By on June 5, 2009

Let’s be clear: TTAC is not in the business of bashing EVs just for the hell of it; there are good reasons why battery-power is the gas foe’s great white hope. But this story is just too crazy. In BMW’s rush to launch its 450-unit MINI E test lease program, it has failed to secure Underwriter’s Laboratory approval for its high-voltage charging cord. As many as 300 of the 450 customers who’ll be getting Mini Es many not get their high-voltage charging cables for a month or so and will have to use sloooooowwwwww 110-volt trickle charging to replenish their car’s power pack when the battery runs down,” according to Edmunds. Which means instead of taking 4 hours to recharge the MINI E’s 150-mile-range batteries, users will have to wait 23 hours to fill up through a 110V cable. At an $850/month lease rate, that makes the MINI E the mother of all EV debacles. Approval for the charger will happen “within weeks,” say BMW. But as professional EV booster Chelsea Sexton puts it, “they are guaranteeing virgin customers a poor experience.” And ain’t that just the way it tends to go for virgins.

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50 Comments on “MINI E Charging Fiasco: 23 Hours for 150 Miles...”


  • avatar
    Stu Sidoti

    Even once Mini delivers their 220V charging cord, the homeowner will typically have to have an licensed electrician install a spare 220V outlet, presumably in the garage so that will cost…then when they get the electric bill for running 220V for 4+ hours a night, oh boy will they be happy about that!
    If the 220V charging cords are not delivered within a few weeks of the car’s delivery date, Mini is probably looking at a lot of disgruntled customers waiting for their car to sloooooowly charge up.

  • avatar
    toxicroach

    Its not like you’d have to charge it every night. 150 miles would last me through my daily commute for a good week.

  • avatar
    midelectric

    In between this debacle and reviews that describe a harsh and primitive regen implementation in a drive system renowned for its smoothness in every other application, it appears BMW is doing what they can to make this venture a failure.

    On the other hand, it will be an interesting experiment to see how necessary faster charging really is. If you can charge at work, then as long as your one-way commute is less than about 48 miles the battery pack would be full again at the end of your eight hour shift.

    If you can’t charge at work, then assuming the car can charge for 10 hours as it sits in the garage overnight then you would be ok for about a 30 mile one-way commute.

    These numbers assume you have to start out with a full pack every journey, which isn’t necessary at all. Even if you couldn’t fully replenish the pack every evening, you could accommodate longer commutes by starting out at a lower state of charge every morning. As long as you can get home on Friday night with a little bit of juice left you’ll be fine, despite BMW’s folly.

  • avatar
    Redbarchetta

    IS the cord hardwired into the house? Or is it like a dryer cord that has the typical 220 3 prong male that goes into a standard 220 outlet. IF it’ just a cord IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE UL LISTED. It’s good insurance for BMW but UL is just a testing agency, like getting the good housekeeping seal of approval. If the design is sound and wont cause fires they can just give the first people ones WITHOUT the UL lable on it and trade them for eactly the same thing with the UL label once they get it, no harm no foul.

    The UL does not have power of law in the U.S. — you are permitted to buy and install non-UL-listed devices. However, insurance policies sometimes have clauses in them that will limit their liability in case of a claim made in response to the failure of a non-UL-listed device. Furthermore, in many situations the NEC will require that a wiring component used for a specific purpose is UL-listed for that purpose. Indirectly, this means that certain parts of your wiring must be UL-listed before an inspector will approve it and/or occupancy permits issued.

    Most houses(not sure what people in apartments are going to do) don’t have a spare 30 amp or more breaker on the panel for an additional 220 that wasn’t originally design into the house. These people are not going to be happy when they have to pay an electrician several hundred to a thousand dollars(depending on if you live in the a unionized state) to have a 220 outlet put in and a new homerun to the panel put in. And I bet anything these “car” plugs will need an independant ground which will add more money to the install.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Ed,

    How many people need to drive 150+ miles a day? The average person is driving about 40 miles a day(15k a year). Topping yourself up after 40 miles would take 6 hours on a slow charge… aka over night.

    I’d hardly call it a “debacle”.

  • avatar
    jberger

    The Mini plug is not something you can just pickup at the supply house, it’s a specialized mating connector with twist lock. I think it’s female to female.

