By on August 31, 2006

13.jpgWhy is it so hard for carmakers to get the little things right? Most of these guys have been building cars for over a century. Yet they put the pedals in the wrong place, or give their machine numb steering, or equip the interior with less style than a Day’s Inn. One reason: compromise. Manufacturer X could offer you perfect pedal placement, or share pedals between five models and save you a grand. Another case in point, who doesn’t want a convertible? Put another way, who the Hell wants a convertible? With the MX-5 Miata Power Hartop, Mazda has removed compromise from that particular equation.

Drivers in the know have always seen past the Miata’s mini-suppository shape and focused on its brilliant driving dynamics. No more. The “refreshed” MX-5 is now one of the best looking vehicles on the road, especially from the front. Finally, someone’s built a Japanese car that’s proud to be Japanese. The Miata shows the world an angry, fishy, warrior face, and I love it. I like the MX-5’s profile as well, with its elegant fenders, meaty arches and athletic-looking ten-spoke wheels. The back is [still] pure pabulum, but at least it’s massaged and sculpted pabulum that’s been fitted with business class twin-pipes.

8.jpg Like the sharp front end, the new hard roof is a homerun. The origami-tastic top looks like something an autocrosser might bolt onto their track day sled. (You half expect to see a roll cage welded under it.) At a stroke, the hardtop casts off the aesthetic aspersions thrown at previous Miatas; the lid makes the car look serious. And it’s easy to operate too. Release a simple latch, press a button and read this sentence twice.  It takes just twelve seconds to fold and stow the top, which is four seconds faster than a Mercedes SL550. Even better, all that mechanical slickness adds just 77 pounds to the car’s weight. And wind noise isn’t an issue until you crack 75mph.

The interior belies the Miata’s sub-25k sticker. Snobs will moan that Mazda uses plastic where they could have used wood, or that the leather does not come from pampered, sushi-sucking cows penned in by rubber band fences. Ignore them. At this price-point, the MX-5 sports one of the classiest interiors extant. Press the double-cool air vent buttons and you will believe. The steering wheel, clutch pickup, pedal and shifter placement are all ideally positioned, despite the car’s Lilliputian proportions. Normally, I detest steering wheels buttons, but Mazda has arranged them perfectly for tweakers who know the value of keeping their eyes on the road.

1.jpg Like Mazda’s Speed6, the MX-5 has two personas. Leave the traction control on and you can take any turn at any speed and live to tell the tale. Of course, crappy pavement and a strong right foot send the little yellow idiot light blinking faster than a timing gun, but that’s half the fun. In that case, DSC stands for “Don’t Sweat Charlie.” Put the e-nanny to bed and the Miata transforms. Oversteer clocks in at the press of the throttle; only pilots familiar with the phrase, “when in spin, both feet in” need apply. Turning off the computer makes the Miata go from fantastically fun to an open invitation at Hoonatics Anonymous. Caning the wee beastie on the fabled Angeles Crest Highway, I aged the Michelin Pilots 2,000 miles in 30. The desperate squeal from the rubber coupled with the buzzsaw of the motor’s 7,000rpm redline was pistonhead paradise. While I could keep up with the motorcycles in the bends… 

Sadly and predictably, the MX-5’s a little… slow. The relatively high-revving 2.0-liter I4 manages just 170hp @ 6700 rpm. Worse still, you only get access to 140lbs. feet of torque @ 5000rpm. Even when pitted against 2575 pounds of car, it’s not enough twist for a watered down Tom Collins. (Call me overly American, but I can’t abide losing to big, fat Yank-tanks at stop lights.) Equally troubling, cruising at 80mph, the Miata’s engine spins at 4000rpm in sixth gear, burning plenty of premium petrol. Future MazdaSpeed versions will no doubt slap on a turbo to fix the power gap, but Honda squeezes way more juice out of a normally aspirated 2.0-liter mill. Mazda’s mechanical minions should follow suit.

15.jpg By keeping the price below $25k, the MX-5 sacrifices raw grunt. Besides luggage and ass-space, that’s it for compromise. It’s by no means a deal breaker. Combine the Miata’s legendary handling with the relative convenience and security (and coolness) of a hardtop drop top, and it’s clear that little Mazda has succeeded where no other automaker has bothered to go. Yet. The introduction of the first generation Miata back in 1989 was an automotive high water mark. The MX-5 Hardtop is déjà vu all over again.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

64 Comments on “Mazda MX-5 Miata Power Retractable Hardtop Review...”


  • avatar
    lizthevw

    One of the things I like about the Miata is that you can row the gearbox quite aggressively and have a lot of fun without hitting ludicrous speed. I really admire cars like Z06′s and STI’s, but if I sneeze they will be travelling so fast I will go back in time. The Miata truly is an improved version of the old british sportscar. Not powerful, but fun.

