By on September 3, 2008

Evaluating the Canadian-designed, built and sold Acura CSX without mentioning the Honda Civic is no easy task. (See?) Comparisons are so tempting, namely because the latter is an excellent car in its own right. The feeling’s mutual. Honda of Japan loved the Acura CSX so much that it served as a template for the JDM Civic. And why not? The CSX delivers an excellent compact luxury package without the reliability issues bedeviling certain (cough German cough) imports. Said otherwise, the CSX is the penny-pinching—I mean, thinking man’s luxury compact.

Seen from afar, you’d be forgiven for thinking the CSX and the Civic ARE the same car. Given its resemblance to its platform mate, the CSX is a perfect spiritual successor to the Civic EL of yore. My tester’s CSX’s exterior upgrades included chrome wheels and door handles, Acura rims, double exhaust and a re-styled front fascia with the all-important Acura badge. Fortunately for the CSX, the humble Civic’s rakish styling plays well even in the semi-luxury market, giving the car a sporty stance without reducing interior space

The donor Civic’s good genes are also apparent across the interior. Acura preserves the Civic’s futuristic double-decker dashboard and small, deep steering. (Honda drivers who don’t get the whole Star Wars thing need not apply.) On the list of what feels the same: the shifter, parking brake, arm rests, steering, thigh support, and storage areas. Get the idea? The major differences are easy to spot. The Acura’s manumatic comes with flimsy, thin paddles mounted on the steering column. Though crisp and responsive, they feel cheap and demand hand placement at exactly nine and three.

Acura swapped-out the Civic’s plain Jane HVAC set-up for an all-controlling screen and voice-activated satellite navigation, which dominates the minimalist instrument panel. Gloved Canadians may curse the unit’s Chicklet-sized buttons, but they’re sensibly-placed, suitably smooth operators. The Acura’s leather front seats are heated for cold Canadian cabooses. The CSX’s rear seats are spacious; easily as comfortable and commodious as the ones found in the previous generation Accord. Provided you have no more than two car chairs in the rear, the CSX is the Goldilocks of family cars.

The CSX is blessed with a 2.0-liter I4 good for 155 HP. RSX owners know this engine well; the mini-mill revs smoothly operates in tight harmony with the automatic transmission— obviating the need for those cheesy paddles. That said, the wheel-mounted cog swappers are quite satisfying, with very little delay between tap (of the finger) to blip (of the engine) to take-off. Though adequately refined and propelled, the CSX’s accelerative performance isn’t class leading– not by a long shot. The MINI Cooper, Volvo C30, BMW 128i and Audi A3 2.0T all have it outgunned. Not to mention the similarly-priced Civic SI. D’oh!

On the road, the CSX’s chassis’ tuning is the automotive equivalent of the Missouri compromise. The ride’s too harsh for the Lexus crowd, and too soft for the BMW crowd. But it works (for a while). The CSX doesn’t mask any of the road’s imperfections, but does a capable job of reducing most of them to the level of minor nuisance.

Put the CSX through its paces at a normal speed and you’d never think it’s really an econobox wearing a silk suit. There isn’t enough torque or power to make the drive wheels matter. The CSX offers up a healthy dose of sportiness, carving into turns quite happily and with minimal body roll when driven reasonably. Leave the realm of reasonableness (in pursuit of that VTEC cam switchover, perhaps) and the car will betray its roots faster than Pamela Anderson on safari. The unrelenting understeer will make one pine for the better-tuned Si. For a comparable experience, the CSX is only slightly less crisp than the Mazda3/Volvo S40 siblings. That is to say it’s excellent for its price point, but not a selling point.

Given Acura’s failures to follow Lexus and Infiniti up the food-chain, Honda can take the Acura CSX as its consolation prize. By steadfastly refusing to ante-up and offer purpose-built luxury cars with V8’s, Acura’s U.S. sales have been evaporated. Now, Honda finds itself with an excellent, fuel-sipping luxury car built in the NAFTA zone ready to go stateside with minimal delay.

At only a $7k mark-up over a regular Civic, given its appointments, the CSX represents tremendous value. In a time of ballooning gas prices and shrinking wallets, it may be just what the doctor ordered to restore Acura’s sagging U.S. sales. Canadians have made whatever Civic-variant Acura the hottest seller for the premium brand since the days of the EL. Whether the CSX will ever go stateside, though, depends on Honda’s ever-changing aspirations for its luxury brand. But I can’t see it doing any more damage to a brand that never moved beyond “mid-luxury” in the first place.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

86 Comments on “2008 Acura CSX Navi Premium Review...”


  • avatar
    inept123

    Thanks for an excellent review, Samir.

    When posted in Canada, I drove this car’s predecessor. It was a pleasant, efficient package. As, apparently, is this generation.

    This points in a direction small cars need to go: comfortable, toy-full, fuel efficient versions of larger cars. I know it will never satisfy those with hoonery in their hearts, but for most of us, it does more than suffice.

    I think it also points the way for Acura — bringing better-equipped, relatively inexpensive “upscale” models to folks who want a bit more “Buick” to Honda’s “Chevy”.

    • 0 avatar
      ronparsons

      We just bought a 2010 Acura CSX. It’s for my wife and we traded in her 2009 Corolla because she had lost confidence in it because of the acceleration problems (It happened to her). We test drove a lot of cars and she fell in love with the CSX. It has the dependability of Honda, having been built in the award winning Alliston, Ontario plant and it has a touch of luxury and class. It handled well and was comfortable. It doesn’t bother us that it is much like the Civic. If it is as dependable as the Civic cousin, we will be thrilled. It is the perfect size for her and offers excellent fuel economy. We are trusting that it will provide many years of dependable service.

  • avatar

    Those cooled seats must be a major selling point in Canada.

    Or is this just what happens when someone at Honda muses, “What can we throw in a Civic to try to justify the Acura badge and a $7,000 bump?”

  • avatar

    This is badge engineering at its worst.
    Take Civic
    Throw in engine lying around
    Add some lux touches.
    Add different badge.
    In my opinion this car lowers Acura’s brand position.

  • avatar
    chanman

    Outside of the Pacific Northwest where the climate is similar to Seattles, the rest of the country experiences scorching summers on top of the freezing winters. Toronto, on the shore of the Great Lakes is both hot and humid in the summer, so those cooled seats may in fact get a good amount of use.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Given its resemblance to its platform mate, the CSX is a perfect spiritual successor to the Civic EL of yore

    You mean Acura EL, right? Or was that deliberate?