    The UL listing might not required for use, but it is required for certain markets and when bundled with certain equipment.

  • avatar

    If I were BMW, I would not start the payment clock on the leases until this is resolved. The short-term financial gains of taking customers’ money before the car can be viably used are far lower than the PR losses of this fiasco.

    That being said, can’t you get a 220 volt compatible extension cord anywhere and plug it into the car? Does it have to be special in some way to work with the Mini?

    D

  • avatar
    RetardedSparks

    Well, since these folks are paying $1.18 an hour to lease the car, BMW should refund them 27 bucks for every 150 miles they drive until they get the proper cord. Sounds fair to me.

    Seriously, though, this is stupid and bad PR, but hardly a catastrophe, or a Ponzi scheme like taking a $5G deposit and then NOT delivering a car!

    The comments above also note that people probably won’t use EV’s this way – fully charge every night and fully deplete every day. If some guy leased a MINIe for his 150 mile round trip daily commute he’s an idiot.

  • avatar
    RetardedSparks

    Oh yeah, re the cord, I’m wondering if it has to be an outdoor or wet location 220V cord, which might have complicated things. Don’t want to have anyone step onto a wet floor, grab their charging cord, and become the first MINIe fatality!

    Come to think of it, though, the marine industry has made shore power cords for high voltage and amperage applications for years, and you don’t get any wetter than on a dock.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Oh, I don’t know. I thought my virgin experience was pretty good.

    Short, mind you.

  • avatar
    chuckR

    The Mini E has a 35 kw-hr battery capacity, AFAIK. At US $0.15/kw-hr, that’s $5.25 for 150 miles. Throw in a charging efficiency factor and it’s more, but I don’t know what that factor is for big batteries – chargers for the laptop sized ones are supposed to be very high efficiency.

    Retardedsparks – $850 a month? Yikes. Anybody who’d put up with that will put up with slow charging for a month….

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Come to think of it, though, the marine industry has made shore power cords for high voltage and amperage applications for years, and you don’t get any wetter than on a dock.

    If you keep the conductors well, well in from hands you’re fine. Marine is a good example, as is the block-heater cords I’ve had on my cars for years.

    Gasoline is no less dangerous. It would take only a decent spark in the presence of fumes to cause trouble.

  • avatar
    tced2

    As this little tale demonstrates, “refueling” electric cars is time consuming. I can “refuel” my Acura is 2 or 3 minutes and drive more than 500 miles.

    Yes, gas is dangerous. But it apparently handled everyday (by millions of users) without widespread danger.

  • avatar
    long126mike

    As this little tale demonstrates, “refueling” electric cars is time consuming. I can “refuel” my Acura is 2 or 3 minutes and drive more than 500 miles.

    Time is relative. Go to sleep then wake up. How much time has seemed to have passed? Perception-wise, it seems like just a moment.

    For a lot of people using this, it’s as simple as attaching to an outlet in the garage. That can’t take more than a few seconds. No special trip to a gas station.

    Lots of research moving along at the moment in radically decreasing absolute charge times, and then there’s swapping approaches like the one proposed by Shai Agassi.

  • avatar
    chuckR

    tced2

    After Obama’s merry band monetizes all the trillion$ in new debt and gas goes much, much higher, you’ll consider electric vehicle refueling to be just wonderful….

    We are in the middle of a modern slow motion version of the ancient Greek’s seisachtheia – debts forgiven while creditors and prudent people are ‘pooned.

  • avatar

    I drive 125 miles a day, sometimes more. PLEASE can I have a MINI-D?

    Screw the CARB Nazis, let us have the Diesel.

    –chuck

  • avatar
    long126mike

    Screw the CARB Nazis, let us have the Diesel.

    There’s a number of 50-state diesels on the market.

  • avatar
    tced2

    After Obama “carbon caps” electric plants, the price of electricity won’t be a bargain either. “Refueling” your electric car won’t be cheap. Here’s the real goal: the President doesn’t want you to be very mobile. I have another name for mobility: freedom. The President doesn’t favor it. I wonder how well an electric Air Force One will work.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    EV’s ?
    Bah. Unless they are charged by a power plant that is powered by renewables, it is a joke.
    Has anyone everanalyzed just how much CO2 per mile an EV would “emit” vs a good old fasioned gas engine? Considering all the transformations and energy losses from power plant to the EV’s drive wheels, it would not be surprizing if the co2/mile is actually higher.
    And all of this plus limited range and expense.
    It would require one hell of an extreme battery chemistry to contain the potential energy of tank of gas and the oxygen in the air with which it combines. Incidentally,stoichemitrically speaking, the gasoline is only one third of the total fuel used. By molecular weight, atmospheric oxygen is the other two thirds.