  • avatar
    a_d_y_a

    What about tire roar. One NB model i went in had a bad case of tire roar. Nastily loud?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    lizthevw:

    You bring up a good point, as if this guy was much faster, I’d be dead.

    But, that’s my business, isn’t?

  • avatar


    170hp @ 67000rpm? Is this an internal combustion engine or a dental drill?

    [text fixed, ED] 

    I harp. Great review. I think the miata lineage did something the British Empire never could, a sporty fun coupe that didn't include Lucas Wiring that short circuited.

  • avatar
    ChartreuseGoose

    Funny that every other manufacturer with a folding hardtop has ended up with a silly-looking brick with an overlong rear deck and a too-high beltline (Eos, anyone?), while the Miata barely gains any weight and barely loses any cargo room. It really does look good, too, with that hard top. Meanwhile, it’s still lighter and retains more luggage room than the Solstice, which still has a fabric roof. Miata for the win, in my opinion.

    Also, laughed at the “Hoonatics Anonymous” comment. :D

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Tire roar? That’s half the point!

    Also — just so we’re clear. This is a pre-production vehicle (that’s why it’s festooned with stickers) and pricing has yet to be set. Though, I heard $23,995 being thrown about.

  • avatar
    Quo Vadis

    I really like the thought of having British sportscar fun any time I want, rather than having to be in the garage for days every time I finish a 2 hour stint in the country.

  • avatar
    Jim Boyd

    Great review. I haven’t driven one yet, but I can speak to the exceptional interior for a car of this price. My ’94 Miata is functional, but the ’06s envelop you, making you a part of the car.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Mr. Boyd,

    So true. I could have written the entire review on just the pedals.

  • avatar
    Nick Aziz

    Actually, pricing has been announced an it’s $24,350.

  • avatar

    Nice review. I’ve always liked the Miata as they captured EXACTLY what the British lost when BL destoyed themselves. The Miata/MX-5 deserves its immortal status.

    I’m waiting for a turbo-Diesel for my next dialy-driver/commuter/drop-top though. I suspect Audi will be the first to the finish line with one of those however, as the Japanese seem to be out of the oil-burner business. The VW TDI I’ve been driving to work has been just too good to me to ever go back to burning gasoline as a daily habit ever again.

    Hey QV! Old British sports cars aren’t *that* bad. I’m about to take one on a 3000 mile trip starting Saturday in a ’65 E-type Jaguar. Mind you I’ve put a lot of prep work in, and stocked ever square inch of it’s FedEx envelope-sized boot with spare parts. That said, I fully expect to have more fun than should be legal and hopefully require minimal roadside maintenance. Feel free to follow along on my website, as I’ll be updating it nightly (provided I have ‘Net access.) http://chuck.goolsbee.org.

  • avatar
    Quo Vadis

    TY Chuck… Sounds like an excellent time to be had.

  • avatar
    ret

    JL -

    Great review, as usual. Can you comment on combined road noise (tires, wind, etc.) with the top up? How about squeaks, rattles, or shakes from the closed top? Of course, I can’t blame you if you spent most of your drive time topless…

  • avatar
    Brian E

    ret: I can. Who wants to see Jonny driving topless? And what difference would that make to the car, anyway?

  • avatar
    ret

    Har, har, har!! Very funny Brian… :-)

    Still, I’d be curious to know, even based on a pre-production example. Can you make it a daily driver or a road trip car and still be comfortable during inclement weather? Yes, most of the appeal of the car is driving top-down, but that’s not always an option.

    I can deal with wind noise around a fabric top, but I’d prefer the security of a hard shell. One thing I wouldn’t be able to stand would be shaking, rattling or squeaking from an unnecessarily flexible top.

    I suppose I could wait for a ‘real’ one to show up at a local dealer and see for myself, but I’m lazy and impatient.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Great review! Just like I’ve always thought, a great car needing more power.

    Does Mazda still disapprove of calling this new one a “Miata” or have they come to their senses?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Noise: With the top up, the car is relatively quiet. I say relatively because no car has ever demanded more heel and toe (thankfully), so I was reving it like crazy, constantly. Once you get the MX-5 above 75MPH there is some wind noise behind your left ear. Not horrible, but a continent away from Lexus.