    It’s nice to see this review. The CSX is a good car and is by a good margin Acura Canada’s best-seller (even if it’s hard to tell because, well, it looks every normal Civic). Since Canadians haven’t always gotten EX and Si Civics, it’s a good compromise

    I’d have like to see the European three and five-door Civics released as the new RSX. I understand that it’s mechanically quite a bit different from the sedan/coupe, but I think the car–especially the five–door–would sell far better than the EL/CSX does, especially in the urban markets where Acura is losing ground to Mini, VW and Mazda.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Toronto, on the shore of the Great Lakes is both hot and humid in the summer, so those cooled seats may in fact get a good amount of use.

    +1

    People forget that some of the most populous parts of Canada are well south, and that it does get goddamn hot in Toronto or Montreal in the summer.

    Toronto, particularly, is nasty. It has a lot of the same geography-induced smog problems that Los Angeles does, though winter spares our having to deal with it all-year round. Of course, I’d like to see an Angelino dig out under from a meter of snow.

  • avatar
    cwallace

    Here in Houston, Honda could probably get an extra $7K for a Civic with cooled seats, and keep the other stuff. I wish these were more common– the three-speed cooled seats were the only saving grace for the basketcase Saabs I’ve owned down here.

  • avatar
    Ryan

    Good review. Honda should really try to differentiate the CSX a lot more than they have. I could not justify the premium over a Civic EX-L. Acura has really started to tail spin in the last few years. This to me is just further dilution.

  • avatar
    danms6

    I’m a little lost with this review. I understand the star rating system isn’t absolute but it sounds like this car is really nothing more than a Civic with all the options checked plus fancy seats. I haven’t driven it but it doesn’t sound worth a $7k premium. Also, is that an extra $7k over a stripped-down Civic or a fully loaded one?

  • avatar
    rpol35

    CSX is an eastern (Jacksonville, Florida) U.S. based railroad, known officially as CSX Transportation. I am amazed Acura could get away with calling a car by that trademarked name.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    CSX is an eastern (Jacksonville, Florida) U.S. based railroad, known officially as CSX Transportation. I am amazed Acura could get away with calling a car by that trademarked name.

    Trademark law is national; CSX Rail would need to file suit against Acura Canada and prove that they’re causing confusion in consumer’s minds. Since CSXR doesn’t operate in Canada and Acura doesn’t sell the CSX in the US, that probably won’t happen.

  • avatar
    Samir

    rpol: The car is sold only in Canada. In Canada, the CSX doesn’t mean anything.

    Kurt B Says:
    September 3rd, 2008 at 9:52 am
    This is badge engineering at its worst.

    I agree. But consider that $7,000 gives you:
    -HID lights
    -Major ICE upgrade (Bilingual voice-activated sat nav, 6-cd)
    -Flappy paddles
    -Engine upgrade
    -Leather heated/cooled
    -Nicer mags and chrome detailing
    -Power everything (except seats)

    Price that out and add it to a Civic.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    American Civic EX-L with Navi and 5AT in US $: 23,555
    Canadian CSX Tech with 5AT (as reviewed) in US $: 30,718
    American TSX Tech with 5AT in US $: 32,060
    Canadian TSX Tech with 5AT in US $: 39,526
    Having a Canadian warranty: priceless?

    I am sure that the CSX is a nice car, and the RSX motor no doubt makes it a good choice for those who want something peppier than a standard Civic but not as high-strung as the Si. But is this a true Acura – the heir of the Integra, a nice car for those who want to commute to work and don’t need to carve corners on the way there – or a brand-destroying product that would only hurt Acura’s image more if people knew it existed? I have to believe it’s the latter. This is the Mercury Sable school of badge-engineering, and it does neither Honda nor Acura any favors. You will never run into a European Accord on the streets of Ottowa (unless it’s been de-badged by its owner), but CSX owners will constantly find themselves alongside nearly identical Civics at every stoplight.

    Wouldn’t it make more sense to offer the EU-market Civic hatch here as an RSX replacement and C30/A3 fighter?

    Worth mentioning is that Acura isn’t the only luxury brand that offers a smaller car for the Canadian market. Mercedes offers the B-class in Canada, and also offers smaller engines in their cars than they do here in the States. Volvo offers a normally-aspirated version of the C30, and BMW offers a smaller six in the 323i that would be more than adequate for most drivers here. As gas prices rise and emissions regulations become more stringent, will we see more of these products south of the border?

    (Edited: whoops, I meant to say C30 instead of S40 above. Volvo offers the normally aspirated I5 in the S40 here, but not in the C30.)

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    By steadfastly refusing to ante-up and offer purpose-built luxury cars with V8’s, Acura’s U.S. sales have been evaporated.

    I don’t think that’s Acura’s problem. Their weakness is in the low end, not the high.

    They killed themselves when they axed the RSX/Integra just as Mini, VW, Mazda and Subaru were coming into their own. Now, there’s no entry point into the Acura brand for young, relatively affluent buyers. Worse, without people coming into the brand via the RSX, there’s a ripple effect moving into sales of the TSX, TL and such.

    Acura thought they could milk the customer base by selling the pricier TSX and RDX instead of the low-margin, low-dollar RSX. The were wrong: people who wanted a performance Honda went to the lower-margin Civic Si; people who wanted a nice, sporty small car went to VW/Mini/Mazda instead.

    Sure, the lack of a V8 might be hurting sales of the RL or MDX, but that’s not really the problem.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Worth mentioning is that Acura isn’t the only luxury brand that offers a smaller car for the Canadian market. Mercedes offers the B-class in Canada, and also offers smaller engines in their cars than they do here in the States. Volvo offers a normally-aspirated version of the S40, and BMW offers a smaller six in the 323i that would be more than adequate for most drivers here. As gas prices rise and emissions regulations become more stringent, will we see more of these products south of the border?

    What’s also worth pointing out is that the S40, C230 and 323i are wickedly overpriced in Canada. So are Subaru’s offerings, by the way. The B200 isn’t too, but it’s sufficiently different from the CSX that it’s basically a noncompetitor . That any of these cars sell given such inflated MSRPs is a testament to what gas prices can do.