  • avatar
    long126mike

    After Obama “carbon caps” electric plants, the price of electricity won’t be a bargain either.

    You may not be aware, but the large increases in natural gas prices over the past few years have brought on many instances when wind power costs became lower than normal grid costs to end users.

    Here’s the real goal: the President doesn’t want you to be very mobile. I have another name for mobility: freedom. The President doesn’t favor it. I wonder how well an electric Air Force One will work.

    Now that’s silly.

  • avatar
    maniceightball

    I drive 125 miles a day, sometimes more. PLEASE can I have a MINI-D?

    Screw the CARB Nazis, let us have the Diesel.

    Yeah, but this is the exception. Most folks don’t drive that far, so a limited-range EV would make sense.

    You know, this actually brings up a good point. EV enthusiasts such as myself do *NOT* think every car can be electric. We don’t even have the power infrastructure to support that (yet). But as long as we can keep the tech moving, and slowly start replacing ICE power with electric where it makes sense, then we’ve made progress. It really bugs me when we’re portrayed as extreme totalitarians bent on forcing inconvenience on everyone.

  • avatar
    maniceightball

    Unless they are charged by a power plant that is powered by renewables, it is a joke.
    Has anyone everanalyzed just how much CO2 per mile an EV would “emit” vs a good old fasioned gas engine? Considering all the transformations and energy losses from power plant to the EV’s drive wheels, it would not be surprizing if the co2/mile is actually higher.

    Of course we’ve analyzed this, we’re not the bumbling idiots you think we are.

    And guess what? Even with coal power, EVs are more environmentally friendly. Why? Because of consolidation of power generation. In a car, you have many constraints (weight, size) on how much you can clean the output of the powerplant. A cat converter can only do so much. With a centralized power plant, you can put elaborate and efficient systems to deal with the environmental impact.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    tced2

    “Obama “carbon caps” = Mr. Obama does not want you to have mobility and therefore freedom, is a bit of a logic leap. It really means your mobility would be limited by cost, to low or non carbon ways of getting around.
    Freedom is defined as rule of law in a nation of laws that guarantees such things a Habeus Corpus, the Bill of Rights, and other guarantees of limited government powers. Expensive per mile transportataion costs in no way defines loss of “Freedom”.
    Just how much mobility was there in 1776 ?

  • avatar
    long126mike

    EV’s ?
    Bah. Unless they are charged by a power plant that is powered by renewables, it is a joke.
    Has anyone everanalyzed just how much CO2 per mile an EV would “emit” vs a good old fasioned gas engine? Considering all the transformations and energy losses from power plant to the EV’s drive wheels, it would not be surprizing if the co2/mile is actually higher.

    Yes, it’s been analyzed. Even at grid averages, BEVs have lower systemic CO2 output per mile driven compared to their ICE counterparts.

    Using the MINI as an example, the BEV version uses 0.22 kWh per mile. Grid average CO2 emissions are 1.33 pounds per net generated kWh. So over 100 miles, that amounts to 29.4 pounds of CO2 emissions.

    A manual MINI with an ICE is good for maybe 32-35 mpg in the real world. Using 35 mpg, that means it will consume 2.86 gallons of gasoline per 100 miles. The emissions coefficient for gasoline is 19.5 pounds per gallon, so that comes to 55.7 pounds of CO2 per 100 miles.

    And as you mentioned, the BEV user is capable of reducing those emissions by choosing less CO2-intensive electricity, whereas the ICE driver doesn’t have that option.

    This isn’t a full “well to wheel” comparison, but there’s almost certainly more embedded carbon in that wider frame for the gasoline compared to electricity.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    long126mike :

    Thanks for the logical and analytical answer. Now all I need to do my annual all day drive road trip, would be a modular standardized battery package that could be simply swapped for recharged battery packs at “fueling” stations so there would be no recharging delay, and I could be on my way.

    maniceightball, a catalytic converter does nothing to reduce CO2.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I am somewhat familiar with compliance testing for electrical devices. Power cords are notoriously difficult to get approved.

