that’s a different story.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      I saw a bright yellow Aztek today – one of the later models without the ‘pleasure ribs’ – and I liked it! It was grotesque and I wouldn’t want one, but for a second there…

    • 0 avatar
      john.fritz

      It still amazes me that Buick took that piece-of-shit Aztek and made something out of it that almost looks normal. Not that a Rendezvous is anything I would own but at least I wouldn’t be embarrassed driving it.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    What an abolute mess of a car.
    It wasn’t supposed to look like this.
    It was supposed to be a refreshed 1958 model, which gave Oldsmobile a lift compared to the disasterous sales 1958 gave to the other GM divisions. Oldsmobile actually survived 1958 with it’s hideously overchromed monster. Buyers liked them for some reason, and Olds staffers looked golden during a very non-golden year.

    So, by the summer 1957 Earl styling coup d’etat, perhaps the other divisions felt a need to get excited over their new designs while Olds fretted during their brief taste of success. Perhaps the Olds stylist preferred the Harvey Earl 1958 designs originally scheduled. But whatever happened, Buick, Cadillac and Chevrolet rolled the dice with their 1959s – and Buick and Chevrolet lost, Cadillac was laughed at, and Pontiac took their 1959 design to the “Wide Track” bank and won big. Oldsmobile just coasted on their earlier success and waited out the clock with their nonchalant attempt at a 1959.

    By 1960, GM was seriously considering axing Buick, not Oldsmobile. Buick was on life support for a couple of years until GM fortunes started to turn around. Chrysler and Ford killed their Buicks during this era, but GM still had deep enough pockets to keep it living in zombieland until Buick found a new niche.

    Oldsmobile had a great twenty year run from 1958 to 1978, a new golden age. Maybe they knew crap when they saw it with clay wings during that summer of ’57.

    • 0 avatar
      Juniper

      The 59 was a mess, but they learned their lesson. Find us a 61 2dr. Hardtop.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Now we’re on the same page; all the ’61 GM cars are gold.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Thanks for filling in the details, which confirm what my intuition told me.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      One reason the 1958 Oldsmobile sold well was because Oldsmobile had avoided major quality problems in the 1955-57 period.

      Buick set a sales record in 1955, but those cars were produced too fast, and the slipshod quality alienated buyers for a few years. Buick simply didn’t have the capacity to produce 750,000 cars in one year – at least, not 750,000 well-made cars.

      Chrysler, Dodge and DeSoto sold well in 1957, but those cars were rusting away and falling apart within a year.

      Mercury had as much of an image in the marketplace then as it does today. And it was plagued by quality problems in 1957, too.

      I also wouldn’t say that the 1958 model year marked a “brief” taste of success for Oldsmobile. The division had been steadily rising in sales since the debut of the Rocket V-8 in 1949, and had nailed down fourth place on the sales charts for 1954, behind Buick (a dowdy Plymouth fell back to fifth place).

      In 1955 and 1956, Oldsmobile held fifth place, behind a resurgent Plymouth. It was still in fifth place for 1957, when Plymouth knocked Buick down to fourth place.

      The 1958 Oldsmobile sold well despite its styling, not because of it.

  • avatar
    Martin Schwoerer

    Oops, crossed wires. My “but why” question was directed at Cynguy. And has subsequently been answered (discussed) by others.

  • avatar

    Actually, my best drug experiences were
    1. the endorphin high I got riding my bicycle up Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain Nat’l Park, from Estes Park, elev ~8000 feet to more than 12,000 feet at the pass.
    2. the sodium pentathol I had for getting my wisdom teeth out.

    • 0 avatar
      educatordan

      Ever smoke a big ol’ cigar and then drink a large Starbucks coffee?  You can do that in Albuquerque, NM.  Duke City Cigars is right next to a Starbucks, NOW THAT”S A RUSH!

  • avatar

    I think what VanillaDude is describing was driven by the 1957 Chrysler Corp restyling. I do love the rear on th ’58 Chevy.