    For the record, we pay about $1.20-$1.50 per litre, or about $4.80 to $6.00/gallon, depending on grade and location. Canadians paid before the price spike about or slightly more than what Americans are paying now.

    What’s killing the CSX is the Mazda3 GT and Jetta, which are priced competitively. The Mini doesn’t help matters. And this is in Canada, where the CSX has a snowball’s chance at selling. In the US this car would never make it, not unless gas prices approached Canadian levels.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    I can assure you those cooled seats would be most welcome, mid-summer in Toronto.

    Badge-engineering or not, the CSX packs in a lot of extra luxury goodies for a fairly reasonable price. It is also the only remining Acura sedan that has yet to be beaten with the ugly stick. No preposterous, gangsta-chromed, oversized, robots-in-disguise beak grafted on to this one.

  • avatar
    Samir

    Worth mentioning is that Acura isn’t the only luxury brand that offers a smaller car for the Canadian market. Mercedes offers the B-class in Canada

    Buddy, go see who reviewed the B200 on this site.

    I readily admitted it’s badge-engineering, but that is why I discussed brand damage at the conclusion.

    The Mercury Sable was based on what I thought was kind of a crappy car (sorry Sajeev). So it’s a wrong on top of wrong. The CSX is a wrong on top of a very right (The Civic) – therefore I don’t totally agree with comparison being made.

    The C30 in Canada isn’t as good a value. Firstly, it starts at $28,000 for the base. Adding a few more options sends it north of the CSX’s fully-optioned price in a hurry. Though it admittedly is a more fun car to drive, it loses in value and reliability.

    As for the 323i – it represents the ultimate dichotomy between what a brand promises and what a car delivers. What a complete and utter snore – BMW’s answer to the non-sport Boxster model. On top of that, BMW’s interiors for its low end models have slowly been turning ghastly. Someone needs to tell them that dour, Germanic look only works with high-quality materials. That aside, it’s also RWD – a big no-no for many Canadians.

    Which means all prospective buyers in this segment have a good reason to pick the CSX – and many will.

  • avatar
    RedStapler


    CSX is an eastern (Jacksonville, Florida) U.S. based railroad, known officially as CSX Transportation. I am amazed Acura could get away with calling a car by that trademarked name.

    In my business law class one of the examples cited for similar trademarks in different areas was Lexus Automobiles and LexisNexis research service for Attorneys.

    There is also the famous case of Apple Records versus Apple Computer.

  • avatar
    tommy!

    I’d rather have an RSX, honestly.

    The CSX is a confusing choice for a faux-luxury coupe, for all the reasons mentioned above in the review and the comments. While the Civic and the RSX have competed while the two models were around, it seems this is merely a ploy to justify the lack of the Si in the land of the great white north.

    Take note – there was (is?) a Type-S model, which was basically the Si in Acura clothing.

  • avatar
    Wunsch

    Those cooled seats must be a major selling point in Canada.

    Just because it gets cold up here in winter doesn’t mean it doesn’t get reasonably hot in summer. It was 95 Fahrenheit a few days ago, and we hit triple digits now and then.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    psarhjinian Says: Acura thought they could milk the customer base by selling the pricier TSX and RDX instead of the low-margin, low-dollar RSX. The were wrong: people who wanted a performance Honda went to the lower-margin Civic Si; people who wanted a nice, sporty small car went to VW/Mini/Mazda instead.

    You took the words right out of my mouth!

    At $30,000 the CSX will be a non-starter in the USA. That price will get you a fully loaded Honda Accord EX-l Auto with NAV and a few accessories thrown in for good measure. Amazingly the EPA mileage would be within 2mpg of each other.
    Equip the CSX with the Si engine and a new 6spd dual clutch manumatic and maybe they might have something, but you would end up with a smaller car with worst gas mileage than the Accord.

    With that said the real problem is Honda could offer the engine from the CSX as a option in the Civic EX-L or as a Civic Si auto and following Honda policy the price premuim would only be about $1000 on the Civic EX and NOTHING on the Si.

    WAIT, why is this engine NOT standard or even offered on the USA Civic EX?

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    Take note – there was (is?) a Type-S model, which was basically the Si in Acura clothing.

    How much is the Type-S model in Canada?

  • avatar
    Brian E

    The Mercury Sable was based on what I thought was kind of a crappy car (sorry Sajeev). So it’s a wrong on top of wrong. The CSX is a wrong on top of a very right (The Civic) – therefore I don’t totally agree with comparison being made.

    Samir, just to clarify I was not criticizing your review. As I said, I am sure that the CSX is a good car because the donor car (Civic) and engine (RSX) are both very good. I was merely commenting on what the badge engineering does for the brand, and I have to conclude that even if the car is good, this kind of badge engineering is still cynical and brand-destroying. To say that it could not damage the brand any more only seems to suggest that Acura has already destroyed what the original Legend and NSX did so much to build.

    To put it another way, is there any reason why this car couldn’t be sold as a Civic Touring Special Titanium Edition TX-L Navi? If not, then there is no reason to put the Acura badge on it. It hurts Honda’s reputation by suggesting that the Honda brand is not good enough for this car. And because it’s well known that Acura is just a marketing creation of Honda, it also diminishes the Acura brand. It’s a Catch-22: marketing this car as an Acura destroys the very reason to have a separate luxury brand. The only way to win at this badge engineering game is not to play.

    I am sure that Mr. Farago would also have something interesting to say about this, too.

    Unfortunately Canadians are getting the short end of the stick when it comes to car prices, which is why Honda/Acura can get away for offering an upgraded Civic in Canada for just shy of what a loaded TSX costs in the US. If MB and BMW did decide to bring the C230 and 323i here to the US, I have to believe they’d cost less than the Canadian versions, and be much more competitive products as a result. I’d especially like to see the C230 here. The B-class, not so much :-) (And yes, I did read your review of it! I did not mean to suggest that it had been ignored – only that it was worth discussing in this thread too.)

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Equip the CSX with the Si engine and a new 6spd dual clutch manumatic and maybe they might have something, but you would end up with a smaller car with worst gas mileage than the Accord.

    That would be the CSX Type-S (well, less the fancy transmission), which indeed you can buy. Again, it’s a very nice car–nicer than the Civic Si at any rate–but you really have to be in love with Acura to walk past the Mazdaspeed 3 and GTI/GLI.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    ” I’d rather have an RSX, honestly.