    Shaking: None

    Rattling: None

    Squeaking: None

    Panel gaps: Immense

    I put 500 miles on the Miata, and 200 (stupidly) were spent with the top up.

    Sajeev — On Mazda’s website they call it an MX-5 Miata

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    Yah, great story Jonny! I love the edginess of the new style too, over the rounded lozenge of the previous model. There’s something so wonderful about Mazda’s sporty cars, it’s like partnering a living creature. The lively steering, intuitive shifting and pedals, they all work with you.

  • avatar
    Joe C.

    Excellent!

    I love my 99 Miata, and I’m glad to hear it doesn’t lose anything in hardtop translation. I’m also glad Mazda will continue to sell a ragtop alongside it. Best of both worlds, and nice to have an option.

    When I bought mine last year, I had an option to pick a 2000 with the 6-speed, and I was surprised to see that RPM at speed in 5th on the 5-speed and 6th on the 6-speed were just about the same. Sure, the engine loves to rev, but c’mon now (Car and Driver said that the 6-speed actually took a couple tenths longer to get to 60). I picked the 5-speed, and as long as I keep it under 85 MPH, I get about 30 MPG on my 30-mile commute. But, I sometimes wish there was a steeper OD 6th speed.

    C&D on the Miata: “Think of it as a really good MG.” I couldn’t say it better myself. Taking it to the Sierra foothill wine country this weekend…

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Lesley,

    I just wish that the pedals and shifter from the Miata could find their way into the Speed6. Hence, my comments about compromise. For while the Miata is essentially perfect (as a driving utensil), the Speed6 is a bit tipsy and in need of a hot shower.

    I am expecting great things out of the Speed3.

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    Me too! I was invited to a track day with the Speed3, unfortunately it’s been postponed… hopefully for not too long.

  • avatar

    dear Mazda, please bless us with a fastback coupe, or a nice little MGB-GT-style hatch. in Mazdaspeed trim, of course.

  • avatar
    carguy

    After owning two BWMs (E36 328is and an E46 330ci) I can easily conclude that while both were faster and had more grip than my 99 Miata, none were nearly as much fun. The Miata is and will always be my #1 automotive love affair. (unless I win the lottery and can afford a GT3).

    Now where is that Mazdaspeed version that everyone really wants?

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    I prefer the styling on the Sky/Solstice but they are no real competition for the MX5 if what you truly love is driving with a sprinkle of functionality. Perhaps a new Mazdaspeed Miata will come out for the HP hungry.

    I had hoped Mazda would have come out with a MS RX8 but no such luck. Great car but just needs a little more Ommph.

    I have a feeling the MS3 is going to be an under and torque steering little SOB. I’m sure a ton better if a tad slower than the SRT4 in a straight line will be when it comes out. At least it looks a lot better.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    I think the Solstice is the most beautiful car on the road (the Sky not so much) with the possible exception of the Quattroporte.

    That said, the MX-5 Hardtop is not too far behind. The rear, and even the rear fenders hurt it the most. Still… that hard top looks fabulous.

    And I agree that a fixed-roof hardtop MazdaSpeed version of this car would rule divine.

    Just imagine the name!!!

    “Mazda MazdaSpeed MX-Speed5 Turbo MiataSpeed Fixed Roof Hatchback”

  • avatar
    adehus

    Great review. Surely Mazda could equal the Elise’s power-weight ratio if they wanted to, couldn’t they? And if the did it for cheaper than the Elise… well, *drool*.

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    A hardtop would rock. I’m not really into the topless thing, purely from an aesthetic point of view (car illustrator) and I hate the taste of my own hair.

    I like the RX8 too, but it’s one high-maintenance fellow, thirsty as hell and in need of almost daily oil transfusions. Plus, rotary engines freak me out.

  • avatar
    eslai

    I still prefer the last generation’s styling. This one is plagued with Mazda’s recent design elements and I personally don’t like ‘em. The fender flares look like an afterthough, as though someone molded them onto the clay after the body had already been worked out. They also moved the headlights too far in, making the car look a little crosseyed.

    The rear three-quarters view is always very complimentary though from what I’ve seen. The aluminum rollbars make the car look much more expensive than it actually is. Too bad they’re still slow.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Liking the looks of the second-gen Miata compared to this one is akin to prefering pre-boob job Pam Anderson to the post-op version.