    • 0 avatar
      VanillaDude

      The 1957 Chrysler restyling effected the 1959 GM cars, not the 1958s. The 1958 GM cars were complete redesigns that were already finished before the 1957 Chryslers hit the road. Harley Earl oversaw the 1958 designs, just as he had over the previous many years as design head of GM.

      When Earl left after refreshing the 1958 GM cars, and traveled for an extended vacation in Europe. The 1959 GM cars he approved were tossed aside and while Earl was in Europe, the GM design staff created a new set of 1959 GM cars, reflecting the fin designs of the Chrysler products.

      So the 1957 GM cars were refreshes of the original 1955 cars, the 1958 cars were totally new, but lasted only one year instead of three as originally planned, and the 1959 designs were totally new, but lasted only two years instead of three as originally planned because the fin era died out as fast as it had lived, and GM had to scrap the original 1959 designs. What this all means is that instead of keeping the original 1958 design until 1961, GM spent millions to scrap it, then spent millions to design another car they had to scrap before 1961. This was very expensive to GM’s bottom line.

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    My cub scout den mother had one of these when I was a kid.  A white 4 door wingback hardtop with blue and white interior.  This would have been in the late 60s, so the car was pretty old then.  Like all of you, I loved the steering wheel.
    I also remember marvelling at the big rubber bellows that went from the huge POWER BRAKE pedal down to the floor.  I never understood what it did, but it looked serious.
    Say what you like about the styling, the Olds was the best of GMs 59 line if we are measuring quality for the buck.  The big 394 Rocket V8 and the old Jetaway HydraMatic (IIRC) may have been the pinnacle of GM powertrain engineering.
    As you can see by my icon, I am all about Mopars from this era, but I wouldn’t half mind a big Super 88 (or maybe even a 98) hardtop or convertible.  Put on a fedora and find a way to get some Sinatra or Basie out of the Wonderbar radio, and folks, we have the real 50s experience.

    • 0 avatar
      educatordan

      I have the fedora, now I’m just looking for the car.  My girlfriend bought me a fedora for Christmas, I wore it as we drove to her parents house, she said, “You look like you need a big ridiculous station wagon and a couple of kids to yell at in the back.”  She meant it as a compliment.  I would love a 50s “anything” American made in a 4 door sedan version or station wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      I have an old top hat. Let me know when you come across a Locomobile woody fixer upper.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Dan,

      Watch Jay Leno’s clip of him driving his ’54 Coronet Station Wagon.  You’ll love it.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    While that steering wheel might look cool, I can see it causing the grisley demise of more than a few loaded individuals that took their ’59 Olds on an ill-advised trip. In today’s world, that steering wheel is a class-action lawsuit waiting to happen.

    IOW, whereas Chevy had the Impala, maybe Oldsmobile should have called their version the Impaler.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert.Walter

      I think you mean “product liability” rather than “class action”.
      Actually, with an airbag buried in the wheel hub, an unbelted occupant would be unlikely to suffer a case of “pinch-face”.

    • 0 avatar
      scottcom36

      That’s the “Safety Vee” steering wheel, the whole point of which is that it LACKS a protruding center hub to be impaled on.

  • avatar
    educatordan

    Paul, could you find the wagon versions of these bad boys?  If you haven’t noticed yet, I’m a wagon nut.  I always find it fascinating what manufacturers will do to create wagons, Studebaker being one of the most obvious “hey we grafted this back part on here” look.

  • avatar
    mikey

    It was the winter of 1973. I was working in the pit on what was known as the Chev line at the Oshawa plant.  The last job in the pit was manned by a  fat ,crusty “old guy” I guess he was about 35. He was the repair/inspection dude. Myself and my fellow 18 year old assembler were shocked when the old dude invited us out for beer in the parking lot at lunch.

      There sitting at the back of the lot was a sad looking 59 Olds convert. Even in 1973 a 59 was a rare sight.

    Well, there was room for six of us and a 24 of beer. 40 minutes for lunch in those days,I don’t think,we ever did the heater working. If  I remember right,the 24 took a beating.