    The CSX is a confusing choice for a faux-luxury coupe..”,

    It’s only confusing if you actually think it’s a coupe. I count 4 doors. I don’t think they’re trying to pretend it’s a coupe.

    Jaeger

  • avatar
    factotum

    It’s good to know that the U.S. is not the only recipient of ugly Acuras. Are those taillights standard or aftermarket? Either way they’re fugly.

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    This car’s half-assed and everyone knows it! If it were a Dodge or Ford, y’all would’ve lambasted this car fo sure!

    By the way, you should always calculate mark-up with percentages, in my opinion. A 7k markup on a 20kish car is pretty hefty.

  • avatar
    WaftableTorque

    I hate it when automotive journalists think people shop price rather than size classes.
    Personally, I think the CSX and IS250 are direct competitors against the A4/3/C-Class/S60, not the TL/CTS/ES350/G35.
    I think Acura screwed up by downsizing the current RL into a TL/5/M35/GS/E/S80 competitor, rather than upsizing into a A8/7/DTS/XJ/LS460/S competitor.
    Mind you, Cadillac and Infiniti don’t know who their competitors are either, no wonder some of their models are struggling.

  • avatar
    shaker

    I think that bringing the Euro-Civic 3-Door to the States as the new RSX would be a great move; anyone else?

  • avatar
    Samir

    romanjetfighter Says:
    September 3rd, 2008 at 12:20 pm
    This car’s half-assed and everyone knows it! If it were a Dodge or Ford, y’all would’ve lambasted this car fo sure!

    I did say it was a shameless badge-engineering job. The difference is that Chrysler badge engineered a Sebring into an Avenger. Terrible breeds terrible. The Lincoln version of the Ford Fusion was reviewed favorably on this site, btw.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    OK. I want one. Now that the TSX is a bloated mess, is there any chance of this car being sold in the US?

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    It’s good to know that the U.S. is not the only recipient of ugly Acuras. Are those taillights standard or aftermarket? Either way they’re fugly.

    They’re standard. The design is an evolution of the Honda Domani-based Acura EL’s. It does look a little odd, that’s true.

  • avatar
    SAAB95JD

    I have never understood why anyone would actually buy this over the Civic.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Talk about a Cimarron redux, despite how good the CSX is. Slapping Acura badges on a Civic is one step below riceboy league. The ‘exclusive’ appoint ments you can get with this car are inconsequential

    Badge engineering is badge engineering. If it’s unforgiveable when Ford, GM, and Chrysler do it, then it’s equally unforgiveable when Honda engages in it as well.

  • avatar
    beetlebug

    I tend to side with those who say the CSX is a bad example of badge engineering. Chassis, components, even engines can be shared upmarket or down without most people noticing. But when the body shell and interior are so similar I think you’re doing a Cimarron style move. It’s not going to go unnoticed.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Interestingly, the CSX is not a badge-engineered JDM Civic; the JDM Civic is a badge-engineered Acura CSX. Of course, both are close enough to the NA/Euro Civic sedan as to make no real difference, but it’s a point I though was worth making.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    Acura and Honda. are they the same company?

    So, what’s the problem with this car. Nothing!

    2.0 liter with 155 hp that’s not bad at all.
    Nav system screen is big which I prefer, Racing pedal pads, I hope it has intake or high performance muffler but the car stereo is like a JVC though knobs are old school and dash board is missing something the RPM I think.

    But over all the car is good looking just don’t mistake it as a Honda Civic.

    Acuras are solid car and you feel it when you drive a manual.
    48 mpg on highways and 28 on citiy not bad at all better than my 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer or a Mazda 3

    Here’s a better picture of the car. It is a type S with 200 HP. http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3125653

    BY THE WAY TTAC READERS DON’T LIKE IT but tuners at car domain are impress with this car.

    Here’s another Web site that shows everything about this car
    http://www.performancecars.ca/acura/new_models/acura_csx

  • avatar
    SupaMan

    That car would never sell in the States. Don’t care if it has the RSX motor or that it has more equipment that a regular Civic. When it all boils down to it, it’s still a Civic.

    Wonder how it would look with that beak of an Acura shield?

    *barfs*

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    I must be a cheap SOB. $7,000 for HID lights, nav, CD changer, paddle shift, alternate engine, leather, and aluminum wheels in a manual seat Civic doesn’t strike me as a bargain. It will undoubtedly be a terrific used car buy.

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    @Samir:

    You fail to mention the damaging effects this has on Acura’s image and branding. Honda doesn’t even try to differentiate the Civic and this CSX. The prestige of the Acura brand diminishes, the premium price Acura command diminishes, profit margins diminish, and this is why Acura sucks. You even mention yourself that the speed and ride are mediocre.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    BTW,
    there is a CSX Type S option in Canada with the Civic Si drivetrain…

  • avatar
    BEAT

    How can a Sister company destroy another company that belongs to the same company?

    That’s another American Consumer behavior that the rest of the world doesn’t follow.

    The world stop wearing white sneakers since Nike introduced a Black tennis shoe but We Americans still love White sneakers. Do you get it?

    American taste on cars is not the the entire consumer world to follow.

    Oh We rather wear the same style of clothes like what see on the road with lots of Mazda.

    FACTS ABOUT THE CAR:

    The Acura CSX is an Acura badged version of the Japanese 8th generation Honda Civic that replaces the Acura EL as Acura’s entry-level luxury car. It is only available in Canada. Like the EL, it is built in Alliston, Ontario, Canada. The CSX is the first Acura model with two predecessors, since the CSX’s predecessors were the Integra sedan (1986-1996) and the EL (1997-2005).

    The CSX also carries over features from the JDM Civic, most notably the 2.0 L DOHC i-VTEC engine rated at 155 hp (116 kW) @ 6000 rpm and 139 ft·lbf (188 N·m) @ 4500 rpm. Also carried over from the JDM Civic are the front and rear fascias and the steering wheel (also used in the USDM Civic Si and Euro Civic).

    Standard features on the 2008 base model include leather interior, automatic climate control, paddle shifters for automatic transmission models, heated front seats, interior illumination (ignition lock, driver’s power window and mirror switches, steering wheel-mounted audio and cruise controls, glove compartment, ambient), integrated turn signals in power door mirrors, chrome door handles, moon roof, tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS), and vehicle stability assist (VSA) with traction control. TPMS is new for 2008; and VSA is new for the base CSX.