    You can make an argument, but… why bother?

    The third generation is a knockout.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Just talked to Mazda — no price has been set yet, despite all reports to the contrary.

    Under 25k is the official line.

  • avatar
    BimmerHead

    Good Review.

    I know that TTAC tends to dispense with the technical data for their reviews, however in this case it would have been nice to know more about how much trunk is left with the top down… and maybe how accessable/easy to use the storage space is (again with the top down).

    Clearly, besides driving dymanmics, one of the miata’s trump cards over the GM twins is trunk space.

    Speaking of the GM twins, I read a piece in C&D comparing the new solstice gxp to a boxster. If I read correctly, they said that they were actually faster around their track in the Solstice, but it was way sloppier than the boxster (but much cheaper too). I would guess a MSM would be awefully compelling in this context.

    Also, when is the last time anyone ever had a porcshe and a pontiac in the same article… Can’t imagine anyone cross shopping the two, just the same.

  • avatar
    BimmerHead

    Regarding asthetics, Pam Anderson looked great before and after. No argument nessesary.

    But back to cars… I think I like the second gen looks better as well. The current car is a much better car (I actually fit well enough to consider driving one for longer than 10 minutes), but from a pure asthetic point of view, I agree with eslai… Gen 2 has a very fluid and muscular shape that appeals to me more than the new body style. That being said, the new one is the only miata that I would own (if I could just convince the kids to ride in the trunk).

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Miata Hardtop

    5.1 Cubic feet of trunk space with the top up

    5.1 Cubic feet of trunk space with the top down.

    They pulled it off.

  • avatar

    >>The Miata shows the world an angry, fishy, warrior face, and I love it.

    The Miata shows the world a goddam Pokemon face, and I hate it. Despite that, it’s obviously a worthy car. Thanks for a great review.

  • avatar
    mastermik

    hot damn… as you said, no compomises.

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    Haaaahaaa…

  • avatar
    o_fizzle

    Good review.

    I’ve always loved these cars. I drove an ’04 Mazdaspeed Miata and found it to be fantastic. However, I’m 6’2″ and the seating was insanely cramped. This car is on the top of my list when I trade in my Focus in a couple years (alongside RX8 and S2000).

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    O_Fiz,

    I think you’ll find this new car suits your height. Hopefully you’re not fat like me, because then it would be a tight fit.

    It handles better than a focus, too.

  • avatar
    zerogeek

    I want one of these so bad… i’ve wanted a miata forever but the new hardtop is just too awesome for words. But the last time i tried to squeeze into a Miata, i couldn’t get my legs under the steering wheel. :( I hope you’re right and they fixed that… by the time i had the seat back far enough to keep my knees from competing with my hands for steering room space, i could barely reach the pedals. The seats just didn’t adjust in the right way to accommodate my disproportionately long thighbones.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Zero,

    Most people don’t sit in their seats properly.

    With your foot depressing the brake all the way, your knee should still be bent. That’s where you move the seat to.

    As far as the back goes, with you arms fully extended, your wrists should be resting on the wheel.

    Try that and let me know.

  • avatar

    You’re too American. I’m part of the “it’s not how much horsepower you have, it’s how you use it” crowd. I’d better be, since I drive a Protege5.

    Which might also be why I find the MX-5 plenty powerful.

    And yes, Sajeev, Mazda does appear to be coming to its senses. The Miata has always been officially the Miata MX-5. Now, after some talk about dumping “Miata,” the name has simple been reversed. The Japanese do that, you know.

    o_fizzle: before you get your heart set on an S2000, price it with your insurance company. It’s way more than anything else I’ve gotten quotes on.

    Between the MX-5 and RX-8 you cannot go wrong. Insurance cost is comparable between the two, with the RX-8 a bit more. Oddly, my 130HP Protege5 falls between the two.

  • avatar

    The Miata shows the world an angry, fishy, warrior face, and I love it.

    The Miata shows the world a goddam Pokemon face, and I hate it.

    I should add to my prevoius comments above that although I hate the Pokemon face, Mazda did an excellent rendition of that style. Anyone who likes that style should love the look of the Miata. Unlike so many other cars which have no real style. Ford’s so-called “new edge” comes to mind.

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    Actually, Jonny, the important thing about arm position is more that your shoulders should still be firmly against the seatback with your arms extended just far enough–”fully extended” is almost certainly too far–to rest your wrists atop your wheel.