    Not only that, but the approval effort must be performed for every country in which the cord will be sold. It’s a long, expensive process.

    As for the 110 V charging, that’s only a problem if you need a full “tank”. Topping off won’t take 23 hours.

  • avatar
    Stein X Leikanger

    Before car-use hit the present downturn, Americans drove an average of 30 miles/day in their cars. A very curious slanting to the number, as 75% of drivers drove less, and 25% drove substantially more than 30m/d.
    (From memory, from a presentation I did.)

  • avatar
    long126mike

    Thanks for the logical and analytical answer. Now all I need to do my annual all day drive road trip, would be a modular standardized battery package that could be simply swapped for recharged battery packs at “fueling” stations so there would be no recharging delay, and I could be on my way.

    Or, for that one day out of 365 per year, you could rent an ICE vehicle.

    Kind of one those “pave the world or put on some shoes” sort of things.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Charging takes only 30 seconds … 15 seconds to plug it in at night and 15 seconds to unplug it in the morning. Faster than gassing up a car, if you think of it that way!

  • avatar
    kaleun

    Since the 150 mile radius is their distinctive property this really is lame. Sure, UL is not required, but neither is ABS and curtain airbags… but we still won’t want to miss those.

    About the EV in general, with the batteries they are BS. The Prius battery stays charged to 70-90% all the time since that extends the battery life dramatically and Toyota prooved that the battery is not a maintenance concern, not even on the long run. However, an EV runs the battery all the way down (unless you only want 40 mile instead of 150 mile range with the same battery). This will kill the battery. It is for a good reason that Toyota/Honda don’t offer EV’s. those two are the companies that should be clsoest to being able to offer an EV. The fact that they don’t offer one speaks volumes…

    Yesterday I coincidentally went to a super-capacitor research lab and they work on super-caps to be used in EVs, electronic devices and by renewable energy producers. So anywhere from iPod to utility-scale. Anyway, their advantage is 100 or 1000 times charge and discharge capacity. A battery only can be charged/discharged so fast. Even the Prius only recovers 50% of the regenerative breaking since the battery is not capable to take that much energy so quickly (a super-cap in series could help buffering). The super-caps also can be discharged to zero, and that million times. But I kind of knew that before… and just got more confirmation that an EV still has limited application. Even with super-modern batteries. Since the battery has a chemical reaction, the problems at zero-charge can’t be resolved. Only solution would be to have batteries 4 times as large and only dicharge them to 75%, or have smaller batteries, that don’t live long.

    Just imagine your car battery lasts 5 years if you drive every couple of days several miles to charge it. Let the car sit for some weeks, and your battery is irreversibly damaged. OK, Li-ion probably is better. But the problem still is there.

    Really, GM and BMW, the companies that never had a hybrid on their own and don’t have any experience with batteries now think they can master EV?

    Thank god it is leasing, so not much liability for the owner.

    I really want to see the test results of that guinea-pig test. If all the leasees would drive 100-150 miles between charging, how their batteries will look like after 3 years. I’m sure they won’t do that sine whoever has $ 850 leasing money probably has a big HUMMER and a big Mansion and a Ferrari anyway. I don’t think anyone is leasing it to seriously save money and to actually use the range.

  • avatar

    Sunnyvale, you would be right as long as total charging time does not exceed 8 hours (or however long you normally sleep/don’t use your car).

    Unfortunately, 23 hours means you could really only use your car every other day if you consumed an entire charge in a day.

    The real issue here is reserve capacity. Would you really want to go out with a car that was not fully charged, when power consumption no doubt varies wildly depending on your driving style, and there is no way to quickly fill up your car if it’s discharged? My guess is if you run out of power, you’re calling for a tow truck.

    I once rented a Honda CRV electric SUV, and it was nerve-wracking watching the available power indicators go down when I was not sure if I would make it back to the airport.

    On the other hand it’s true that if you do use up 50 miles worth of charge, you still have that 100 miles and so you will only have to charge 50 miles worth of power to top off the battery. Remember, though, that topping off a battery is often very time-consuming – try looking at your laptop charge indicator sometime and see how long it gets stuck on almost, but not quite, charged.