    The 2008 CSX Technology Package adds Acura Navigation System with Biligual Voice Recognition, MP3/WMA CD player & Digital Audio Card Reader, high-intensity discharge headlights, Fog lights, and XM Satellite Radio with roof antenna.

    The resulting car is 62 kg (140 lb) to 88 kg (190 lb) heavier than the Civic EX sedan, with fuel consumption raised to 8.7 L/100 km (27 mpg–U.S. / 32 mpg–imp) city, 6.4 L/100 km (37 mpg–U.S. / 44 mpg–imp) highway for manual model; and 9.5 L/100 km (25 mpg–U.S. / 30 mpg–imp) city, 6.5 L/100 km (36 mpg–U.S. / 43 mpg–imp) highway for automatic model.

  • avatar
    Dragophire

    Why would you want a 30 thousand dollar CIVIC>..LOL

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    If you understand the American car market than you will understand why folks here consider the CSX to be a bad brand damaging joke.

    It is nothing more than a Civic (a $16,000 car) with a slightly jazzed-up grill and rear lights. IT DOES NOT rise to the level that Honda ITSELF set for the Acura brand in the USA.
    Like Honda and the Acura brand or not, but the CSX (if sold in the USA) would be the Cimmeron of the 21 century. THIS IS BADGE ENGINEERING AT ITS WORST. For the same reason most folks consider the MKZ nothing more than a chromed up Fusion the CSX gets the thumbs down here.

    This is a dangerous game to play for a company as small as Honda. I live in NY and seen at least 3 of these things cross the border in the USA. I sure it is painful to see a fully loaded Civic EX-L in a US Honda dealership listing for only $23,000.

    It also explains why the Civic is stuck with a less than class leading 140hp engine in the USA.
    The shame is when you look at the CSX you can see what the real potential of the Civic in the USA could be. I would gladly kick out another $1000 for the better non-Si engine equiped with an auto.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Let’s first check out the asking prices:

    Acura CSX: $27k
    Acura TSX: $33k for unloaded; $38k for premium package (leather,HID,etc)
    Lexus IS250: $31.5k for unloaded; $39k for X package (leather,HID,moon roof)
    BMW 323 (not 328): $36k for base version; $38k for premium package (moonroof,heated seats)

    Yes, the CSX is substantially weaker than the other entry level luxury cars listed here. But a price difference of $10k is still something to think about. The interior isn’t terribly small; it’s the small engine that really made it weaker. But again, you would save $10k and more on gas.

  • avatar
    MagMax

    I agree that the small Acura is a badge-engineered Civic but what’s wrong with that? We need more fully contented smaller vehicles. It was this car in EL form that saved Canada’s Acura dealers from extinction since it offered them something to sell at a reasonable price. Historically in Csnada, that’s what Meteor did for the Mercury channel; a Plymouth-based Dodge did for the Dodge dealers and a Chevrolet-based Pontiac did for Pontiac-Buick dealers, for decades. With Canada’s population and sales one tenth of those in the USA, it would have been inpossible to support dealer franchises with only mid-priced or better brands. It was such a successful formula that Chrysler adopted it for the US market when it introduced the Dodge Dart line in 1960, effectively sentencing Plymouth to death some years later. I remember the Infiniti G20 as being more or less what the CSX does today, with full load features in a reasonably sized package. All it needed was another 30 hp or so. But it kept the franchise going in Canada while Infiniti gradually gained a customer base. All cars have traditionally been overpriced in Canada, some more than others but none more egregiously than the Germans, and Acura is no exception. Just a small correction to the review, I think: this Canadian Acura may have lots of toys as standard equipment, including heated front seats and automatic climate control, but cooled seats are not part of the package, at least not for 2008. I’ve not seen that equipment on the cars and have found no mention of it on their website.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The car itself may be a decent ride, but it really does show you how poorly Honda manages the Acura brand.

    There’s nothing wrong in providing a car like this for Canadians, even though it wouldn’t make the translation here. But the Civic kinship is just too obvious, a guaranteed long-term brand killer. At the very least, give it unique styling and a different dash, so that the cynicism isn’t so obvious.

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    The revised front-end looks a bit better than the Civic. However, I’d probably rather have the Civic Si sedan (for sport) or get the Hybrid (as a cruiser). Heated seats and HIDs can be added, if so desired for a total of $500.

    And if I had wanted a sedan, then I’d have gotten another Honda (after my old Integra GS-R).

  • avatar
    carsinamerica

    Let’s stop throwing around this $30,000 Civic figure. Converting Canadian prices to US prices is a fraught exercise, so allow me to quote, briefly, from my own webpage, where I posted some comments about the CSX in a review of the ’07 US Civic.

    With its higher feature content over the previous generation, the new Civic was already better-equipped than it had ever been, but in Canada, an even better version was offered: the Acura CSX. Built on the Civic, with a unique grille, restyled lights, twin exhaust, and Acura badging to distinguish it, the CSX sedan was a rather more special animal. It used a 2-liter engine with 155 bhp on tap, matched to paddle shifters with the optional automatic transmission. In Premium trim, it added a leather interior [written before the ’08 Civic EX-L came out], automatic climate control, HID headlights, and a 6-disc in-dash CD changer to the equipment list, all features unavailable on any US Civic, for about 28% more than the Canadian Civic EX.

    Now, look at that 28% price premium (which is for the kitted-out Technology Package model), and compare that to a US Civic EX. The result is a $23,949 car. Twenty-four grand is still a lot for a Civic, I’ll agree, but it’s a lot better proposition than $30 large. $23,949 puts it right on top of the Volvo C30, with less power, but more feature content and better fuel consumption figures. When you think about inflation, added safety & convenience features, and extra room, it could nearly be a direct price-point replacement for the RSX in the US market.

    Like it or not, smaller (and thus simpler and cheaper) luxury cars are going to become more common in the US market, fueled (as it were) by rising gas prices and the need to find gateway cars to get young buyers into luxury brands — an important consideration when formerly entry-level luxury cars like the C-Class and 3-Series now start, without options, at more than $32,000.

  • avatar
    Mrb00st

    The CSX/EL is a neat concept… it’s a shame that they went to great lengths to make it much uglier on the outside than the regular Civic.