     Ah…..the memories… those that didn’t get destroyed  by the acid. BTW Paul ,In my case it was a 1962 Strato Chief.

    • 0 avatar
      educatordan

      Mikey, what vehicle were you guys building?
       
      (BTW, you’ve got me thinking about an Impala for when I finally get an Education Administrators job (principal, ect) next year.  Take my test Saturday, wish me luck!)

  • avatar
    mikey

    Hey a little piece of movie trivia. Anybody remember the drive in classic “Hot rods to Hell”? I think it was a 59 Olds that a drunk roared through a picnic area,only to find himself  crashed a few miles down the road.

  • avatar
    obbop

    Owsley said the odds were good that those believing it was LSD-25 imbibed was all but.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @educatordan…We ran 1973 full size B Chevs ,American and Canadian Pontiac [the US models were totally different vehicles in those days,sheet metal was the only common part] We also ran the hugely popular A body Monte Carlo.  All in the same building ,the A plant also ran Monte Carlo,Lemans and Chevelle.

     Hope that answers your question, and good luck on your exam.

    BTW If your looking for the best, bang for your buck, you just can’t beat the Impala.

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Dress that pig up to as rolled off the assembly line and no further explanation is required as to the demise of Detroit.

  • avatar
    mikey

    RogerB34 it was 1959 thats what cars looked like then. Yeah I guess,you could call them ugly. Park it beside a 2009 Camry or the new model Accord…..and the 59 don’t look that bad eh?

  • avatar

    @ 86er: I, too, liked the 1959 Pontiac. IMO the 1961 – 1966 full-size Pontiacs represent some of GM’s best styling.

    @ educatordan: How fortunate you are. Here in Irvine, it’s almost impossible to find a cigar-friendly outdoor venue. BTW, every cigar guy should experience a real Habana Hoyo de Monterey Double Corona at least once. Incomparable!

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    The Olds rear pods (can’t really call them fins), are so obviously tacked on that it’s pathetic.  They didn’t even hide the joint line between the pod and the rest of the body!  Not quite as noticeable on the Poncho for some reason.  Chevy and Buick did much more of their own sculpting of the sheet metal, and Caddy did a good job of integrating their over the top fins. 

    You can see easily, looking at the Olds, what the rear body line would be without fins or pods of any kind.   There were some clay models done that way during the styling development.  The effect is sort of like the ’73 Pontiac LeMans sloping rear end; it just looks like it is missing something.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Yes… The Imperialist your right. Though I will include the 60 and the 69,didn’t care for the 67 or 68 much.

     Did the US get the Garmin ad where the toy soldier drives around in a red 66 ragtop?Only a true car nut would have it saved in his PVR…like I do.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I can’t decide if this 88 would be more appropriate in a Stephen King movie or one from John Waters.

  • avatar
    210delray

    After all these years, I still love that ’59-’60 GM wraparound windshield with the distinctively shaped A-pillars and front vent windows.  I don’t think we’ll ever see something like it again.

    Regarding the Olds styling, I agree that the oval pods look weird, but I’ve always kind of liked the front end, with the widely spaced headlights with the parking light/turn signal in between.

    I also think the ’59 Pontiac is the best-looking of the GM’s wild ’59s, in spite of the small double fins at the rear.  The front is clean with the new split grille, and the wide-track design put the wheels where they should have been in relation to the new, wider bodies.   The other four all look strange with their wheels so far inboard of the fenders — like “football players wearing ballerina slippers,” as Bunkie Knudsen reportedly said.

    I do have to agree though with mikey that the big Pontiac’s best years were 1960-69, except for the somewhat odd-looking ’67 and ’68s.
     

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    That was the last car my great-grandmother, the same one who had owned a Baker Electric, ever owned. By the time I turned 16 in 1963, she had given up driving, and my father had inherited the car.
    I remember driving it a few times, but later in that year (63-64) Dad traded it it for a 64 Bonneville, a much more attractive vehicle.
    I don’t remember any hoonery in the Olds, but I do remember the sensation of driving it. I later told my brother that it was like driving a mushroom. The visibility was very poor and I had no idea where the fenders were.
    GM produced some great cars in the 50s and 60s. But that Olds, was not one of them.