    D

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    Its not like you’d have to charge it every night. 150 miles would last me through my daily commute for a good week.

    Two weeks for me.

    Eventually we’ll stop comparing EVs to ICEs, in the same way that most of us have learned not to compare apples and oranges.

    EVs are good for about 85% of the driving most people do.

    The future will be hybrids which can be switched to run in EV mode, or hybrid mode. Many will find they can go days in EV mode.

  • avatar
    kaleun

    BTW, 35 kWh capacity… maybe we need 40 kWh including charging inefficiencies. If we charged for 10 hours we needed a 4 kW Powersupply. At 240 V that would be 16.6 amps… the breaker should not have more than 75% of its rating. So we needed a 22.2 amp breaker.. so we need a 30 amp 240 V connection for 10 hours. I suppose newer houses can supply that. When I now charge for 5 hours only, I would need two 30-amp or one 60-amp supply. Holy cow! I think we seriously need to downsize our cars (not sure if it gets smaller than a Mini). I’m not sure what my AC (2 tons / 20 amp breaker) rated at, but running three of my AC units for 5 hours constantly (My AC cycles on and off and doesn’t run constantly) seems quite a challenge unless the power utility gives people a separate night-rate-meter to charge at night time only. Assuming I use my AC AND charge my car, that would quadrupple my demand. If the majority of my neighbors did that at a July afternoon… holy moses!

  • avatar
    Syke

    Dynamic88,

    A very good thought.

    What we’re forgetting in all this discussion is that those who are going to drive rechargeable electrics are the early adopters, the guinea pigs. Yeah, they’re going to pay ridiculous prices for their cars, have to change their personal behaviors in some minor (or maybe major) fashion . . . . . but there the ones who are going to figure out if these newfangled (uh huh) propulsion systems are actually going to work, and are practical. As well as figure out the social behaviors necessary in their use.

    More power to them. The concept of the electric car interests me greatly, although I’ve yet to find one that’ll take care of my personal needs. I’ll keep looking.

    I’ve got a fair idea of what it entails, having had use of one of those primitive Sebring-Vanguard CitiCars thirty plus years ago. It showed me back then when and where an electric car can work, and was practical. And within its limits, it was. If I could find one today, I’d probably restore it, and use the bloody thing.

    The biggest change in adoption of electric cars isn’t going to be technological, but rather social. The propriety of plugging in somewhere other than home every night. Just learning to religiously plug the car in every evening. Stuff like that, that we don’t think of when we’re talking technology.

  • avatar
    lw

    This whole 110/220V seems odd to me…

    I picked up an adapter for my RV the other day that pulls juice from two circuits. Seems like someone could work out a way to use two 110V circuits.

    http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-power-cords/rv-cheater-box.htm

  • avatar
    kaleun

    lw: 240 V basically is two circuits (two 120 V agaisnt each other as opposed to neutral).

    Well, europe has 400 Y 3-phase in almsot every single family house, so potential charging time is much better unless we change our ancient grid (the same way we will switch to the metric system lol)

  • avatar
    ZoomZoom

    toxicroach :

    Its not like you’d have to charge it every night. 150 miles would last me through my daily commute for a good week.

    My thinking too. My daily commute is only 20 miles round trip, if I don’t have to run errands. I could do it, too, and top it off each night.

    And I could possibly take it on one 50-75 mile round trip weekend jaunt and let it charge all day Sunday.

    I say 50-75 miles, because that would run it down about 50%, which the point where I’d try not to go below. Deep discharges are rough on batteries.

    Such a car could be a “light-duty daily driver” for me. If I were in the market and if I weren’t so happy with my Prius, that is.

  • avatar
    lw

    Kaleun:

    How about this baby?

    $120 is sure cheaper than calling an electrician and you can take it with you on trips.

    http://www.dvdoverseas.com/store/index.html?loadfile=catalog91_0.html

  • avatar
    DarkSpork

    Its not like you’d have to charge it every night. 150 miles would last me through my daily commute for a good week.

    A week sounds about right for me too, maybe a little less (180m/week). But the 150mile range is probably based on lower highway speeds (speed limit here is 70), and you probably won’t be using accessories that drain your battery like the radio, A/C, heater etc. if you want the full 150 mile range. I can not, will not do my commute without radio and the like, so my range would be a lot shorter.