    You would have to be short a full brain or two to choose this over a Civic Si. I mean, you’re paying more and getting less. Well, okay, an upside-down Honda badge. Imagine the prestige; a luxury brand that’s only a year older than I am.

    This car makes no sense as it stands now. I think the US Market TSX makes a lot more sense as far as a compact luxury car for the US. It actually IS luxurious and is different enough from the US Accord to warrant consideration. They need to do something with the CSX. I have suggestions.

    K23T (or whatever the code is) – 2.3L turbo I4 out of the RDX
    6MT

    This way it’s a more relaxed performance competitor to the Si, which can be the hardcore 900000 rpm nutjob car.

  • avatar
    changsta

    I think what most people from the US aren’t realizing is that the Civic is not that cheap in Canada. A loaded Civic hits $25,000 in Canada, and things like leather, navi and auto climate control are not offered. In light of this, the CSX really does not seem to be as bad a deal does it? Especially when you realize that a Mazda3 GT can easily hit $26-27000 before tax!

    Also, Accords and Camrys end up being quite expensive in Canada loaded up. For example, my uncle bought a 2007 Toyota Camry SE V6, and he did not even get navi, and the car was $34,800 before tax!

    The CSX is popular in Canada because it offers luxury options in a really good economy car that cannot otherwise be had in a Honda Civic.

  • avatar
    Samir

    MagMax – I think: this Canadian Acura may have lots of toys as standard equipment, including heated front seats and automatic climate control, but cooled seats are not part of the package, at least not for 2008. I’ve not seen that equipment on the cars and have found no mention of it on their website.

    You’re right sir. I returned to the Acura dealer, because I could have sworn I saw two settings on the seat temp switches. The car I drove was already sold and in prep so I couldn’t get back into it. I went into a CSX Type-S instead, which has the much sportier Civic Si 200 HP engine. It had the same seat temp switches. Well, turns out they are “high” and “low” – low being low heat. I apologize for that. Justin has amended the text accordingly.

    I think what most people from the US aren’t realizing is that the Civic is not that cheap in Canada. A loaded Civic hits $25,000 in Canada

    Bingo. If you factor in the usual unjustified price premium paid by Canadians (go look at a 350Z for example) the CSX in the US would be ~24 to 26k. Not the 31 it costs up in Canada.

    A fully loaded Civic Si here nips into German sport sedan territory.

  • avatar
    Prado

    The CSX’s rear seats are spacious; easily as comfortable and commodious as the ones found in the previous generation Accord

    Maybe to a dual leg amputee, but to this 5’11” guy the 7th gen Accord (2003-2007) has significantly more interior room, both legroom and width than the current Civic…er CSX.

    +1 on the bad badge engineering comments.

  • avatar
    Samir

    Prado:

    I’m 5’11” as well and I own a 2005 Accord and I disagree. Space in the eye of the beholder?

  • avatar
    Jimal

    COUGH Cimmaron /COUGH

    If badge engineering is bad for the domestics, then it is bad for the imports… unless it isn’t. But that would mean that domestic automakers and foreign automakers are being held to different standards… Nah, that would never happen.

    /SARCASM

  • avatar
    Michael Ayoub

    I love the Star Wars reference. :)

  • avatar
    thetopdog

    I was born and raised in Canada and this car (as well as the EL predecessor) never made sense to me. You very well can compare the price of this thing to US prices becuase it’s not like Canada is across the Atlantic or anything, the vast majority of Canadians live within spitting distance of the US border and are well aware of the price of cars in the US. The EL/CSX are ridiculous, brand-damaging exercises that are absolutely no different from what Cadillac did with the Cimmaron in the 80s. It sells solely because of whatever brand cachet the “Acura” name still has left over from the days of the NSX and Legend

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    I think what most people from the US aren’t realizing is that the Civic is not that cheap in Canada. A loaded Civic hits $25,000 in Canada

    The Civic isn’t that cheap in on this side either. A loaded Civic hits $24,000 in the U.S.

  • avatar
    mikeolan

    This is the kind of crap we hate on GM and Ford and Chrysler for doing, but this is the kind of rebadge job that may have flown in the 90’s but shouldn’t cut it anymore. The Civic + upgraded engine might be a competent car, but the cloned dashboard layout screams “lazy.” The car doesn’t look any more expensive than its Honda counterpart (it doesn’t even look as good… it just looks “differentiated.”) . And am I missing something? Why would I purchase this over a Civic Si? I rest my case…

  • avatar
    Prado

    Agree that space in the eye of the beholder. I find the Civic’s interior to be acceptable while the Accords seems spacious. I’d take the smaller car myself.

  • avatar
    Jeff in Canada

    The CSX is a really good car. The price-point issues has already been raised, so I won’t elaborate, but will add one pint.
    Only recently has Honda added the Civic Si sedan to their Canadian fleet, so for the last 3 years, if you wanted a hopped-up Civic with the best engine, 6 spd, and 4 doors, you had to step up to the CSX Type-S. The downside was that this car aproached the $35k+ price-point.
    Now that the Si sedan is available in Canada, I’m not sure what buyer is going to head into the Acura dealerships for a CSX.

  • avatar
    200k-min

    I’d certinaly buy this car.

    My complaint about the compact luxury cars is they do so poorly on MPG’s for their size. I’m not looking for a fast 0-60 time in a commuter. What I am looking for are some luxury touches that make the ride more comfortable.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    You very well can compare the price of this thing to US prices becuase it’s not like Canada is across the Atlantic or anything, the vast majority of Canadians live within spitting distance of the US border and are well aware of the price of cars in the US.

    Have you priced a Subaru Legacy, Volvo S40 or 350Z? The prices of Canadian and American consumer products are quite often wildly divergent. The point of the CSX’s price is that you have to compare it to the Canadian MSRP of the Civic Si, and then compare the Canadian and American SI’s prices. It’s more sensibly priced if you think of it in that context.

    Of course, it’s still gouging, but Honda isn’t alone in that respect.

    My company operates web storefronts in both countries and it’s problematic for our sales staff, dealing with irate customers who’ve seen the price difference on both sites. It’s a problem, though, because everyone in Canada gouges and the first make to break ranks is going to suffer margin bloodloss.