    But you’re right, too many people still think the Stirling Moss Straightarm is the deal. I particularly like it when it’s done one-handed at the 12 o’clock position and you can only see the top of the driver’s sideways ball cap.

  • avatar
    eslai

    Lieberman–that’s a very good comparison between old and new pam! See, the second gen is like Pam after her *first* boob job, with the first gen being The Original.

    The current Miata is like Pam as she stands today, the “My God Why Didn’t You Stop When You Were Hot” Pam. All fat collagen lips and bowling-ball nightmares bolted onto the front fairing…

  • avatar
    blue adidas

    The MX5 looks odd with the hard top up. It’s too cute and too slow. This is an idea that should have stayed on paper. The Sky is much better to look at, and will be a thrill ride when it’s available with the turbo engine. If only GM could do something about the trunk space.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Stephan,

    The second I hit “submit” I realized I had forgot to say that your shoulders must be flat against the back of the chair… knew someone (probably you) would catch it.

  • avatar
    Blunozer

    Excellent write up, definately accurate to the general “feel” of the car. Just one question… How the hell is 170hp in a 2500lb car slow?

    0-60 in the same time as the new Civic Si, VW GTI, and RSX-S. 6.7 seconds. Are they slow as well?

    I own a’06 Miata (ragtop), and let me tell you… It ain’t slow. Not by a long shot. Never had a problem passing, going uphill, or squealing the tires. As far as handling and breaking is concerned, the car simply DANCES!

    You guys are too spoiled by all these 300+hp 2 ton hulks like the new Mustang and the 300C.

  • avatar
    Marco

    For those yearning for a hardtop Miata, look at the Mazda Kabura concept. It’s a RWD 2-door hatch slightly larger than the Miata and almost as light.

    I don’t think it has been green-lighted for production yet but I wouldn’t be surprized if it eventually was. Mazda is great at identifying empty market segments and filling them. If you’re looking for a performance car right now, your only options are:
    1. A luxury-filled RWD/AWD sports cars/performance sedan priced in Z/RX-8 territory or higher
    2. A souped-up FWD/AWD econobox (every car manufacturer seems to offer at least one such car)
    3. A FWD sports car.
    4. The Miata (and now Solstice/Sky)

    Nobody has addressed the need for cheap RWD sedans/coupes.

    I’d buy one in a heartbeat. I love my Miata but it’s just a tad too small to hold all the junk I carry around and be my daily driver.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Blunozer,

    Slow is the wrong way to describe it — however, it simply isn’t fast.

    The 300c is one thing, but a Honda accord getting to 60 nearly a second faster than a RWD convertible?

    How do you account for that?

  • avatar
    Johnny Canada

    I don’t know Jonny.

    Check out the gap between the tire and the bottom of the fender.

    Perhaps this new Miata will be dual marketed as a sports car and a cross-over vehicle.

  • avatar
    chris00seven

    Johnny, you know that the Accord has two more cylinders and a whole liter of displacement on the Miata’s lump. And though it’s a Honda V6 (same peak torque RPMs as the Miata, different peak values) it still provides the grunt to blow by the Miata in the straights. The Accord doesn’t weigh nearly as you might think, either.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Ahem.

    Honda Accord: 0-60 in 5.9 seconds

    Mazda Miata: 0-60 in 6.7 seconds

    Conclusion: the Mazda Miata, while possesing oodles of other fantastic attributes, [i]cannot[/i] be characterized as “fast.”

  • avatar
    Blunozer

    Neither can it be characterized as “slow”.

    How ’bout “adequate? ;)

    And the Accord you’re refering to seems like the 6-speed V6 version, which is a definate “Q-ship” that also happens to cost a bit more than the Miata as well.

    High company indeed when 0-60 times under 6 seconds are needed to be considered “average”.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    I won’t call it slow it you won’t call it fast, deal?

  • avatar
    Kim

    From the land down under.

    The NC MX5 Hardtop Coupe has not arrived in Australia yet. But I will be one of the first at the dealer’s front door when it does. The plates are in storage NC-MX-05.

    Every word written by Johnny about this latest version of the series 3 is as stated. My original test of a soft top confirmed all he has to say. But I heard a roomer that a power top version was to be built, so I waited….

    The original NC MX5 soft top down under did not have DSC or Traction Control; it was fun to through around. The 2007 hardtop and soft top come with both as standard. With the DSC switch-able fun can still be had.