  • avatar
    Canucknucklehead

    Paul, thank you so much for yet another highly entertaining article with equally excellent photographs to go with with it.
     
    I really want your job, looking for cool old cars to write about!

  • avatar
    scottcom36

    Funny, just yesterday I was reading about the ’59 Olds here: http://www.kingoftheroad.net/59olds/olds-1.html 
    Here’s what I think is cool about the ’59s:
    The pancake roof and wrap-around rear windshield on the Sport Coupe and Sedan.
    The entire dashboard, esp. the wide clock face with Ninety-Eight spelled out across it.
    The much greater detail in the 98 taillights.
    The interesting effect of placing the parking lamps between the headlights that Olds riffed on for a few years.
    Yeah, it’s not as inspired as some ’59s, but still plenty to like.

  • avatar
    NickR

    There were worse looking cars back then, but this is damn ugly.  The front in particular is hideous.  Those kinked A pillars always looked stupid to me.  And the rest of it…garden variety 50s kitsch.  I guess I like the tailights…they’d look good on something else.

  • avatar
    AnthonyG

    I prefer the Chevrolet and Buick of the 59′s, the Olds is probably the least successful of that years GM cars.
    The owner obviously lives in the woods – I kind of like the look!

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    For those who stated their love for the ’59 Pontiac, be advised that the rear overhang, measured from the center of the rear axle to the outer limit of the bumper, approached seven feet in length, the longest of any mass-production sedan. Caltrans actually rewrote it’s standard for driveway design, particularly the curb and sidewalk slopes, to accommodate that overhang. With today’s driveway standards, anyone driving a ’59 Pontiac should expect a bent bumper, crushed tailpipe, or gouged pavement, or any combination thereof.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    I grew up with one of these, a bronze ’59 Super 88.  I believe that ours had a wrap around rear windshield, though.  My parents told me that I got out of my crib and toddled outside to see it when they first brought it home, probably foreshadowing my love of cars to come.  I wore a hole in the carpet on the transmission hump between the rear seats, as I stood there as a child, so that I could see out the front when they drove.  No car seats or seat belts in those days!  Even though we owned one, I never considered it an attractive car.  Our next car, a ’64 Riviera, had a much more profound influence on me.  By the way,  I believe that a Super 88 won the Daytona 500 that year.  How times have changed!

  • avatar
    AccAzda

    Man…

    What kind of tires are on that thing…

  • avatar
    Cheech

    Can anyone ID the model type of this 1959 oldsmobile image, I hope I can insert or attach the picture I had taken of what appeared to be a 1959 olds but this 1959 olds has tail lights in the rear bumper, and it also has different, (more roundish) tail lights, even the fins appear to be different then the more common 59 olds rear fins. Was this customized, or truly a rare model ?

  • avatar
    Cheech

    I did not see how to insert a image into my previous post, so here is the link to the 1959 olds image.

    http://s213.photobucket.com/albums/cc155/Cheech63/1959%20oldsmobile/?action=view&current=MVC-001S.jpg

  • avatar
    bugo

    I’d love to see pictures of the stillborn ’59 Harley Earl designs.

    Was the El Camino approved before or after the new ’59 models were planned? An El Camino based on a facelifted ’58 model would have been interesting for sure but I’m not sure it would have worked.

  • avatar
    danisaurus

    Hello,
    I am curious as to where these photos were taken. I sold this car years ago to someone and am sad to see it in the condition it is in now. It looks also like it may have been tagged for towing. Is that the case? Please let me know where this car was spotted! Thank you in advance.

  • avatar
    dukestory

    Interesting write-up on the Super 88. I happen to have a mint condition version of the 1959 Super 88 Convertible. I love driving and riding in this car….Need help with finding parts…58s seem to have a lot of parts in the market….but not the 59s..any advice on where I could get the parts. I’d love to find the car in the pictures…could be a great source for parts.


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