    The EL/CSX make sense because Honda has not always sold the Si or EX Civics here, likely because Canadians wouldn’t buy them. What with prices being higher and disposable income lower, a loaded Civic is not worth doing; indeed, a lot of Canadian models (Odyssey DX, Matrix Base, Mini Cooper Classic, Caravan CVP, BMW 323i) have a trim line that’s more basic than anything offered in the US.

    That said, there’s still a demand for a nice car about the Civics’ level from luxury buyers (again, remember that lower net income level). So what do you do? Take a Civic Si and trim it up slightly. The CSX makes sense if you think about it’s predecessor: the Acura EL, which has always been the best-selling model in Acura’s Canadian line, and has been since the model’s inception in the early/mid 1990s.

    The problem with the CSX is twofold: it’s a lot more blatant than the original, Honda Domani-based version (though not so much as the 7G Civic/2G EL), and it’s up against some serious competition (Jetta, 3); it used to have the field more or less to itself. Again, though, prior to the 3 and Jetta moving upmarket, this car sold extremely well for Acura. Badge-engineering may smell bad, but if it’s exploiting a market that clearly exists, it makes some sense.

    Keep in mind: this isn’t a Cadillac Cimarron, which was an overpriced version of a very bad car. The CSX is a well-priced version of what is a good car. H onda could have differentiated the car more, but if the past two generations’ sales were any indication, it didn’t need to.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    EXCUSE ME….

    Civic can cost up to $25,000 for a fully loaded without BAD CREDIT.

    You can only get a fully loaded Civic for $18,000 if you PAY CASH but financing forget it.

    $30,000 car is Canadian money. I believe this car would be around $26,000 or $25,000 here in America.

    The same with a fully loaded Honda Civic sold in America.

    Ladies and Gentleman it is the same price but much better than a regular Civic.

    Honda Civic SI? Small, stick shift on the dash and
    and again small. I won’t buy that car.

    yes it is fast if you want to over take a mini cooper.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    Issues of badge engineering aside, I would love a car like this as part of the Honda Civic line in the U.S. I’m an enthusiast, but my daily driver also needs to double as a family hauler. I currently drive a Saab 9-5 Aero, which satisfies on both counts, but it’s unreliable, and I’d prefer something more agile and less expensive next time around.

    So I’ve tested both the new Acura TSX and the Civic Si four door. The Acura is a very good car, but a little expensive considering its performance. The Civic Si is a fabulous driver’s car, but too stiff and loud for family road trips. So, if I could get a slightly de-tuned version — something between the Si and an EX — it might be just about perfect. It seems this CSX is along those lines.

  • avatar

    My mother has had a 1.7EL touring for a few years now. Bought it as a demo unit for 20K, only option being an auto box (no leather, no seat heaters, no sunroof, basically a Civic with a tad more power and a CD player).

    For tooling around it was fine. Gets very good fuel economy, about 45 mpg (Canadian gallons) on the highway and something in the 30s around town – that’s with the automatic, too.

    Unfortunately it is not a great car to drive. The suspension was built to a price compared to the earlier Civic generation (and 1.6EL) and is terrible – harsh, crashes over bumps, and has poor grip. Squeals the tires and understeers horribly even at a moderate pace, and has an issue with snap-oversteer that I learned the hard way (spun it around on a country road and came within feet of going ass-first into the ditch – I came to a stop in the opposite lane, trunk over the shoulder, with a nice S carved into the road from the corner to where I stopped). The engine isn’t bad, but it’s a single-cam VTEC that feels harsh at high revs and is a terrible match to the four speed auto, has zero torque which you are reminded of every time the ‘box refuses to downshift. The interior is low-rent, identical to a standard Civic aside from the colour of the guages, and like most Hondas I always found the steering column was poorly placed so I either had to drive with my arms straight out, Italian style, or with my knees jammed under the dash.

    On top of that, we had a host of problems with it. Tie rods and front bushings were toast by 40 000 miles, the rear brake rotors were done by 70 000 miles, the alternator broke at 90 000 miles, plus a bunch of other little niggles. Amazingly we had the extended warranty, which saved us a bunch of exorbitant repair bills. My father’s 03 Altima was perfectly reliable next to mom’s EL, which was quite the surprise for anyone who pays attention to the drivel they spout in the Lemon Aid guides.

  • avatar
    changsta

    The Civic isn’t that cheap in on this side either. A loaded Civic hits $24,000 in the U.S.

    Yes, it does, but that is with leather, navigation system and automatic climate control. Those options are not offered AT ALL on the Canadian Civic, and that is why the CSX makes sense and is not the huge rip off that everyone seems to think it is.

    It offers luxury features that we Canadians do NOT get on the Civic, and that Americans can.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Yes, it does, but that is with leather, navigation system and automatic climate control. Those options are not offered AT ALL on the Canadian Civic, and that is why the CSX makes sense and is not the huge rip off that everyone seems to think it is.

    It offers luxury features that we Canadians do NOT get on the Civic, and that Americans can.

    I’ll keep this excuse in mind the next time we slam Ford for selling the Lincoln MKZ alongside the Ford Fusion.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Yes, it does, but that is with leather, navigation system and automatic climate control. Those options are not offered AT ALL on the Canadian Civic, and that is why the CSX makes sense and is not the huge rip off that everyone seems to think it is.

    It offers luxury features that we Canadians do NOT get on the Civic, and that Americans can.

    So what? Nobody’s arguing that Canadians shouldn’t be able to get those features on their Civics. Keeping features out of the lower badged car to be able to sell the badge-engineered high-spec variant is exactly the type of cynical strategy that this site has attacked over and over as ultimately self-destructive. Why is it better when Honda does it instead of the Big 2.8?

    I’d have a lot more tolerance for this if it (a) looked unique, and (b) had totally wikkid toys on the inside. I’m thinking of the ELS surround sound system, radar cruise control, cooled seats, massaging seats (why not?), full-color LCD for the gauges, and all the phone-link toys of Sync. Throw in a link to your cell phone for uploading your gas mileage to your Xbox Live gamertag, and you’ve got the ultimate overpaid IT nerd’s dream computer commuter car.