    My former roadster was a Triumph TR4A in a younger life. There are some items on the NC that remind me of my old friend. The flared guards, the twin exhaust. But the shark nose and flowing lines give the NC male appeal. The NB bottle nose dolphin mid rift has gone. The new version no longer looks a ladies car. Thank god! In a score of 1-10 the NA was an 11, the NB a minus 50 and the NC a perfect 10.

    There is a little massaging that could be done. It sits a little high particularly when viewed from the rear. Lowered, it would sit the wheels in the flares better and give it a wider stance with a more aggressive look. The TR had the same problem.

    Last word. The power provided is adequate as Mazda intended. However if more is needed then a MazdaSpeed/MPS should not go down the snail path. The engine has been developed for racing by others; I suggest giving it S2000 power output by doing a deal with Cosworth for a Duratec update (same Block). This would give it the driveability and throttle control that no Turbo will allow. Can you imagine this badge?

    Mazda MX5 (Miata) Hardtop Coupe – Power by Cosworth.

    Now that would be Zoom Zoom!

  • avatar
    ZoomZoom

    lizthevw:
    “I really admire cars like Z06’s and STI’s, but if I sneeze they will be travelling so fast I will go back in time.”

    That made me laugh. It’s funny but true! Even in my stock Vette, I once got to my destination five minutes before I left the house!

    Johnny, thank you for the review. I skimmed it, and will read it more in-depth as soon as I can. I’m not in the market for another car right now, but I really must check out that roof!

    Hey, has anybody else noticed that they don’t put the “Miata” name on the car anymore? It’s just “MX-5″ now. That’s a real disappointment to me. I think Miata meant “High Reward” or something; it’s not the same without the name!

  • avatar
    plugot

    The MX-5 was, and is, a great Brit retro sports car without the Brit retro bills. My wife had an original 1990, and a second generation ’99, and both cars were exceptionally well put together and problem free. Now that she’s moved up to an Acura TL, I’m carrying the sportscar banner with a S2000. I bring this up because as Johnny says “Honda squeezes way more juice out of a normally aspirated 2.0-liter mill” — and charges roughly 10 grand more. The S2000 is a more basic, yet more sophisticated sportscar, than the current MX-5. In the interior, Honda uses better plastics and leathers. Under the hood the really big difference between the 2 cars is Honda’s HANDBUILT VTEC engine. If Mazda offer a Mazdaspeed version of this hardtop/convertible and keeps the price within striking distance of the current MSRP, they will have produced the perfect under $50K retroBritmobile (particularly since Honda is dropping the S2000 after the 2007 model year).
    Here’s hoping.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    plugot,

    You are right in every regard — check out the MX-5′s interior — better in both plastic and leather than the S2000.

    Admittedly, the S2000 is really do for a refresh.

  • avatar
    Droptop

    Leslie Wimbush: “I like the RX8 too, but it’s one high-maintenance fellow, thirsty as hell and in need of almost daily oil transfusions. Plus, rotary engines freak me out.”

    It’s off-topic, but I couldn’t let the above go as it’s simply incorrect.

  • avatar
    bripab007

    My how the automotive world has changed in 17 years. When the Miata came out in ’89, it had 116hp and did 0-60 in ~9.0 seconds. Meanwhile, the Accord had a base engine that was carburetted and made 98hp with an optional 110hp fuel-injected engine…both did 0-60 in around 10 seconds.

    And some of you are complaining about 170hp in a 2500lb. car that gets to 60 in 6.5-7.0 seconds!?

  • avatar
    C2100

    My latest Miata is a 1990 Classic red with a used engine from Japan, 1600cc 91-93 vintage installed last year

    No 1 was also a classic red – owned for 6 yrs
    No.2 a 1996 loaded. Sold after 6 yrs

    No.3 also in the garage now a 2001 driven by my partner. Made some money on this USA import.

    No4 see above – the roomiest and lightest with the best tires, not the newest though the 2001 has a fresher set, the most fun to drive.

  • avatar
    lisamort

    Is it possible to put a 2007 retractable hard top in the 2006 miata?

  • avatar

    No.

  • avatar
    RyanK02

    How is this car for 6′ + drivers? It looks impossibly small, but I have driven a 350Z roadster, 85 VW Cabriolet, 96 Geo Metro hatchback, and an 05 Honda Civic Coupe. They only car that felt smallish is the Z. I also tried shoehorning myself into a Saturn Sky, but that did not happen.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States