    One large question I have about EVs is I live in a place where the temperatures get down to -35F before windchill. In the mornings the battery will be so depleted from the cold that it will barely have enough charge to turn the engine over until it starts. How would one avoid this issue with an EV? Does the cold not drain the battery when its plugged in (I’m guessing not), would the battery charge slower in this sort of climate? Would you plug in a battery warmer, and have the battery charger running simultaneously with a battery warmer? How do you keep the battery from draining while you are at the store, work, etc? I see myself likely to carry a gas powered generator in the trunk, starting it up, and plugging the car into it. I don’t disagree with the idea that EVs are good for some people in some climates, just don’t see it working for me.

  • avatar
    kaleun

    lw: do you want to use the travel voltage transformer to charge the 35 kWh battery???

    sure you can make 240 v from 120 V.. but you hlave the amps then (even more since the converter uses juice too)

    Or what did you want to say… sorry, I’m not quite sure what you meant, I suppose you didn’t mean one of the region free DVD players :-)

  • avatar
    Mirko Reinhardt

    @Stu Sidoti :
    …then when they get the electric bill for running 220V for 4+ hours a night, oh boy will they be happy about that!

    Electricity is still a magnitude cheaper than gas.

  • avatar
    lw

    @kaleun

    IMHO: An all electric car needs a viable 120V travel charger to work.

    Sure sounds like Congress will want the Volt and since it won’t work for anyone except the uber greenies, therefore GM will be zombiefied a bit more with every step closer to Volt production.

    Toyota didn’t screw up.. They didn’t forget to have 1 electrical engineer take about 20 minutes to determine what was / wasn’t viable.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    bluecon,

    Your closing statement (“Oil has served us well and made us the wealthiest people in the history of the world. Now you want to throw that away?”)
    implies to me that you believe there is an endless supply of oil. Do you believe that?
    If you do believe that, then might you be able to offer some substantiation or sound evidence of your view?
    If there was is an endless supply of oil, then also please answer me this. do you belive that we can endlessly increase the percentage of CO2 in the atmosphere without any consequence? 5%, 25%, or maybe 50% CO2 in the atmosphere and still no climatic or biological consequences?

  • avatar
    volvo

    At $850/month lease rate most of the owners of these cars will just be environmental poseurs.

    Would be interesting to see what their actual “carbon footprint” is. Other cars, size of home, vacation homes, domestic help, travel etc.

    Mini-e might not be bad to have in the stable for bragging rights as long as the CLK is ready when a “real car” is needed.

    While it is possible to create an EV with adequate size and performance current battery technology, electrical power generation and distribution infrastructure means that the EV is not ready for widespread prime time use.

    By the way, what is the carbon footprint of a Nuc___r (a name not to be used in polite company) power plant?

  • avatar
    long126mike

    At $850/month lease rate most of the owners of these cars will just be environmental poseurs.

    As opposed to paying $1,000/mo for a Humvee that gets used to run over suburban speed bumps or a 600 hp vehicle in a society with 60 mph speed limits.

    Many ways to pose.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    Just wait until a couple of guys use a $1.99 cord from Wally-world and burn down their houses while their familys sleep. The end of the electric car. That’s what they are trying to avoid.

  • avatar
    long126mike

    Just wait until a couple of guys use a $1.99 cord from Wally-world and burn down their houses while their familys sleep. The end of the electric car. That’s what they are trying to avoid.

    So when a vehicle catches on fire and burns down a building, it’s the “end” of that vehicle type?

  • avatar
    shaker

    So far, I’m seeing

    EV = Liberal

    Oil/Gas Power = Conservative

    Am I getting this right, or did I miss something?

  • avatar
    volvo

    So far, I’m seeing
    EV = Liberal
    Oil/Gas Power = Conservative
    Am I getting this right, or did I miss something?

    I see

    EV = Feelings (right brain)

    Oil = Rationality (left Brain)

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    maniceightball :
    June 5th, 2009 at 5:24 pm

    We don’t even have the power infrastructure to support that (yet).

    Unless there is quickly a massive crash program to start placing nuclear power plants on line it will never happen. Plasma TVs, computers and all kinds of new consumer electronic devices are already starting to strain the grid. There’s no way it can sustain a sudden increase in high current consumption electric vehicles in any foreseeable future.


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