  • avatar
    exnilo

    I think most people here come from an American car market bias. In Canada ( like me ) small cars are consistent best sellers and have been for decades.
    Granted the CSX is badge engineered but it works for our market. Period. Full stop.
    We kinda like small cars and really like small cars that move up market in features. Acura EL was really the first and sold extremely well here. The CSX is simply the next version of that in Canada.
    This car would not work in the US. But remember… it was never supposed to.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    exnilo,
    Unfortunately dismissing this as an issue of “Americans not getting it” misses the point. Whether the CSX is a fine car or not isn’t the issue, it’s a matter of Honda getting a pass from allot of people for doing the exact same thing those same people hammer the Big 3 over. Well equipped premium small cars have been around in the U.S. and are starting to catch on. It is no better than a Cimmaron being a Cavalier with leather seats or an I35 being a Maxima with a grille.

    It’s just too bad you guys have to pay for the Acura badge to get a fully equipped Civic.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Jimal:

    Isn’t it the same that you guys pay for the Lexus badge to get a fully equipped Camry?

    While the Lexus ES350 costs about $10k less than a GS350, the Acura CSX costs $10k less than a TSX. People indeed care about a $10k price difference.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    wsn,
    Regardless, it is all badge engineering, which is supposedly the root of all evil for the domestics. If it is bad for domestic car makers then it should be equally bad for the imports. All I’m asking for is consistency in scorn.

  • avatar
    thoots

    Here in the US, the Civic EX-L makes a whole lot better sense. Leather seats and a long list of standard equipment makes for a pretty upscale car without getting ridiculous about it. Plus — and it’s a big one — you can get it in the attractive Civic coupe.

    Still, there’s one thing that’s a deal-breaker in either car for me. Gosh, if you’re gonna give me leather seats, if you’re gonna go so far as to heat and maybe even cool them, would it kill you to make them POWER seats in the bargain?

    Power seats are almost infinitely adjustable. It’s probably the most “luxury” you can add to a seat, beyond “leather.” I’m definitely at a point where I want that power adjustability over almost anything else in any given car. I might have actually purchased a Civic EX-L coupe, but the lack of a power seat indeed was a deal-breaker for me.

  • avatar
    eldaino1

    there seems to be some confusion here as to what an american civic costs.

    an ex-l navi costs around 23k, but it does not offer automatic climate control.

    there is NO american civic that offers the jdm/cdm spec k20 that used to be in the rsx. we get the z3 in the si and the r18 four clyinder. and we don’t have a shiftable auto like the csx, though strangely the fit does.

    this car would make sense in the states if it was priced a little higher than the exl. maybe around 26k.

    and yes, an exl does cost more than an si in base form.

    BEAT: you love the csx but wouldn’t buy an si? its the same car practically! the csx version is the type s.

  • avatar
    Edward Niedermeyer

    You can’t question the CSX as a package. It’s only unforgivable (for many) sin is the bodyshell. How hard would it have been to put just a little work into differentiating it from the Civic?

    Let’s also not forget that the TSX is to the European Accord as the CSX is to Civic. The Canucks don’t get loaded Civics, so they get CSX. We don’t get Accords that are fun to drive, so we get TSX. The only difference is that few Americans know what a Euro-Accord looks like (unless they live near pedantic Euro-spec tuners). Image-conscious CSX drivers must always live in fear of parking next to a Civic.

    Cynicism is only detectable in proper context.

  • avatar
    eldaino1

    i just held my mouse over all the pics.

    top notch quotes ;)

  • avatar
    Stingray

    Hey guys… your review got quoted here:

    http://forums.motortrend.com/70/7039841/the-general-forum/when-the-japanese-make-it-its-ok-the-acura-cimmaro/index.html

    11 pages.

    Please tell your filter it’s not malicious link.

  • avatar
    RobertB

    My CSX owner 2 Canadian cents worth…

    The leather interior Civic EX-L is now available in Canada (2008 models) MSRP C$23480 or C$26500 incl tax but navi still not available(not important).
    My CSX premium navi 5 speed purchased new in 2007 discounted cost C$27652 plus 13% tax = C$31246 on the road.

    I plan to buy a Civic as a second car to my CSX, the equipment differences are now negligible compared to the cost savings.

    Why the CSX?

    It was the leather sold it for me, I like all Japanese cars but for years no leather seating in their compacts. As for cost of leather I have previously been mugged for upwards of C$2000 for leather by Volvo and Mercedes, I don’t get it – it is after all a byproduct of the hamburger industry!

    The 2 litre DOHC engine is quieter and more driveable that the base Civic but I don’t consider it a deal breaker – bonus, the Civic burns about 15% less fuel, gas just hit $1.40 this weekend. The CSX has electric steering, I don’t know if that is more reliable or what advantage it has.

    Acura dealership experience is good, both sales and service. Honda shops are crowded madhouses here, a victim of their success due to their extreme popularity.

    Looking like a Civic is fine – I can drive it and park it anywhere anytime and crooks don’t think I’m a rich target. I even refer to my car as a Civic, no shame.

    Whether these minor items are worth $4000 is arguable. In Canada a fuel efficient fully loaded car with a great rep for around $30,000 is OK by me especially since I have moved down from Mercedes,Volvos costing over $50,000 and am really enjoying spending the savings on other stuff than car payments/repairs/gas so what I’m saying is sure it’s 30 grand – but it could be a lot worse!

    In summary I would (and will) gladly take one of each!

    Robert in Toronto

    • 0 avatar
      514csx

      Robert, pleople don’t understand that it’s resale value will also be higher. We had a grand cherokee and after my dad passed, my mom needed a nice not too expensive car. The CSX was perfect. I always liked it better then a civic and appreciated the extra sportyness it has. Not only does it have all those extra ppl are talking about, it also has larger brakes which hasn’t been mentioned and sportier suspension. I liked it so much, i couldn’t say no when they were discounting the 2011’s with tech and bought another one in white(first was midnight blue). I’m a happy CSX owner, I’m proud of it and do refer it as a civic aswell LoL

  • avatar
    csxgurl

    I own a CSX, and I must say I love my car. The ride *is* smooth. The price point cannot be compared to an American civic…price differences in vehicles, and standard of living etc etc…

    Anyways, I test drove an 8th gen civic, then crossed the street and test drove the CSX…and yeh, it won. The price is not a sore point for me at all. I *love* my CSX! I couldn’t get the civic with the same features that the CSX had in 2007. The leather seats were a biggie for me!

    Needless to say, I would like to get another one. :D The only thing I would have liked different is seat memory! :D

    Cheers!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States